PeerGalaxy Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring offerings of telephone + online peer support + wellness activities! 

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

Click the Accessibility Button on the right side, halfway down in the middle, for enhanced viewing and/or access options!  Click the Translate Button in the lower left corner for language options.

Your use of this site is subject to the Privacy Policy, Terms and Conditions of Use.  Reminder: Fees or charges may be charged by your carrier for sending or receiving SMS text messaging, phone, or data.

If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

How Events are Sorted:

First, at the top of the list: Disaster Hotline & Oregon Safe + Strong Helpline.

Next in the list: Bundled “All Day” Events for organizations with events happening at multiple times throughout the day and/or in many formats or locations; these are bundled into a single listing to prevent endless scrolling.  Usually these offer a lookup by zip code or other criteria. 

Lastly, Time-Specific Events listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  Warmlines and places east of Oregon’s time zone tend to start earlier (e.g. 4am in Oregon is 7am in New York).

Apr
14
Wed
000 Oregon Safe+Strong 24/7 Helpline 1-800-923-HELP (4357) Interpreters Available @ Phone, Toll-Free
Apr 14 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

002 Time Sensitive! – Resources & Assistance for Renters and Landlords during COVID-19 Pandemic
Apr 14 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
AR – Addictions Recovery – Virtual Online Meetings – Weekdays & Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Apr 14 all-day

Recovery Resources and Supports for Addictions Recovery During COVID-19

The following organizations provide links to daily online resources, supports and meetings for people recovering from addictions during COVID-19.  Events change daily and offerings serve a wide variety of people recovering many forms of addiction.

1) Digital Recovery – Meetings Schedule and Resources List with Links:

RecoveryResourcesPDX.com offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.  Plus you’ll find links to recovery resources, social services, food & housing, financial resources and COVID-19 information.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com/digital-meetings

Recovery Resources PDX Website:

logo

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com

 

2) The Alano Club of Portland – Meetings Schedule with Links

PortlandAlano.org offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily.

https://portlandalano.org/schedule/

Alano Club meeting types include:

AA: Alcoholics Anonymous
ACA: Adult Children of Alcoholics
Al-Anon: Families & Friends of Alcoholics
AVS: Attention Veritability Syndrome
CLA: Clutterers Anonymous
CMA: Crystal Meth Anonymous
CODA: Codependents Anonymous

COSA: Partners of Sex Addicts
DA: Debtors Anonymous
FA: Food Addicts
GA: Gamblers Anonymous
HA: Heroin Anonymous
MA: Marijuana Anonymous
NA: Narcotics Anonymous
OA: Overeaters Anonymous

RCA: Recovering Couple Anonymous
RR: Refuge Recovery
RTS: Recovery Toolkit Series
SAA: Sex Addicts Anonymous
SIA: Survivors of Incest Anonymous SLAA: Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous
SMART: Self Management And Recovery Training
WA: Workaholics Anonymous
WB: Wellbriety

Meeting Details:
(C) Closed
(G) Gay
(L) Lesbian
(MO) Men Only
(SM) Secular Meeting
(WO) Women Only

Portland Alano Club Website:

logo

https://portlandalano.org/

 

3) Oregon Recovery Network features listing of Online Meetings with Links

https://oregonrecoverynetwork.org/support/

Oregon Recovery Network Website:

Oregon Recovery Network

https://www.OregonRecoveryNetwork.org

 

And… last but not least…

4) MyRecoveryLink Digital Meetings Schedule and Links

Digital Meetings Online – Every Day, 7 Days per Week, Daily at:

4am, 6am, 9am, 12pm, 3pm, 6pm and 8pm PST and other times for other meetings

https://myrecoverylink.com/digital-recovery-meetings/

MyRecoveryLink Website:

logo

https://myrecoverylink.com/

GS – Gender Spectrum – Online Virtual Groups for Parents and Teens – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Apr 14 all-day

logo

Gender Spectrum works to create gender sensitive and inclusive environments for all children and teens.  Gender Spectrum offers over 25 online groups for parents and teens.

In the Gender Spectrum Lounge you can find the list of groups to explore or sign up for.  There is a great variety of topics featured.

https://lounge.genderspectrum.org/groups/

Registration required.  See group description for contact information details.

Additional online groups, webinars, recordings, and events online including resources related to the pandemic at:

https://www.genderspectrum.org/articles/blog-covid-resources

Additional resources specific for schools and professionals, too.

Website:

https://www.genderspectrum.org

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/GenderSpectrum/

Twitter:

https://twitter.com/genderspectrum

 

Warmline – MHAAO – Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon – Evolve Peer Support Services – Multiple Numbers -Weekdays – 9am-5pm (PST) @ Phone
Apr 14 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

logo 144h

MHAAO is pleased to offer Evolve’s Peer Support by Phone for persons affected by the pandemic, wildfires, and similar issues.

Do you need someone to talk to?  We’re available for anyone to call peer support no matter what!

Happy to work with any age groups from any area.

Will make arrangements for virtual peer support if requested. 

Generally available @ 9am-5pm PST Weekdays, Monday through Friday.

See names and numbers below.

Flyer excerpt(s):
Have you been impacted by COVID-19 or the Oregon Wildfires?
Our Peer Support Specialists are here to help!
Call us Monday through Friday, 9am-5pm PST
==========
Monica Alexander
971-337-6716
Bill Beall
971-337-4550
Roman Becerra
971-930-9017
Bryan Corley
971-282-8101
Amber Hatkoff
971-352-0582
Molly Griggs
971-337-5506
Anthony Jarrard
971-337-4791
Grace Jo
503-314-3309
Amber Lakin
971-930-9404
Jenny Manzanares
971-241-1404
Howard Marlow
971-337-6293
Jesse Maxwell
971-202-6337
Larae Miller
503-719-1725
Brenda Mitchell
971-337-6715
Geoff Moser
971-202-3142
Marianne O’Neill-Tutor
971-337-6624
Tara Prince
971-413-0264
Kristina Teasley
971-930-9014
=========
Evolve is a program of Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon (MHAAO).
flyer p2

 

OCAC – OREGON CONSUMER ADVISORY COUNCIL – The Peer Voice For Us – Wednesday Meeting @ Online Via Zoom
Apr 14 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

https://timelyapp-prod.s3.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/images/54702358/oha-logo_43em.png

Hosted by the Oregon Health Authority

 

The Peer Voice For Us – Oregon Consumer Advisory Council

Online-2nd Wednesdays of Even Months 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM PDT 

This is a Public Meeting To Attend Use The Zoom Link Provided Below

Meeting ID: 161 084 3482
Passcode: 512151
One Tap Mobile
+16692545252,1610843482# US (San Jose)
+16468287666,1610843482# US (New York)

 

About the Oregon Consumer Advisory Committee

The Oregon Consumer Advisory Council, established by Oregon Revised Statute 430.073, is charged with the responsibility “…to advise the director [Dr. Bruce Goldberg] on the provision of mental health services by the Oregon Health Authority. The council may review, evaluate and provide feedback on all site reviews related to mental health services provided by the authority.”

 

 

Apr
15
Thu
000 Oregon Safe+Strong 24/7 Helpline 1-800-923-HELP (4357) Interpreters Available @ Phone, Toll-Free
Apr 15 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

002 Time Sensitive! – Resources & Assistance for Renters and Landlords during COVID-19 Pandemic
Apr 15 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
AR – Addictions Recovery – Virtual Online Meetings – Weekdays & Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Apr 15 all-day

Recovery Resources and Supports for Addictions Recovery During COVID-19

The following organizations provide links to daily online resources, supports and meetings for people recovering from addictions during COVID-19.  Events change daily and offerings serve a wide variety of people recovering many forms of addiction.

