PeerGalaxy

Oregon's Peer Support Directory

PeerGalaxy Original Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring over 187,600+ monthly offerings of FREE telephone- and online-accessible peer support, recovery support, and wellness activities!  Plus 50+ warmlines, helplines, chatlines, and hotlines.  Plus workshops, webinars, job postings, resources, observances, special events, consumer input opportunities and more.

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

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If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

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Calendar Event Sorting

At the top, the 24/7/365 SAMHSA Disaster Helpline and similar links.

Next, Bundled “All Day” Events

Some organizations (like 12 step recovery programs, AA, NA, AlAnon, etc.) have so many events happening throughout the day that they need to be in a bundled listing to spare endless scrolling.  Often there is a link to look up events by zip code and other criteria.

Lastly, Time-Specific Events

So you can see what’s happening in the next hours, time specific events are tagged and listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  There can be events and warmlines operating in different time zones, though we try to list all in Oregon’s Pacific Time Zone.

Page Advancement

The calendar displays ~50 listings per page.  To advance to next page with ~50 more listings, click the right arrow in the lower left corner of the calendar


Screenshot image of the page advancing arrows at the bottom of the calendar, lower left corner.
May
23
Thu
2024
0 – Helpline – SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline @ (800) 985-5990 (Multilingual) or (800) 846-8517 (TTY) – 24/7-Weekdays & Weekends
May 23 all-day

Excerpt(s) from link:

https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/disaster-distress-helpline

Disaster Distress Helpline

SAMHSA’s Disaster Distress Helpline provides 24/7, 365-day-a-year crisis counseling and support to people experiencing emotional distress related to natural or human-caused disasters.

The Disaster Distress Helpline, 1-800-985-5990, is a 24/7, 365-day-a-year, national hotline dedicated to providing immediate crisis counseling for people who are experiencing emotional distress related to any natural or human-caused disaster. This toll-free, multilingual, and confidential crisis support service is available to all residents in the United States and its territories. Stress, anxiety, and other depression-like symptoms are common reactions after a disaster. Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746 to connect with a trained crisis counselor.

Who Should Contact the Disaster Distress Helpline?

This crisis support service is for anyone experiencing emotional distress related to disasters such as:

The Disaster Distress Helpline also answers calls and texts related to infectious disease outbreaks, such as the Ebola outbreak, incidents of community unrest, and other traumatic events.

The impact of crises may affect people in different ways. Learn how to recognize the warning signs and risk factors for emotional distress related to natural and human-caused disasters.

The Disaster Distress Helpline is open to everyone. This includes survivors of disasters; loved ones of victims; first responders; rescue, recovery, and relief workers; clergy; and parents and caregivers. You may call for yourself or on behalf of someone else.

Call or Text

From the United States and its territories, call 1-800-985-5990 to connect with a trained crisis counselor, 24/7. Spanish-speakers can call the hotline and press “2” for 24/7 bilingual support.

Callers to the hotline can also connect with counselors in over 100 other languages via 3rd-party interpretation services; to connect with a counselor in your primary language, simply indicate your preferred language to the responding counselor and she/he will connect to a live interpreter (interpretation in less commonly-spoken languages may require calling back at an appointed time). Learn more and download information about the Disaster Distress Helpline in 30 of the most commonly-spoken languages in the U.S.

To connect with a live DDH crisis counselor 24/7 via SMS, from the 50 states text “TalkWithUs” for English or “Hablanos” for Spanish to 66746. Spanish-speakers from Puerto Rico can text “Hablanos” to 1-787-339-2663.

Texting is subscription-based and only involves a few steps:

  1. Enroll in the service by texting TalkWithUs or Hablanos exactly as written. It’s important to do this before sending your first text message because otherwise the enrollment may fail, and you will not be able to speak with a counselor, or you may accidentally subscribe to another service.
  2. Look for confirmation that your subscription was successful. You will receive a Success! message if it was.
  3. To unsubscribe, text Stop or Unsubscribe to 66746 (or 1-787-339-2663 from Puerto Rico) at any time. For help, text Help to 66746 (or 1-787-339-2663 from Puerto Rico).

Standard text and data message rates will apply when texting from mobile phones. International text and data rates may apply from within U.S. territories and free association nations. SAMHSA will not sell your phone numbers to other parties.

The Disaster Distress Helpline’s TTY number 1-800-846-8517 is available 24/7 to Deaf and hard of hearing individuals, who can also utilize the texting options or their preferred Relay service (including 7-1-1) to connect with the main DDH hotline 1-800-985-5990, 24/7.

DDH Online Peer Support Communities

In an effort to broaden our reach to disaster survivors and emergency responders, the Disaster Distress Helpline has developed online peer support communities through Facebook Groups for those who have experienced a natural or human-caused disaster. These online communities offer opportunities for survivors and responders to connect with others who have experienced similar events, share accurate information and trusted resources, and help one another continue to heal from the effects of a traumatic event.

What Does it Offer?

The purpose of DDH Online Peer Support Communities is to create enhanced opportunities for survivors and responders of disaster to come together for mutual aid and emotional support.

DDH Online Peer Support Communities Also Include:

Trained Peer Supporters

DDH Online Peer Support includes trained peer supporters who assist with group moderation and vetting resources. In addition to community forums, our goal is also to create purposeful discussions lead by peer supporters with specific themes and relevant topics. While each survivor and responder’s experiences are unique, being with peers who have had a similar experience can promote connection, offer new ways of coping, and build a foundation of trust.

Peer support does not take the place of therapy or counseling. The opportunity to provide mutual aid and support to others who have faced similar challenges, when and where they need it, offers hope that healing and recovery is possible after a disaster.

Immediate Crisis Support

All DDH Online Peer Support Communities are monitored 24/7 by a designated DDH crisis center where crisis counselors are available to talk to members who may be in emotional distress and need crisis support. Members can talk to a counselor at any time of the day or night via Crisis Support Over Messenger (CSOM).

Available Communities

Survivors and Responders of the COVID-19 Pandemic 

DDH Online Peer Support Communities offer peer support for anyone who identifies as a survivor or responder of the COVID-19 pandemic. Both survivors and responders can come together for mutual aid, to share trusted resources, and to help one another continue to heal from the effects of a national pandemic. Survivors and responders may include but are not limited to, any healthcare workers, emergency responders, parents/caregivers, educators, individuals who have lost loved ones, people who are dealing with “Long-haul COVID”, those impacted by job loss or economic hardship during the pandemic, and anyone else who has been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. DDH-trained Peer Supporters are also available to listen and offer validation and encouragement. Additionally, they provide structured moderation within the community to engage members in meaningful discussions on relevant topics and offer timely and trusted resources. To join our Facebook group dedicated to Survivors and Responders of the COVID-19 Pandemic, click here.

Survivors of Mass Violence

DDH Online Peer Support Communities offer peer support for survivors of mass violence in the United States including mass shootings, terrorist attacks, or other large-scale community violence. Survivors and loved ones who have experienced mass violence can connect with one another and provide emotional support in the aftermath of a mass violence incident, including how to cope with activating events and memorials, self-care strategies, and challenges with daily living. DDH-trained Peer Supporters are available to listen to members, and offer validation and encouragement. They also provide structured moderation to engage members in meaningful discussions on relevant topics and provide timely and trusted resources. If you are a survivor or the loved one of a survivor of mass violence and need support, please join our Facebook group by requesting to be a member here.

Other Inquiries

If you’re not in immediate need of crisis counseling support and would like to contact us for other reasons, send an email. Contact us for:

  • Technical problems. If you encountered a technical problem while trying to contact the Disaster Distress Helpline, please include your name and preferred contact information in your email if you wish to receive a reply.
  • Provider inquiries. Providers with specific inquiries about technical assistance and support, requests for materials, and exploring collaborations are encouraged to send an email.
  • Feedback. To provide feedback about your experience reaching out to the Disaster Distress Helpline, send an email describing your experience and SAMHSA will look into the matter. Please include your name and preferred contact information if you wish to receive a reply.
  • Social media inquiries. Email us with questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline’s use of social media.
  • All media inquiries. Members of the media with questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline are encouraged to call the SAMHSA Media Services Team at 1-240-276-2130.

Our staff appreciate hearing from people about their experiences. SAMHSA takes feedback about our services, whether it is positive or negative, very seriously.

SAMHSA also encourages public promotion of the Disaster Distress Helpline. Anyone can use the Disaster Distress Helpline logo and telephone number on their website and link to the Disaster Distress Helpline’s materials and social media properties.

Call 211 for information about disaster-related evacuations, shelters, food and clothing distribution, volunteer opportunities, and other resources and referrals. Or visit the national 211 Call Center Search website to find the 211 information and referral center nearest you.

Last Updated: 11/11/2019

Deaf/Hard of Hearing & Spanish

Deaf/Hard of Hearing

Spanish Speakers

Twitter Tweets:

Facebook

Follow the Disaster Distress Helpline on Facebook.

0 – Hotline – DH – DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends
May 23 all-day
0 - Hotline - DH - DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) - 24/7 - Weekdays and Weekends

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

00 – Hotlilne – 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline – 24/7 Weekdays & Weekends
May 23 all-day

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Oregon is ready for nationwide launch of 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline

Starting July 16, people in Oregon and nationwide will be able to call, text or chat 988, a new three-digit number, available 24/7, that will directly connect anyone experiencing a behavioral health crisis to compassionate care and support from trained crisis counselors. The 988 dialing-code connects callers to the existing National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, a network of local crisis call-centers throughout the country. In Oregon, 988 call-centers are operated by Lines for Life statewide, and Northwest Human Services in Marion and Polk counties.

How Does 988 Work?

988 was established in July 2022 to improve access to crisis services in a way that meets our country’s growing suicide and mental health-related crisis care needs. 988 provides easier access to behavioral health crisis services, which are distinct from the public safety purposes of 911 (where the focus is on dispatching Emergency Medical Services, fire and police as needed).

911 continues to operate as it does across the state. For serious and life-threatening situations, 988 call centers work with local mental health providers to support appropriate interventions.

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and Oregon’s 988 call centers are collaborating with 911 Public Safety Answering Points to develop a roadmap on how 911 and 988 can coordinate with each other in the future.

988 crisis counselors are trained to use the least invasive interventions. Oftentimes, responding to a call, text or chat is all that is needed to help someone in crisis. In fact, more than 95 percent of current calls are resolved over the phone.

If a 988 call cannot be resolved over the phone, a mobile crisis team or first responder may be dispatched.

Other important facts to know:

  • 988 is available through every landline, cell phone and voice-over internet device in the United States, as well as text and chat.
  • The current technology for 988 routes callers by area code, not geolocation.
  • 988 is not currently available when phones are locked or do not have prepaid minutes.
  • The transition to 988 does not impact the availability of crisis services for veterans and military service members. They can call 988 and press 1 to connect with the Veterans Crisis Line.
  • For support in Spanish, callers can press 2 to connect with the Red Nacional de Prevención del Suicidio.

The 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline has an infographic with more information on what happens when people call, text or chat.

Community partners interested in helping promote 988 can use posters, social media shareables and other materials about 988 from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration at samhsa.gov/988. Learn more about 988 in Oregon on OHA’s 988 webpage. Read press release about 988.

00 – Hotline – 2SLGBT+ CRISIS CALL & TEXT SERVICES GUIDE – 24/7 Weekdays & Weekends
May 23 all-day

 

 

 2SLGBT+ CRISIS CALL & TEXT SERVICES GUIDE

YOUR GUIDE TO CRISIS CALL & TEXT SERVICES

 

988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline Crisis Text Line                           Youthline
Text or cal l988 Text “NATIVE” to 741741 Call 877-968-8491 or text” teen2teen” to 839863
Available 24/7 Available 24/7 Available 24/7, youth peers answering from 4pm-10pm PST.
Connects to Crisis Counselor Connects to Crisis Counselor Connects to youth peer counselors  native youth peer counselors available
For Any Person For Any Person For Youth
For any mental health Crisis For any mental health Crisis For any mental health crisis or general emotional support
Formerly known as the Suicide Prevention Lifeline, operated by SAMHSA Operated by Crisis Text Line Operated by Lines for Life

 

00 – Hotline – Boys Town National Hot Line – A 24/7 crisis, resource and referral number for kids and parents – 1-800-448-3000 – Text VOICE to 20121 @ Phone
May 23 all-day

 

 

 

 

 

Increasing Outreach to Teens

Teens are more connected than ever ​before and the Boys Town National Hotline® at 800-448-3000 is right there with them.

In addition to calling, teens can now text VOICE to 20121 or email hotline@boystown.org any day, any time to speak with a trained counselor.

Online resources are also available at yourlifeyourvoice.org.

 

00 – Hotline – DWIHN – Detroit Wayne Integrated Health Network – Mental Heath Crisis Help – 1-800-241-4949 – 24/7
May 23 all-day

Mental Health Crisis Help

The Detroit Wayne Integrated Health Network is Here to Talk. Here to Help. Our trained clinicians are standing by 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to help you.

