PeerGalaxy Original Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring over 187,600+ monthly offerings of FREE telephone- and online-accessible peer support, recovery support, and wellness activities!  Plus 50+ warmlines, helplines, chatlines, and hotlines.  Plus workshops, webinars, job postings, resources, observances, special events, consumer input opportunities and more.

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

Click the Accessibility Button on the right side, halfway down in the middle, for enhanced viewing and/or access options!  Click the Translate Button in the lower left corner for language options. 

Your use of this site is subject to the Privacy Policy, Terms and Conditions of Use.

If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

7

Training Opportunities in July 2020
List Provided Courtesy of State of Oregon, Oregon Health Authority
Click here to download PDF Format, 16 pages

Calendar Event Sorting

At the top, the 24/7/365 SAMHSA Disaster Helpline and similar links.

Next, Bundled “All Day” Events

Some organizations (like 12 step recovery programs, AA, NA, AlAnon, etc.) have so many events happening throughout the day that they need to be in a bundled listing to spare endless scrolling.  Often there is a link to look up events by zip code and other criteria.

Lastly, Time-Specific Events

So you can see what’s happening in the next hours, time specific events are tagged and listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  There can be events and warmlines operating in different time zones, though we try to list all in Oregon’s Pacific Time Zone.

Page Advancement

The calendar displays ~50 listings per page.  To advance to next page with ~50 more listings, click the right arrow in the lower left corner of the calendar


Screenshot image of the page advancing arrows at the bottom of the calendar, lower left corner.
Jul
24
Wed
2024
01 – Helpline – NCPG – National Council on Problem Gaming – National Problem Gaming Chatline @ ncpgambling.org/chat – 24/7 @ Online Via Chat
Jul 24 all-day
01 - Helpline - NCPG - National Council on Problem Gaming - National Problem Gaming Chatline @ ncpgambling.org/chat - 24/7 @ Online Via Chat

 

National Problem Gambling Helpline

Chatline

www.ncpgambling.org/chat

Click the link below to chat with a helpline specialist.

Free, confidential and available 24/7. Works in all 50 states.

Online. Click here to enter.

Below are state helpline text/chat numbers. Hyperlinked items with take you directly to their contact page:

Arizona: Text NEXTSTEP to 53342

California: Text SUPPORT to 53342

Connecticut: Text CTGAMB to 53342

Illinois:  Text ILGAMB to 53342

Indiana: Text INGAMBÂto 53342

Minnesota: Text HOPE to 53342

Mississippi: Text to MSGAMB 53342

North Carolina:  Text MORETHANAGAMENC 53342

If you would like to call the National Problem Gambling Helpline, dial 1-800-522-4700

If you would like to text the helpline, text 1-800-522-4700.

NCPG also supports GamTalk, a 24/7 moderated online peer support forum, www.gamtalk.org.

 

CGAA – Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous – Support Meetings, Support Chat for Family and Friends, Resources – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online Via ZOOM
Jul 24 all-day

 

Who We Are

Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous is a fellowship of people who support each other in recovering from the problems resulting from excessive game playing. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop video gaming, which is completely up to you. CGAA has no dues or fees. Our groups share their collective experience and the principles that helped them, but CGAA has no experts, hierarchy, or required beliefs. We have etiquette and traditions, but no strict rules.
If you are struggling with compulsive gaming, leave your contact info at 970-364-3497 and a CGAA member will call you back
Or email us at helpline@cgaa.info
For other issues, contact us at support@cgaa.info

 

ZOOM MEETINGS

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 
ZOOM MEETING

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 

Gamers Find A Local Support Group

Use the link below to get more information about local groups and a notification when a local meeting is started. Due to the COVID pandemic, most meetings are currently held in an outdoor setting or online.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LOCAL GROUP FINDER TOOL

 

CONTACT GROUPS IN OREGON BY LOCATION

 

 

SUPPORT FOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS

What Can I Do?

Video gaming is a common pastime. To many people, it is surprising that it can become a serious addiction, that is, an activity that is engaged in compulsively, without control or concern for consequences.

Video gaming addiction is a very serious problem that is harmful to everyone it touches. Since everyone involved suffers from it, everyone involved needs some help. Here are some important things to know.

First, no one is responsible for someone else’s compulsive gaming. As the Al-Anon slogan goes, “I didn’t cause it, I can’t control it, and I can’t cure it.”

You didn’t cause it.

Some people partly blame themselves for the dysfunctional behavior of their family members, particularly with addicts who are very quick to shift responsibility off themselves and blame others. Perhaps you played games with your loved one, purchased games, or encouraged it, thinking it was a harmless leisure activity. Maybe you’ve been involved in some conflict and wonder if that has driven him or her to hide away in gaming. But no one is responsible for another person’s behavior or mental disorders.

You can’t control it.

You may have already tried to talk to your friend or family member. Perhaps you have bargained with them, or given ultimatums. You have tried to help them see what damage they are doing to themselves and others. And none of it has worked. This is baffling to you. Why don’t they seem to understand or care? Why can’t they see what is obvious to you? This is actually a symptom of the disease of addiction, one that destines efforts for control to failure.

You can’t cure it.

We all would like to believe that we have the ability to help those we love. We often think that if we can just get the right information, figure out the right thing to say or do, perhaps change something about ourselves, we can fix the problem. People should be able to solve their own problems. Why can’t we do that with this one? There is a simple reason. There is no cure for addiction. It requires treatment. The recovery process is long and difficult. And there is only one person who can start that process, the one who is gaming compulsively. There are things you can do. Here are some suggestions that you may want to consider, that other family members and friends have found helpful.

Get information.

The literature of recovery fellowships for family and friends of addicts (such as Al-Anon) has much helpful guidance, some of which is available online as well. There are people who have been in situations very similar to yours, who have learned much from them, and who are willing to share the lessons learned, their experience, strength and hope. We hope you avail yourself of such resources.

Detach with love.

Putting energy into arguing with someone who is playing compulsively will not help either of you. Your loved one has a serious problem that you are powerless to control or cure, and that they will not get help until they want it. As much as you love someone, you cannot force this process on another person.

Stop enabling.

Paradoxically, at the same time people are arguing with, bargaining with or shaming a compulsive gamer, they are often (perhaps without realizing it) supporting the addiction in many ways. Anything that shields an addict from the consequences of his or her behavior is enabling, and can include such basic things as providing food, shelter, money, companionship, housekeeping, and covering for employment and legal difficulties. Helping a compulsive gamer keep up an appearance of normalcy is helping him or her continue in the destructive behavior. While you cannot change him or her, you can make changes for yourself. You can shift your energy away from enabling behaviors and toward meeting your own needs.

Take care of yourself.

Whether or not your loved one ever stops gaming, you deserve to have a healthy and happy life. Once you have accepted that you are powerless over their gaming behavior, you can begin to focus on what you can do for yourself, to accomplish your own goals. With the help of others who have been where you are, you can learn to set healthy boundaries and stick to them.

Join our WhatsApp Chat Site for Family and Friends!

Game-Anon

WhatsApp Group Invite

Visit whatsapp.com/dl on your mobile phone to install.

By installing WhatsApp, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

 

Chat Using A Macintosh

 

Mac OS X 10.10 and higher. WhatsApp must be installed on your phone.

By clicking the Download button, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

DOWNLOAD FOR MAC OS X

Download for Windows 8 and higher (64-bit)
Download for Windows 8 and higher (32-bit)

 

 


Things To Do Instead of Gaming

One of the things we were trying to do with our gaming was meet some basic needs. If we do not meet those needs in normal healthy ways, we will suffer much stronger urges to game again. Some basic needs to cover are social needs, self expression, creativity, a sense of challenge and accomplishment, stress relief, a sense of purpose and meaning, and a sense of safety through control and predictability.

Here are some ideas for activities that will help meet these needs, reduce cravings, help with recovery from addiction, and fill some of the hours freed from compulsive gaming.

Please don’t let the length of this list overwhelm you. The idea is not to start ten new things and try to change everything all at once. We seek small bits of progress, not perfection. A good place to start is to put first things first. What need is currently most important? What’s right in front of me? What opportunity has come my way recently? If we take steps of small improvement with one or two areas each day, we are moving in the right direction.

 

Stress Relief

  • Talking with a sponsor or recovery buddy, CGAA meetings, or step work
  • Getting outside for fresh air and sunlight by taking a walk or doing some outdoor work
  • Meditation, coloring, craft work, journaling, or reading
 

Sense of safety through freedom, control, and predictability

  • Goal setting
  • Counseling or psychotherapy
  • Home organization, renovation, or spring cleaning
 

Sense of purpose, meaning, and self-respect

  • Supporting and growing the larger CGAA fellowship through service work like helping run a meeting, starting a local meeting, doing outreach to professionals, or attending CGAA business meetings
  • Attending a spiritual group like meditation, yoga, spiritual retreat, or religious gathering
  • Doing volunteer work like teaching, helping others, animal care, or building community places
  • Caring for a pet, house plants, or garden
 

Social needs

  • Attending CGAA meetings, connecting outside of meetings, reaching out to newcomers, or calling someone
  • Joining a hobby group like theater, a hiking group, art workshop, book club, public speaking, board games or card game group
  • Hosting a fun event like board games night or karaoke
  • Playing team sports, taking up martial arts, or playing one-on-one sports
  • Going to fun events like concerts, dances, or events on meetup.com
  • Calling up, video conferencing, or visiting with friends, family, neighbors, or other communities
 

Self expression and creativity

  • Journaling, opening up to a CGAA sponsor, or sharing openly in a meeting
  • Art work like drawing, photography, sculpting, or creative writing
  • Performance art like theater, singing, playing music, or writing music
 

Sense of challenge and accomplishment

  • Working the steps with a sponsor
  • Crafts like woodworking, origami, knitting
  • Outdoor activities like gardening, geocaching, bird watching, star gazing, tracking, plant identification, survival skills, or boating
  • Learning something like a foreign language, dancing, magic tricks, mechanical repair, cooking, a musical instrument, or computer programming
  • Career goals like getting a new job, starting a business, enrolling in school, or taking classes
 

Reconnection to one’s body and whole self

  • Meditating on breath, sounds, or bodily sensations
  • Exercise like walking, hiking, swimming, cycling, yoga, jogging, going to a gym, or playing a sport

If you are in your first week or two off of games, it’s likely that few of these ideas will appeal to you. That’s normal. Until our minds and bodies have some time to heal, we have low interest, energy, and motivation. This list will probably not give you something that you can plug in place of video games and immediately throw yourself into with the same zeal. This list is meant to help us explore new ways of spending our time, meeting our needs, and connecting with people. Find a few that hold some appeal and try taking some small steps in their direction. If you can’t seem to think of anything fun to do except game, you can come back to this list, find the most appealing thing, and just take a couple of little steps in its direction.