1) Digital Recovery – Meetings Schedule and Resources List with Links:

RecoveryResourcesPDX.com offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.  Plus you’ll find links to recovery resources, social services, food & housing, financial resources and COVID-19 information.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com/digital-meetings

Recovery Resources PDX Website:

logo

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com

 

2) The Alano Club of Portland – Meetings Schedule with Links

PortlandAlano.org offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily.

https://portlandalano.org/schedule/

Alano Club meeting types include:

AA: Alcoholics Anonymous
ACA: Adult Children of Alcoholics
Al-Anon: Families & Friends of Alcoholics
AVS: Attention Veritability Syndrome
CLA: Clutterers Anonymous
CMA: Crystal Meth Anonymous
CODA: Codependents Anonymous

COSA: Partners of Sex Addicts
DA: Debtors Anonymous
FA: Food Addicts
GA: Gamblers Anonymous
HA: Heroin Anonymous
MA: Marijuana Anonymous
NA: Narcotics Anonymous
OA: Overeaters Anonymous

RCA: Recovering Couple Anonymous
RR: Refuge Recovery
RTS: Recovery Toolkit Series
SAA: Sex Addicts Anonymous
SIA: Survivors of Incest Anonymous SLAA: Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous
SMART: Self Management And Recovery Training
WA: Workaholics Anonymous
WB: Wellbriety

Meeting Details:
(C) Closed
(G) Gay
(L) Lesbian
(MO) Men Only
(SM) Secular Meeting
(WO) Women Only

Portland Alano Club Website:

logo

https://portlandalano.org/

 

3) Oregon Recovery Network features listing of Online Meetings with Links

https://oregonrecoverynetwork.org/support/

Oregon Recovery Network Website:

Oregon Recovery Network

https://www.OregonRecoveryNetwork.org

 

And… last but not least…

4) MyRecoveryLink Digital Meetings Schedule and Links

Digital Meetings Online – Every Day, 7 Days per Week, Daily at:

4am, 6am, 9am, 12pm, 3pm, 6pm and 8pm PST and other times for other meetings

https://myrecoverylink.com/digital-recovery-meetings/

MyRecoveryLink Website:

logo

https://myrecoverylink.com/

GS – Gender Spectrum – Online Virtual Groups for Parents and Teens – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Apr 15 all-day

logo

Gender Spectrum works to create gender sensitive and inclusive environments for all children and teens.  Gender Spectrum offers over 25 online groups for parents and teens.

In the Gender Spectrum Lounge you can find the list of groups to explore or sign up for.  There is a great variety of topics featured.

https://lounge.genderspectrum.org/groups/

Registration required.  See group description for contact information details.

Additional online groups, webinars, recordings, and events online including resources related to the pandemic at:

https://www.genderspectrum.org/articles/blog-covid-resources

Additional resources specific for schools and professionals, too.

Website:

https://www.genderspectrum.org

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/GenderSpectrum/

Twitter:

https://twitter.com/genderspectrum

 

Warmline – MHAAO – Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon – Evolve Peer Support Services – Multiple Numbers -Weekdays – 9am-5pm (PST) @ Phone
Apr 15 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

logo 144h

MHAAO is pleased to offer Evolve’s Peer Support by Phone for persons affected by the pandemic, wildfires, and similar issues.

Do you need someone to talk to?  We’re available for anyone to call peer support no matter what!

Happy to work with any age groups from any area.

Will make arrangements for virtual peer support if requested. 

Generally available @ 9am-5pm PST Weekdays, Monday through Friday.

See names and numbers below.

Flyer excerpt(s):
Have you been impacted by COVID-19 or the Oregon Wildfires?
Our Peer Support Specialists are here to help!
Call us Monday through Friday, 9am-5pm PST
==========
Monica Alexander
971-337-6716
Bill Beall
971-337-4550
Roman Becerra
971-930-9017
Bryan Corley
971-282-8101
Amber Hatkoff
971-352-0582
Molly Griggs
971-337-5506
Anthony Jarrard
971-337-4791
Grace Jo
503-314-3309
Amber Lakin
971-930-9404
Jenny Manzanares
971-241-1404
Howard Marlow
971-337-6293
Jesse Maxwell
971-202-6337
Larae Miller
503-719-1725
Brenda Mitchell
971-337-6715
Geoff Moser
971-202-3142
Marianne O’Neill-Tutor
971-337-6624
Tara Prince
971-413-0264
Kristina Teasley
971-930-9014
=========
Evolve is a program of Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon (MHAAO).
flyer p2

 

ROCC – Recovery Outreach Community Center – Getting Candid About Covid with Jill – Thursdays @ online via Zoom
Apr 15 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

 

logo

ROCC Salem presents online peer support

Getting Candid About Covid with Jill

Online – Saturdays 4:00PM-5:00 PM PST

In this group we will have not only have factual, science based education but also an open conversation to answer questions and address concerns, challenges and anxieties about Covid.

Click link below to attend group. You will be asked to register on ZOOM. It’s free and fast!

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZIpcumvqjsjG92MfEqHDTHKk7hf3B01owBa

ZOOM Meeting Id: 864 5074 0919 

ROCC has peer support by phone and other online groups, too!

Do you need someone to talk to?

We’re available for anyone to call peer support no matter what!

Call anytime between 11am – 7pm PST 7 days per week, weekdays and weekends.

971-718-8668 (MONDAY-THURSDAY)
971-718-0967 (TUESDAY-FRIDAY)
971-718-8670 (FRIDAY-MONDAY)

To learn about ROCC’s Online Groups visit:
http://www.roccsalem.org/online-groups

ROCC Mission Statement

Recovery Outreach Community Center (ROCC), is a safe place for people recovering from or who are interested in mental health, addiction, trauma, or other related issues. Our mission is to empower and respect others through peer-led service and peer-to-peer support. We want to encourage self-direction, personal responsibility and hope, by providing a safe place for people to share story and heal.

ROCC Principles

Principle I

The source of ROCC’s power is peer-to-peer relations. By sharing story and experiences, we lead each other into hope.

Principle II

Self-direction and personal recovery is ROCC’s goal. To be able to lead, control and choose your own recovery path will achieve a self-determined life.

Principle III

ROCC requires respectful conduct and encourages the voice of all. We must instill hope in the individual while fulfilling the values of the group.

ROCC Website:

https://www.roccsalem.org

ROCC Facebook Page:

https://www.facebook.com/ROCCSALEM/

ROCC Facebook Group for Chat:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/232944234571700/

Apr
16
Fri
000 Oregon Safe+Strong 24/7 Helpline 1-800-923-HELP (4357) Interpreters Available @ Phone, Toll-Free
Apr 16 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

002 Time Sensitive! – Resources & Assistance for Renters and Landlords during COVID-19 Pandemic
Apr 16 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
AR – Addictions Recovery – Virtual Online Meetings – Weekdays & Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Apr 16 all-day

Recovery Resources and Supports for Addictions Recovery During COVID-19

The following organizations provide links to daily online resources, supports and meetings for people recovering from addictions during COVID-19.  Events change daily and offerings serve a wide variety of people recovering many forms of addiction.