Crisis Helpline

Helpline:(800) 241-4949 (24/7)
TTY:(800) 630-1044 (24/7)
DWIHN:(313) 833-2500 (8:00 am – 4:30 pm M-F)

DWIHN Customer Service

Monday-Friday 8:00 am – 4:30 pm
Toll-Free: 888-490-9698 or 313-833-3232
TDD/TTY: 800-630-1044
Fax: 313-833-2217 or 313-833-4280

Recipient Rights Office

Toll-Free: 888-339-5595
TDD/TTY: 888-339-5588

00 – Hotline – Embrace – On-Call Victim Advocates for Domestic Abuse, Dating Abuse, Sexual Harassment – 1 (800) 924-0556 – 24/7 @ phone
May 23 all-day
00 - Hotline - Embrace - On-Call Victim Advocates for Domestic Abuse, Dating Abuse, Sexual Harassment - 1 (800) 924-0556 - 24/7 @ phone

 

Are you looking for support and information after experiencing domestic or sexual violence?

If you’ve experienced sexual or domestic violence, dating abuse, sexual harassment, or stalking, confidential advocacy is available to you. After an incident, an Embrace On-Call Victim Advocate can respond in-person to support you during medical exams and victim interviews. You should not have to face this alone. We are here to help you regain a sense of control and safety and explore the options about reporting and receiving medical care.

Embrace has on-call victim advocates available to respond to you in-person 24/7!

 1 (800) 924-0556

 

00 – Hotline – HRSA – Health Resources and Services Administration – National Maternal Mental Health Hotline -1-833-TLC-MAMA (1-833-852-6262) – en Espanol – 24/7 @ Phone
May 23 all-day
00 - Hotline - HRSA - Health Resources and Services Administration - National Maternal Mental Health Hotline -1-833-TLC-MAMA (1-833-852-6262) - en Espanol - 24/7 @ Phone

 

National Maternal Mental Health Hotline

24/7, free, confidential hotline for pregnant and new moms in English and Spanish

1-833-TLC-MAMA (1-833-852-6262)

About the National Maternal Mental Health Hotline

The National Maternal Mental Health Hotline provides 24/7, free, confidential support before, during, and after pregnancy. The Hotline offers callers:

  • Phone or text access to professional counselors
  • Real-time support and information
  • Response within a few minutes, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week
  • Resources
  • Referrals to local and telehealth providers and support groups
  • Culturally sensitive support
  • Counselors who speak English and Spanish
  • Interpreter services in 60 languages

Frequently Asked Questions about the National Maternal Mental Health Hotline.

Use our Partner Toolkit to promote the Hotline or order promotional materials.

Date Last Reviewed:
00 – Hotline – LIR – Love is Respect – Confidential Support for Healthy Relationships – Teens – Young Adults – Loved Ones – 866-331-9473 – 24/7
May 23 all-day
00 - Hotline - LIR - Love is Respect - Confidential Support for Healthy Relationships - Teens - Young Adults - Loved Ones - 866-331-9473 - 24/7

Love is Respect Advocates are available 24/7

We offer confidential support for teens, young adults, and their loved ones seeking help, resources, or information related to healthy relationships and dating abuse in the US. We’re available by text (“LOVEIS” to 22522), call (866.331.9474), or live chat online.

Terms & conditions for text services

No matter how you reach out to us, you’ll always receive one-on-one, real-time, confidential support.

Our advocates are trained on issues related to dating abuse and healthy relationships, as well as crisis intervention. When you contact us, we’ll listen to your situation, assess how you’re feeling in the moment, and help you identify what next steps may be best for you.

This might include brainstorming a safety plan together or identifying local resources to further support you, whether it’s a service provider, legal resource, counselor, or survivor network to get in touch with.

00 – Hotline – NATIONAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE HOTLINE – 800 799-7233 – 24/7 – Weekdays & Weekends
May 23 all-day
00 - Hotline - NATIONAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE HOTLINE - 800 799-7233 - 24/7 - Weekdays & Weekends

 

 

NATIONAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE HOTLINE

CALL

1.800.799.7233

 

TEXT

Text “START” to 87788

 

CHAT

Chat Live Now

 

SEARCH FOR RESOURCES

https://www.thehotline.org/search-our-resources/

 

00 – Hotline – NCMEC – National Center for Missing & Exploited Children – 24 Hour Hotline – 1-800-843-5678 @ phone
May 23 all-day
00 - Hotline - NCMEC - National Center for Missing & Exploited Children - 24 Hour Hotline  - 1-800-843-5678 @ phone

 

24-Hour Call Center 1-800-843-5678

Act immediately if you believe your child is missing.

Download this checklist of actions to be taken by families in the initial stages of a missing child case.

If you have any questions call the NCMEC at 1-800-THE-LOST® (1-800-843-5678). If you are not located in the United States, call your country’s hotline.

NCMEC is the nation’s largest and most influential child protection organization.

We lead the fight to protect children, creating vital resources for them and the people who keep them safe.

HOW NCMEC can help

When you call NCMEC, a Call Center specialist will record information about your child. A NCMEC case management team will next work directly with your family and the law enforcement agency investigating your case. They will offer technical assistance tailored to your case to help ensure all available search and recovery methods are used. As appropriate NCMEC case management teams:

  • Rapidly create and disseminate posters to help generate leads.
  • Rapidly review, analyze and disseminate leads received on 1-800-THE-LOST® (1-800-843-5678) to the investigating law enforcement agency.
  • Communicate with federal agencies to provide services to assist in the location and recovery of missing children.
  • Provide peer support, resources and empowerment from trained volunteers who have experienced a missing child incident in their own family.
  • Provide families with access to referrals they may use to help process any emotional or counseling needs.
00 – Hotline – NHTH – National Human Trafficking Hotline – 1-888-373-7888 – Confidential – 24/7 @ phone
May 23 all-day
00 – Hotline – NRS – National Runaway SafeLine – CALL 1-800-RUNAWAY – 1-800-786-2929 – 24/7 @ Toll Free Number
May 23 all-day

Hotline

By calling 1-800-RUNAWAY (1-800-786-2929), you can connect with a trusted, compassionate person who will listen and help you create a plan to address your concerns.

For 50 years, the National Runaway Safeline has been responding to youth and families in crisis, serving as the national communications system for runaway and homeless youth. We continually transform technology, training and services to meet the current needs of vulnerable youth and ultimately achieve an end to youth homelessness.

 

 

 

00 – Hotline – Oregon Recovery Center Hotline – Call (833) 975-0505 and Live Chat – 24/7 – Weekdays & Weekends @ phone
May 23 all-day
00 - Hotline - Oregon Recovery Center Hotline - Call (833) 975-0505 and Live Chat - 24/7 - Weekdays & Weekends @ phone

 

 

 

Oregon Recovery Center Hotline

Reach out.

We’re here for you, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The Oregon Recovery Center Hotline is a free and confidential statewide resource that can connect you to harm reduction, treatment, recovery, and supportive services.


Call Now – (833) 975 – 0505
or
Use this Link For Live Chat
https://orrecoverycenterhotline.org/

Connecting you to the services you need.

When you call us or chat with us online, you’ll talk to one of our caring, trained Peer Support Specialists. We can help you decide what kind of services you need by asking you a few questions, and we can connect you to them through your local Behavioral Health Resource Network (BHRN). Learn more about the kind of services available to you

Received a fine for possession?

If you received a citation for possessing small amounts of drugs in Oregon (called a “Class E violation”), you can have the fine waived by calling the Oregon Recovery Center Hotline and completing a health assessment.

1. Call us at (833) 975-0505. Our trained Peer Support Specialists will provide a screening for substance use, mental health and other supportive service referrals you might need.

2. Once the screening is complete, we will refer you to appropriate services.

3. We will email you a letter that confirms you have completed the health assessment. Bring it to court to waive your fine.

Harm reduction

Harm reduction saves lives. These services keep people who use drugs, like fentanyl or alcohol, safe by offering non-judgmental care that improves their quality of life and health, prevents and manages injury and disease, and prevents fatal overdoses. Harm reduction honors the dignity and wellbeing of each person.

Treatment

Treatment combines medical care, like supporting people through withdrawal symptoms or starting medication that helps with cravings, with services that help you learn coping skills. Treatment can happen in an inpatient or outpatient setting, and you and your treatment provider decide together what kind of treatment is right for you.

Recovery

Being in recovery means making changes over time that can help you feel better, live life on your own terms, and work toward reaching your goals. Recovery looks different for everyone and might include medication-assisted treatment, self-help or support groups, recovery coaching, or being part of recovery communities.

Supportive services

A person’s recovery is best supported when they have everything they need to live well. In addition to substance use services, services like housing support, employment assistance, and food insecurity services are also available.

Behavioral Health Resource Networks (BHRNs)

Behavioral Health Resource Networks (BHRNs) are networks of organizations that provide trauma-informed, culturally specific services to people who need treatment and support for substance use concerns. The services they provide include screening for substance use disorder, substance use disorder treatment, harm reduction services, and peer support services. They also screen for health and social service needs, including housing support. Each county and Tribal area in Oregon has at least one BHRN.

 

00 – Hotline – RAINN – Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network – National Sexual Assault Telephone Hotline – (800) 656-4673 – 24/7 Weekdays & Weekends @ phone
May 23 all-day
00 - Hotline - RAINN - Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network  - National Sexual Assault Telephone Hotline  - (800) 656-4673 - 24/7 Weekdays & Weekends @ phone

 

The National Sexual Assault Hotline is available 24/7

Telephone: 800.656.HOPE (4673)

Online chat: online.rainn.org

Español: rainn.org/es

How does it work?

When you call 800.656.HOPE (4673), you’ll be routed to a local RAINN affiliate organization based on the first six digits of your phone number. Cell phone callers have the option to enter the ZIP code of their current location to more accurately locate the nearest sexual assault service provider.

Telephone Hotline Terms of Service

How can the hotline help me?

Calling the National Sexual Assault Hotline gives you access to a range of free services including:

  • Confidential support from a trained staff member
  • Support finding a local health facility that is trained to care for survivors of sexual assault and offers services like sexual assault forensic exams
  • Someone to help you talk through what happened
  • Local resources that can assist with your next steps toward healing and recovery
  • Referrals for long term support in your area
  • Information about the laws in your community
  • Basic information about medical concerns

Is it confidential?

The National Sexual Assault Hotline is a safe, confidential service. When you call the hotline, only the first six numbers of the phone number are used to route the call, and your complete phone number is never stored in our system. Most states do have laws that require local staff to contact authorities in certain situations, like if there is a child or vulnerable adult who is in danger.

While almost all callers are connected directly to a staff member or volunteer at a local sexual assault service provider, a handful of providers use an answering service after daytime business hours. This service helps manage the flow of calls. If all staff members are busy, you may choose to leave a phone number with the answering service. In this case, the number will be confidential and will be given directly to the organization’s staff member for a callback. If you reach an answering service, you can try calling back after some time has passed, or you can choose to call during regular business hours when more staff members are available. You can also access 24/7 help online by visiting online.rainn.org.

Who are the sexual assault service providers?

Sexual assault service providers are organizations or agencies dedicated to supporting survivors of sexual assault. The providers who answer calls placed to the hotline are known as RAINN affiliates. To be part of the National Sexual Assault Hotline, affiliates must agree to uphold RAINN’s confidentiality standards. That means:

  • Never releasing records or information about the call without the consent of the caller, except when obligated by law
  • Only making reports to the police or other agencies when the caller consents, unless obligated by law
  • Agreeing to RAINN’s non-discrimination policy

To learn more about how a provider can become an affiliate of the National Sexual Assault Hotline, visit the Sexual Assault Service Provider information page. Volunteer opportunities for the National Sexual Assault Hotline are coordinated through these local providers. Search for volunteer opportunities near you.

How was the National Sexual Assault Hotline created?

The National Sexual Assault Hotline was the nation’s first decentralized hotline, connecting those in need with help in their local communities. It’s made up of a network of independent sexual assault service providers, vetted by RAINN, who answer calls to a single, nationwide hotline number. Since it was first created in 1994, the National Sexual Assault Hotline (800.656.HOPE and online.rainn.org) has helped more than 3 million people affected by sexual violence.

Before the telephone hotline was created, there was no central place where survivors could get help. Local sexual assault services providers were well equipped to handle support services, but the lack of a national hotline meant the issue did not receive as much attention as it should. In response, RAINN developed a unique national hotline system to combine all the advantages of a national organization with all the abilities and expertise of local programs. One nationwide hotline number makes it easier for survivors to be connected with the help they deserve.

Anyone affected by sexual assault, whether it happened to you or someone you care about, can find support on the National Sexual Assault Hotline. You can also visit online.rainn.org to receive support via confidential online chat.