Consider setting reminders for yourself or keeping a schedule of your time and new activities. It is important to appreciate the small victories of exercising willpower, regaining motivation, and socializing. It helps to discuss our progress and the challenges we experience with a CGAA sponsor, recovery buddy, personal counselor, or therapist.

Rediscovering What is Fun

It is normal to think that nothing but gaming sounds fun. For most of us, our years of compulsive gaming warped and narrowed our idea of fun. As small children, it meant almost anything new or interesting or social or even mildly rewarding. Years of pulling the dopamine lever with video games changed our concept of fun to require instant gratification, frequent rewards, clear and constant progress, excitement, intense visuals, control, and/or predictability.

Part of recovery is letting our concept of fun expand back outward to a wide world of possible new challenges and experiences, many of which are calm and subtle compared to video games. It takes time to overcome withdrawals and heal from the damage, but the change does happen if we abstain from all gaming long term and focus on new pursuits and improving our lives. This list has many activities that do not meet the old, narrow, warped idea of “fun,” but those of us who persist at exploring them do find many to be gratifying and enjoyable.

Take, for example, a hike up a mountain. To a group of hikers excited to venture into the wilderness with friends and see wildlife and panoramic views from on high, all while getting a great workout, it’s a ton of fun. To someone who is uninterested in hiking, out of shape, and focused on every little unpleasant aspect of it, it’s a torturous death march. It is exactly the same hike in either case. The difference is in the attitude and conditioning.

The same is true with every item of these lists. Whether or not an activity sounds fun or torturous depends entirely upon attitude and conditioning. Every one of them has the potential to be gratifying and enjoyable if we adopt a positive attitude, try to have fun, and persist at it, especially when we involve friends and like-minded people.

SGS – Support Groups – Internet & Gaming Addiction – Message Board and Support Group – 24/7 @ Register For Details
Jul 24 all-day

 

 

 

Internet & Gaming Addiction

24/7

Our Internet & Gambling Addiction support group provides a safe and compassionate space for individuals struggling with compulsive online behavior and gaming, offering guidance and support on the path towards recovery.

When you create an account you’ll always come back to where you left off. With an account you can also be notified of new replies, save bookmarks, and use likes to thank others. We can all work together to make this community great. heart

Use the link Below to Join

https://supportgroups.com/

About SupportGroups™

SupportGroups.com is a safe, social support network that allows members & therapists to engage in group discussions for everyone involved. Our groups provide support for those dealing with Mental and Physical Health issues, Addiction, Relationships, or their Identity. Our mission is simple: Provide support in a safe online community for everyone who needs it.

 

Jul
25
Thu
2024
01 – Helpline – NCPG – National Council on Problem Gaming – National Problem Gaming Chatline @ ncpgambling.org/chat – 24/7 @ Online Via Chat
Jul 25 all-day
01 - Helpline - NCPG - National Council on Problem Gaming - National Problem Gaming Chatline @ ncpgambling.org/chat - 24/7 @ Online Via Chat

 

National Problem Gambling Helpline

Chatline

www.ncpgambling.org/chat

Click the link below to chat with a helpline specialist.

Free, confidential and available 24/7. Works in all 50 states.

Online. Click here to enter.

Below are state helpline text/chat numbers. Hyperlinked items with take you directly to their contact page:

Arizona: Text NEXTSTEP to 53342

California: Text SUPPORT to 53342

Connecticut: Text CTGAMB to 53342

Illinois:  Text ILGAMB to 53342

Indiana: Text INGAMBÂto 53342

Minnesota: Text HOPE to 53342

Mississippi: Text to MSGAMB 53342

North Carolina:  Text MORETHANAGAMENC 53342

If you would like to call the National Problem Gambling Helpline, dial 1-800-522-4700

If you would like to text the helpline, text 1-800-522-4700.

NCPG also supports GamTalk, a 24/7 moderated online peer support forum, www.gamtalk.org.

 

CGAA – Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous – Support Meetings, Support Chat for Family and Friends, Resources – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online Via ZOOM
Jul 25 all-day

 

Who We Are

Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous is a fellowship of people who support each other in recovering from the problems resulting from excessive game playing. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop video gaming, which is completely up to you. CGAA has no dues or fees. Our groups share their collective experience and the principles that helped them, but CGAA has no experts, hierarchy, or required beliefs. We have etiquette and traditions, but no strict rules.
If you are struggling with compulsive gaming, leave your contact info at 970-364-3497 and a CGAA member will call you back
Or email us at helpline@cgaa.info
For other issues, contact us at support@cgaa.info

 

ZOOM MEETINGS

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 
ZOOM MEETING

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 

Gamers Find A Local Support Group

Use the link below to get more information about local groups and a notification when a local meeting is started. Due to the COVID pandemic, most meetings are currently held in an outdoor setting or online.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LOCAL GROUP FINDER TOOL

 

CONTACT GROUPS IN OREGON BY LOCATION

 

 

SUPPORT FOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS

What Can I Do?

Video gaming is a common pastime. To many people, it is surprising that it can become a serious addiction, that is, an activity that is engaged in compulsively, without control or concern for consequences.

Video gaming addiction is a very serious problem that is harmful to everyone it touches. Since everyone involved suffers from it, everyone involved needs some help. Here are some important things to know.

First, no one is responsible for someone else’s compulsive gaming. As the Al-Anon slogan goes, “I didn’t cause it, I can’t control it, and I can’t cure it.”

You didn’t cause it.

Some people partly blame themselves for the dysfunctional behavior of their family members, particularly with addicts who are very quick to shift responsibility off themselves and blame others. Perhaps you played games with your loved one, purchased games, or encouraged it, thinking it was a harmless leisure activity. Maybe you’ve been involved in some conflict and wonder if that has driven him or her to hide away in gaming. But no one is responsible for another person’s behavior or mental disorders.

You can’t control it.

You may have already tried to talk to your friend or family member. Perhaps you have bargained with them, or given ultimatums. You have tried to help them see what damage they are doing to themselves and others. And none of it has worked. This is baffling to you. Why don’t they seem to understand or care? Why can’t they see what is obvious to you? This is actually a symptom of the disease of addiction, one that destines efforts for control to failure.

You can’t cure it.

We all would like to believe that we have the ability to help those we love. We often think that if we can just get the right information, figure out the right thing to say or do, perhaps change something about ourselves, we can fix the problem. People should be able to solve their own problems. Why can’t we do that with this one? There is a simple reason. There is no cure for addiction. It requires treatment. The recovery process is long and difficult. And there is only one person who can start that process, the one who is gaming compulsively. There are things you can do. Here are some suggestions that you may want to consider, that other family members and friends have found helpful.

Get information.

The literature of recovery fellowships for family and friends of addicts (such as Al-Anon) has much helpful guidance, some of which is available online as well. There are people who have been in situations very similar to yours, who have learned much from them, and who are willing to share the lessons learned, their experience, strength and hope. We hope you avail yourself of such resources.

Detach with love.

Putting energy into arguing with someone who is playing compulsively will not help either of you. Your loved one has a serious problem that you are powerless to control or cure, and that they will not get help until they want it. As much as you love someone, you cannot force this process on another person.

Stop enabling.

Paradoxically, at the same time people are arguing with, bargaining with or shaming a compulsive gamer, they are often (perhaps without realizing it) supporting the addiction in many ways. Anything that shields an addict from the consequences of his or her behavior is enabling, and can include such basic things as providing food, shelter, money, companionship, housekeeping, and covering for employment and legal difficulties. Helping a compulsive gamer keep up an appearance of normalcy is helping him or her continue in the destructive behavior. While you cannot change him or her, you can make changes for yourself. You can shift your energy away from enabling behaviors and toward meeting your own needs.

Take care of yourself.

Whether or not your loved one ever stops gaming, you deserve to have a healthy and happy life. Once you have accepted that you are powerless over their gaming behavior, you can begin to focus on what you can do for yourself, to accomplish your own goals. With the help of others who have been where you are, you can learn to set healthy boundaries and stick to them.

Join our WhatsApp Chat Site for Family and Friends!

Game-Anon

WhatsApp Group Invite

Visit whatsapp.com/dl on your mobile phone to install.

By installing WhatsApp, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

 

Chat Using A Macintosh

 

Mac OS X 10.10 and higher. WhatsApp must be installed on your phone.

By clicking the Download button, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

DOWNLOAD FOR MAC OS X

Download for Windows 8 and higher (64-bit)
Download for Windows 8 and higher (32-bit)

 

 


Things To Do Instead of Gaming

One of the things we were trying to do with our gaming was meet some basic needs. If we do not meet those needs in normal healthy ways, we will suffer much stronger urges to game again. Some basic needs to cover are social needs, self expression, creativity, a sense of challenge and accomplishment, stress relief, a sense of purpose and meaning, and a sense of safety through control and predictability.

Here are some ideas for activities that will help meet these needs, reduce cravings, help with recovery from addiction, and fill some of the hours freed from compulsive gaming.

Please don’t let the length of this list overwhelm you. The idea is not to start ten new things and try to change everything all at once. We seek small bits of progress, not perfection. A good place to start is to put first things first. What need is currently most important? What’s right in front of me? What opportunity has come my way recently? If we take steps of small improvement with one or two areas each day, we are moving in the right direction.