1) Digital Recovery – Meetings Schedule and Resources List with Links:

RecoveryResourcesPDX.com offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.  Plus you’ll find links to recovery resources, social services, food & housing, financial resources and COVID-19 information.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com/digital-meetings

Recovery Resources PDX Website:

logo

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com

 

2) The Alano Club of Portland – Meetings Schedule with Links

PortlandAlano.org offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily.

https://portlandalano.org/schedule/

Alano Club meeting types include:

AA: Alcoholics Anonymous
ACA: Adult Children of Alcoholics
Al-Anon: Families & Friends of Alcoholics
AVS: Attention Veritability Syndrome
CLA: Clutterers Anonymous
CMA: Crystal Meth Anonymous
CODA: Codependents Anonymous

COSA: Partners of Sex Addicts
DA: Debtors Anonymous
FA: Food Addicts
GA: Gamblers Anonymous
HA: Heroin Anonymous
MA: Marijuana Anonymous
NA: Narcotics Anonymous
OA: Overeaters Anonymous

RCA: Recovering Couple Anonymous
RR: Refuge Recovery
RTS: Recovery Toolkit Series
SAA: Sex Addicts Anonymous
SIA: Survivors of Incest Anonymous SLAA: Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous
SMART: Self Management And Recovery Training
WA: Workaholics Anonymous
WB: Wellbriety

Meeting Details:
(C) Closed
(G) Gay
(L) Lesbian
(MO) Men Only
(SM) Secular Meeting
(WO) Women Only

Portland Alano Club Website:

logo

https://portlandalano.org/

 

3) Oregon Recovery Network features listing of Online Meetings with Links

https://oregonrecoverynetwork.org/support/

Oregon Recovery Network Website:

Oregon Recovery Network

https://www.OregonRecoveryNetwork.org

 

And… last but not least…

4) MyRecoveryLink Digital Meetings Schedule and Links

Digital Meetings Online – Every Day, 7 Days per Week, Daily at:

4am, 6am, 9am, 12pm, 3pm, 6pm and 8pm PST and other times for other meetings

https://myrecoverylink.com/digital-recovery-meetings/

MyRecoveryLink Website:

logo

https://myrecoverylink.com/

Warmline – MHAAO – Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon – Evolve Peer Support Services – Multiple Numbers -Weekdays – 9am-5pm (PST) @ Phone
Apr 16 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

logo 144h

MHAAO is pleased to offer Evolve’s Peer Support by Phone for persons affected by the pandemic, wildfires, and similar issues.

Do you need someone to talk to?  We’re available for anyone to call peer support no matter what!

Happy to work with any age groups from any area.

Will make arrangements for virtual peer support if requested. 

Generally available @ 9am-5pm PST Weekdays, Monday through Friday.

See names and numbers below.

Flyer excerpt(s):
Have you been impacted by COVID-19 or the Oregon Wildfires?
Our Peer Support Specialists are here to help!
Call us Monday through Friday, 9am-5pm PST
==========
Monica Alexander
971-337-6716
Bill Beall
971-337-4550
Roman Becerra
971-930-9017
Bryan Corley
971-282-8101
Amber Hatkoff
971-352-0582
Molly Griggs
971-337-5506
Anthony Jarrard
971-337-4791
Grace Jo
503-314-3309
Amber Lakin
971-930-9404
Jenny Manzanares
971-241-1404
Howard Marlow
971-337-6293
Jesse Maxwell
971-202-6337
Larae Miller
503-719-1725
Brenda Mitchell
971-337-6715
Geoff Moser
971-202-3142
Marianne O’Neill-Tutor
971-337-6624
Tara Prince
971-413-0264
Kristina Teasley
971-930-9014
=========
Evolve is a program of Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon (MHAAO).
flyer p2

 

MHTTC: We Make The Path By Walking Webinar Series -Thursdays -January to April-2021 @ Fourthcoming
Apr 16 @ 11:00 am – 1:00 pm

 

‘We Make The Path By Walking’ Webinar Series


Logo/BannerThe Northwest MHTTC is excited to collaborate with Rebekah Demirel L.Ac.  MPCC to deliver live webinars as part of our Provider Well-Being activities.


Series Description:

We Make The Path By Walking is an eight-part webinar series designed to help us reckon with our turbulent world, offering support and direction for a clearer path forward and featuring an open forum.

Interactive sessions bring focus and connection through meaningful group discussion, opening opportunities for personal exploration, insight and the discovery of new ways to navigate life with resilience and hope.

Psychotherapeutic modalities drawn from East Asian medicine equips participants with self-nurturance skills such as, meditation and breathing practices, voice-work and body awareness techniques for day to day well-being and sharing with others.


Sessions:

01/22/21 – Stress Test: Join us as we challenge the “business as usual” mode of operating during a time of crisis, taking a deep dive into how we are coping with stress in our day to day lives.

02/05/21 – My Nervous System: This session examines the body/mind science of psychoneuroimmunology, discovering how our thoughts are the first and maybe the most important thing impacting our health and well-being.

02/19/21 – Investigating Thoughts: As we peel back the layers of our beliefs, we may be surprised by what we see. This session gives us tools to look closely at what works and what may not be serving us now.

03/05/21 – Head, Heart and Gut: If we learn to pay attention, our bodies can inform us how to make wise decisions, though early trauma may have shut down some of that knowing. This session looks at how we can retrieve our deep instincts, through observation and self-care.

03/19/21 – Tending Our Tender Selves: Some of us didn’t learn how to care for ourselves because we weren’t adequately cared for in crucial stages of development. This session is focused on re-learning how to tend to ourselves with tender care.

04/02/21 – Care Without Carrying: We know how much caring is needed in our world, though caring at times can feel like too heavy a load to carry. This session will focus on finding ways to keep caring, without carrying a burden.

04/16/21 – Walking a Parallel Path: For many of us working in the fields of mental health services or teaching, we may notice that the very issues we help our clients with, are things we recognize in ourselves. We’ll discuss how this useful teaching tool in our work not only gives us empathy, but can help us heal our own wounds.

04/30/21 – Walking the Path We Make: In this final session, we can look at how we move forward, changed by what we have experienced and continuing to feel as we go and see what path appears as the dust settles and we build a new world.


Presenter:

Rebekah Demirel HeadshotRebekah Demirel L.Ac.  MPCC is the founder and director of Trauma Integration Programs, with more than a decade as an ambulance paramedic, twenty-two years as a paramedic trainer, eighteen years of mental health counseling experience, specializing in traumatic stress and she is a licensed East Asian medicine practitioner and acupuncturist. Rebekah’s unique skill set and experience are informed by her own traumatic childhood and teen years spent on the street and in the foster care system, giving her a special familiarity and empathy for trauma and loss.


Want more information? Visit the Northwest MHTTC’s Resource Library and Websites by Topic  and sign up for our monthly newsletter for regular updates about events, trainings, and resources available to the Northwest region.


Northwest MHTTC

University of Washington Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
325 9th Avenue
Box 359911
Seattle, WA 98104
United States

northwest@mhttcnetwork.org

Northeast and Caribbean Mental Health Technology Transfer Center – Mental Health Service Providers Mutual Support Group – Third Mondays @ Fourthcoming
Apr 16 @ 11:00 am – 1:00 pm
Northeast and Caribbean Mental Health Technology Transfer Center - Mental Health Service Providers Mutual Support Group  - Third Mondays @ Fourthcoming
Mental Health Service Providers Mutual Support Group

About this Event

The Northeast & Caribbean Mental Health Technology Center invites you to our:

Mental Health Service Providers Mutual Support Group

Third Mondays – Online – 9:00 am to 10:00 pm PST

The Northeast and Caribbean MHTTC wants to continue to support you and your work during the COVID-19 public health crisis. Many of you have developed unique strategies for meeting the needs of service participants over the course of the year, but you may still be struggling with maintaining your own wellness and self-care. To help facilitate support and the sharing of wellness strategies and resources, we will be facilitating Mutual Support Calls for Thriving at Work During COVID-19.

Who: Community Mental Health Service Providers

What: One-hour virtual support group sessions to share experiences, exchange resources, develop skills, and provide and receive mutual support

When: The third Monday of each month, February through September 2021

Time: 12:00pm till 1:00pm (EST), starting on February 15th

Schedule dates: 2/15; 3/15; 4/19; 5/17; 6/21; 7/19; 8/16; 9/20

We will email registrants a Zoom meeting link as the date approaches.

To Register Use this Link: Click Here To Register

We look forward to connecting with you!