 

00 – Hotline – SURO – SpeakUp ReachOut – The Suicide Prevention Coalition of Eagle Valley – Crisis Numbers Talk and Text – 24/7 @ phone
May 23 all-day

 

SpeakUp ReachOut
The Suicide Prevention Coalition of Eagle Valley – Crisis Numbers Talk and Text
If you or someone you know is struggling or in crisis, help is available. If need someone to talk to, help is available. If you are trying to help someone else and are not sure what to do, help is available.
Your Hope Center’s support line and Colorado Crisis Services are open 24/7. Vail Health Behavioral Health can help you find a therapist or access 6 free therapy sessions through Olivia’s Fund. Please take advantage of these FREE resources if you need them, anytime you need them:
💛 Your Hope Center: 970-306-4673
💛 Colorado Crisis Services: 844-493-8255
💛 Colorado Crisis Services: text TALK to 38255
💛 Behavioral Health: vailhealthbh.org
Si usted o alguien que conoce está luchando con una crisis de salud mental o en crisis, hay ayuda disponible. Si necesita alguien con quien hablar, hay ayuda disponible. Si está tratando de ayudar a otra persona y no está seguro de qué hacer, hay ayuda disponible.
La línea de apoyo de Your Hope Center y Colorado Crisis Services están abiertas las 24 horas del día, los 7 días de la semana. Behavioral Health puede ayudarte a encontrar un terapeuta, un grupo de apoyo o acceder a 6 sesiones de terapia gratuitas a través de Olivia ‘s Fund. Aproveche estos recursos GRATUITOS en cualquier momento que los necesite:
💛 Your Hope Center: 970-306-4673
💛 Colorado Crisis Services: 844-493-8255
💛 Colorado Crisis Services: text TALK to 38255
💛 Behavioral Health: vailhealthbh.org
00 – Hotline – Text HELP to 741741 to Connect with a Crisis Counselor for Crisis / Depression – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ text/chat
May 23 all-day

CHATLINE

FREE Text Messaging to Connect with a Crisis Counselor for Depression / Crisis, etc.

Anytime 24/7/365 Weekdays and Weekends

Text HELP to 741741  

An alternative way to connect is through Facebook Messenger at this link: https://www.messenger.com/t/204427966369963/?messaging_source=source%3Apages%3Amessage_shortlink

You aren’t alone – support is out there! 

How you feel NOW may not last Forever.

Connecting with someone who cares and listens can make a difference and can help us get through our most difficult moments.

Whether it’s friends, family, or community – Everyone needs Somebody to lean on!

NOTE: Wait time can vary.  Usually a response comes pretty quickly in under 5 minutes.  Sometimes the wait can be 5 to 15 minutes or longer if there is a disaster or other reason.

 

Who are the Crisis Counselors? They are trained volunteers who—with the support of full-time Crisis Text Line staff—use active listening, collaborative problem solving, and safety planning to help texters in their moment of crisis.

Crisis doesn’t just mean suicide; it’s any painful emotion for which you need support. 

This service is for short term needs and is not a substitute for a friend or professional therapist.

For more information, check out the Frequently Asked Questions at this link: https://www.crisistextline.org/about-us/faq/ 

crisis text line banner

00 – Hotline – Tl – Thrive Lifeline – text “THRIVE” for Mental Health Crisis Chat – (313) 662 – 8209 – 24/7 Weekdays & Weekends @ Phone
May 23 all-day

 

The THRIVE Lifeline logo.

 

If you’re experiencing a mental health crisis and need to chat with a qualified crisis responder, we are here for you.

If you are an underrepresented individual (person of color, LGBTQ2S+, person living with disabilities, neurodivergent, and/or other marginalized identities), and experiencing obstacles because of (or simply have questions about) your identities, we want to help you navigate those.

Please text “THRIVE” to begin your conversation with us 24/7/365, from anywhere: +1.313.662.8209

We are experienced suicide interveners who will help keep you safe during times of acute mental health crises. If you are not in an acute crisis, but are dealing with stress as you navigate identity, orientation, or barriers to academic and professional entry, we can help! We are here to support your whole-self and we’re happy to help you during these troubling times.

THRIVE Lifeline offers 24/7/365 judgment-free, confidential text messaging to individuals aged 18+.

Click here for a list of other non-carceral support options in addition to THRIVE Lifeline

 

Together, we THRIVE.
 

01 – Helpline – CBL – Call Blackline – Support for the Black, Black LGBTQ+, Brown, Native and Muslim Community – Call or Text @ 1-800-604-5841 Toll Free – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends
May 23 all-day

Call toll-free anytime 24/7

(800) 604-5841

BlackLine® provides a space for peer support, counseling, witnessing and affirming the lived experiences to folxs who are most impacted by systematic oppression with an LGBTQ+ Black Femme Lens.

Call BlackLine® prioritizes BIPOC
(Black, Indigenous and People of Color).

By us for us.

 

01 – Helpline – Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline – 1-800-422-4453 – Confidential – 24/7 @ text/chat
May 23 all-day
01 – Helpline – DoD – Department of Defense – Safe Helpline – Helpline 877-995-5247, One-On-One Chat, Report Retaliation, Resources – 24/7 – Weekdays & Weeknds @ Phone, Text
May 23 all-day

 

SAFE Helpline Number on Black background

 

 

DoD Safe Helpline is the sole secure, confidential, and anonymous crisis support service specially designed for members of the Department of Defense community affected by sexual assault.

Safe Helpline Serves

Active Duty Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force Reserve component (Army National Guard, Army Reserve, Navy Reserve, Marine Corps Reserve, Air National Guard, Air Force Reserve, and DHS’s Coast Guard Reserve) members and their families.

 

 

Telephone Helpline

Need help?

Call 877-995-5247 to be connected with a trained, confidential
Safe Helpline staff member, 24/7.

DSN users can call Safe Helpline by dialing 877-995-5247.

For those unable to call toll-free or DSN, call 202-540-5962.

OCONUS Service members can call the Telephone Helpline for free from
anywhere in the world by using Voice over IP (VoIP) technology from
theSafe Helpline App.

live-help-img

Online Helpline

Need help?

Visitonline.safehelpline.org or download the Safe Helpline
app
to chat one-on-one with a trained Safe Helpline staff member
through an anonymous, secure instant-messaging format 24/7.

How can the Online Helpline help me?

You can chat one-on-one with a Safe Helpline staff member
to access a range of support services including:

  • Anonymous, confidential, crisis intervention services
  • Emotional support
  • Referrals to both military and civilian resources in your area— sexual assault response coordinators (SARCs)/sexual assault prevention and response victim advocates (SAPR VAs), Chaplain, Legal, Medical/Behavioral health care services, military police, Veterans Crisis Line, local civilian sexual assault service providers, and many others.
  • Information on military-specific policies, such as reporting options (Restricted and Unrestricted)
  • Information for family and friends of survivors
  • Information for leadership

Safe Helpline App

Safe Helpline appWhat is the Safe Helpline app?

Itunes Store Badge      Google play icon

The Safe Helpline app is a free mobile resource created to meet the unique needs of members of the Department of Defense community affected by sexual assault. By downloading the app, you can access 24/7 support through Safe Helpline’s Telephone and Online Helplines, get information and resources to help address the short- and long-term effects of sexual assault, as well as practical exercises, to help you manage your self-care. We also recognize that for many survivors stationed outside of the United States (OCONUS) additional limitations may arise when accessing resources, which is why the Safe Helpline app has been designed to give survivors access to a variety of support services and self-care exercises in a free, and convenient way.

Safe Helpline app home screen

How can the Safe Helpline app help me?

We’ve designed the app to give you a way to access any resource within the app directly from the home screen.

Chat: Access one-on-one support through the Online Helpline, 24/7 and chat directly with a Safe Helpline staff member.

Call: Connect directly to a Safe Helpline staff member for one-on-one support through the Telephone Helpline, 24/7. You can choose to make the call using Voice over IP (VoIP) or by using your cellular data. Using VoIP might be a good option for Service members who are OCONUS and may not have access to cellular service in their current location.

Learn: Within this section of the Safe Helpline app, you can access our self-paced educational programs to learn how to address the effects of sexual assault, how to support a survivor and ways Safe Helpline can support you or someone you know. All of these education programs can be completed anonymously by the user. You’ll also be able to access scenarios to give you tangible ways to step-in and support others.

Self-Care: The app allows you to easily create and use a customized self-care plan with specially designed self-care exercises. Once downloaded, you can come back to view your plan and exercises at any time, even without an Internet connection.

How do the self-care plans work?

The self-care plan is created by answering a series of six questions designed to help you focus and identify how you are feeling at that moment. Questions are answered on a sliding scale of zero (never) to five (always), and the app will recommend different exercises based on your responses. There are no “good” or “bad” answers to these questions, and responses can vary from day to day, depending on how you are feeling.

Once you’ve answered the questions on the plan, the app will suggest self-care exercises. The exercises include:

  • Guided breathing
  • Guided muscle relaxation
  • Imagining yourself at the beach
  • Focusing on the present
  • Soothing sounds, such as sounds of the forest and sounds of rain falling

We recognize the importance of keeping your information safe, so we’ve also set up a security feature that allows you to lock your self-care plans behind a privacy wall using a 6-digit pin of your choosing.

Journaling:

The Safe Helpline app allows you to journal directly in the app with weekly prompts. Taking some time out of your week to journal can give you a moment for reflection and an opportunity for self-care. You can also choose to skip any prompts or just write freely depending on how you are feeling. Some of the questions include:

  • When do you feel the most energized?
  • What do you want to let go of this week?
  • What are three things that you would do if you weren’t afraid?

Like the self-care plans, the journal entries you save are protected by a privacy wall and will allow you to lock your information behind a 6-digit pin of your choosing. You can also access and refer back to your journal without an Internet connection.

Coloring Book:

Sometimes focusing on a mindless activity can help you process difficult emotions and be grounded in the present.  To help with this, another self-care activity available on the app is a collection of six designs, ranging from easy to difficult, that allow you to paint or color your own works of art.

How is the Safe Helpline app secure, and is activity on the app traceable by third parties?

As with all Safe Helpline services, your privacy is of utmost importance, and the technology behind the Safe Helpline app was created by RAINN to protect your safety and anonymity by ensuring that no personally identifiable information (PII) is collected.

The following precautions have been implemented to protect your privacy when using the app:

  • The app does not require an email address or any of your contact information when it is initially downloaded.
  • You have the ability to set up a pin code to protect the information you record in the self-care plans, the journal, and completed coloring book designs.
  • No information on how you use the app is ever collected or shared by Safe Helpline. This includes how often you use the app, who uses the app, or where you use the app.
  • If you are concerned that someone may be able to access the app, you can delete all journal entries, self-care plans, and completed coloring books by simply deleting the app.

While Safe Helpline has taken the steps outlined above to help increase the safety and anonymity of Safe Helpline app users, please remember that if you are using the app on a DoD or other work-related device, your employer may be able to track your usage of this app. In addition, similarly to a paper journal, Safe Helpline app journal entries may be admissible during court proceedings.

REPORT RETALIATION

Military Feedback Form

If you have questions, comments, or complaints about the services on your installation/base or provided by a Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC), victim advocate or other military staff or personnel, please use this feedback form. You can submit the form anonymously if you prefer. The information you provide on this form will be forwarded to the DoD Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO).

Retaliation

If you believe you have experienced or witnessed retaliation in any form from a peer, supervisor, or someone in your chain of command following a report of sexual assault, you can share the retaliation allegations with SAPRO using this form.

If you would like to submit a retaliation report, please report directly to the Department of Defense Inspector General (DoD IG) here.

For members of the Coast Guard who have experienced retaliation, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) IG will accept retaliation complaints as falling within the scope of their responsibilities for Whistleblower protection. Coast Guard Members who have experienced retaliation can contact the DHS IG by calling 1-800-323-8603 (toll-free) or access the Allegation Form online.

Retaliation Reporting Options to learn more about how to report relation and your options : https://www.safehelpline.org/reporting-option

RESOURCE LINKS

 

For Responders

I work with Survivors

For Leadership

I am a Commander

For Supporters of Survivors

I am a Friend, Family Member, Colleague

For Service Members Leaving the Military

I am a Transitioning Service Member

For Survivors

I am a Transitioning Service Member

 

01 – Helpline – GR – Grad Resources – The National Grad Crisis Line – (877)-472-3457 – 24/7 – Weekdays & Weekends @ Phone
May 23 all-day

 

 

 

 

The National Grad Crisis Line

1.877.GRAD.HLP (1.877.472.3457)

The National Grad Crisis Line helps graduate students reach free, confidential telephone counseling, crisis intervention, suicide prevention, and information and referral services provided by specially-trained call-takers. Caring, professional staff and well-trained volunteers answer around the clock.

All counselors have completed training to understand the unique issues faced by graduate students. In addition to listening to and empathizing with a caller’s concerns, counselors assess the caller’s lethality risk, counsel, and offer various local support services and mental health resources for follow-up.