 

Stress Relief

  • Talking with a sponsor or recovery buddy, CGAA meetings, or step work
  • Getting outside for fresh air and sunlight by taking a walk or doing some outdoor work
  • Meditation, coloring, craft work, journaling, or reading
 

Sense of safety through freedom, control, and predictability

  • Goal setting
  • Counseling or psychotherapy
  • Home organization, renovation, or spring cleaning
 

Sense of purpose, meaning, and self-respect

  • Supporting and growing the larger CGAA fellowship through service work like helping run a meeting, starting a local meeting, doing outreach to professionals, or attending CGAA business meetings
  • Attending a spiritual group like meditation, yoga, spiritual retreat, or religious gathering
  • Doing volunteer work like teaching, helping others, animal care, or building community places
  • Caring for a pet, house plants, or garden
 

Social needs

  • Attending CGAA meetings, connecting outside of meetings, reaching out to newcomers, or calling someone
  • Joining a hobby group like theater, a hiking group, art workshop, book club, public speaking, board games or card game group
  • Hosting a fun event like board games night or karaoke
  • Playing team sports, taking up martial arts, or playing one-on-one sports
  • Going to fun events like concerts, dances, or events on meetup.com
  • Calling up, video conferencing, or visiting with friends, family, neighbors, or other communities
 

Self expression and creativity

  • Journaling, opening up to a CGAA sponsor, or sharing openly in a meeting
  • Art work like drawing, photography, sculpting, or creative writing
  • Performance art like theater, singing, playing music, or writing music
 

Sense of challenge and accomplishment

  • Working the steps with a sponsor
  • Crafts like woodworking, origami, knitting
  • Outdoor activities like gardening, geocaching, bird watching, star gazing, tracking, plant identification, survival skills, or boating
  • Learning something like a foreign language, dancing, magic tricks, mechanical repair, cooking, a musical instrument, or computer programming
  • Career goals like getting a new job, starting a business, enrolling in school, or taking classes
 

Reconnection to one’s body and whole self

  • Meditating on breath, sounds, or bodily sensations
  • Exercise like walking, hiking, swimming, cycling, yoga, jogging, going to a gym, or playing a sport

If you are in your first week or two off of games, it’s likely that few of these ideas will appeal to you. That’s normal. Until our minds and bodies have some time to heal, we have low interest, energy, and motivation. This list will probably not give you something that you can plug in place of video games and immediately throw yourself into with the same zeal. This list is meant to help us explore new ways of spending our time, meeting our needs, and connecting with people. Find a few that hold some appeal and try taking some small steps in their direction. If you can’t seem to think of anything fun to do except game, you can come back to this list, find the most appealing thing, and just take a couple of little steps in its direction.

Consider setting reminders for yourself or keeping a schedule of your time and new activities. It is important to appreciate the small victories of exercising willpower, regaining motivation, and socializing. It helps to discuss our progress and the challenges we experience with a CGAA sponsor, recovery buddy, personal counselor, or therapist.

Rediscovering What is Fun

It is normal to think that nothing but gaming sounds fun. For most of us, our years of compulsive gaming warped and narrowed our idea of fun. As small children, it meant almost anything new or interesting or social or even mildly rewarding. Years of pulling the dopamine lever with video games changed our concept of fun to require instant gratification, frequent rewards, clear and constant progress, excitement, intense visuals, control, and/or predictability.

Part of recovery is letting our concept of fun expand back outward to a wide world of possible new challenges and experiences, many of which are calm and subtle compared to video games. It takes time to overcome withdrawals and heal from the damage, but the change does happen if we abstain from all gaming long term and focus on new pursuits and improving our lives. This list has many activities that do not meet the old, narrow, warped idea of “fun,” but those of us who persist at exploring them do find many to be gratifying and enjoyable.

Take, for example, a hike up a mountain. To a group of hikers excited to venture into the wilderness with friends and see wildlife and panoramic views from on high, all while getting a great workout, it’s a ton of fun. To someone who is uninterested in hiking, out of shape, and focused on every little unpleasant aspect of it, it’s a torturous death march. It is exactly the same hike in either case. The difference is in the attitude and conditioning.

The same is true with every item of these lists. Whether or not an activity sounds fun or torturous depends entirely upon attitude and conditioning. Every one of them has the potential to be gratifying and enjoyable if we adopt a positive attitude, try to have fun, and persist at it, especially when we involve friends and like-minded people.

SGS – Support Groups – Internet & Gaming Addiction – Message Board and Support Group – 24/7 @ Register For Details
Jul 25 all-day

 

 

 

Internet & Gaming Addiction

24/7

Our Internet & Gambling Addiction support group provides a safe and compassionate space for individuals struggling with compulsive online behavior and gaming, offering guidance and support on the path towards recovery.

When you create an account you’ll always come back to where you left off. With an account you can also be notified of new replies, save bookmarks, and use likes to thank others. We can all work together to make this community great. heart

Use the link Below to Join

https://supportgroups.com/

About SupportGroups™

SupportGroups.com is a safe, social support network that allows members & therapists to engage in group discussions for everyone involved. Our groups provide support for those dealing with Mental and Physical Health issues, Addiction, Relationships, or their Identity. Our mission is simple: Provide support in a safe online community for everyone who needs it.

 

Jul
26
Fri
2024
01 – Helpline – NCPG – National Council on Problem Gaming – National Problem Gaming Chatline @ ncpgambling.org/chat – 24/7 @ Online Via Chat
Jul 26 all-day
01 - Helpline - NCPG - National Council on Problem Gaming - National Problem Gaming Chatline @ ncpgambling.org/chat - 24/7 @ Online Via Chat

 

National Problem Gambling Helpline

Chatline

www.ncpgambling.org/chat

Click the link below to chat with a helpline specialist.

Free, confidential and available 24/7. Works in all 50 states.

Online. Click here to enter.

Below are state helpline text/chat numbers. Hyperlinked items with take you directly to their contact page:

Arizona: Text NEXTSTEP to 53342

California: Text SUPPORT to 53342

Connecticut: Text CTGAMB to 53342

Illinois:  Text ILGAMB to 53342

Indiana: Text INGAMBÂto 53342

Minnesota: Text HOPE to 53342

Mississippi: Text to MSGAMB 53342

North Carolina:  Text MORETHANAGAMENC 53342

If you would like to call the National Problem Gambling Helpline, dial 1-800-522-4700

If you would like to text the helpline, text 1-800-522-4700.

NCPG also supports GamTalk, a 24/7 moderated online peer support forum, www.gamtalk.org.

 

CGAA – Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous – Support Meetings, Support Chat for Family and Friends, Resources – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online Via ZOOM
Jul 26 all-day

 

Who We Are

Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous is a fellowship of people who support each other in recovering from the problems resulting from excessive game playing. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop video gaming, which is completely up to you. CGAA has no dues or fees. Our groups share their collective experience and the principles that helped them, but CGAA has no experts, hierarchy, or required beliefs. We have etiquette and traditions, but no strict rules.
If you are struggling with compulsive gaming, leave your contact info at 970-364-3497 and a CGAA member will call you back
Or email us at helpline@cgaa.info
For other issues, contact us at support@cgaa.info

 

ZOOM MEETINGS

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 
ZOOM MEETING

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 

Gamers Find A Local Support Group

Use the link below to get more information about local groups and a notification when a local meeting is started. Due to the COVID pandemic, most meetings are currently held in an outdoor setting or online.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LOCAL GROUP FINDER TOOL

 

CONTACT GROUPS IN OREGON BY LOCATION

 

 

SUPPORT FOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS

What Can I Do?

Video gaming is a common pastime. To many people, it is surprising that it can become a serious addiction, that is, an activity that is engaged in compulsively, without control or concern for consequences.

Video gaming addiction is a very serious problem that is harmful to everyone it touches. Since everyone involved suffers from it, everyone involved needs some help. Here are some important things to know.

First, no one is responsible for someone else’s compulsive gaming. As the Al-Anon slogan goes, “I didn’t cause it, I can’t control it, and I can’t cure it.”

You didn’t cause it.

Some people partly blame themselves for the dysfunctional behavior of their family members, particularly with addicts who are very quick to shift responsibility off themselves and blame others. Perhaps you played games with your loved one, purchased games, or encouraged it, thinking it was a harmless leisure activity. Maybe you’ve been involved in some conflict and wonder if that has driven him or her to hide away in gaming. But no one is responsible for another person’s behavior or mental disorders.

You can’t control it.

You may have already tried to talk to your friend or family member. Perhaps you have bargained with them, or given ultimatums. You have tried to help them see what damage they are doing to themselves and others. And none of it has worked. This is baffling to you. Why don’t they seem to understand or care? Why can’t they see what is obvious to you? This is actually a symptom of the disease of addiction, one that destines efforts for control to failure.

You can’t cure it.

We all would like to believe that we have the ability to help those we love. We often think that if we can just get the right information, figure out the right thing to say or do, perhaps change something about ourselves, we can fix the problem. People should be able to solve their own problems. Why can’t we do that with this one? There is a simple reason. There is no cure for addiction. It requires treatment. The recovery process is long and difficult. And there is only one person who can start that process, the one who is gaming compulsively. There are things you can do. Here are some suggestions that you may want to consider, that other family members and friends have found helpful.

Get information.

The literature of recovery fellowships for family and friends of addicts (such as Al-Anon) has much helpful guidance, some of which is available online as well. There are people who have been in situations very similar to yours, who have learned much from them, and who are willing to share the lessons learned, their experience, strength and hope. We hope you avail yourself of such resources.

Detach with love.

Putting energy into arguing with someone who is playing compulsively will not help either of you. Your loved one has a serious problem that you are powerless to control or cure, and that they will not get help until they want it. As much as you love someone, you cannot force this process on another person.

Stop enabling.

Paradoxically, at the same time people are arguing with, bargaining with or shaming a compulsive gamer, they are often (perhaps without realizing it) supporting the addiction in many ways. Anything that shields an addict from the consequences of his or her behavior is enabling, and can include such basic things as providing food, shelter, money, companionship, housekeeping, and covering for employment and legal difficulties. Helping a compulsive gamer keep up an appearance of normalcy is helping him or her continue in the destructive behavior. While you cannot change him or her, you can make changes for yourself. You can shift your energy away from enabling behaviors and toward meeting your own needs.

Take care of yourself.

Whether or not your loved one ever stops gaming, you deserve to have a healthy and happy life. Once you have accepted that you are powerless over their gaming behavior, you can begin to focus on what you can do for yourself, to accomplish your own goals. With the help of others who have been where you are, you can learn to set healthy boundaries and stick to them.

Join our WhatsApp Chat Site for Family and Friends!

Game-Anon

WhatsApp Group Invite

Visit whatsapp.com/dl on your mobile phone to install.

By installing WhatsApp, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

 

Chat Using A Macintosh

 

Mac OS X 10.10 and higher. WhatsApp must be installed on your phone.

By clicking the Download button, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

DOWNLOAD FOR MAC OS X

Download for Windows 8 and higher (64-bit)
Download for Windows 8 and higher (32-bit)

 

 


Things To Do Instead of Gaming

One of the things we were trying to do with our gaming was meet some basic needs. If we do not meet those needs in normal healthy ways, we will suffer much stronger urges to game again. Some basic needs to cover are social needs, self expression, creativity, a sense of challenge and accomplishment, stress relief, a sense of purpose and meaning, and a sense of safety through control and predictability.

Here are some ideas for activities that will help meet these needs, reduce cravings, help with recovery from addiction, and fill some of the hours freed from compulsive gaming.