Facilitator: Bill Burns-Lynch, MA, LPC, has a 30+ year history of engagement in the psychiatric rehabilitation and mental health treatment community. He is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) in both Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Throughout his career, he has worked extensively in community mental health developing and supporting the implementation of innovative, effective, and evidenced-based psychiatric rehabilitation practices and service delivery programs. He has been a direct service provider, program developer, supervisor, administrator, trainer, consultant, researcher, and educator.

Currently, Bill is in private practice in Bordentown, New Jersey, where he provides psychotherapy and counseling services geared toward helping people identify, address, and overcome the distress associated with a number of lifestyle and life- changing events, including depression and anxiety, substance misuse, and substance use disorder, and living with grief and loss (through death, divorce, loss of relationships). Bill’s work focuses on the impact of trauma across the life span for men and women; exploring life challenges and choices related to transitioning to adulthood; and adults living with serious mental health conditions, helping to manage symptoms and develop recovery and wellness plans.

Apr
17
Sat
000 Oregon Safe+Strong 24/7 Helpline 1-800-923-HELP (4357) Interpreters Available @ Phone, Toll-Free
Apr 17 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

002 Time Sensitive! – Resources & Assistance for Renters and Landlords during COVID-19 Pandemic
Apr 17 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
AR – Addictions Recovery – Virtual Online Meetings – Weekdays & Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Apr 17 all-day

Recovery Resources and Supports for Addictions Recovery During COVID-19

The following organizations provide links to daily online resources, supports and meetings for people recovering from addictions during COVID-19.  Events change daily and offerings serve a wide variety of people recovering many forms of addiction.

1) Digital Recovery – Meetings Schedule and Resources List with Links:

RecoveryResourcesPDX.com offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.  Plus you’ll find links to recovery resources, social services, food & housing, financial resources and COVID-19 information.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com/digital-meetings

Recovery Resources PDX Website:

logo

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com

 

2) The Alano Club of Portland – Meetings Schedule with Links

PortlandAlano.org offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily.

https://portlandalano.org/schedule/

Alano Club meeting types include:

AA: Alcoholics Anonymous
ACA: Adult Children of Alcoholics
Al-Anon: Families & Friends of Alcoholics
AVS: Attention Veritability Syndrome
CLA: Clutterers Anonymous
CMA: Crystal Meth Anonymous
CODA: Codependents Anonymous

COSA: Partners of Sex Addicts
DA: Debtors Anonymous
FA: Food Addicts
GA: Gamblers Anonymous
HA: Heroin Anonymous
MA: Marijuana Anonymous
NA: Narcotics Anonymous
OA: Overeaters Anonymous

RCA: Recovering Couple Anonymous
RR: Refuge Recovery
RTS: Recovery Toolkit Series
SAA: Sex Addicts Anonymous
SIA: Survivors of Incest Anonymous SLAA: Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous
SMART: Self Management And Recovery Training
WA: Workaholics Anonymous
WB: Wellbriety

Meeting Details:
(C) Closed
(G) Gay
(L) Lesbian
(MO) Men Only
(SM) Secular Meeting
(WO) Women Only

Portland Alano Club Website:

logo

https://portlandalano.org/

 

3) Oregon Recovery Network features listing of Online Meetings with Links

https://oregonrecoverynetwork.org/support/

Oregon Recovery Network Website:

Oregon Recovery Network

https://www.OregonRecoveryNetwork.org

 

And… last but not least…

4) MyRecoveryLink Digital Meetings Schedule and Links

Digital Meetings Online – Every Day, 7 Days per Week, Daily at:

4am, 6am, 9am, 12pm, 3pm, 6pm and 8pm PST and other times for other meetings

https://myrecoverylink.com/digital-recovery-meetings/

MyRecoveryLink Website:

logo

https://myrecoverylink.com/

GS – Gender Spectrum – Online Virtual Groups for Parents and Teens – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Apr 17 all-day

logo

Gender Spectrum works to create gender sensitive and inclusive environments for all children and teens.  Gender Spectrum offers over 25 online groups for parents and teens.

In the Gender Spectrum Lounge you can find the list of groups to explore or sign up for.  There is a great variety of topics featured.

https://lounge.genderspectrum.org/groups/

Registration required.  See group description for contact information details.

Additional online groups, webinars, recordings, and events online including resources related to the pandemic at:

https://www.genderspectrum.org/articles/blog-covid-resources

Additional resources specific for schools and professionals, too.

Website:

https://www.genderspectrum.org

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/GenderSpectrum/

Twitter:

https://twitter.com/genderspectrum

 

Warmline – MHAAO – Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon – Evolve Peer Support Services – Multiple Numbers -Weekdays – 9am-5pm (PST) @ Phone
Apr 17 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

logo 144h

MHAAO is pleased to offer Evolve’s Peer Support by Phone for persons affected by the pandemic, wildfires, and similar issues.

Do you need someone to talk to?  We’re available for anyone to call peer support no matter what!

Happy to work with any age groups from any area.

Will make arrangements for virtual peer support if requested. 

Generally available @ 9am-5pm PST Weekdays, Monday through Friday.

See names and numbers below.

Flyer excerpt(s):
Have you been impacted by COVID-19 or the Oregon Wildfires?
Our Peer Support Specialists are here to help!
Call us Monday through Friday, 9am-5pm PST
==========
Monica Alexander
971-337-6716
Bill Beall
971-337-4550
Roman Becerra
971-930-9017
Bryan Corley
971-282-8101
Amber Hatkoff
971-352-0582
Molly Griggs
971-337-5506
Anthony Jarrard
971-337-4791
Grace Jo
503-314-3309
Amber Lakin
971-930-9404
Jenny Manzanares
971-241-1404
Howard Marlow
971-337-6293
Jesse Maxwell
971-202-6337
Larae Miller
503-719-1725
Brenda Mitchell
971-337-6715
Geoff Moser
971-202-3142
Marianne O’Neill-Tutor
971-337-6624
Tara Prince
971-413-0264
Kristina Teasley
971-930-9014
=========
Evolve is a program of Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon (MHAAO).
flyer p2

 

4D – 4D Recovery – Quarantine Support for People in Recovery – Saturdays @ Online Via ZOOM
Apr 17 @ 8:00 pm – 9:00 pm

4D Recovery (4th Dimension) hosts Quarantine Support Group for People in Recovery

logo

Saturdays from 8-9pm PST (60 minutes)

This is a an online peer support group for persons in recovery experiencing the effects of quarantine with the COVID-19 pandemic.

We want you to feel safe, welcome and heard.

If you have any questions or would like to get involved, contact Heather by phone at (971) 407-8196.

To join via Zoom:

https://zoom.us/meeting/709664735?occurrence=1586314800000

Apr
18
Sun
000 Oregon Safe+Strong 24/7 Helpline 1-800-923-HELP (4357) Interpreters Available @ Phone, Toll-Free
Apr 18 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

002 Time Sensitive! – Resources & Assistance for Renters and Landlords during COVID-19 Pandemic
Apr 18 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
AR – Addictions Recovery – Virtual Online Meetings – Weekdays & Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Apr 18 all-day

Recovery Resources and Supports for Addictions Recovery During COVID-19

The following organizations provide links to daily online resources, supports and meetings for people recovering from addictions during COVID-19.  Events change daily and offerings serve a wide variety of people recovering many forms of addiction.