1.877.GRAD.HLP

https://gradresources.org/

Who We Are

Since 1990, Grad Resources has recognized the significant role of graduate students in America. From our studies on stress in graduate school to the painful stories of student struggles we hear every day, we understand the pressures they face. We offer services that address their personal, emotional and spiritual needs, providing online materials, meaningful connections, engaging speakers, and supportive faith-based communities that enable graduate students to flourish personally and professionally.
01 – Helpline – LFL – Lines for Life Alcohol and Drug Helpline @ 800-923-4357 – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
May 23 all-day

Alcohol and Drug Helpline

Call 800-923-4357 (24/7/365) or
Text RecoveryNow to 839863 Monday-Friday, 2-6pm PT.

Crisis Worker On the Phone

The Alcohol and Drug Helpline serves anyone who needs information, support, or access to resources and treatment for alcohol or drug use. If you or someone you know needs help, the Alcohol and Drug Helpline is free, confidential, and available for calls 24/7/365. The Alcohol and Drug Text Line is open Monday through Friday, 2pm to 6pm PST.

Call or text us for help understanding or dealing with alcohol and drug use or addiction. When you call us, we listen and support. We provide hope, referrals, resources, and information. Our highly trained staff and volunteers provide immediate assistance, non-judgmental listening, and compassionate support that can put you on a path to healing.

Para Ayuda en Español

llama al número 1-888-628-9454

https://988lifeline.org/help-yourself/en-espanol/

 

For Youth

If you are under age 21 and would like to talk with a peer about alcohol and drug use or abuse, contact our YouthLine. YouthLine is a free, confidential, teen-to-teen crisis and help line.

Call (877) 968-8491
Text ‘teen2teen’ to 839863
Chat https://www.oregonyouthline.org
We listen. We support. We keep it to ourselves.

Visit link:

https://oregonyouthline.org/

Excerpt(s):

Teens are available to help daily from 4-10pm PST (adults are available by phone at all other times!).

YouthLine is a free teen-to-teen crisis support and help line.

YouthLine is confidential to a point- while we will never share conversations had on the lines, we are mandatory reporters. If a young person is unable to agree to safety for themselves or another person, or if abuse is occurring, YouthLine contacts other agencies to ensure the best support and safety for the young person in crisis.

01 – Helpline – Native and Strong Helpline – Washington State Only – 24/7
May 23 all-day
01 - Helpline - Native and Strong Helpline - Washington State Only - 24/7

 

Native & Strong Lifeline

Available 24/7

Dial 988 + 4

The Native & Strong Lifeline is a crisis call center operated entirely by Native staff and is available 24/7 in Washington
State. To connect with the Native & Strong Lifeline from a Washington State area code, dial 988 and press “4”.

The Native crisis counselor who answers will help with mental health crises in an empathetic and culturally connected way.
The Native & Strong Lifeline currently employs 16 Indigenous counselors from all over the United States. In addition to the training all 988 crisis counselors receive, Native & Strong counselors are trained in cultural competency, traditional forms of healing, and Native slang and language. Counselors use cultural activities, traditional medicines, and connections with elders and Native healers as a part of self-care planning with callers, in addition to clinical and community resources.

Although Native & Strong is only available in Washington State, this crisis call center can serve as a model for Tribes
that want to open their own crisis call centers nationwide.

To learn more about how Native & Strong was created, visit
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hleYKuADK70

 

01 – Helpline – NCPG – National Council on Problem Gaming – National Problem Gaming Chatline @ ncpgambling.org/chat – 24/7 @ Online Via Chat
May 23 all-day
01 - Helpline - NCPG - National Council on Problem Gaming - National Problem Gaming Chatline @ ncpgambling.org/chat - 24/7 @ Online Via Chat

 

National Problem Gambling Helpline

Chatline

www.ncpgambling.org/chat

Click the link below to chat with a helpline specialist.

Free, confidential and available 24/7. Works in all 50 states.

Online. Click here to enter.

Below are state helpline text/chat numbers. Hyperlinked items with take you directly to their contact page:

Arizona: Text NEXTSTEP to 53342

California: Text SUPPORT to 53342

Connecticut: Text CTGAMB to 53342

Illinois:  Text ILGAMB to 53342

Indiana: Text INGAMBÂto 53342

Minnesota: Text HOPE to 53342

Mississippi: Text to MSGAMB 53342

North Carolina:  Text MORETHANAGAMENC 53342

If you would like to call the National Problem Gambling Helpline, dial 1-800-522-4700

If you would like to text the helpline, text 1-800-522-4700.

NCPG also supports GamTalk, a 24/7 moderated online peer support forum, www.gamtalk.org.

 

01 – Helpline – ODOJ – Oregon Department of Justice – Sanctuary Promise Hotline @ (844) 924-7829 (844-924-STAY) Toll Free / En Espanol (844) 626-7276 (844-6AMPARO) – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends
May 23 all-day

 

Promise Response Hotline

Talk to Us

Whether it happened to you or to someone else, we can all help track sanctuary promise violations.

Everyone has the right to live safely in Oregon.  Oregon’s sanctuary laws promise safety, human rights, and dignity for all. If you or someone you know was targeted in violation of Oregon’s Sanctuary Promise laws, please call 1-844-924-STAY/1-844-6-AMPARO or report online at SanctuaryPromise.Oregon.gov or PromesaSantuario.Oregon.gov. On the Oregon Department of Justice’s Sanctuary Promise hotline, you can report a suspected violation, receive support, and be connected to resources. The Oregon Department of Justice may open an investigation into the violation.

 

Sanctuary Promise Response Hotline

1-844-924-STAY (1-844-924-7829)
Spanish Direct Line: 1-844-626-AMPARO (1-844-626-7276)

Operators are standing by
9am to 5pm Pacific time, Monday – Friday.

Interpreters in over 240 languages.

After hours? Leave a message and we’ll return your call.

We accept all Relay Calls.

 

Since 1987, Oregon has officially been a sanctuary state that supports immigrant and refugee communities by prioritizing human rights, dignity, and safety.

The Sanctuary Promise Act », signed into law on July 19, 2021, strengthens the existing state sanctuary laws. It restricts the collection and prohibits sharing of information related to a person’s national origin, immigration, or citizenship status. Oregon state and local public resources and personnel, including state and local government offices and law enforcement agencies, are prohibited from being used for immigration enforcement.

If you suspect a violation of Oregon’s sanctuary laws, we want to hear from you.  Suspected violations can be reported through this online portal (available in 8 languages by using the language menu in the upper right hand corner of this screen) or the Sanctuary Promise Hotline at 1-844-924-STAY (1-844-924-7829). Call us in any language.  We have a direct access Spanish language website at PromesaSantuario.Oregon.gov with a Spanish direct dial hotline at 1-844-6-AMPARO (1-844-626-7276).

To report ICE activity in the community, contact Portland Immigrant Rights Coalition, PIRC » at 1-888-622-1510.

Examples of violations to Oregon Sanctuary Promise Laws include:

  • Investigation or interrogation by police for immigration enforcement purposes;
  • Most inquiries, storing, or sharing of information about national origin, immigration, or citizenship status by police or state or local government;
  • Civil arrest without a judicial warrant/order from a court facility;
  • Arrests by federal immigration of a person on their way to or from court or while at court;
  • Police collaboration with federal authorities for immigration enforcement purposes;
  • Denial of services, benefits, or privileges to a person in jail or on probation/parole based on immigration status;
  • Police establishing coordinated traffic stops or traffic perimeters to enforce federal immigration laws; or
  • State or local government or police failing to document or report requests from a federal immigration agency relating to immigration enforcement;

 

Report a Sanctuary Promise Violation

Information About The Victim/Targeted Person

Note: The targeted person’s identity will not be shared publicly by ODOJ, but will be used and shared with the state/local government agency during the course of any investigation ODOJ opens. It will not be shared with federal immigration agencies or otherwise be shared to assist with immigration enforcement. If a specific person was not targeted in the violation, you can simply put “general public” as first and last names.

Use This Link to Report A Violation of the Sanctuary Promise Violation

 

01 – Helpline – PHP – Parents Helping Parents – Parent Stress Line – 1-800-632-8188 – 24/7 – Weekdays & Weekends @ phone
May 23 all-day

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parent Stress Line

1-800 – 632 – 8188

Call our Parent Stress Line any time and any day of the week

if you need to vent about the stress from taking care of a child or children. 18006328188

 

 

01 – Helpline – PTSD/FOA – PTSD Foundation of America/Combat Trauma Help Line – 877-717- 7883 – 24/7 @ phone
May 23 all-day

 

 

 

 

877-717-PTSD (7873)

Combat Trauma Help Line

Mission/Vision

Mission Statement

Rooted in unwavering faith, our mission is to engage in the relentless pursuit of empowering the veteran community by creating a transformative impact that changes the trajectory of their lives.

Vision Statement

Creating a world where veterans find hope by empowering them to embrace L.I.F.E.

01 – Helpline – Samaritans – Helpline – 887- 870 – 4673 – 24/7 @ phone
May 23 all-day

 

24/7 Helpline

887- 870 – 4673

 

Get Support Now

If you are feeling suicidal, lonely, or depressed, we are here for you. Whatever the reason, you will get help from a trained volunteer offering nonjudgmental support. The 24/7 Helpline is confidential and free. You can call or text us any time at 988

You can also use these links

CALL NOW

TEXT NOW

Important information about 988

As of July 16th, 2022, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (NSPL), is transitioning to a three digit number988988 is intended to create an ease of access to care and improve mental health response. NSPL has shared a helpful FAQ document here.

As a member of the NSPL Network, Samaritans will be answering calls going to this line. Moving to 988 does not mean our current number (877-870-4673) goes away. You can still call or text us at this number 24/7.

We are here for you.

 

What happens when you use the 24/7 Helpline?

  1. You call or text Samaritans’ 24/7 Helpline because you need to talk.
  2. One of our incredible volunteers will answer your call or text.
  3. They will ask for your name, but you do not need to disclose it if you don’t feel comfortable.
  4. Our volunteers will listen to you. We will not give advice or try to “fix” anything. We simply want to support you in whatever feelings you want to share.

 

01 – Helpline – SAMHSA – Substance Use and Mental Health Services Administration – Strength After – Online Peer Support Communities – COVID-19 Survivors and Responders Support Group – Mass Violence Support Group – 24/7 @ Facebook Groups
May 23 all-day

DDH ONLINE PEER SUPPORT COMMUNITIES

In an effort to broaden our reach to disaster survivors and emergency responders, the Disaster Distress Helpline has developed online peer support communities through Facebook Groups for those who have experienced a natural or human-caused disaster. These online communities offer opportunities for survivors and responders to connect with others who have experienced similar events, share accurate information and trusted resources, and help one another continue to heal from the effects of a traumatic event.

What Does it Offer?

The purpose of DDH Online Peer Support Communities is to create enhanced opportunities for survivors and responders of disaster to come together for mutual aid and emotional support.

DDH Online Peer Support Communities Also Include:

Trained Peer Supporters

DDH Online Peer Support includes trained peer supporters who assist with group moderation and vetting resources. In addition to community forums, our goal is also to create purposeful discussions lead by peer supporters with specific themes and relevant topics. While each survivor and responder’s experiences are unique, being with peers who have had a similar experience can promote connection, offer new ways of coping, and build a foundation of trust.

Peer support does not take the place of therapy or counseling. The opportunity to provide mutual aid and support to others who have faced similar challenges, when and where they need it, offers hope that healing and recovery is possible after a disaster.

Immediate Crisis Support

All DDH Online Peer Support Communities are monitored 24/7 by a designated DDH crisis center, where crisis counselors are available to talk to members who may be in emotional distress and need crisis support. Members can talk to a counselor at any time of the day or night via Crisis Support Over Messenger (CSOM).

Available Communities

Survivors and Responders of the COVID-19 Pandemic 

DDH Online Peer Support Communities offer peer support for anyone who identifies as a survivor or responder of the COVID-19 pandemic. Both survivors and responders can come together for mutual aid, to share trusted resources, and to help one another continue to heal from the effects of a national pandemic. Survivors and responders may include but are not limited to, any healthcare workers, emergency responders, parents/caregivers, educators, individuals who have lost loved ones, people who are dealing with “Long-haul COVID”, those impacted by job loss or economic hardship during the pandemic, and anyone else who has been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. DDH-trained Peer Supporters are also available to listen and offer validation and encouragement. Additionally, they provide structured moderation within the community to engage members in meaningful discussions on relevant topics and offer timely and trusted resources. To join our Facebook group dedicated to Survivors and Responders of the COVID-19 Pandemic, click here.

Survivors of Mass Violence

DDH Online Peer Support Communities offer peer support for survivors of mass violence in the United States including mass shootings, terrorist attacks, or other large-scale community violence. Survivors and loved ones who have experienced mass violence can connect with one another and provide emotional support in the aftermath of a mass violence incident, including how to cope with activating events and memorials, self-care strategies, and challenges with daily living. DDH-trained Peer Supporters are available to listen to members, and offer validation and encouragement. They also provide structured moderation to engage members in meaningful discussions on relevant topics and provide timely and trusted resources. If you are a survivor or the loved one of a survivor of mass violence and need support, please join our Facebook group by requesting to be a member here.