Please don’t let the length of this list overwhelm you. The idea is not to start ten new things and try to change everything all at once. We seek small bits of progress, not perfection. A good place to start is to put first things first. What need is currently most important? What’s right in front of me? What opportunity has come my way recently? If we take steps of small improvement with one or two areas each day, we are moving in the right direction.

 

Stress Relief

  • Talking with a sponsor or recovery buddy, CGAA meetings, or step work
  • Getting outside for fresh air and sunlight by taking a walk or doing some outdoor work
  • Meditation, coloring, craft work, journaling, or reading
 

Sense of safety through freedom, control, and predictability

  • Goal setting
  • Counseling or psychotherapy
  • Home organization, renovation, or spring cleaning
 

Sense of purpose, meaning, and self-respect

  • Supporting and growing the larger CGAA fellowship through service work like helping run a meeting, starting a local meeting, doing outreach to professionals, or attending CGAA business meetings
  • Attending a spiritual group like meditation, yoga, spiritual retreat, or religious gathering
  • Doing volunteer work like teaching, helping others, animal care, or building community places
  • Caring for a pet, house plants, or garden
 

Social needs

  • Attending CGAA meetings, connecting outside of meetings, reaching out to newcomers, or calling someone
  • Joining a hobby group like theater, a hiking group, art workshop, book club, public speaking, board games or card game group
  • Hosting a fun event like board games night or karaoke
  • Playing team sports, taking up martial arts, or playing one-on-one sports
  • Going to fun events like concerts, dances, or events on meetup.com
  • Calling up, video conferencing, or visiting with friends, family, neighbors, or other communities
 

Self expression and creativity

  • Journaling, opening up to a CGAA sponsor, or sharing openly in a meeting
  • Art work like drawing, photography, sculpting, or creative writing
  • Performance art like theater, singing, playing music, or writing music
 

Sense of challenge and accomplishment

  • Working the steps with a sponsor
  • Crafts like woodworking, origami, knitting
  • Outdoor activities like gardening, geocaching, bird watching, star gazing, tracking, plant identification, survival skills, or boating
  • Learning something like a foreign language, dancing, magic tricks, mechanical repair, cooking, a musical instrument, or computer programming
  • Career goals like getting a new job, starting a business, enrolling in school, or taking classes
 

Reconnection to one’s body and whole self

  • Meditating on breath, sounds, or bodily sensations
  • Exercise like walking, hiking, swimming, cycling, yoga, jogging, going to a gym, or playing a sport

If you are in your first week or two off of games, it’s likely that few of these ideas will appeal to you. That’s normal. Until our minds and bodies have some time to heal, we have low interest, energy, and motivation. This list will probably not give you something that you can plug in place of video games and immediately throw yourself into with the same zeal. This list is meant to help us explore new ways of spending our time, meeting our needs, and connecting with people. Find a few that hold some appeal and try taking some small steps in their direction. If you can’t seem to think of anything fun to do except game, you can come back to this list, find the most appealing thing, and just take a couple of little steps in its direction.

Consider setting reminders for yourself or keeping a schedule of your time and new activities. It is important to appreciate the small victories of exercising willpower, regaining motivation, and socializing. It helps to discuss our progress and the challenges we experience with a CGAA sponsor, recovery buddy, personal counselor, or therapist.

Rediscovering What is Fun

It is normal to think that nothing but gaming sounds fun. For most of us, our years of compulsive gaming warped and narrowed our idea of fun. As small children, it meant almost anything new or interesting or social or even mildly rewarding. Years of pulling the dopamine lever with video games changed our concept of fun to require instant gratification, frequent rewards, clear and constant progress, excitement, intense visuals, control, and/or predictability.

Part of recovery is letting our concept of fun expand back outward to a wide world of possible new challenges and experiences, many of which are calm and subtle compared to video games. It takes time to overcome withdrawals and heal from the damage, but the change does happen if we abstain from all gaming long term and focus on new pursuits and improving our lives. This list has many activities that do not meet the old, narrow, warped idea of “fun,” but those of us who persist at exploring them do find many to be gratifying and enjoyable.

Take, for example, a hike up a mountain. To a group of hikers excited to venture into the wilderness with friends and see wildlife and panoramic views from on high, all while getting a great workout, it’s a ton of fun. To someone who is uninterested in hiking, out of shape, and focused on every little unpleasant aspect of it, it’s a torturous death march. It is exactly the same hike in either case. The difference is in the attitude and conditioning.

The same is true with every item of these lists. Whether or not an activity sounds fun or torturous depends entirely upon attitude and conditioning. Every one of them has the potential to be gratifying and enjoyable if we adopt a positive attitude, try to have fun, and persist at it, especially when we involve friends and like-minded people.

SGS – Support Groups – Internet & Gaming Addiction – Message Board and Support Group – 24/7 @ Register For Details
Jul 26 all-day

 

 

 

Internet & Gaming Addiction

24/7

Our Internet & Gambling Addiction support group provides a safe and compassionate space for individuals struggling with compulsive online behavior and gaming, offering guidance and support on the path towards recovery.

When you create an account you’ll always come back to where you left off. With an account you can also be notified of new replies, save bookmarks, and use likes to thank others. We can all work together to make this community great. heart

Use the link Below to Join

https://supportgroups.com/

About SupportGroups™

SupportGroups.com is a safe, social support network that allows members & therapists to engage in group discussions for everyone involved. Our groups provide support for those dealing with Mental and Physical Health issues, Addiction, Relationships, or their Identity. Our mission is simple: Provide support in a safe online community for everyone who needs it.

 

Jul
27
Sat
2024
01 – Helpline – NCPG – National Council on Problem Gaming – National Problem Gaming Chatline @ ncpgambling.org/chat – 24/7 @ Online Via Chat
Jul 27 all-day
01 - Helpline - NCPG - National Council on Problem Gaming - National Problem Gaming Chatline @ ncpgambling.org/chat - 24/7 @ Online Via Chat

 

National Problem Gambling Helpline

Chatline

www.ncpgambling.org/chat

Click the link below to chat with a helpline specialist.

Free, confidential and available 24/7. Works in all 50 states.

Online. Click here to enter.

Below are state helpline text/chat numbers. Hyperlinked items with take you directly to their contact page:

Arizona: Text NEXTSTEP to 53342

California: Text SUPPORT to 53342

Connecticut: Text CTGAMB to 53342

Illinois:  Text ILGAMB to 53342

Indiana: Text INGAMBÂto 53342

Minnesota: Text HOPE to 53342

Mississippi: Text to MSGAMB 53342

North Carolina:  Text MORETHANAGAMENC 53342

If you would like to call the National Problem Gambling Helpline, dial 1-800-522-4700

If you would like to text the helpline, text 1-800-522-4700.

NCPG also supports GamTalk, a 24/7 moderated online peer support forum, www.gamtalk.org.

 

CGAA – Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous – Support Meetings, Support Chat for Family and Friends, Resources – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online Via ZOOM
Jul 27 all-day

 

Who We Are

Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous is a fellowship of people who support each other in recovering from the problems resulting from excessive game playing. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop video gaming, which is completely up to you. CGAA has no dues or fees. Our groups share their collective experience and the principles that helped them, but CGAA has no experts, hierarchy, or required beliefs. We have etiquette and traditions, but no strict rules.
If you are struggling with compulsive gaming, leave your contact info at 970-364-3497 and a CGAA member will call you back
Or email us at helpline@cgaa.info
For other issues, contact us at support@cgaa.info

 

ZOOM MEETINGS

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 
ZOOM MEETING

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 

Gamers Find A Local Support Group

Use the link below to get more information about local groups and a notification when a local meeting is started. Due to the COVID pandemic, most meetings are currently held in an outdoor setting or online.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LOCAL GROUP FINDER TOOL

 

CONTACT GROUPS IN OREGON BY LOCATION

 

 

SUPPORT FOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS

What Can I Do?

Video gaming is a common pastime. To many people, it is surprising that it can become a serious addiction, that is, an activity that is engaged in compulsively, without control or concern for consequences.

Video gaming addiction is a very serious problem that is harmful to everyone it touches. Since everyone involved suffers from it, everyone involved needs some help. Here are some important things to know.

First, no one is responsible for someone else’s compulsive gaming. As the Al-Anon slogan goes, “I didn’t cause it, I can’t control it, and I can’t cure it.”

You didn’t cause it.

Some people partly blame themselves for the dysfunctional behavior of their family members, particularly with addicts who are very quick to shift responsibility off themselves and blame others. Perhaps you played games with your loved one, purchased games, or encouraged it, thinking it was a harmless leisure activity. Maybe you’ve been involved in some conflict and wonder if that has driven him or her to hide away in gaming. But no one is responsible for another person’s behavior or mental disorders.

You can’t control it.

You may have already tried to talk to your friend or family member. Perhaps you have bargained with them, or given ultimatums. You have tried to help them see what damage they are doing to themselves and others. And none of it has worked. This is baffling to you. Why don’t they seem to understand or care? Why can’t they see what is obvious to you? This is actually a symptom of the disease of addiction, one that destines efforts for control to failure.

You can’t cure it.

We all would like to believe that we have the ability to help those we love. We often think that if we can just get the right information, figure out the right thing to say or do, perhaps change something about ourselves, we can fix the problem. People should be able to solve their own problems. Why can’t we do that with this one? There is a simple reason. There is no cure for addiction. It requires treatment. The recovery process is long and difficult. And there is only one person who can start that process, the one who is gaming compulsively. There are things you can do. Here are some suggestions that you may want to consider, that other family members and friends have found helpful.

Get information.

The literature of recovery fellowships for family and friends of addicts (such as Al-Anon) has much helpful guidance, some of which is available online as well. There are people who have been in situations very similar to yours, who have learned much from them, and who are willing to share the lessons learned, their experience, strength and hope. We hope you avail yourself of such resources.

Detach with love.

Putting energy into arguing with someone who is playing compulsively will not help either of you. Your loved one has a serious problem that you are powerless to control or cure, and that they will not get help until they want it. As much as you love someone, you cannot force this process on another person.

Stop enabling.

Paradoxically, at the same time people are arguing with, bargaining with or shaming a compulsive gamer, they are often (perhaps without realizing it) supporting the addiction in many ways. Anything that shields an addict from the consequences of his or her behavior is enabling, and can include such basic things as providing food, shelter, money, companionship, housekeeping, and covering for employment and legal difficulties. Helping a compulsive gamer keep up an appearance of normalcy is helping him or her continue in the destructive behavior. While you cannot change him or her, you can make changes for yourself. You can shift your energy away from enabling behaviors and toward meeting your own needs.

Take care of yourself.