1) Digital Recovery – Meetings Schedule and Resources List with Links:

RecoveryResourcesPDX.com offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.  Plus you’ll find links to recovery resources, social services, food & housing, financial resources and COVID-19 information.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com/digital-meetings

Recovery Resources PDX Website:

logo

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com

 

2) The Alano Club of Portland – Meetings Schedule with Links

PortlandAlano.org offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily.

https://portlandalano.org/schedule/

Alano Club meeting types include:

AA: Alcoholics Anonymous
ACA: Adult Children of Alcoholics
Al-Anon: Families & Friends of Alcoholics
AVS: Attention Veritability Syndrome
CLA: Clutterers Anonymous
CMA: Crystal Meth Anonymous
CODA: Codependents Anonymous

COSA: Partners of Sex Addicts
DA: Debtors Anonymous
FA: Food Addicts
GA: Gamblers Anonymous
HA: Heroin Anonymous
MA: Marijuana Anonymous
NA: Narcotics Anonymous
OA: Overeaters Anonymous

RCA: Recovering Couple Anonymous
RR: Refuge Recovery
RTS: Recovery Toolkit Series
SAA: Sex Addicts Anonymous
SIA: Survivors of Incest Anonymous SLAA: Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous
SMART: Self Management And Recovery Training
WA: Workaholics Anonymous
WB: Wellbriety

Meeting Details:
(C) Closed
(G) Gay
(L) Lesbian
(MO) Men Only
(SM) Secular Meeting
(WO) Women Only

Portland Alano Club Website:

logo

https://portlandalano.org/

 

3) Oregon Recovery Network features listing of Online Meetings with Links

https://oregonrecoverynetwork.org/support/

Oregon Recovery Network Website:

Oregon Recovery Network

https://www.OregonRecoveryNetwork.org

 

And… last but not least…

4) MyRecoveryLink Digital Meetings Schedule and Links

Digital Meetings Online – Every Day, 7 Days per Week, Daily at:

4am, 6am, 9am, 12pm, 3pm, 6pm and 8pm PST and other times for other meetings

https://myrecoverylink.com/digital-recovery-meetings/

MyRecoveryLink Website:

logo

https://myrecoverylink.com/

GS – Gender Spectrum – Online Virtual Groups for Parents and Teens – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Apr 18 all-day

logo

Gender Spectrum works to create gender sensitive and inclusive environments for all children and teens.  Gender Spectrum offers over 25 online groups for parents and teens.

In the Gender Spectrum Lounge you can find the list of groups to explore or sign up for.  There is a great variety of topics featured.

https://lounge.genderspectrum.org/groups/

Registration required.  See group description for contact information details.

Additional online groups, webinars, recordings, and events online including resources related to the pandemic at:

https://www.genderspectrum.org/articles/blog-covid-resources

Additional resources specific for schools and professionals, too.

Website:

https://www.genderspectrum.org

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/GenderSpectrum/

Twitter:

https://twitter.com/genderspectrum

 

Warmline – MHAAO – Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon – Evolve Peer Support Services – Multiple Numbers -Weekdays – 9am-5pm (PST) @ Phone
Apr 18 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

logo 144h

MHAAO is pleased to offer Evolve’s Peer Support by Phone for persons affected by the pandemic, wildfires, and similar issues.

Do you need someone to talk to?  We’re available for anyone to call peer support no matter what!

Happy to work with any age groups from any area.

Will make arrangements for virtual peer support if requested. 

Generally available @ 9am-5pm PST Weekdays, Monday through Friday.

See names and numbers below.

Flyer excerpt(s):
Have you been impacted by COVID-19 or the Oregon Wildfires?
Our Peer Support Specialists are here to help!
Call us Monday through Friday, 9am-5pm PST
==========
Monica Alexander
971-337-6716
Bill Beall
971-337-4550
Roman Becerra
971-930-9017
Bryan Corley
971-282-8101
Amber Hatkoff
971-352-0582
Molly Griggs
971-337-5506
Anthony Jarrard
971-337-4791
Grace Jo
503-314-3309
Amber Lakin
971-930-9404
Jenny Manzanares
971-241-1404
Howard Marlow
971-337-6293
Jesse Maxwell
971-202-6337
Larae Miller
503-719-1725
Brenda Mitchell
971-337-6715
Geoff Moser
971-202-3142
Marianne O’Neill-Tutor
971-337-6624
Tara Prince
971-413-0264
Kristina Teasley
971-930-9014
=========
Evolve is a program of Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon (MHAAO).
flyer p2

 

Apr
19
Mon
000 Oregon Safe+Strong 24/7 Helpline 1-800-923-HELP (4357) Interpreters Available @ Phone, Toll-Free
Apr 19 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

002 Time Sensitive! – Resources & Assistance for Renters and Landlords during COVID-19 Pandemic
Apr 19 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
AR – Addictions Recovery – Virtual Online Meetings – Weekdays & Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Apr 19 all-day

Recovery Resources and Supports for Addictions Recovery During COVID-19

The following organizations provide links to daily online resources, supports and meetings for people recovering from addictions during COVID-19.  Events change daily and offerings serve a wide variety of people recovering many forms of addiction.

1) Digital Recovery – Meetings Schedule and Resources List with Links:

RecoveryResourcesPDX.com offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.  Plus you’ll find links to recovery resources, social services, food & housing, financial resources and COVID-19 information.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com/digital-meetings

Recovery Resources PDX Website:

logo

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com

 

2) The Alano Club of Portland – Meetings Schedule with Links

PortlandAlano.org offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily.

https://portlandalano.org/schedule/

Alano Club meeting types include:

AA: Alcoholics Anonymous
ACA: Adult Children of Alcoholics
Al-Anon: Families & Friends of Alcoholics
AVS: Attention Veritability Syndrome
CLA: Clutterers Anonymous
CMA: Crystal Meth Anonymous
CODA: Codependents Anonymous

COSA: Partners of Sex Addicts
DA: Debtors Anonymous
FA: Food Addicts
GA: Gamblers Anonymous
HA: Heroin Anonymous
MA: Marijuana Anonymous
NA: Narcotics Anonymous
OA: Overeaters Anonymous

RCA: Recovering Couple Anonymous
RR: Refuge Recovery
RTS: Recovery Toolkit Series
SAA: Sex Addicts Anonymous
SIA: Survivors of Incest Anonymous SLAA: Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous
SMART: Self Management And Recovery Training
WA: Workaholics Anonymous
WB: Wellbriety

Meeting Details:
(C) Closed
(G) Gay
(L) Lesbian
(MO) Men Only
(SM) Secular Meeting
(WO) Women Only

Portland Alano Club Website:

logo

https://portlandalano.org/

 

3) Oregon Recovery Network features listing of Online Meetings with Links

https://oregonrecoverynetwork.org/support/

Oregon Recovery Network Website:

Oregon Recovery Network

https://www.OregonRecoveryNetwork.org

 

And… last but not least…

4) MyRecoveryLink Digital Meetings Schedule and Links

Digital Meetings Online – Every Day, 7 Days per Week, Daily at:

4am, 6am, 9am, 12pm, 3pm, 6pm and 8pm PST and other times for other meetings

https://myrecoverylink.com/digital-recovery-meetings/

MyRecoveryLink Website:

logo

https://myrecoverylink.com/

GS – Gender Spectrum – Online Virtual Groups for Parents and Teens – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Apr 19 all-day

logo

Gender Spectrum works to create gender sensitive and inclusive environments for all children and teens.  Gender Spectrum offers over 25 online groups for parents and teens.

In the Gender Spectrum Lounge you can find the list of groups to explore or sign up for.  There is a great variety of topics featured.

https://lounge.genderspectrum.org/groups/

Registration required.  See group description for contact information details.

Additional online groups, webinars, recordings, and events online including resources related to the pandemic at:

https://www.genderspectrum.org/articles/blog-covid-resources

Additional resources specific for schools and professionals, too.

Website:

https://www.genderspectrum.org

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/GenderSpectrum/

Twitter:

https://twitter.com/genderspectrum

 

NEC/MHTTC – Northeast and Caribbean Mental Health Technology Transfer Center – Mental Health Service Providers Mutual Support Group – Third Mondays @ Online Via Zoom
Apr 19 @ 9:00 am – 10:00 am
Mental Health Service Providers Mutual Support Group

About this Event

The Northeast & Caribbean Mental Health Technology Center invites you to our:

Mental Health Service Providers Mutual Support Group

Third Mondays – Online – 9:00 am to 10:00 pm PST

The Northeast and Caribbean MHTTC wants to continue to support you and your work during the COVID-19 public health crisis. Many of you have developed unique strategies for meeting the needs of service participants over the course of the year, but you may still be struggling with maintaining your own wellness and self-care. To help facilitate support and the sharing of wellness strategies and resources, we will be facilitating Mutual Support Calls for Thriving at Work During COVID-19.