01 – Helpline – SAMHSA’s National Helpline 24/7 – Línea Nacional de Ayuda de SAMHSA de salud mental y adicciones – (800) 622-4357
May 23 all-day

 

SAMHSA’s National Helpline, 1-800-662-HELP (4357) (also known as the Treatment Referral Routing Service), or TTY: 1-800-487-4889 is a confidential, free, 24-hour-a-day, 365-day-a-year, information service, in English and Spanish, for individuals and family members facing mental and/or substance use disorders. This service provides referrals to local treatment facilities, support groups, and community-based organizations.

Línea Nacional de Ayuda de SAMHSA

  • La Línea Nacional de Ayuda de SAMHSA es un servicio gratuito, confidencial, disponible las 24 horas, los 7 días de la semana, los 365 días del año. Esta línea telefónica es un servicio de información (en inglés y español) para personas y familias que enfrentan trastornos mentales o de uso de sustancias.

     

    Visite también el localizador de tratamientos.

Suggested Resources

What Is Substance Abuse Treatment? A Booklet for Families
Created for family members of people with alcohol abuse or drug abuse problems. Answers questions about substance abuse, its symptoms, different types of treatment, and recovery. Addresses concerns of children of parents with substance use/abuse problems.

It’s Not Your Fault (NACoA) (PDF | 12 KB)

Assures teens with parents who abuse alcohol or drugs that, “It’s not your fault!” and that they are not alone. Encourages teens to seek emotional support from other adults, school counselors, and youth support groups such as Alateen, and provides a resource list.

After an Attempt: A Guide for Taking Care of Your Family Member After Treatment in the Emergency Department
Aids family members in coping with the aftermath of a relative’s suicide attempt. Describes the emergency department treatment process, lists questions to ask about follow-up treatment, and describes how to reduce risk and ensure safety at home.

Family Therapy Can Help: For People in Recovery From Mental Illness or Addiction
Explores the role of family therapy in recovery from mental illness or substance abuse. Explains how family therapy sessions are run and who conducts them, describes a typical session, and provides information on its effectiveness in recovery.

01 – Helpline – SHNH – StrongHearts Native Helpline – Call or Text @ 1-844-762-8483 (1-844-7NATIVE) Toll Free – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends
May 23 all-day

StrongHearts Logo

Domestic and Sexual Violence Is Never Okay

StrongHearts Native Helpline 1-844-7NATIVE (762-8483) is a 24/7 safe, confidential and anonymous domestic, dating and sexual violence helpline for Native Americans and Alaska Natives, offering culturally-appropriate support and advocacy.

 

Our Services

StrongHearts Native Helpline (1-844-762-8483) is a 24/7 confidential and anonymous culturally-appropriate domestic, dating and sexual violence helpline for Native Americans. StrongHearts advocates offer the following services at no cost:

  • Peer support and advocacy
  • Information and education about domestic violence and sexual violence
  • Personalized safety planning
  • Crisis intervention
  • Referrals to Native-centered domestic violence and sexual violence service providers
  • Basic information about health options
  • Support finding a local health facility or crisis center that is trained to care for survivors of sexual assault and offers services like sexual assault forensic exams
  • General information about jurisdiction and legal advocacy referrals

 

01 – Helpline – SP – Shatterproof – Crisis Text Line – anxiety, depression, substance use disorder – (SHATTERPROOF to 741741) – 24/7 @ Text Line
May 23 all-day
01 - Helpline - SP - Shatterproof - Crisis Text Line -  anxiety, depression, substance use disorder - (SHATTERPROOF to 741741) - 24/7 @ Text Line

 

 

 

 

 

Crisis Text Line

SHATTERPROOF to 741741

Who can I call if I am going through a crisis?


I
f you are experiencing anxiety, depression, or a substance use disorder, text- SHATTERPROOF to 741741 for help.

You are not alone. Reach out to the following support hotlines for immediate help. If you have an emergency, please dial 911.

 

01 – Helplline – SP – SAFE PLACE – Youth Crisis Support Service – TXT 4 HELP – Text the word “safe” and your current location (address, city, state) to 4HELP (44357) – 24/7 @ Text line
May 23 all-day
01 – Hotline – SAGE – SAGE National LGBTQ+ Elder Hotline – 877 360 5428 – 24/7
May 23 all-day

 

 

 

 

 

877-360-LGBT(5428)

Are you feeling alone, hopeless, or experiencing a crisis? The SAGE LGBTQ+ Elder Hotline is here for you. We connect LGBTQ+ older people who want to talk with friendly responders who are ready to listen.  Hotline responders:

  • Are certified in crisis response
  • Offer support without judgment
  • Are trained in LGBTQ+ culturally competency

The SAGE LGBTQ+ Elder Hotline is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, in English and Spanish, with translation in 180 languages.

The hotline is managed by our partner Centerstone, a nonprofit health system specializing in mental health and substance use disorder treatments for people of all ages.

01 – Linea de Ayuda – L4L – Lines For Life – En Español – Lifeline ofrece 24/7, servicios gratuitos en español @ 888-628-9454 @ Phone
May 23 all-day

 

Ayuda En Español

Lifeline ofrece 24/7, servicios gratuitos en español, y no es necesario hablar inglés si usted necesita ayuda.

¿Qué pasa cuando llamo?

Cuando usted llama al número 1-888-628-9454, su llamada se dirige al centro de ayuda de nuestra red disponible más cercano. Tenemos actualmente 200 centros en la red y usted hablará probablemente con uno situado en su zona. Cada centro funciona en forma independiente y tiene su propio personal calificado.

Cuando el centro contesta su llamada, usted estará hablando con una persona que le escuchará, le hará preguntas y hará todo lo que esté a su alcance para ayudarle.

Yo mismo necesito ayuda

Una persona capacitada le escuchará y hablará con usted. Si es necesario, podrá darle información sobre recursos o servicios existentes en su comunidad que podrán prestarle ayuda después de la llamada. Siempre puede usted volver a llamar al número 1-888-628-9454 si lo necesita o lo desea.

Una persona querida necesita ayuda

Si está usted preocupado por una persona que usted sabe que está pasando por una crisis o que piensa en suicidarse, nuestros centros pueden ayudarle. Una persona calificada del centro puede:

  • Darle ideas y sugerencias sobre la forma de acercarse a la persona que le preocupa. Puede ayudarle a pensar qué podría decir para alentar a esa persona querida a pedir ayuda.
  • En algunos casos, el centro puede hablar en conferencia al mismo tiempo con usted y con la persona que le preocupa.
  • Algunas comunidades tienen equipos móviles que pueden visitar a las personas en sus hogares. Si hay uno de esos equipos en su zona, nuestro centro le pondrá en contacto con él.

Llamo para pedir información sobre cuestiones de salud mental

No hace falta que esté usted en crisis para llamarnos. Nuestros centros pueden responder a preguntas generales sobre salud mental, depresión, suicidio, recursos de salud en la comunidad, y muchas cosas más. También es posible llamar para averiguar más sobre las actividades de prevención del suicidio en su zona.

Algunos datos sobre la Línea de Prevención del Suicidio y Crisis

  • Las llamadas son gratuitas desde cualquier teléfono en los Estados Unidos.
  • Nuestras líneas funcionan las 24 horas todos los días de la semana, de modo que usted puede ponerse en contacto con una persona capacitada en cualquier momento en que lo necesite.
  • Su llamada es confidencial; esto significa que la persona que le escucha hará todo lo posible por no divulgar su identidad.
  • Prestamos servicios en inglés (988) y en español (1-888-628-9454)
  • Somos la única red nacional de respuesta a situaciones de crisis con financiación del Gobierno Federal.

 

01 – Support Line – Racial Equity Support Line w BIPOC Lived Experience @ (503) 575-3764 – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST Weekdays M-F @ Phone
May 23 all-day
01 - Support Line - Racial Equity Support Line w BIPOC Lived Experience @ (503) 575-3764 - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST Weekdays M-F @ Phone

 

Crisis / Support Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 8:30am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Toll-Free Access

If you need toll-free access, call any line at Lines for Life and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line during its operating hours.

For example, you can call Lines for Life / National Suicide Prevention Line @ 1-877-273-8255 and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line between 8:30am and 5pm PST.

02 – Urgent Info – MAC – Mapping Action Collective – Oregon Resources and Services for Transgender Youth and Young Adults
May 23 all-day
02 - Urgent Info - MAC - Mapping Action Collective - Oregon Resources and Services for Transgender Youth and Young Adults

 

RESOURCES

Trans Youth and Young Adults

“These rescources selectedf from the Mapping Action Collective

( https://www.oregonyouthresourcemap.com)

Description:

Description:

541 Willamette St #310, Eugene, OR 97401

 

Description:

1132 SW 13th Ave, Portland, OR 97205

Description:

Ages: 16-24
Housing & Shelter: Homeless Youth
941 W. 7th Ave. Eugene, OR 97402
New Roads Drop-In Center: (541) 686-4310
Station 7 Youth Crisis Line: (541) 689-3111

Description:

COVID Message: Hours may be impacted by COVID. Please call for updated hours.
Eligibility: Homeless youth ages 12-21
Languages: English, Spanish
Ages: 12-21
Housing & Shelter: Housing Services
1202 SE Douglas Ave, Roseburg, OR 97470

Description:

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources
Nativity Lutheran Church, 60850 Brosterhous Rd., Bend

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources
Prineville Presbyterian Church, 1771 NW Madras Hwy, Prineville

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources
5633 SE Division St. Portland, OR 97206

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources
1144 Gateway Loop, Suite 200, Springfield, OR 97477
Crystal Falk, Director of Youth and Family Services: (541) 686-5060

Description:

COVID Message: Building temporarily closed due to COVID, please reach out via phone or email to get support.Languages: English
Ages: 16-25
Mental Health: Support Groups

Description:

Description:

3620 SE Powell Blvd, #102 Portland OR 97202​

Description:

COVID Message: Counseling and Assessments for Surgery letters are being conducted via teletherapy or phone. In-office visits are offered to existing clients on a case-by-case basis.
Cost: Brave Space primarily works with people with Oregon Health Plan insurance. If you have private insurance, please check out our resource guide for therapists who take your insurance.
Dillehunt Hall, Room 1007 3235 S.W. Pavilion Loop Portland, OR 97239

Description:

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources

Description:

Business: (541) 386-4808
24 Hour Hotline: (541) 386-6603

Description:

Description:

Basic Needs: Public Transit

Description:

Eligibility: We have only two requirements in an effort to be as inclusive as possible: 1) You identify as transgender (FTM, genderqueer, non-binary, genderfluid, gender non-conforming, and every other non-cis identity within the trans umbrella.) 2) You cannot afford to purchase a binder, or you cannot safely obtain a binder.

Description:

Are you able to pay for hair removal services out of pocket?

Are you employed and able to save some money towards hair removal services?

Are you a citizen or documented immigrant?

Do you identify as white, or do you experience white/light-skinned privilege?

If you answered YES to these questions, you may consider making space for our trans siblings who mostly answered NO. (Even if you answer YES to most or all of these questions, you are still eligible to apply.)

Description:

Eligibility: We have only two requirements in an effort to be as inclusive as possible: You identify as transgender (MTF, genderqueer, non-binary, genderfluid, gender non-conforming, and every other non-cis identity assigned male at birth within the trans umbrella.) You cannot afford to purchase femme shapewear, or you cannot safely obtain femme shapewear. We accept all requests for support, and applications are open year-round. Once you complete your application, your request will be added to our waitlist. Shipping is discrete and 100% free, and we ship internationally to 90+ countries and counting.
Cost: This program is intended to help trans folks who otherwise can not afford or access femme shapewear. We ask that you consider your access before applying.

Description:

Eligibility: You identify as transgender (FTM, MTF, non-binary, genderqueer, gender non-conforming, and all other non-cis identities). You have financial need that prevents you from affording hormone replacement therapy. You are 18 years old or older (19+ in Nebraska) at the time you apply. You live in one of the states Plume serves. You are not currently on Medicare. If you live in CO or KY, you are not currently on Medicaid.

Cost: This program is intended to help trans folks who otherwise can not afford gender-affirming surgery. We ask that you consider your access to healthcare before applying for this grant. Here are some questions to consider:Do you have health insurance coverage that is trans-inclusive?

If not, do you qualify for Medicaid?

Do you live in a state whose Medicaid plans cover HRT?

Are you employed and able to pay for HRT out of pocket?

Are there nearby clinics that offer HRT with informed consent?

Do you have reliable transportation options to access a provider?

Do you consider yourself healthy and able-bodied (i.e., not living with a chronic or long-standing illness)?

Do you identify as white, or do you experience white/light-skinned privilege?

If you answered YES to most of these questions, you may consider making space for our trans siblings who mostly answered NO. (Even if you answer YES to most or all of these questions, you are still eligible to apply.)