Whether or not your loved one ever stops gaming, you deserve to have a healthy and happy life. Once you have accepted that you are powerless over their gaming behavior, you can begin to focus on what you can do for yourself, to accomplish your own goals. With the help of others who have been where you are, you can learn to set healthy boundaries and stick to them.

Join our WhatsApp Chat Site for Family and Friends!

Game-Anon

WhatsApp Group Invite

Visit whatsapp.com/dl on your mobile phone to install.

By installing WhatsApp, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

 

Chat Using A Macintosh

 

Mac OS X 10.10 and higher. WhatsApp must be installed on your phone.

By clicking the Download button, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

DOWNLOAD FOR MAC OS X

Download for Windows 8 and higher (64-bit)
Download for Windows 8 and higher (32-bit)

 

 


Things To Do Instead of Gaming

One of the things we were trying to do with our gaming was meet some basic needs. If we do not meet those needs in normal healthy ways, we will suffer much stronger urges to game again. Some basic needs to cover are social needs, self expression, creativity, a sense of challenge and accomplishment, stress relief, a sense of purpose and meaning, and a sense of safety through control and predictability.

Here are some ideas for activities that will help meet these needs, reduce cravings, help with recovery from addiction, and fill some of the hours freed from compulsive gaming.

Please don’t let the length of this list overwhelm you. The idea is not to start ten new things and try to change everything all at once. We seek small bits of progress, not perfection. A good place to start is to put first things first. What need is currently most important? What’s right in front of me? What opportunity has come my way recently? If we take steps of small improvement with one or two areas each day, we are moving in the right direction.

 

Stress Relief

  • Talking with a sponsor or recovery buddy, CGAA meetings, or step work
  • Getting outside for fresh air and sunlight by taking a walk or doing some outdoor work
  • Meditation, coloring, craft work, journaling, or reading
 

Sense of safety through freedom, control, and predictability

  • Goal setting
  • Counseling or psychotherapy
  • Home organization, renovation, or spring cleaning
 

Sense of purpose, meaning, and self-respect

  • Supporting and growing the larger CGAA fellowship through service work like helping run a meeting, starting a local meeting, doing outreach to professionals, or attending CGAA business meetings
  • Attending a spiritual group like meditation, yoga, spiritual retreat, or religious gathering
  • Doing volunteer work like teaching, helping others, animal care, or building community places
  • Caring for a pet, house plants, or garden
 

Social needs

  • Attending CGAA meetings, connecting outside of meetings, reaching out to newcomers, or calling someone
  • Joining a hobby group like theater, a hiking group, art workshop, book club, public speaking, board games or card game group
  • Hosting a fun event like board games night or karaoke
  • Playing team sports, taking up martial arts, or playing one-on-one sports
  • Going to fun events like concerts, dances, or events on meetup.com
  • Calling up, video conferencing, or visiting with friends, family, neighbors, or other communities
 

Self expression and creativity

  • Journaling, opening up to a CGAA sponsor, or sharing openly in a meeting
  • Art work like drawing, photography, sculpting, or creative writing
  • Performance art like theater, singing, playing music, or writing music
 

Sense of challenge and accomplishment

  • Working the steps with a sponsor
  • Crafts like woodworking, origami, knitting
  • Outdoor activities like gardening, geocaching, bird watching, star gazing, tracking, plant identification, survival skills, or boating
  • Learning something like a foreign language, dancing, magic tricks, mechanical repair, cooking, a musical instrument, or computer programming
  • Career goals like getting a new job, starting a business, enrolling in school, or taking classes
 

Reconnection to one’s body and whole self

  • Meditating on breath, sounds, or bodily sensations
  • Exercise like walking, hiking, swimming, cycling, yoga, jogging, going to a gym, or playing a sport

If you are in your first week or two off of games, it’s likely that few of these ideas will appeal to you. That’s normal. Until our minds and bodies have some time to heal, we have low interest, energy, and motivation. This list will probably not give you something that you can plug in place of video games and immediately throw yourself into with the same zeal. This list is meant to help us explore new ways of spending our time, meeting our needs, and connecting with people. Find a few that hold some appeal and try taking some small steps in their direction. If you can’t seem to think of anything fun to do except game, you can come back to this list, find the most appealing thing, and just take a couple of little steps in its direction.

Consider setting reminders for yourself or keeping a schedule of your time and new activities. It is important to appreciate the small victories of exercising willpower, regaining motivation, and socializing. It helps to discuss our progress and the challenges we experience with a CGAA sponsor, recovery buddy, personal counselor, or therapist.

Rediscovering What is Fun

It is normal to think that nothing but gaming sounds fun. For most of us, our years of compulsive gaming warped and narrowed our idea of fun. As small children, it meant almost anything new or interesting or social or even mildly rewarding. Years of pulling the dopamine lever with video games changed our concept of fun to require instant gratification, frequent rewards, clear and constant progress, excitement, intense visuals, control, and/or predictability.

Part of recovery is letting our concept of fun expand back outward to a wide world of possible new challenges and experiences, many of which are calm and subtle compared to video games. It takes time to overcome withdrawals and heal from the damage, but the change does happen if we abstain from all gaming long term and focus on new pursuits and improving our lives. This list has many activities that do not meet the old, narrow, warped idea of “fun,” but those of us who persist at exploring them do find many to be gratifying and enjoyable.

Take, for example, a hike up a mountain. To a group of hikers excited to venture into the wilderness with friends and see wildlife and panoramic views from on high, all while getting a great workout, it’s a ton of fun. To someone who is uninterested in hiking, out of shape, and focused on every little unpleasant aspect of it, it’s a torturous death march. It is exactly the same hike in either case. The difference is in the attitude and conditioning.

The same is true with every item of these lists. Whether or not an activity sounds fun or torturous depends entirely upon attitude and conditioning. Every one of them has the potential to be gratifying and enjoyable if we adopt a positive attitude, try to have fun, and persist at it, especially when we involve friends and like-minded people.

SGS – Support Groups – Internet & Gaming Addiction – Message Board and Support Group – 24/7 @ Register For Details
Jul 27 all-day

 

 

 

Internet & Gaming Addiction

24/7

Our Internet & Gambling Addiction support group provides a safe and compassionate space for individuals struggling with compulsive online behavior and gaming, offering guidance and support on the path towards recovery.

When you create an account you’ll always come back to where you left off. With an account you can also be notified of new replies, save bookmarks, and use likes to thank others. We can all work together to make this community great. heart

Use the link Below to Join

https://supportgroups.com/

About SupportGroups™

SupportGroups.com is a safe, social support network that allows members & therapists to engage in group discussions for everyone involved. Our groups provide support for those dealing with Mental and Physical Health issues, Addiction, Relationships, or their Identity. Our mission is simple: Provide support in a safe online community for everyone who needs it.

 

Jul
28
Sun
2024
01 – Helpline – NCPG – National Council on Problem Gaming – National Problem Gaming Chatline @ ncpgambling.org/chat – 24/7 @ Online Via Chat
Jul 28 all-day
01 - Helpline - NCPG - National Council on Problem Gaming - National Problem Gaming Chatline @ ncpgambling.org/chat - 24/7 @ Online Via Chat

 

National Problem Gambling Helpline

Chatline

www.ncpgambling.org/chat

Click the link below to chat with a helpline specialist.

Free, confidential and available 24/7. Works in all 50 states.

Online. Click here to enter.

Below are state helpline text/chat numbers. Hyperlinked items with take you directly to their contact page:

Arizona: Text NEXTSTEP to 53342

California: Text SUPPORT to 53342

Connecticut: Text CTGAMB to 53342

Illinois:  Text ILGAMB to 53342

Indiana: Text INGAMBÂto 53342

Minnesota: Text HOPE to 53342

Mississippi: Text to MSGAMB 53342

North Carolina:  Text MORETHANAGAMENC 53342

If you would like to call the National Problem Gambling Helpline, dial 1-800-522-4700

If you would like to text the helpline, text 1-800-522-4700.

NCPG also supports GamTalk, a 24/7 moderated online peer support forum, www.gamtalk.org.

 

CGAA – Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous – Support Meetings, Support Chat for Family and Friends, Resources – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online Via ZOOM
Jul 28 all-day

 

Who We Are

Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous is a fellowship of people who support each other in recovering from the problems resulting from excessive game playing. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop video gaming, which is completely up to you. CGAA has no dues or fees. Our groups share their collective experience and the principles that helped them, but CGAA has no experts, hierarchy, or required beliefs. We have etiquette and traditions, but no strict rules.
If you are struggling with compulsive gaming, leave your contact info at 970-364-3497 and a CGAA member will call you back
Or email us at helpline@cgaa.info
For other issues, contact us at support@cgaa.info

 

ZOOM MEETINGS

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 
ZOOM MEETING

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 

Gamers Find A Local Support Group

Use the link below to get more information about local groups and a notification when a local meeting is started. Due to the COVID pandemic, most meetings are currently held in an outdoor setting or online.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LOCAL GROUP FINDER TOOL

 

CONTACT GROUPS IN OREGON BY LOCATION

 

 

SUPPORT FOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS

What Can I Do?

Video gaming is a common pastime. To many people, it is surprising that it can become a serious addiction, that is, an activity that is engaged in compulsively, without control or concern for consequences.

Video gaming addiction is a very serious problem that is harmful to everyone it touches. Since everyone involved suffers from it, everyone involved needs some help. Here are some important things to know.

First, no one is responsible for someone else’s compulsive gaming. As the Al-Anon slogan goes, “I didn’t cause it, I can’t control it, and I can’t cure it.”

You didn’t cause it.

Some people partly blame themselves for the dysfunctional behavior of their family members, particularly with addicts who are very quick to shift responsibility off themselves and blame others. Perhaps you played games with your loved one, purchased games, or encouraged it, thinking it was a harmless leisure activity. Maybe you’ve been involved in some conflict and wonder if that has driven him or her to hide away in gaming. But no one is responsible for another person’s behavior or mental disorders.

You can’t control it.

You may have already tried to talk to your friend or family member. Perhaps you have bargained with them, or given ultimatums. You have tried to help them see what damage they are doing to themselves and others. And none of it has worked. This is baffling to you. Why don’t they seem to understand or care? Why can’t they see what is obvious to you? This is actually a symptom of the disease of addiction, one that destines efforts for control to failure.

You can’t cure it.

We all would like to believe that we have the ability to help those we love. We often think that if we can just get the right information, figure out the right thing to say or do, perhaps change something about ourselves, we can fix the problem. People should be able to solve their own problems. Why can’t we do that with this one? There is a simple reason. There is no cure for addiction. It requires treatment. The recovery process is long and difficult. And there is only one person who can start that process, the one who is gaming compulsively. There are things you can do. Here are some suggestions that you may want to consider, that other family members and friends have found helpful.