Who: Community Mental Health Service Providers

What: One-hour virtual support group sessions to share experiences, exchange resources, develop skills, and provide and receive mutual support

When: The third Monday of each month, February through September 2021

Time: 12:00pm till 1:00pm (EST), starting on February 15th

Schedule dates: 2/15; 3/15; 4/19; 5/17; 6/21; 7/19; 8/16; 9/20

We will email registrants a Zoom meeting link as the date approaches.

To Register Use this Link: Click Here To Register

We look forward to connecting with you!

Facilitator: Bill Burns-Lynch, MA, LPC, has a 30+ year history of engagement in the psychiatric rehabilitation and mental health treatment community. He is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) in both Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Throughout his career, he has worked extensively in community mental health developing and supporting the implementation of innovative, effective, and evidenced-based psychiatric rehabilitation practices and service delivery programs. He has been a direct service provider, program developer, supervisor, administrator, trainer, consultant, researcher, and educator.

Currently, Bill is in private practice in Bordentown, New Jersey, where he provides psychotherapy and counseling services geared toward helping people identify, address, and overcome the distress associated with a number of lifestyle and life- changing events, including depression and anxiety, substance misuse, and substance use disorder, and living with grief and loss (through death, divorce, loss of relationships). Bill’s work focuses on the impact of trauma across the life span for men and women; exploring life challenges and choices related to transitioning to adulthood; and adults living with serious mental health conditions, helping to manage symptoms and develop recovery and wellness plans.

Warmline – MHAAO – Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon – Evolve Peer Support Services – Multiple Numbers -Weekdays – 9am-5pm (PST) @ Phone
Apr 19 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

logo 144h

MHAAO is pleased to offer Evolve’s Peer Support by Phone for persons affected by the pandemic, wildfires, and similar issues.

Do you need someone to talk to?  We’re available for anyone to call peer support no matter what!

Happy to work with any age groups from any area.

Will make arrangements for virtual peer support if requested. 

Generally available @ 9am-5pm PST Weekdays, Monday through Friday.

See names and numbers below.

Flyer excerpt(s):
Have you been impacted by COVID-19 or the Oregon Wildfires?
Our Peer Support Specialists are here to help!
Call us Monday through Friday, 9am-5pm PST
==========
Monica Alexander
971-337-6716
Bill Beall
971-337-4550
Roman Becerra
971-930-9017
Bryan Corley
971-282-8101
Amber Hatkoff
971-352-0582
Molly Griggs
971-337-5506
Anthony Jarrard
971-337-4791
Grace Jo
503-314-3309
Amber Lakin
971-930-9404
Jenny Manzanares
971-241-1404
Howard Marlow
971-337-6293
Jesse Maxwell
971-202-6337
Larae Miller
503-719-1725
Brenda Mitchell
971-337-6715
Geoff Moser
971-202-3142
Marianne O’Neill-Tutor
971-337-6624
Tara Prince
971-413-0264
Kristina Teasley
971-930-9014
=========
Evolve is a program of Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon (MHAAO).
flyer p2

 

FT – FolkTime – YANA – You Are Not Alone – Support Group for People Experienced Isolation Due to Depression, Anxiety, And/Or Agoraphobia – Mondays @ Online via Zoom
Apr 19 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

 

YANA – YOU ARE NOT ALONE

Support Group For People experiencing isolation due to depression, anxiety, and/or agoraphobia

Mondays, 12:00pm to 1:00pm PST

The purpose of this group is to connect with people who are experiencing, or have experienced, isolation due to depression, anxiety, agoraphobia, and/or COVID-19. The goal of this group is to provide a space where people can come together for support and engagement with others. Various tools for coping and recovery will be offered while discussions focus on personal experiences

ZOOM MEETING:Use the Link Below

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86267295991

Meeting ID: 862 6729 5991

CONTACTS

Website:  http://www.FolkTime.org/

Email: admin@folktime.org

Phone: (503) 238-6428

Apr
20
Tue
000 Oregon Safe+Strong 24/7 Helpline 1-800-923-HELP (4357) Interpreters Available @ Phone, Toll-Free
Apr 20 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

002 Time Sensitive! – Resources & Assistance for Renters and Landlords during COVID-19 Pandemic
Apr 20 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
AR – Addictions Recovery – Virtual Online Meetings – Weekdays & Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Apr 20 all-day

Recovery Resources and Supports for Addictions Recovery During COVID-19

The following organizations provide links to daily online resources, supports and meetings for people recovering from addictions during COVID-19.  Events change daily and offerings serve a wide variety of people recovering many forms of addiction.

1) Digital Recovery – Meetings Schedule and Resources List with Links:

RecoveryResourcesPDX.com offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.  Plus you’ll find links to recovery resources, social services, food & housing, financial resources and COVID-19 information.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com/digital-meetings

Recovery Resources PDX Website:

logo

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com

 

2) The Alano Club of Portland – Meetings Schedule with Links

PortlandAlano.org offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily.

https://portlandalano.org/schedule/

Alano Club meeting types include:

AA: Alcoholics Anonymous
ACA: Adult Children of Alcoholics
Al-Anon: Families & Friends of Alcoholics
AVS: Attention Veritability Syndrome
CLA: Clutterers Anonymous
CMA: Crystal Meth Anonymous
CODA: Codependents Anonymous

COSA: Partners of Sex Addicts
DA: Debtors Anonymous
FA: Food Addicts
GA: Gamblers Anonymous
HA: Heroin Anonymous
MA: Marijuana Anonymous
NA: Narcotics Anonymous
OA: Overeaters Anonymous

RCA: Recovering Couple Anonymous
RR: Refuge Recovery
RTS: Recovery Toolkit Series
SAA: Sex Addicts Anonymous
SIA: Survivors of Incest Anonymous SLAA: Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous
SMART: Self Management And Recovery Training
WA: Workaholics Anonymous
WB: Wellbriety

Meeting Details:
(C) Closed
(G) Gay
(L) Lesbian
(MO) Men Only
(SM) Secular Meeting
(WO) Women Only

Portland Alano Club Website:

logo

https://portlandalano.org/

 

3) Oregon Recovery Network features listing of Online Meetings with Links

https://oregonrecoverynetwork.org/support/

Oregon Recovery Network Website:

Oregon Recovery Network

https://www.OregonRecoveryNetwork.org

 

And… last but not least…

4) MyRecoveryLink Digital Meetings Schedule and Links

Digital Meetings Online – Every Day, 7 Days per Week, Daily at:

4am, 6am, 9am, 12pm, 3pm, 6pm and 8pm PST and other times for other meetings

https://myrecoverylink.com/digital-recovery-meetings/

MyRecoveryLink Website:

logo

https://myrecoverylink.com/

GS – Gender Spectrum – Online Virtual Groups for Parents and Teens – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Apr 20 all-day

logo

Gender Spectrum works to create gender sensitive and inclusive environments for all children and teens.  Gender Spectrum offers over 25 online groups for parents and teens.

In the Gender Spectrum Lounge you can find the list of groups to explore or sign up for.  There is a great variety of topics featured.

https://lounge.genderspectrum.org/groups/

Registration required.  See group description for contact information details.

Additional online groups, webinars, recordings, and events online including resources related to the pandemic at:

https://www.genderspectrum.org/articles/blog-covid-resources

Additional resources specific for schools and professionals, too.