Minimum age served: 18

Description:

Eligibility: We have very few requirements in an effort to be as inclusive as possible: You identify as transgender (FTM, MTF, non-binary, genderqueer, gender non-conforming, and all other non-cis identities). You are 18 years of age or older at the time of your surgery, or have consent from your legal guardian(s) and healthcare provider(s). You have financial need that prevents you from affording gender-affirming surgery. You can demonstrate past attempts at affording care (i.e. saving money, fundraising, attempting to get insurance coverage). You complete your surgery in the United States with a US-based surgeon.

Cost: This program is intended to help trans folks who otherwise can not afford gender-affirming surgery. We ask that you consider your access to healthcare before applying for this grant. Here are some questions to consider:Do you have health insurance coverage that is trans-inclusive?

If not, do you qualify for Medicaid? (Learn more)

Do you have access to healthcare providers who are trans competent, and are able to travel to them to receive care?

Are you employed and able to save some money towards surgery?

Are you a citizen or documented immigrant?

Do you consider yourself healthy and able-bodied (i.e., not living with a chronic or long-standing illness)?

Do you identify as white, or do you experience white/light-skinned privilege?

If you answered YES to most of these questions, you may consider making space for our trans siblings who mostly answered NO. (Even if you answer YES to most or all of these questions, you are still eligible to apply.)

Minimum age served: 18

Description:

Eligibility: It is a benefit for eligible Health Share of Oregon members in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties.
Languages: Spanish, Russian, Mandarin, Arabic, Vietnamese, Somali, Swahili
9955 NE Glisan St, Portland, OR 97220

Description:

Basic Needs: Transportation

Description:

Basic Needs: Transportation
10055 E Burnside St, Portland, OR 97216
Energy Assistance: (503) 294-7444
Housing & Rent Assistance: (503) 721-1740

Description:

650 NW Irving St, Portland, OR 97209

Description:

Day Services & Drop-in: Mail, Laundry, & Showers
610 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97205

Description:

Call or Text: (541) 246-4046
24/7 Text (541) 246-4046

Description:

Maximum age served: 18
605 W 4th Ave, Eugene, OR 97402

Description:

Springfield: (541) 726-3714

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1175 G St, Springfield, 97477

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1160 Grant St, Eugene, OR 97402

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3500 E 17th Ave, Eugene, 97403

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Text “START” to 678678

Description:

323 E 12th Ave, Eugene, 97401

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1300 Irvington Dr, Eugene, 97404

Description:

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Community Resources: Veteran Services
02 – Urgent Info – Services and Resources for Families and Children in Response to the Recent Tragic Events Across the Country
May 23 all-day

 

Some Resources for Families and Communities:

Due to recent tragic events across the country

 

Agency Logo

Racial Stress and Self-care:

Parent Tip Tool

How race-related stress affects you and your relationship with your child

What effect does racism have on your health and well-being?

Not only does racism impact you as a parent, it can also impact how you interact with your children. Experiences of racism build on each other and can chip away at your emotional, physical and spiritual resources as a parent, contributing to race-related stress. Race-related stress can make it hard to have the space needed to take care of yourself as a parent, which reduces the emotional space you need to adequately take care of your children.

Racism can impact parents emotionally, physically and spiritually

Physical effects

Physical Effects

Physical Effects can include increased hypertension, illness and risky behaviors such as substance use.

Emotional effects

Emotional Effects

Emotional effects can include depression, anxiety, anger, irritability and aggression.

Spiritual effects

Spiritual Effects

Spiritual effects can include a decreased sense of purpose, lack of connection with the larger community, isolation from larger social groups and reduced involvement in communal activities that you enjoy.

Potential reactions to racial stress or trauma

Insecure feelings

Insecure Feelings

Feelings of shame and lack of confidence due to feeling that a situation cannot be changed.

Lack of trust

Lack of Trust

Feeling detached or a lack of trust for others due to experiencing multiple losses or letdowns. This can make it very difficult to seek out help and to identify potential safe sources of support.

Triggers

Triggers

Reminders of the event, such as particular people or situations, can also trigger strong emotional or physical responses (e.g., crying or rapid heartbeat).

Emotions

Difficulty Controlling Emotions

Difficulty controlling emotional responses (going from “zero to one hundred”) can occur as the body helps you adapt to potentially unsafe situations, making you feel constantly on “alert.”

The body’s response to the experience of racism can make accessing resources to cope with the situation difficult. Race-related stress is unique in that it threatens psychological resources that are needed to cope and fulfill basic needs such as financial support, housing, access to jobs, etc.

When your body is in stress mode, it is geared up to help you and your child survive, which sometimes leads to impulsive decisions. If you live in a chronic state of stress related to racism, you can start to engage in survival coping. Survival coping can help you to deal with very hard or potentially life-threatening situations. However, if you continue to exist in this mode long-term, it can make it difficult to enjoy being in the moment with your child and can reduce your ability to feel safe and in control.

What impact can racial stress have on your parenting?

Experiencing race-related stress can also impact the quality of parenting relationships in the following ways:

Impostor syndrome

When you are exposed to racism repeatedly, you often start doubting yourself and can feel like you are an imposter in dominant culture settings or in settings where you feel as though you do not belong. Your inner thoughts might sound something like: “Am I being judged?” “Am I worthy?” “I got lucky.” “I only got this because I am Black.”

Being overly alert (hypervigilance)

Experiencing racial stress can make you more aware of potential dangers and negative experiences that can occur. This, in turn, can make the experience of parenting even more stressful. When you interact with your children, you can sometimes be reminded of negative race-related experiences that you had when you were a child. This reminder can amp up emotional responses, or hyperarousal, making it hard for you to “keep your cool” and be open to flexible problem solving.

“Helicopter parenting” (monitoring in fear)

These experiences of racism and unwarranted blame or lack of acceptance can make you want to protect your children so much, that you don’t allow them to explore in the way that they need to. You may shelter them from failures, which everyone needs to experience in order to learn how to manage everyday life. You may tend to be overly cautious or suspicious. Examples can include not allowing your children to have sleepovers or go to the park, even with your supervision.

Difficulty regulating emotions

  • When your past influences your emotional state, it can affect your emotional responses to both big and minor stressors with children, such as when they misbehave. This, in turn, can lead to being overprotective or overuse of physical discipline, as a means of survival.
  • For children, having parents who can keep perspective (stay cool) when children are upset, or misbehaving is very important. Likewise, it is important to stay calm when disciplining a child, otherwise discipline may go overboard. Both of these things can be hard if you are having difficulty controlling your emotions.

Avoidance

  • Avoiding situations that are related to racism can be a needed strategy to survive; such as instances that may involve violence or threat to yourself or your family. Sometimes you may avoid reminders of past experiences due to the pain or discomfort they cause.
  • If you find yourself avoiding strong feelings or situations with your child that bring up painful memories, it may make it hard to show affection and support for your child. It may even make it difficult to know how to provide emotional support for your child during times of stress. For instance, if your child brings up their own experience of oppression or an event in their life reminds you of something from your own childhood.

Mistrusting others

  • Racism can lead to distrust or mistrust of other communities. Internalized racism is when you begin to accept negative messages about your own abilities and inherent worth by the dominant group in society.
  • When you use society’s norms to judge yourself, you can feel depressed, unworthy and just not good enough. You are taught in many ways to take these feelings and paint them onto another group.
  • Intra and interracial violence, contention among disenfranchised communities or color, and the way the media conveys information about people of color, contribute to this.
  • This kind of coping can make you more vulnerable to racism, because on some level you may believe in racial hierarchy and difference when you belittle other groups. And when you show your children that it is right to discriminate against certain other groups, you make them more vulnerable to discrimination that they face.

Minimizing racism

  • Racism is overwhelming, as is the history of violence. You are sometimes taught that accepting this and minimizing racism is the only thing you can do. But when you ignore racism, and accept powerlessness, you encourage your kids to internalize racism. This can lead to increased levels of depression, anxiety and externalizing behaviors (e.g., engaging in risky behaviors, such as alcohol or substance use).
  • When you believe that you should be able to handle and manage it all without a break or without asking for help, you are at increased risk for health problems and can miss important cues about your well-being and safety.

Self-blame

Experiencing chronically unfair and dangerous discriminatory practices due to race can lead to feelings of low worth. For parents, this can also lead to a questioning of your parenting choices and abilities.

Unbalanced Racial and Ethnic Socialization (RES)

Unbalanced messaging or communication about race and ethnicity occurs when you only promote messages of mistrust, preparation for bias, or only give racial pride messages to your children.

So, what can you do to mitigate racial stress?

As parents, it is important to develop positive identities and share your cultural identities with your children. Positive cultural identity and advocacy are protective factors against racism, which can help to reduce and prevent racial stress.

There are many other ways to cope with stress and everyone has different preferences. Reducing stress can also allow you to model healthy coping strategies for your child. Here are some suggestions with links you can try.

Agency Logo
Talking with Children About Tragic Events

What do we tell our children? How do we reassure them of their own safety?

At The Dougy Center in Portland, Oregon, we’ve provided grief support groups for children, teens, young adults and their parents or adult caregivers since 1982.

Based on our experience, here are some things for adults to keep in mind as you struggle with how to talk with children following tragic events, such as natural disasters, plane crashes, or school shootings.

1. Don’t project your fears onto your children. They take their cues from the adults around them.
You can’t hear the news about children being murdered or communities devastated by natural disasters without thinking about how you’d feel if it happened to your family, friends, or hometown. The outpouring of care and empathy for the families who lost loved ones will be powerful, and…we all know it could have been our friends, our child, our family and community members who died or were injured.

Identifying with the senselessness and randomness makes us all feel more vulnerable. But we should remember that children don’t always see things the same way that adults do, and it won’t be helpful to them for us to fall apart. They need to see that we care, that we feel terrible about this tragedy, and that we will do everything we can to keep them safe. They will take their cues from our behavior.

It’s okay to show emotion. We can model for children that feeling sad, scared, and upset is normal after tragedies. But we don’t want to overwhelm them with our emotions, or put them in the position of having to ‘parent,’ or take care of, the adults around them. Make sure you also model taking care of yourself, by sharing with trusted and supportive adult friends, eating (and drinking) healthfully.

2. Try to limit their access to the recurring news and exposure to the tragedy over and over.
Over-exposure to the graphic and emotional news can be overwhelming for children and can cause unnecessary anxiety and fear. Some children who repeatedly watched the footage of planes crashing into the towers on 9/11 thought it was happening again and again. Some children (and some adults) may have difficulty getting graphic scenes and images out of their minds. Too much exposure can fuel their fear, so don’t let them sit and watch the news over and over. Better yet, set the example of not doing so yourself as well.

3. Understand that you can’t completely shield them from what happened.
It would be next to impossible to hide these events from children, as much as we wish we could. You might be able to shield your own child in your home, for example, by not turning on (or owning) a television, but you can’t protect your children from hearing about it from other kids. The fact is, they will hear about it, so although they don’t “need” to know about it, pretending we can shield them is magical thinking.

That said, you don’t need to give them more information than they can handle, or more than they’re asking for. A simple, “Did they talk about what happened in _____ today at school?” would be a good starter. They need to know that you’re not trying to hide the truth from them, that you’re open to talking about it, but that you’re also not forcing them to do so.

4. Model truth-telling and build trust with your children by letting them hear things, even hard things, from you directly.
Eight days after the 9/11 attacks, I was meeting in small groups with pre-school workers in New York City, talking about how to respond to the young children in their care about the events. A man asked to speak to me privately after one of the trainings, and asked for my advice around his 7-year-old daughter. For the last week, since September 12th, she had been having stomach aches and difficulty sleeping. He said it was not tied to the events of 9/11 because, “We don’t have a television.” As his story unfolded it was evident that he did not want to have to explain to his child why people would do such horrible things, a normal dilemma that we face as parents and adults. This child was experiencing physical reactions, as it turned out, not primarily because of her reaction to the events of 9/11, but because she was unable to share her fears and concerns and questions in her own home, faced with her parents’ denial.

Here are some principles to keep in mind as you talk with children:

1. There is no one typical reaction one can or should expect from children.
Their responses will vary all over the ‘emotional’ map, from seeming disinterest to nightmares, eating issues, and anxiety. How any specific child will respond will depend on their age, previous experience with death and loss, and their personality style. Fearful children will tend to worry; quiet children may keep their feelings to themselves; those who want to appear unfazed may exhibit a sense of bravado or lack of caring. Of course, children directly affected – those who had a family member die; those who witnessed the tragedy; those who had friends die – will tend to have longer-term reactions and needs. Watch for changes in behavior, or concerning trends. While it would be normal to have heightened anxiety and sleeplessness, any concerning behavior or troubling symptoms should be taken seriously, and if warranted, professional help sought.

2. Many children will have an increased sense of fear about their safety.
Understandably. So will many adults. After a shooting at an Oregon mall in December 2012, the news outlets were filled with people who said they’d never take their children there again. Others said they’d return as soon as it opened in order to support the stores and employees who had experienced the traumatic events, and whose livelihoods were going to suffer as a result of the several day closure. Some runners in the Boston Marathon vowed to return; others said they would never do so again.