Get information.

The literature of recovery fellowships for family and friends of addicts (such as Al-Anon) has much helpful guidance, some of which is available online as well. There are people who have been in situations very similar to yours, who have learned much from them, and who are willing to share the lessons learned, their experience, strength and hope. We hope you avail yourself of such resources.

Detach with love.

Putting energy into arguing with someone who is playing compulsively will not help either of you. Your loved one has a serious problem that you are powerless to control or cure, and that they will not get help until they want it. As much as you love someone, you cannot force this process on another person.

Stop enabling.

Paradoxically, at the same time people are arguing with, bargaining with or shaming a compulsive gamer, they are often (perhaps without realizing it) supporting the addiction in many ways. Anything that shields an addict from the consequences of his or her behavior is enabling, and can include such basic things as providing food, shelter, money, companionship, housekeeping, and covering for employment and legal difficulties. Helping a compulsive gamer keep up an appearance of normalcy is helping him or her continue in the destructive behavior. While you cannot change him or her, you can make changes for yourself. You can shift your energy away from enabling behaviors and toward meeting your own needs.

Take care of yourself.

Whether or not your loved one ever stops gaming, you deserve to have a healthy and happy life. Once you have accepted that you are powerless over their gaming behavior, you can begin to focus on what you can do for yourself, to accomplish your own goals. With the help of others who have been where you are, you can learn to set healthy boundaries and stick to them.

Join our WhatsApp Chat Site for Family and Friends!

Game-Anon

WhatsApp Group Invite

Visit whatsapp.com/dl on your mobile phone to install.

By installing WhatsApp, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

 

Chat Using A Macintosh

 

Mac OS X 10.10 and higher. WhatsApp must be installed on your phone.

By clicking the Download button, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

DOWNLOAD FOR MAC OS X

Download for Windows 8 and higher (64-bit)
Download for Windows 8 and higher (32-bit)

 

 


Things To Do Instead of Gaming

One of the things we were trying to do with our gaming was meet some basic needs. If we do not meet those needs in normal healthy ways, we will suffer much stronger urges to game again. Some basic needs to cover are social needs, self expression, creativity, a sense of challenge and accomplishment, stress relief, a sense of purpose and meaning, and a sense of safety through control and predictability.

Here are some ideas for activities that will help meet these needs, reduce cravings, help with recovery from addiction, and fill some of the hours freed from compulsive gaming.

Please don’t let the length of this list overwhelm you. The idea is not to start ten new things and try to change everything all at once. We seek small bits of progress, not perfection. A good place to start is to put first things first. What need is currently most important? What’s right in front of me? What opportunity has come my way recently? If we take steps of small improvement with one or two areas each day, we are moving in the right direction.

 

Stress Relief

  • Talking with a sponsor or recovery buddy, CGAA meetings, or step work
  • Getting outside for fresh air and sunlight by taking a walk or doing some outdoor work
  • Meditation, coloring, craft work, journaling, or reading
 

Sense of safety through freedom, control, and predictability

  • Goal setting
  • Counseling or psychotherapy
  • Home organization, renovation, or spring cleaning
 

Sense of purpose, meaning, and self-respect

  • Supporting and growing the larger CGAA fellowship through service work like helping run a meeting, starting a local meeting, doing outreach to professionals, or attending CGAA business meetings
  • Attending a spiritual group like meditation, yoga, spiritual retreat, or religious gathering
  • Doing volunteer work like teaching, helping others, animal care, or building community places
  • Caring for a pet, house plants, or garden
 

Social needs

  • Attending CGAA meetings, connecting outside of meetings, reaching out to newcomers, or calling someone
  • Joining a hobby group like theater, a hiking group, art workshop, book club, public speaking, board games or card game group
  • Hosting a fun event like board games night or karaoke
  • Playing team sports, taking up martial arts, or playing one-on-one sports
  • Going to fun events like concerts, dances, or events on meetup.com
  • Calling up, video conferencing, or visiting with friends, family, neighbors, or other communities
 

Self expression and creativity

  • Journaling, opening up to a CGAA sponsor, or sharing openly in a meeting
  • Art work like drawing, photography, sculpting, or creative writing
  • Performance art like theater, singing, playing music, or writing music
 

Sense of challenge and accomplishment

  • Working the steps with a sponsor
  • Crafts like woodworking, origami, knitting
  • Outdoor activities like gardening, geocaching, bird watching, star gazing, tracking, plant identification, survival skills, or boating
  • Learning something like a foreign language, dancing, magic tricks, mechanical repair, cooking, a musical instrument, or computer programming
  • Career goals like getting a new job, starting a business, enrolling in school, or taking classes
 

Reconnection to one’s body and whole self

  • Meditating on breath, sounds, or bodily sensations
  • Exercise like walking, hiking, swimming, cycling, yoga, jogging, going to a gym, or playing a sport

If you are in your first week or two off of games, it’s likely that few of these ideas will appeal to you. That’s normal. Until our minds and bodies have some time to heal, we have low interest, energy, and motivation. This list will probably not give you something that you can plug in place of video games and immediately throw yourself into with the same zeal. This list is meant to help us explore new ways of spending our time, meeting our needs, and connecting with people. Find a few that hold some appeal and try taking some small steps in their direction. If you can’t seem to think of anything fun to do except game, you can come back to this list, find the most appealing thing, and just take a couple of little steps in its direction.

Consider setting reminders for yourself or keeping a schedule of your time and new activities. It is important to appreciate the small victories of exercising willpower, regaining motivation, and socializing. It helps to discuss our progress and the challenges we experience with a CGAA sponsor, recovery buddy, personal counselor, or therapist.

Rediscovering What is Fun

It is normal to think that nothing but gaming sounds fun. For most of us, our years of compulsive gaming warped and narrowed our idea of fun. As small children, it meant almost anything new or interesting or social or even mildly rewarding. Years of pulling the dopamine lever with video games changed our concept of fun to require instant gratification, frequent rewards, clear and constant progress, excitement, intense visuals, control, and/or predictability.

Part of recovery is letting our concept of fun expand back outward to a wide world of possible new challenges and experiences, many of which are calm and subtle compared to video games. It takes time to overcome withdrawals and heal from the damage, but the change does happen if we abstain from all gaming long term and focus on new pursuits and improving our lives. This list has many activities that do not meet the old, narrow, warped idea of “fun,” but those of us who persist at exploring them do find many to be gratifying and enjoyable.

Take, for example, a hike up a mountain. To a group of hikers excited to venture into the wilderness with friends and see wildlife and panoramic views from on high, all while getting a great workout, it’s a ton of fun. To someone who is uninterested in hiking, out of shape, and focused on every little unpleasant aspect of it, it’s a torturous death march. It is exactly the same hike in either case. The difference is in the attitude and conditioning.

The same is true with every item of these lists. Whether or not an activity sounds fun or torturous depends entirely upon attitude and conditioning. Every one of them has the potential to be gratifying and enjoyable if we adopt a positive attitude, try to have fun, and persist at it, especially when we involve friends and like-minded people.

SGS – Support Groups – Internet & Gaming Addiction – Message Board and Support Group – 24/7 @ Register For Details
Jul 28 all-day

 

 

 

Internet & Gaming Addiction

24/7

Our Internet & Gambling Addiction support group provides a safe and compassionate space for individuals struggling with compulsive online behavior and gaming, offering guidance and support on the path towards recovery.

When you create an account you’ll always come back to where you left off. With an account you can also be notified of new replies, save bookmarks, and use likes to thank others. We can all work together to make this community great. heart

Use the link Below to Join

https://supportgroups.com/

About SupportGroups™

SupportGroups.com is a safe, social support network that allows members & therapists to engage in group discussions for everyone involved. Our groups provide support for those dealing with Mental and Physical Health issues, Addiction, Relationships, or their Identity. Our mission is simple: Provide support in a safe online community for everyone who needs it.

 

Jul
29
Mon
2024
01 – Helpline – NCPG – National Council on Problem Gaming – National Problem Gaming Chatline @ ncpgambling.org/chat – 24/7 @ Online Via Chat
Jul 29 all-day
01 - Helpline - NCPG - National Council on Problem Gaming - National Problem Gaming Chatline @ ncpgambling.org/chat - 24/7 @ Online Via Chat

 

National Problem Gambling Helpline

Chatline

www.ncpgambling.org/chat

Click the link below to chat with a helpline specialist.

Free, confidential and available 24/7. Works in all 50 states.

Online. Click here to enter.

Below are state helpline text/chat numbers. Hyperlinked items with take you directly to their contact page:

Arizona: Text NEXTSTEP to 53342

California: Text SUPPORT to 53342

Connecticut: Text CTGAMB to 53342

Illinois:  Text ILGAMB to 53342

Indiana: Text INGAMBÂto 53342

Minnesota: Text HOPE to 53342

Mississippi: Text to MSGAMB 53342

North Carolina:  Text MORETHANAGAMENC 53342

If you would like to call the National Problem Gambling Helpline, dial 1-800-522-4700

If you would like to text the helpline, text 1-800-522-4700.

NCPG also supports GamTalk, a 24/7 moderated online peer support forum, www.gamtalk.org.

 

CGAA – Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous – Support Meetings, Support Chat for Family and Friends, Resources – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online Via ZOOM
Jul 29 all-day

 

Who We Are

Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous is a fellowship of people who support each other in recovering from the problems resulting from excessive game playing. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop video gaming, which is completely up to you. CGAA has no dues or fees. Our groups share their collective experience and the principles that helped them, but CGAA has no experts, hierarchy, or required beliefs. We have etiquette and traditions, but no strict rules.
If you are struggling with compulsive gaming, leave your contact info at 970-364-3497 and a CGAA member will call you back
Or email us at helpline@cgaa.info
For other issues, contact us at support@cgaa.info

 

ZOOM MEETINGS

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 
ZOOM MEETING

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 

Gamers Find A Local Support Group

Use the link below to get more information about local groups and a notification when a local meeting is started. Due to the COVID pandemic, most meetings are currently held in an outdoor setting or online.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LOCAL GROUP FINDER TOOL

 

CONTACT GROUPS IN OREGON BY LOCATION

 

 

SUPPORT FOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS

What Can I Do?

Video gaming is a common pastime. To many people, it is surprising that it can become a serious addiction, that is, an activity that is engaged in compulsively, without control or concern for consequences.

Video gaming addiction is a very serious problem that is harmful to everyone it touches. Since everyone involved suffers from it, everyone involved needs some help. Here are some important things to know.