Website:

https://www.genderspectrum.org

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/GenderSpectrum/

Twitter:

https://twitter.com/genderspectrum

 

Warmline – MHAAO – Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon – Evolve Peer Support Services – Multiple Numbers -Weekdays – 9am-5pm (PST) @ Phone
Apr 20 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

logo 144h

MHAAO is pleased to offer Evolve’s Peer Support by Phone for persons affected by the pandemic, wildfires, and similar issues.

Do you need someone to talk to?  We’re available for anyone to call peer support no matter what!

Happy to work with any age groups from any area.

Will make arrangements for virtual peer support if requested. 

Generally available @ 9am-5pm PST Weekdays, Monday through Friday.

See names and numbers below.

Flyer excerpt(s):
Have you been impacted by COVID-19 or the Oregon Wildfires?
Our Peer Support Specialists are here to help!
Call us Monday through Friday, 9am-5pm PST
==========
Monica Alexander
971-337-6716
Bill Beall
971-337-4550
Roman Becerra
971-930-9017
Bryan Corley
971-282-8101
Amber Hatkoff
971-352-0582
Molly Griggs
971-337-5506
Anthony Jarrard
971-337-4791
Grace Jo
503-314-3309
Amber Lakin
971-930-9404
Jenny Manzanares
971-241-1404
Howard Marlow
971-337-6293
Jesse Maxwell
971-202-6337
Larae Miller
503-719-1725
Brenda Mitchell
971-337-6715
Geoff Moser
971-202-3142
Marianne O’Neill-Tutor
971-337-6624
Tara Prince
971-413-0264
Kristina Teasley
971-930-9014
=========
Evolve is a program of Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon (MHAAO).
flyer p2

 

Apr
21
Wed
000 Oregon Safe+Strong 24/7 Helpline 1-800-923-HELP (4357) Interpreters Available @ Phone, Toll-Free
Apr 21 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

002 Time Sensitive! – Resources & Assistance for Renters and Landlords during COVID-19 Pandemic
Apr 21 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
AR – Addictions Recovery – Virtual Online Meetings – Weekdays & Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Apr 21 all-day

Recovery Resources and Supports for Addictions Recovery During COVID-19

The following organizations provide links to daily online resources, supports and meetings for people recovering from addictions during COVID-19.  Events change daily and offerings serve a wide variety of people recovering many forms of addiction.

1) Digital Recovery – Meetings Schedule and Resources List with Links:

RecoveryResourcesPDX.com offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.  Plus you’ll find links to recovery resources, social services, food & housing, financial resources and COVID-19 information.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com/digital-meetings

Recovery Resources PDX Website:

logo

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com

 

2) The Alano Club of Portland – Meetings Schedule with Links

PortlandAlano.org offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily.

https://portlandalano.org/schedule/

Alano Club meeting types include:

AA: Alcoholics Anonymous
ACA: Adult Children of Alcoholics
Al-Anon: Families & Friends of Alcoholics
AVS: Attention Veritability Syndrome
CLA: Clutterers Anonymous
CMA: Crystal Meth Anonymous
CODA: Codependents Anonymous

COSA: Partners of Sex Addicts
DA: Debtors Anonymous
FA: Food Addicts
GA: Gamblers Anonymous
HA: Heroin Anonymous
MA: Marijuana Anonymous
NA: Narcotics Anonymous
OA: Overeaters Anonymous

RCA: Recovering Couple Anonymous
RR: Refuge Recovery
RTS: Recovery Toolkit Series
SAA: Sex Addicts Anonymous
SIA: Survivors of Incest Anonymous SLAA: Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous
SMART: Self Management And Recovery Training
WA: Workaholics Anonymous
WB: Wellbriety

Meeting Details:
(C) Closed
(G) Gay
(L) Lesbian
(MO) Men Only
(SM) Secular Meeting
(WO) Women Only

Portland Alano Club Website:

logo

https://portlandalano.org/

 

3) Oregon Recovery Network features listing of Online Meetings with Links

https://oregonrecoverynetwork.org/support/

Oregon Recovery Network Website:

Oregon Recovery Network

https://www.OregonRecoveryNetwork.org

 

And… last but not least…

4) MyRecoveryLink Digital Meetings Schedule and Links

Digital Meetings Online – Every Day, 7 Days per Week, Daily at:

4am, 6am, 9am, 12pm, 3pm, 6pm and 8pm PST and other times for other meetings

https://myrecoverylink.com/digital-recovery-meetings/

MyRecoveryLink Website:

logo

https://myrecoverylink.com/

GS – Gender Spectrum – Online Virtual Groups for Parents and Teens – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Apr 21 all-day

logo

Gender Spectrum works to create gender sensitive and inclusive environments for all children and teens.  Gender Spectrum offers over 25 online groups for parents and teens.

In the Gender Spectrum Lounge you can find the list of groups to explore or sign up for.  There is a great variety of topics featured.

https://lounge.genderspectrum.org/groups/

Registration required.  See group description for contact information details.

Additional online groups, webinars, recordings, and events online including resources related to the pandemic at:

https://www.genderspectrum.org/articles/blog-covid-resources

Additional resources specific for schools and professionals, too.

Website:

https://www.genderspectrum.org

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/GenderSpectrum/

Twitter:

https://twitter.com/genderspectrum

 

Warmline – MHAAO – Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon – Evolve Peer Support Services – Multiple Numbers -Weekdays – 9am-5pm (PST) @ Phone
Apr 21 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

logo 144h

MHAAO is pleased to offer Evolve’s Peer Support by Phone for persons affected by the pandemic, wildfires, and similar issues.

Do you need someone to talk to?  We’re available for anyone to call peer support no matter what!

Happy to work with any age groups from any area.

Will make arrangements for virtual peer support if requested. 

Generally available @ 9am-5pm PST Weekdays, Monday through Friday.

See names and numbers below.

Flyer excerpt(s):
Have you been impacted by COVID-19 or the Oregon Wildfires?
Our Peer Support Specialists are here to help!
Call us Monday through Friday, 9am-5pm PST
==========
Monica Alexander
971-337-6716
Bill Beall
971-337-4550
Roman Becerra
971-930-9017
Bryan Corley
971-282-8101
Amber Hatkoff
971-352-0582
Molly Griggs
971-337-5506
Anthony Jarrard
971-337-4791
Grace Jo
503-314-3309
Amber Lakin
971-930-9404
Jenny Manzanares
971-241-1404
Howard Marlow
971-337-6293
Jesse Maxwell
971-202-6337
Larae Miller
503-719-1725
Brenda Mitchell
971-337-6715
Geoff Moser
971-202-3142
Marianne O’Neill-Tutor
971-337-6624
Tara Prince
971-413-0264
Kristina Teasley
971-930-9014
=========
Evolve is a program of Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon (MHAAO).
flyer p2

 

Apr
22
Thu
000 Oregon Safe+Strong 24/7 Helpline 1-800-923-HELP (4357) Interpreters Available @ Phone, Toll-Free
Apr 22 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

002 Time Sensitive! – Resources & Assistance for Renters and Landlords during COVID-19 Pandemic
Apr 22 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
AR – Addictions Recovery – Virtual Online Meetings – Weekdays & Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Apr 22 all-day

Recovery Resources and Supports for Addictions Recovery During COVID-19

The following organizations provide links to daily online resources, supports and meetings for people recovering from addictions during COVID-19.  Events change daily and offerings serve a wide variety of people recovering many forms of addiction.