While we can’t guarantee to our children that nothing bad will ever happen to them, we can provide assurance that these events are relatively rare, and that we will do everything we can to keep them safe. Children may have many questions about the events, particularly about natural disasters. Answer their questions with language that fits their developmental stage. It’s okay if you don’t know the answer to a question. If it’s a question that might have an answer, offer to look up more information. You can also ask children what they think the answer is as they often have thoughts and ideas they want to share with you. In the case of natural disasters, if your child is fearful of something like that happening in your community, talk with them about the safety plan that you have in place for your family and home. You can also look into what community safety measures are in place and whatever elements are relevant with your children. Many children will be reassured knowing that there are specific, tangible things they and your family can do if something occurs. Some examples include, picking a meeting place, keeping flashlights in every bedroom, talking about where you will keep emergency water and food.

3. Children want, need, and deserve the truth.
In over 30 years of providing grief support to thousands of children and teens at The Dougy Center for Grieving Children & Families, we have never heard a child say, “I’m glad I was lied to.” Many, however, struggle with anger and lack of trust toward parents or other adults who lied to them. When we don’t tell the truth, they learn that we cannot be trusted. As difficult as it can be at times, and as horrendous as the truth may be, children want, need, and deserve the truth. Being able to talk openly and honestly with your children about tragic events and other losses, creates a foundation of trust, enabling them to come to you in the future with their questions, fears, and concerns.

 

 

Daniel Tiger

Helping Children with Tragic Events in the News

In times of community or world-wide crisis, it’s easy to assume that young children don’t know what’s going on. But one thing’s for sure — children are very sensitive to how their parents feel. They’re keenly aware of the expressions on their parents’ faces and the tone of their voices. Children can sense when their parents are really worried, whether they’re watching the news or talking about it with others. No matter what children know about a “crisis,” it’s especially scary for children to realize that their parents are scared.

Some Scary, Confusing Images

The way that news is presented on television can be quite confusing for a young child. The same video segment may be shown over and over again through the day, as if each showing was a different event. Someone who has died turns up alive and then dies again and again. Children often become very anxious since they don’t understand much about videotape replays, closeups, and camera angles. Any televised danger seems close to home to them because the tragic scenes are taking place on the TV set in their own living room. Children can’t tell the difference between what’s close and what’s far away, what’s real and what’s pretend, or what’s new and what’s re-run.

The younger the children are, the more likely they are to be interested in scenes of close-up faces, particularly if the people are expressing some strong feelings. When there’s tragic news, the images on TV are most often much too graphic and disturbing for young children.

“Who will take care of me?”

In times of crisis, children want to know, “Who will take care of me?” They’re dependent on adults for their survival and security. They’re naturally self-centered. They need to hear very clearly that their parents are doing all they can to take care of them and to keep them safe. They also need to hear that people in the government and other grown-ups they don’t even know are working hard to keep them safe, too.

Helping Children Feel More Secure

Play is one of the important ways young children have of dealing with their concerns. Of course, playing about violent news can be scary and sometimes unsafe, so adults need to be nearby to help redirect that kind of play into nurturing themes, such as a hospital for the wounded or a pretend meal for emergency workers.

When children are scared and anxious, they might become more dependent, clingy, and afraid to go to bed at night. Whining, aggressive behavior, or toilet “accidents” may be their way of asking for more comfort from the important adults in their lives. Little by little, as the adults around them become more confident, hopeful and secure, our children probably will, too.

Turn Off the TV

When there’s something tragic in the news, many parents get concerned about what and how to tell their children. It’s even harder than usual if we’re struggling with our own powerful feelings about what has happened. Adults are sometimes surprised that their own reactions to a televised crisis are so strong, but great loss and devastation in the news often reawaken our own earlier losses and fears – even some we think we might have “forgotten”

It’s easy to allow ourselves to get drawn into watching televised news of a crisis for hours and hours; however, exposing ourselves to so many tragedies can make us feel hopeless, insecure, and even depressed. We help our children and ourselves if we’re able to limit our own television viewing. Our children need us to spend time with them – away from the frightening images on the screen.

Talking and Listening

Even if we wanted to, it would be impossible to give our children all the reasons for such things as war, terrorists, abuse, murders, major fires, hurricanes, and earthquakes. If they ask questions, our best answer may be to ask them, “What do you think happened?” If the answer is “I don’t know,” then the simplest reply might be something like, “I’m sad about the news, and I’m worried. But I love you, and I’m here to care for you.”

If we don’t let children know it’s okay to feel sad and scared, they may think something is wrong with them when they do feel that way. They certainly don’t need to hear all the details of what’s making us sad or scared, but if we can help them accept their own feelings as natural and normal, their feelings will be much more manageable for them.

Angry feelings are part of being human, especially when we feel powerless. One of the most important messages we can give our children is, “It’s okay to be angry, but it’s not okay to hurt ourselves or others.” Besides giving children the right to their anger, we can help them find constructive things to do with their feelings. This way, we’ll be giving them useful tools that will serve them all their life, and help them to become the worlds’ future peacemakers — the world’s future “helpers.”

Helpful Hints

  • Do your best to keep the television off, or at least limit how much your child sees of any news event.
  • Try to keep yourself calm. Your presence can help your child feel more secure.
  • Give your child extra comfort and physical affection, like hugs or snuggling up together with a favorite book. Physical comfort goes a long way towards providing inner security. That closeness can nourish you, too.
  • Try to keep regular routines as normal as possible. Children and adults count on their familiar pattern of everyday life.
  • Plan something that you and your child enjoy doing together, like taking a walk, going on a picnic, having some quiet time, or doing something silly. It can help to know there are simple things in life that can help us feel better, in good times and in bad.
  • Even if children don’t mention what they’ve seen or heard in the news, it can help to ask what they think has happened. If parents don’t bring up the subject, children can be left with their misinterpretations. You may be really surprised at how much your child has heard from others.
  • Focus attention on the helpers, like the police, firemen, doctors, nurses, paramedics, and volunteers. It’s reassuring to know there are many caring people who are doing all they can to help others in this world.
  • Let your child know if you’re making a donation, going to a town meeting, writing a letter or e-mail of support, or taking some other action. It can help children to know that adults take many different active roles and that we don’t give in to helplessness in times of worldwide crisis.

 

03 – Job / Career Fairs, Events, Openings and Internships – Peer Support, Recovery & Wellness
May 23 all-day

 

 

 

 

 

JOB / CAREER FAIRS, EVENTS, OPENINGS, AND INTERNSHIPS 2024

Peer Support, Recovery & Wellness

NOTE: Information here is provided solely as a courtesy without any guarantees or warranties or liability of any kind whatsoever.  Use at your own risk and expense.

If you learn of any opportunities not listed here, please share via social media or email: webmail@peergalaxy.com.

NW Instituto Latino

We are hiring! We are seeking Bilingual Recovery Center Support Staff in Washington County! Please send a cover letter & resume to dmichael@nwilpdx.com

¡Estamos contratando! ¡Estamos buscando un Personal de Apoyo Bilingüe para El Centro de Recuperación en el condado de Washington! Envíe una carta de presentación y un currículum a dmichael@nwilpdx.com

We are hiring! We are seeking Bilingual Recovery Center Support Staff in Washington County! Please send a cover letter & resume to dmichael@nwilpdx.com

Position Description Recovery Center Support Staff

Position Description Mentor Job Description

MHAAO – Mental Health and Addiction Association of Oregon is recruiting for several positions.  For more details visit the link below:

* MHAAO Careers

Oregon Peer Warmline / CCS – Community Counseling Solutions

* CCS Job Openings Page

Folktime

FOLKTIME Career Page

Multnomah County Crisis Assessment & Treatment Center (CATC)

* Telecare CATC Overview

Telecare CATC Careers

Lines for Life:

Lines for Life – Jobs Page

JOB BOARDS

MHACCBO – Mental Health and Addictions Certification Credentialing Board of Oregon

MHACCBO Job Board

State of Oregon

* State of Oregon – Jobs Page

Partners in Diversity

Jobs Board

Indeed.com

Job Board for Peer Support Specialist positions

Job Board for Certified Recovery Mentor positions

MAC’S LIST features many nonprofit opportunities

MAC’S List

04 – Jobs/Career Fairs, Events, Openings and Internships – 2024 @ Application Instructions Provided
May 23 all-day

 

 

 

 

 

 

JOB / CAREER FAIRS, EVENTS, OPENINGS, AND INTERNSHIPS 2024

Peer Support, Recovery & Wellness

NOTE: Information here is provided solely as a courtesy without any guarantees or warranties or liability of any kind whatsoever.  Use at your own risk and expense.

If you learn of any opportunities not listed here, please share via social media or email: webmail@peergalaxy.com.

NW Instituto Latino

We are hiring! We are seeking Bilingual Recovery Center Support Staff in Washington County! Please send a cover letter & resume to dmichael@nwilpdx.com

¡Estamos contratando! ¡Estamos buscando un Personal de Apoyo Bilingüe para El Centro de Recuperación en el condado de Washington! Envíe una carta de presentación y un currículum a dmichael@nwilpdx.com

We are hiring! We are seeking Bilingual Recovery Center Support Staff in Washington County! Please send a cover letter & resume to dmichael@nwilpdx.com

Position Description Recovery Center Support Staff

Position Description Mentor Job Description

MHAAO – Mental Health and Addiction Association of Oregon is recruiting for several positions.  For more details visit the link below:

* MHAAO Careers

Oregon Peer Warmline / CCS – Community Counseling Solutions

* CCS Job Openings Page

Folktime

* FOLKTIME Career Page

Multnomah County Crisis Assessment & Treatment Center (CATC)

Telecare CATC Overview

Telecare CATC Careers

Lines for Life:

* Lines for Life – Jobs Page

JOB BOARDS

MHACCBO – Mental Health and Addictions Certification Credentialing Board of Oregon

MHACCBO Job Board

State of Oregon

* State of Oregon – Jobs Page

Partners in Diversity

Jobs Board

Indeed.com

Job Board for Peer Support Specialist positions

Job Board for Certified Recovery Mentor positions

MAC’S LIST features many nonprofit opportunities

MAC’S List

04 – Resources – AKIDSCO – A Kids Book About School Shootings – Free
May 23 all-day

A Kids Book About School Shootings

Crystal Woodman Miller

Many of us are going to need to find the words to talk to the kids in our lives about tragic events like the school shooting in Uvalde, Texas. Here’s a free resource from A Kids Company About to help you do that was written by Crystal Woodman-Miller, one of the survivors of the Columbine school shooting.

I hate that we need tools like this. I can’t wait for us to have to write the book “A Kids Book About Why It’s So Hard To Buy A Gun”

Link: www.akidsco.com

There aren’t enough words to explain all the thoughts, emotions, and heartbreak that comes with yesterday’s tragedy in Uvalde. We hope this book helps everyone start somewhere.

We’re making #AKidsBookAboutSchoolShootings free for kids, grownups, and educators everywhere, so that this conversation can get started when it matters most.

FREE DOWNLOAD

A Kids Book About School Shootings by Crystal Woodman Miller:

Link: akidsco.com

 

04 – Resources – APH – American Printing House for the Blind – VisionAware – Visual Impairment Information Service
May 23 all-day

 

 

 

 

VisionAware

Are you or a family member having difficulty seeing? Or perhaps been diagnosed with an eye condition such as macular degeneration, cataracts, glaucoma, or diabetic retinopathy? If the answer is yes, you’re not alone: vision problems affect 25 million Americans, and they are on the rise.

VisionAware is a free, easy-to-use informational service for adults who are blind or have low vision, their families, caregivers, healthcare providers, and social service professionals. Visitors will find tips and resources on living with blindness or low vision; information on eye diseases and disorders; and a searchable, free Directory of Services.

man getting an eye exam

Eye Conditions

Some changes in vision are normal as we grow older. This section of our website can help you understand these vision changes, alert you to abnormal changes in vision, and […]

READ MORE

Man sitting on park bench with white cane holding his phone

Recreation and Leisure

From crafts, woodworking, traveling, and reading to sports and exercise, this section is full of information on the variety of activities people who are blind or low vision can engage […]

READ MORE

Person using a refreshable braille display.

Products and Technology

Discover low and high-tech solutions enabling independence at home and work, connection with friends and family, and enjoyment of hobbies and leisure activities.

READ MORE

Professionals in scrubs talking

Professionals

Find resources and techniques you can use to serve people who are blind or low vision effectively and safely, and learn key information about the impact of aging and vision […]

READ MORE

Older man wearing eyeglasses surrounded by family of various ages

Families and Friends

Do you know someone (parent or family member, neighbor, or friend) having trouble seeing? You may be wondering about blindness/ low vision and how to talk with them about it. […]

READ MORE

Woman sitting in kitchen reading braille.

Living with Blindness or Low Vision

If you are new to blindness or low vision, take the journey one day and one step at a time. Utilize our tips for adjusting to vision changes, living independently, […]

Read More

04 – Resources – Autism Resources, Articles, Support
May 23 all-day
04 - Resources - Autism Resources, Articles, Support

 

 

 

 

What is Autism?