First, no one is responsible for someone else’s compulsive gaming. As the Al-Anon slogan goes, “I didn’t cause it, I can’t control it, and I can’t cure it.”

You didn’t cause it.

Some people partly blame themselves for the dysfunctional behavior of their family members, particularly with addicts who are very quick to shift responsibility off themselves and blame others. Perhaps you played games with your loved one, purchased games, or encouraged it, thinking it was a harmless leisure activity. Maybe you’ve been involved in some conflict and wonder if that has driven him or her to hide away in gaming. But no one is responsible for another person’s behavior or mental disorders.

You can’t control it.

You may have already tried to talk to your friend or family member. Perhaps you have bargained with them, or given ultimatums. You have tried to help them see what damage they are doing to themselves and others. And none of it has worked. This is baffling to you. Why don’t they seem to understand or care? Why can’t they see what is obvious to you? This is actually a symptom of the disease of addiction, one that destines efforts for control to failure.

You can’t cure it.

We all would like to believe that we have the ability to help those we love. We often think that if we can just get the right information, figure out the right thing to say or do, perhaps change something about ourselves, we can fix the problem. People should be able to solve their own problems. Why can’t we do that with this one? There is a simple reason. There is no cure for addiction. It requires treatment. The recovery process is long and difficult. And there is only one person who can start that process, the one who is gaming compulsively. There are things you can do. Here are some suggestions that you may want to consider, that other family members and friends have found helpful.

Get information.

The literature of recovery fellowships for family and friends of addicts (such as Al-Anon) has much helpful guidance, some of which is available online as well. There are people who have been in situations very similar to yours, who have learned much from them, and who are willing to share the lessons learned, their experience, strength and hope. We hope you avail yourself of such resources.

Detach with love.

Putting energy into arguing with someone who is playing compulsively will not help either of you. Your loved one has a serious problem that you are powerless to control or cure, and that they will not get help until they want it. As much as you love someone, you cannot force this process on another person.

Stop enabling.

Paradoxically, at the same time people are arguing with, bargaining with or shaming a compulsive gamer, they are often (perhaps without realizing it) supporting the addiction in many ways. Anything that shields an addict from the consequences of his or her behavior is enabling, and can include such basic things as providing food, shelter, money, companionship, housekeeping, and covering for employment and legal difficulties. Helping a compulsive gamer keep up an appearance of normalcy is helping him or her continue in the destructive behavior. While you cannot change him or her, you can make changes for yourself. You can shift your energy away from enabling behaviors and toward meeting your own needs.

Take care of yourself.

Whether or not your loved one ever stops gaming, you deserve to have a healthy and happy life. Once you have accepted that you are powerless over their gaming behavior, you can begin to focus on what you can do for yourself, to accomplish your own goals. With the help of others who have been where you are, you can learn to set healthy boundaries and stick to them.

Join our WhatsApp Chat Site for Family and Friends!

Game-Anon

WhatsApp Group Invite

Visit whatsapp.com/dl on your mobile phone to install.

By installing WhatsApp, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

 

Chat Using A Macintosh

 

Mac OS X 10.10 and higher. WhatsApp must be installed on your phone.

By clicking the Download button, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

DOWNLOAD FOR MAC OS X

Download for Windows 8 and higher (64-bit)
Download for Windows 8 and higher (32-bit)

 

 


Things To Do Instead of Gaming

One of the things we were trying to do with our gaming was meet some basic needs. If we do not meet those needs in normal healthy ways, we will suffer much stronger urges to game again. Some basic needs to cover are social needs, self expression, creativity, a sense of challenge and accomplishment, stress relief, a sense of purpose and meaning, and a sense of safety through control and predictability.

Here are some ideas for activities that will help meet these needs, reduce cravings, help with recovery from addiction, and fill some of the hours freed from compulsive gaming.

Please don’t let the length of this list overwhelm you. The idea is not to start ten new things and try to change everything all at once. We seek small bits of progress, not perfection. A good place to start is to put first things first. What need is currently most important? What’s right in front of me? What opportunity has come my way recently? If we take steps of small improvement with one or two areas each day, we are moving in the right direction.

 

Stress Relief

  • Talking with a sponsor or recovery buddy, CGAA meetings, or step work
  • Getting outside for fresh air and sunlight by taking a walk or doing some outdoor work
  • Meditation, coloring, craft work, journaling, or reading
 

Sense of safety through freedom, control, and predictability

  • Goal setting
  • Counseling or psychotherapy
  • Home organization, renovation, or spring cleaning
 

Sense of purpose, meaning, and self-respect

  • Supporting and growing the larger CGAA fellowship through service work like helping run a meeting, starting a local meeting, doing outreach to professionals, or attending CGAA business meetings
  • Attending a spiritual group like meditation, yoga, spiritual retreat, or religious gathering
  • Doing volunteer work like teaching, helping others, animal care, or building community places
  • Caring for a pet, house plants, or garden
 

Social needs

  • Attending CGAA meetings, connecting outside of meetings, reaching out to newcomers, or calling someone
  • Joining a hobby group like theater, a hiking group, art workshop, book club, public speaking, board games or card game group
  • Hosting a fun event like board games night or karaoke
  • Playing team sports, taking up martial arts, or playing one-on-one sports
  • Going to fun events like concerts, dances, or events on meetup.com
  • Calling up, video conferencing, or visiting with friends, family, neighbors, or other communities
 

Self expression and creativity

  • Journaling, opening up to a CGAA sponsor, or sharing openly in a meeting
  • Art work like drawing, photography, sculpting, or creative writing
  • Performance art like theater, singing, playing music, or writing music
 

Sense of challenge and accomplishment

  • Working the steps with a sponsor
  • Crafts like woodworking, origami, knitting
  • Outdoor activities like gardening, geocaching, bird watching, star gazing, tracking, plant identification, survival skills, or boating
  • Learning something like a foreign language, dancing, magic tricks, mechanical repair, cooking, a musical instrument, or computer programming
  • Career goals like getting a new job, starting a business, enrolling in school, or taking classes
 

Reconnection to one’s body and whole self

  • Meditating on breath, sounds, or bodily sensations
  • Exercise like walking, hiking, swimming, cycling, yoga, jogging, going to a gym, or playing a sport

If you are in your first week or two off of games, it’s likely that few of these ideas will appeal to you. That’s normal. Until our minds and bodies have some time to heal, we have low interest, energy, and motivation. This list will probably not give you something that you can plug in place of video games and immediately throw yourself into with the same zeal. This list is meant to help us explore new ways of spending our time, meeting our needs, and connecting with people. Find a few that hold some appeal and try taking some small steps in their direction. If you can’t seem to think of anything fun to do except game, you can come back to this list, find the most appealing thing, and just take a couple of little steps in its direction.

Consider setting reminders for yourself or keeping a schedule of your time and new activities. It is important to appreciate the small victories of exercising willpower, regaining motivation, and socializing. It helps to discuss our progress and the challenges we experience with a CGAA sponsor, recovery buddy, personal counselor, or therapist.

Rediscovering What is Fun

It is normal to think that nothing but gaming sounds fun. For most of us, our years of compulsive gaming warped and narrowed our idea of fun. As small children, it meant almost anything new or interesting or social or even mildly rewarding. Years of pulling the dopamine lever with video games changed our concept of fun to require instant gratification, frequent rewards, clear and constant progress, excitement, intense visuals, control, and/or predictability.

Part of recovery is letting our concept of fun expand back outward to a wide world of possible new challenges and experiences, many of which are calm and subtle compared to video games. It takes time to overcome withdrawals and heal from the damage, but the change does happen if we abstain from all gaming long term and focus on new pursuits and improving our lives. This list has many activities that do not meet the old, narrow, warped idea of “fun,” but those of us who persist at exploring them do find many to be gratifying and enjoyable.

Take, for example, a hike up a mountain. To a group of hikers excited to venture into the wilderness with friends and see wildlife and panoramic views from on high, all while getting a great workout, it’s a ton of fun. To someone who is uninterested in hiking, out of shape, and focused on every little unpleasant aspect of it, it’s a torturous death march. It is exactly the same hike in either case. The difference is in the attitude and conditioning.

The same is true with every item of these lists. Whether or not an activity sounds fun or torturous depends entirely upon attitude and conditioning. Every one of them has the potential to be gratifying and enjoyable if we adopt a positive attitude, try to have fun, and persist at it, especially when we involve friends and like-minded people.

SGS – Support Groups – Internet & Gaming Addiction – Message Board and Support Group – 24/7 @ Register For Details
Jul 29 all-day

 

 

 

Internet & Gaming Addiction

24/7

Our Internet & Gambling Addiction support group provides a safe and compassionate space for individuals struggling with compulsive online behavior and gaming, offering guidance and support on the path towards recovery.

When you create an account you’ll always come back to where you left off. With an account you can also be notified of new replies, save bookmarks, and use likes to thank others. We can all work together to make this community great. heart

Use the link Below to Join

https://supportgroups.com/

About SupportGroups™

SupportGroups.com is a safe, social support network that allows members & therapists to engage in group discussions for everyone involved. Our groups provide support for those dealing with Mental and Physical Health issues, Addiction, Relationships, or their Identity. Our mission is simple: Provide support in a safe online community for everyone who needs it.

 

Jul
30
Tue
2024
01 – Helpline – NCPG – National Council on Problem Gaming – National Problem Gaming Chatline @ ncpgambling.org/chat – 24/7 @ Online Via Chat
Jul 30 all-day
01 - Helpline - NCPG - National Council on Problem Gaming - National Problem Gaming Chatline @ ncpgambling.org/chat - 24/7 @ Online Via Chat

 

National Problem Gambling Helpline

Chatline

www.ncpgambling.org/chat

Click the link below to chat with a helpline specialist.

Free, confidential and available 24/7. Works in all 50 states.

Online. Click here to enter.

Below are state helpline text/chat numbers. Hyperlinked items with take you directly to their contact page:

Arizona: Text NEXTSTEP to 53342

California: Text SUPPORT to 53342

Connecticut: Text CTGAMB to 53342

Illinois:  Text ILGAMB to 53342

Indiana: Text INGAMBÂto 53342

Minnesota: Text HOPE to 53342

Mississippi: Text to MSGAMB 53342

North Carolina:  Text MORETHANAGAMENC 53342

If you would like to call the National Problem Gambling Helpline, dial 1-800-522-4700

If you would like to text the helpline, text 1-800-522-4700.

NCPG also supports GamTalk, a 24/7 moderated online peer support forum, www.gamtalk.org.