What you should know

Autism is a severe developmental disorder that affects the way a child sees and interacts with the rest of the world. It limits their ability to interact with others socially, in fact many autism suffers avoid human contact.

Autism is part of a larger group of disorders called pervasive developmental disorders (PDD). More information about autism: Click on each of these links

 

Autism-Definition

Autism is a developmental disability that comes from a neurological disorder that affects the normal functioning of the brain. It is characterized by the abnormal development of communication skills, social skills, and reasoning. Males are affected four times as often as females. Children may appear normal until around the age of 30 months.

 

Click each of these following titles learn more….

Autism Symptoms

Autism Symptoms vary widely in severity, include impairment in social interaction, fixation on inanimate objects, inability to communicate normally, and resistance to changes in daily routine. Characteristic traits include lack of eye contact, repetition of words or phrases, unmotivated tantrums, inability to express needs verbally, and insensitivity to pain.

Behaviors may change over time. Autistic children often have other disorders of brain function; about two thirds are mentally retarded; over one quarter develop seizures.

What Autism is Not

Autism can be confused with several other disorders which may have similar behaviors. Here is a list of autism like disorders that you should look at.

What Causes Autism

It remains unclear, but a psychological one has been ruled out. Neurological studies seem to indicate a primary brain dysfunction, and a genetic component is suggested by a pattern of autism in some families. It is largely believed that autism is a genetic disorder that involves several genes related to gene function. However it is unclear to researchers what causes these genes to turn on. Learn more about other causes of autism.

Autism Research

There are many exciting developments in autism research going on at the top universities. They are focusing on inherited autism and autism gene research.

Other Autism Spectrum Disorders

Asperger’s Syndrome – A child with asperger’s disorder has the same common problems as children with autism however they don’t have language development problems of a autistic child.

Pervasive Developmental Disorder and not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) – This child has autism but doesn’t meet the criteria for high functioning autism.

High-Functioning Autism – This child has autism but has normal learning and cognitive and learning skills. Language development is difficult initially but they become proficient eventually.

 

FAQ about Autism Special Education and IEP

This is an important list of questions and answers to help you deal with special education issues at your school.

 

Autism Tips for working with Teachers

This is a great check list of items to be aware of when you work with your child’s teacher and your child’s Individual Education Plan.

Tip: Go to our Autism education discussion boards and post a question with other parents.

Early Origins of Autism

 

ADDITIONAL LINKS TO RESOURCES AND EXPERTISE

Ask an Expert on Autism

Health Finder

Talk to Autism Expert

National Institutes of Mental Health

Combined Health Information Database

Abstracts on Autism

 

 

Searchable Directory of Autism Resources

CLICK HERE TO VISIT THE DIRECTORY PAGE 

Or Click on the Topic area directly below

Adult Resources

Attorneys & Advocates

Behavior/Family Training

Community Living

Education

Medical Providers/Diagnosis

Non-English Resources

Respite Care Providers

Safety

Sports & Camps

Therapy Providers

 

Autism NOW Center’s fact sheets on topics of importance to people with autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disabilities are a resource you and your family members, as well as educators, employers, physicians and others, can use to get information in an easy-to-read and understand format.  The fact sheets are available in several languages in PDF form which can be printed out for your convenience. See the full list of topics and language choices below.

English:

Spanish:

Find the resources you need 1-885-828-847

 

Article Links

Follow this page link for listings of over 800 articles and resources

https://autismnow.org/resources/

Interagency Autism Coordination Committee

 

About Autism

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disability that is estimated to affect about 1 in 36 children and approximately 2.21% of adults. Autism affects the way a person experiences the world and can result in significant challenges in social communication and interaction, as well as repetitive behaviors and unusual or intense interests.

People on the autism spectrum often have a strong preference for routines and predictability, and some are challenged in adapting to change. Many people on the autism spectrum experience sensory differences, including high or low sensitivity to sounds, light, textures, tastes, and physical touch. Some have accompanying language and/or intellectual disabilities, and some may be intellectually gifted or possess other unique abilities, talents, or strengths.

ASD can be diagnosed at any age, but differences generally appear in the first two years of life. ASD is known as a “spectrum” condition because it encompasses a wide variation in the type, combination, and severity of disabilities, as a well as a range of unique abilities and strengths, many of which can change over the course of a person’s lifespan. The type and intensity of supports and services that a child or adult on the autism spectrum may require, ranging from minimal to intensive, will vary depending on their unique needs.

With appropriate supports and an environment that promotes inclusion, acceptance, and empowerment, people on the autism spectrum can fully participate in community life and achieve their full potential.

This page includes resources that provide general information about autism.

 

Websites and Programs

The Autistic Self Advocacy Network was created by autistic people and for autistic people. This page provides an overview of typical characteristics of autism.

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

This tool kit provides families of children ages four and under with guidance on how to access services the first 100 days after an autism diagnosis.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

March 2020

This report from provides an overview of 2016 data collected by the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network and Early ADDM. ADDM provides estimates of the prevalence of ASD among 8-year-old children. Early ADDM estimates ASD prevalence and monitors early identification of 4-year-old children. Full findings of the data on 8-year-old and 4-year-old children are available.

March 2020

The CDC released their first estimate of the prevalence of autism in adults based on 2017 data. They estimated that 2.21 percent of adults in the United States have ASD.

More Reports

Videos

April 24, 2019

NIMH Director Joshua Gordon, M.D., Ph.D. interviews Ann Wagner, Ph.D., National Autism Coordinator, and Lisa Gilotty, Ph.D., program chief of NIMH’s chief of NIMH’s Research Program on Autism Spectrum Disorders, to discuss advances on the study of autism in adulthood.

 

Federal Departments and Agencies

This list includes federal departments and agencies that provide funding, programs, and support for issues related to autism and other developmental disabilities.

Independent Agencies

  • National Council on Disability (NCD)
    • Meetings and Events The NCD is an independent federal agency that advises the President, Congress, and other federal agencies on policies, programs, practices, and procedures that affect people with disabilities. Their meetings are open to the public.
    • Resources This page includes information on disability rights and links to resources and services on education, employment, financial assistance and incentives, health care, housing, and more.
  • National Science Foundation (NSF)
    • About NSF The NSF is an independent federal agency that supports fundamental research and education in all non-medical fields of science and engineering.
  • Social Security Administration (SSA)
    • Disability Benefits The Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability programs provide assistance to people with disabilities. This page explains these benefits and the application process.
    • Spotlight on Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Accounts Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (ABLE) allows individuals with disabilities to make tax-free saving accounts to cover qualified disability expenses. Individuals can save up to $100,000 without counting against their Supplemental Security Income (SSI) eligibility.

Transition from youth to adulthood

Websites and Programs

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

ASAN partnered with the Family Network on Disabilities to produce this guide, which prepares transition age youth for adulthood. The first half provides information on preparing for transition and the second half gives in-depth information on post-secondary education, employment, housing and independent living, and healthcare.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

March 22, 2018

This report examines guardianship and makes recommendations for its use. Recommendations are based on disability law and policy, how people with disabilities are treated in the legal system, alternatives to guardianship, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

March 13, 2019

This report describes the demographics, disability, education, and health characteristics of teens and young adults ages 12-23 on the autism spectrum.

More Reports

Research Articles

More Research Articles

Videos

March 23, 2020

This webinar provided information about supports and resources to improve access to competitive, integrated employment for youth and young adults on the autism spectrum and enhance their career pathways.

 

 

Employment

National data has shown that many autistic adults are unemployed or underemployed, even when compared to people with other disabilities and in spite of having needed skills and abilities for the workplace. Researchers and policy makers have worked to develop programs that can increase opportunities for employment and improve employment outcomes. This includes job training and recruitment programs, as well as supports for employees and employers to increase retention and success in the workplace. This page provides information related to employment for people with autism and other disabilities.

Websites and Programs

This program helps public and private sectors recruit, hire, train, and retain job seekers with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

This plain language toolkit explains the existing policies that help people with disabilities people find and keep good jobs, and solve employment problems.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

October 9, 2018

Of the 74 state vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies that responded to GAO’s survey, most reported expanding services to help students with disabilities transition from school to work as required under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), enacted in July 2014. Most state agencies reported serving more students and providing work-based learning experiences and other activities.

May 12, 2020

Researchers analyzed Rehabilitation Services Administration data to determine the association of vocational rehabilitation services with employment outcomes for students ages 16-21. Students with autism were less likely to receive job-related services less than comparison groups.

More Reports

Research Articles

More Research Articles

Videos

March 23, 2020

In this webinar, Scott Michael Robertson Ph.D. provides information about government supports and resources that help youth and young adults with autism access competitive, integrated employment and enhance their careers. Full Transition Aged Youth Webinar Series.

Housing

Housing plays an important role in ensuring the well being of people on the autism spectrum and helping them integrate into the community. Some people can live independently with minimal or no supports, while others require high levels of support. There is a variety of federal and private resources that can enable people to live in settings that best fit their needs. This page provides information about models of housing for people with disabilities and resources and programs related to disability housing.

Websites and Programs

  • Medicaid.Gov
    • Home & Community Based Services This page provides information on Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) regulations. The page includes a training series for stakeholders, transition plans for individual states, technical assistance, and more. The Final Regulation page provides an overview of rules and regulations states must follow when providing HCBS under Medicaid.
  • The Arc
    • Housing Overview This page provides an overview of housing issues that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) encounter as well the Arc’s advocacy efforts. The page also describes key federal housing initiatives that enable people with I/DD to live in the community and links to additional resources.

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

This handbook is designed to help people with disabilities find and use resources that promote independent living. It includes information on support services and waivers, housing, employment, and community resources. This handbook was created in partnership with Autism NOW Center.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

May 24, 2019

This report that examines occurrences of institutionalization of people with disabilities, as well as thwarted threats of institutionalization, during hurricanes and the California wildfires in 2017 and 2018. The NCD found that people with disabilities are frequently institutionalized during and after disasters due to conflicting federal guidance; a lack of equal access to emergency and disaster-related programs and services; and a lack of compliance with federal law.

June 2018

The Residential Information Systems Project (RISP) studies trends in residential service settings, funding, and expenditures for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the United States. The most recent report uses data through Fiscal Year 2016.

More Reports

Research Articles

More Research Articles

Videos

July 23, 2019

This workshop focused on the housing needs of people on the autism spectrum and included examples of various housing models. Meeting details.

July 26, 2017

JaLynn Prince, Adrienne McBride, and Desiree Kameka present Madison House Autism Foundation’s Autism After 21 initiative. Madison House aims to raise awareness of the abilities of and issues facing adults with autism. They also promote housing options for adults with autism and other I/DD through the Autism Housing Network. Meeting details.

 

For Service Providers and Public Services

Unlocking Potential: Innovative Library Programs Enhancing the Lives of Autistic Individuals

http://librarysciencedegreesonline.org/libraries-and-autism/

 

Making Entertainment and Public Spaces More Autistim-Friendly

https://happiful.com/making-entertainment-and-public-spaces-more-autistic-friendly

 

 

04 – Resources – BHRN – Behavioral Health Resource Network – Free Passes Peer Support & Recovery
May 23 all-day

 

 

Behavioral Health Resource Network

Per Measure 110 Funding through the Oregon Health Authority, each of the Oregon 36 Counties across the state has at least one BHRN service network, plus there is an Oregon Tribe BHRN.

Follow this link got more information about Measure 110 and BHRN: https://www.oregon.gov/oha/hsd/amh/pages/measure110.aspx

Each BHRN network has 1 or more community partners to ensure access to services for SUD – Substance Use Disorder recovery.

Each BHRN network provides trauma-informed, culturally specific and linguistically responsive services. Services include but are not limited to:

    Screening for health and social service needs.
    Screening and referral for substance use disorder.
    Access to an individualized intervention plan.
    Case management.
    Low-barrier substance use disorder treatment.
    Harm reduction services.
    Peer-supported services.
    Housing.
    Mobile and virtual outreach.
    Referral to appropriate outside services.

BHRN programs and services in Oregon are contracted through June 30th, 2025.

To access BHRN Programs and Services, use the Oregon BHRN Maps Page.

These maps offer Information about the BRHNs, the Partner Organizations, their Service Offerings specific to each BHRN, and additional insights..

04 – Resources – BROR – Bridges Oregon – Hard of Hearing – Resources
May 23 all-day
04 - Resources - BROR - Bridges Oregon - Hard of Hearing  - Resources

 

Bridges Oregon

Hard of Hearing

RESOURCES

Bridges Oregon, Inc. is a nonprofit organization serving Oregonians who are Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing or face other communication barriers. It is in our mission to facilitate equity and inclusiveness and to provide a bridge to opportunities through advocacy, education and communication.

Advocacy

  • Victims’ Rights Pocket Cards (link)
  • Civil Rights Fact Sheet (link)

American Sign Language (ASL)

  • Portland Community College ASL Studies (link)
  • Sign Class (link)
  • Western Oregon University ASL Studies (link)

Children

  • Position Statement on Improving Child Protection Services for Families with Deaf Individuals (