 

CGAA – Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous – Support Meetings, Support Chat for Family and Friends, Resources – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online Via ZOOM
Jul 30 all-day

 

Who We Are

Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous is a fellowship of people who support each other in recovering from the problems resulting from excessive game playing. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop video gaming, which is completely up to you. CGAA has no dues or fees. Our groups share their collective experience and the principles that helped them, but CGAA has no experts, hierarchy, or required beliefs. We have etiquette and traditions, but no strict rules.
If you are struggling with compulsive gaming, leave your contact info at 970-364-3497 and a CGAA member will call you back
Or email us at helpline@cgaa.info
For other issues, contact us at support@cgaa.info

 

ZOOM MEETINGS

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 
ZOOM MEETING

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 

Gamers Find A Local Support Group

Use the link below to get more information about local groups and a notification when a local meeting is started. Due to the COVID pandemic, most meetings are currently held in an outdoor setting or online.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LOCAL GROUP FINDER TOOL

 

CONTACT GROUPS IN OREGON BY LOCATION

 

 

SUPPORT FOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS

What Can I Do?

Video gaming is a common pastime. To many people, it is surprising that it can become a serious addiction, that is, an activity that is engaged in compulsively, without control or concern for consequences.

Video gaming addiction is a very serious problem that is harmful to everyone it touches. Since everyone involved suffers from it, everyone involved needs some help. Here are some important things to know.

First, no one is responsible for someone else’s compulsive gaming. As the Al-Anon slogan goes, “I didn’t cause it, I can’t control it, and I can’t cure it.”

You didn’t cause it.

Some people partly blame themselves for the dysfunctional behavior of their family members, particularly with addicts who are very quick to shift responsibility off themselves and blame others. Perhaps you played games with your loved one, purchased games, or encouraged it, thinking it was a harmless leisure activity. Maybe you’ve been involved in some conflict and wonder if that has driven him or her to hide away in gaming. But no one is responsible for another person’s behavior or mental disorders.

You can’t control it.

You may have already tried to talk to your friend or family member. Perhaps you have bargained with them, or given ultimatums. You have tried to help them see what damage they are doing to themselves and others. And none of it has worked. This is baffling to you. Why don’t they seem to understand or care? Why can’t they see what is obvious to you? This is actually a symptom of the disease of addiction, one that destines efforts for control to failure.

You can’t cure it.

We all would like to believe that we have the ability to help those we love. We often think that if we can just get the right information, figure out the right thing to say or do, perhaps change something about ourselves, we can fix the problem. People should be able to solve their own problems. Why can’t we do that with this one? There is a simple reason. There is no cure for addiction. It requires treatment. The recovery process is long and difficult. And there is only one person who can start that process, the one who is gaming compulsively. There are things you can do. Here are some suggestions that you may want to consider, that other family members and friends have found helpful.

Get information.

The literature of recovery fellowships for family and friends of addicts (such as Al-Anon) has much helpful guidance, some of which is available online as well. There are people who have been in situations very similar to yours, who have learned much from them, and who are willing to share the lessons learned, their experience, strength and hope. We hope you avail yourself of such resources.

Detach with love.

Putting energy into arguing with someone who is playing compulsively will not help either of you. Your loved one has a serious problem that you are powerless to control or cure, and that they will not get help until they want it. As much as you love someone, you cannot force this process on another person.

Stop enabling.

Paradoxically, at the same time people are arguing with, bargaining with or shaming a compulsive gamer, they are often (perhaps without realizing it) supporting the addiction in many ways. Anything that shields an addict from the consequences of his or her behavior is enabling, and can include such basic things as providing food, shelter, money, companionship, housekeeping, and covering for employment and legal difficulties. Helping a compulsive gamer keep up an appearance of normalcy is helping him or her continue in the destructive behavior. While you cannot change him or her, you can make changes for yourself. You can shift your energy away from enabling behaviors and toward meeting your own needs.

Take care of yourself.

Whether or not your loved one ever stops gaming, you deserve to have a healthy and happy life. Once you have accepted that you are powerless over their gaming behavior, you can begin to focus on what you can do for yourself, to accomplish your own goals. With the help of others who have been where you are, you can learn to set healthy boundaries and stick to them.

Join our WhatsApp Chat Site for Family and Friends!

Game-Anon

WhatsApp Group Invite

Visit whatsapp.com/dl on your mobile phone to install.

By installing WhatsApp, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

 

Chat Using A Macintosh

 

Mac OS X 10.10 and higher. WhatsApp must be installed on your phone.

By clicking the Download button, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

DOWNLOAD FOR MAC OS X

Download for Windows 8 and higher (64-bit)
Download for Windows 8 and higher (32-bit)

 

 


Things To Do Instead of Gaming

One of the things we were trying to do with our gaming was meet some basic needs. If we do not meet those needs in normal healthy ways, we will suffer much stronger urges to game again. Some basic needs to cover are social needs, self expression, creativity, a sense of challenge and accomplishment, stress relief, a sense of purpose and meaning, and a sense of safety through control and predictability.

Here are some ideas for activities that will help meet these needs, reduce cravings, help with recovery from addiction, and fill some of the hours freed from compulsive gaming.

Please don’t let the length of this list overwhelm you. The idea is not to start ten new things and try to change everything all at once. We seek small bits of progress, not perfection. A good place to start is to put first things first. What need is currently most important? What’s right in front of me? What opportunity has come my way recently? If we take steps of small improvement with one or two areas each day, we are moving in the right direction.

 

Stress Relief

  • Talking with a sponsor or recovery buddy, CGAA meetings, or step work
  • Getting outside for fresh air and sunlight by taking a walk or doing some outdoor work
  • Meditation, coloring, craft work, journaling, or reading
 

Sense of safety through freedom, control, and predictability

  • Goal setting
  • Counseling or psychotherapy
  • Home organization, renovation, or spring cleaning
 

Sense of purpose, meaning, and self-respect

  • Supporting and growing the larger CGAA fellowship through service work like helping run a meeting, starting a local meeting, doing outreach to professionals, or attending CGAA business meetings
  • Attending a spiritual group like meditation, yoga, spiritual retreat, or religious gathering
  • Doing volunteer work like teaching, helping others, animal care, or building community places
  • Caring for a pet, house plants, or garden
 

Social needs

  • Attending CGAA meetings, connecting outside of meetings, reaching out to newcomers, or calling someone
  • Joining a hobby group like theater, a hiking group, art workshop, book club, public speaking, board games or card game group
  • Hosting a fun event like board games night or karaoke
  • Playing team sports, taking up martial arts, or playing one-on-one sports
  • Going to fun events like concerts, dances, or events on meetup.com
  • Calling up, video conferencing, or visiting with friends, family, neighbors, or other communities
 

Self expression and creativity

  • Journaling, opening up to a CGAA sponsor, or sharing openly in a meeting
  • Art work like drawing, photography, sculpting, or creative writing
  • Performance art like theater, singing, playing music, or writing music
 

Sense of challenge and accomplishment

  • Working the steps with a sponsor
  • Crafts like woodworking, origami, knitting
  • Outdoor activities like gardening, geocaching, bird watching, star gazing, tracking, plant identification, survival skills, or boating
  • Learning something like a foreign language, dancing, magic tricks, mechanical repair, cooking, a musical instrument, or computer programming
  • Career goals like getting a new job, starting a business, enrolling in school, or taking classes
 

Reconnection to one’s body and whole self

  • Meditating on breath, sounds, or bodily sensations
  • Exercise like walking, hiking, swimming, cycling, yoga, jogging, going to a gym, or playing a sport

If you are in your first week or two off of games, it’s likely that few of these ideas will appeal to you. That’s normal. Until our minds and bodies have some time to heal, we have low interest, energy, and motivation. This list will probably not give you something that you can plug in place of video games and immediately throw yourself into with the same zeal. This list is meant to help us explore new ways of spending our time, meeting our needs, and connecting with people. Find a few that hold some appeal and try taking some small steps in their direction. If you can’t seem to think of anything fun to do except game, you can come back to this list, find the most appealing thing, and just take a couple of little steps in its direction.

Consider setting reminders for yourself or keeping a schedule of your time and new activities. It is important to appreciate the small victories of exercising willpower, regaining motivation, and socializing. It helps to discuss our progress and the challenges we experience with a CGAA sponsor, recovery buddy, personal counselor, or therapist.

Rediscovering What is Fun

It is normal to think that nothing but gaming sounds fun. For most of us, our years of compulsive gaming warped and narrowed our idea of fun. As small children, it meant almost anything new or interesting or social or even mildly rewarding. Years of pulling the dopamine lever with video games changed our concept of fun to require instant gratification, frequent rewards, clear and constant progress, excitement, intense visuals, control, and/or predictability.

Part of recovery is letting our concept of fun expand back outward to a wide world of possible new challenges and experiences, many of which are calm and subtle compared to video games. It takes time to overcome withdrawals and heal from the damage, but the change does happen if we abstain from all gaming long term and focus on new pursuits and improving our lives. This list has many activities that do not meet the old, narrow, warped idea of “fun,” but those of us who persist at exploring them do find many to be gratifying and enjoyable.

Take, for example, a hike up a mountain. To a group of hikers excited to venture into the wilderness with friends and see wildlife and panoramic views from on high, all while getting a great workout, it’s a ton of fun. To someone who is uninterested in hiking, out of shape, and focused on every little unpleasant aspect of it, it’s a torturous death march. It is exactly the same hike in either case. The difference is in the attitude and conditioning.

The same is true with every item of these lists. Whether or not an activity sounds fun or torturous depends entirely upon attitude and conditioning. Every one of them has the potential to be gratifying and enjoyable if we adopt a positive attitude, try to have fun, and persist at it, especially when we involve friends and like-minded people.

SGS – Support Groups – Internet & Gaming Addiction – Message Board and Support Group – 24/7 @ Register For Details
Jul 30 all-day

 

 

 

Internet & Gaming Addiction

24/7

Our Internet & Gambling Addiction support group provides a safe and compassionate space for individuals struggling with compulsive online behavior and gaming, offering guidance and support on the path towards recovery.

When you create an account you’ll always come back to where you left off. With an account you can also be notified of new replies, save bookmarks, and use likes to thank others. We can all work together to make this community great. heart

Use the link Below to Join

https://supportgroups.com/

About SupportGroups™

SupportGroups.com is a safe, social support network that allows members & therapists to engage in group discussions for everyone involved. Our groups provide support for those dealing with Mental and Physical Health issues, Addiction, Relationships, or their Identity. Our mission is simple: Provide support in a safe online community for everyone who needs it.