1) Digital Recovery – Meetings Schedule and Resources List with Links:

RecoveryResourcesPDX.com offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.  Plus you’ll find links to recovery resources, social services, food & housing, financial resources and COVID-19 information.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com/digital-meetings

Recovery Resources PDX Website:

logo

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com

 

2) The Alano Club of Portland – Meetings Schedule with Links

PortlandAlano.org offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily.

https://portlandalano.org/schedule/

Alano Club meeting types include:

AA: Alcoholics Anonymous
ACA: Adult Children of Alcoholics
Al-Anon: Families & Friends of Alcoholics
AVS: Attention Veritability Syndrome
CLA: Clutterers Anonymous
CMA: Crystal Meth Anonymous
CODA: Codependents Anonymous

COSA: Partners of Sex Addicts
DA: Debtors Anonymous
FA: Food Addicts
GA: Gamblers Anonymous
HA: Heroin Anonymous
MA: Marijuana Anonymous
NA: Narcotics Anonymous
OA: Overeaters Anonymous

RCA: Recovering Couple Anonymous
RR: Refuge Recovery
RTS: Recovery Toolkit Series
SAA: Sex Addicts Anonymous
SIA: Survivors of Incest Anonymous SLAA: Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous
SMART: Self Management And Recovery Training
WA: Workaholics Anonymous
WB: Wellbriety

Meeting Details:
(C) Closed
(G) Gay
(L) Lesbian
(MO) Men Only
(SM) Secular Meeting
(WO) Women Only

Portland Alano Club Website:

logo

https://portlandalano.org/

 

3) Oregon Recovery Network features listing of Online Meetings with Links

https://oregonrecoverynetwork.org/support/

Oregon Recovery Network Website:

Oregon Recovery Network

https://www.OregonRecoveryNetwork.org

 

And… last but not least…

4) MyRecoveryLink Digital Meetings Schedule and Links

Digital Meetings Online – Every Day, 7 Days per Week, Daily at:

4am, 6am, 9am, 12pm, 3pm, 6pm and 8pm PST and other times for other meetings

https://myrecoverylink.com/digital-recovery-meetings/

MyRecoveryLink Website:

logo

https://myrecoverylink.com/

GS – Gender Spectrum – Online Virtual Groups for Parents and Teens – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Apr 22 all-day

logo

Gender Spectrum works to create gender sensitive and inclusive environments for all children and teens.  Gender Spectrum offers over 25 online groups for parents and teens.

In the Gender Spectrum Lounge you can find the list of groups to explore or sign up for.  There is a great variety of topics featured.

https://lounge.genderspectrum.org/groups/

Registration required.  See group description for contact information details.

Additional online groups, webinars, recordings, and events online including resources related to the pandemic at:

https://www.genderspectrum.org/articles/blog-covid-resources

Additional resources specific for schools and professionals, too.

Website:

https://www.genderspectrum.org

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/GenderSpectrum/

Twitter:

https://twitter.com/genderspectrum

 

Warmline – MHAAO – Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon – Evolve Peer Support Services – Multiple Numbers -Weekdays – 9am-5pm (PST) @ Phone
Apr 22 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

logo 144h

MHAAO is pleased to offer Evolve’s Peer Support by Phone for persons affected by the pandemic, wildfires, and similar issues.

Do you need someone to talk to?  We’re available for anyone to call peer support no matter what!

Happy to work with any age groups from any area.

Will make arrangements for virtual peer support if requested. 

Generally available @ 9am-5pm PST Weekdays, Monday through Friday.

See names and numbers below.

Flyer excerpt(s):
Have you been impacted by COVID-19 or the Oregon Wildfires?
Our Peer Support Specialists are here to help!
Call us Monday through Friday, 9am-5pm PST
==========
Monica Alexander
971-337-6716
Bill Beall
971-337-4550
Roman Becerra
971-930-9017
Bryan Corley
971-282-8101
Amber Hatkoff
971-352-0582
Molly Griggs
971-337-5506
Anthony Jarrard
971-337-4791
Grace Jo
503-314-3309
Amber Lakin
971-930-9404
Jenny Manzanares
971-241-1404
Howard Marlow
971-337-6293
Jesse Maxwell
971-202-6337
Larae Miller
503-719-1725
Brenda Mitchell
971-337-6715
Geoff Moser
971-202-3142
Marianne O’Neill-Tutor
971-337-6624
Tara Prince
971-413-0264
Kristina Teasley
971-930-9014
=========
Evolve is a program of Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon (MHAAO).
flyer p2

 

ROCC – Recovery Outreach Community Center – Getting Candid About Covid with Jill – Thursdays @ online via Zoom
Apr 22 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

 

logo

ROCC Salem presents online peer support

Getting Candid About Covid with Jill

Online – Saturdays 4:00PM-5:00 PM PST

In this group we will have not only have factual, science based education but also an open conversation to answer questions and address concerns, challenges and anxieties about Covid.

Click link below to attend group. You will be asked to register on ZOOM. It’s free and fast!

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZIpcumvqjsjG92MfEqHDTHKk7hf3B01owBa

ZOOM Meeting Id: 864 5074 0919 

ROCC has peer support by phone and other online groups, too!

Do you need someone to talk to?

We’re available for anyone to call peer support no matter what!

Call anytime between 11am – 7pm PST 7 days per week, weekdays and weekends.

971-718-8668 (MONDAY-THURSDAY)
971-718-0967 (TUESDAY-FRIDAY)
971-718-8670 (FRIDAY-MONDAY)

To learn about ROCC’s Online Groups visit:
http://www.roccsalem.org/online-groups

ROCC Mission Statement

Recovery Outreach Community Center (ROCC), is a safe place for people recovering from or who are interested in mental health, addiction, trauma, or other related issues. Our mission is to empower and respect others through peer-led service and peer-to-peer support. We want to encourage self-direction, personal responsibility and hope, by providing a safe place for people to share story and heal.

ROCC Principles

Principle I

The source of ROCC’s power is peer-to-peer relations. By sharing story and experiences, we lead each other into hope.

Principle II

Self-direction and personal recovery is ROCC’s goal. To be able to lead, control and choose your own recovery path will achieve a self-determined life.

Principle III

ROCC requires respectful conduct and encourages the voice of all. We must instill hope in the individual while fulfilling the values of the group.

ROCC Website:

https://www.roccsalem.org

ROCC Facebook Page:

https://www.facebook.com/ROCCSALEM/

ROCC Facebook Group for Chat:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/232944234571700/

Apr
23
Fri
000 Oregon Safe+Strong 24/7 Helpline 1-800-923-HELP (4357) Interpreters Available @ Phone, Toll-Free
Apr 23 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

002 Time Sensitive! – Resources & Assistance for Renters and Landlords during COVID-19 Pandemic
Apr 23 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
AR – Addictions Recovery – Virtual Online Meetings – Weekdays & Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Apr 23 all-day

Recovery Resources and Supports for Addictions Recovery During COVID-19

The following organizations provide links to daily online resources, supports and meetings for people recovering from addictions during COVID-19.  Events change daily and offerings serve a wide variety of people recovering many forms of addiction.

1) Digital Recovery – Meetings Schedule and Resources List with Links:

RecoveryResourcesPDX.com offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.  Plus you’ll find links to recovery resources, social services, food & housing, financial resources and COVID-19 information.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com/digital-meetings

Recovery Resources PDX Website:

logo

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com

 

2) The Alano Club of Portland – Meetings Schedule with Links

PortlandAlano.org offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily.

https://portlandalano.org/schedule/

Alano Club meeting types include:

AA: Alcoholics Anonymous
ACA: Adult Children of Alcoholics
Al-Anon: Families & Friends of Alcoholics
AVS: Attention Veritability Syndrome
CLA: Clutterers Anonymous
CMA: Crystal Meth Anonymous
CODA: Codependents Anonymous

COSA: Partners of Sex Addicts
DA: Debtors Anonymous
FA: Food Addicts
GA: Gamblers Anonymous
HA: Heroin Anonymous
MA: Marijuana Anonymous
NA: Narcotics Anonymous
OA: Overeaters Anonymous

RCA: Recovering Couple Anonymous
RR: Refuge Recovery
RTS: Recovery Toolkit Series
SAA: Sex Addicts Anonymous
SIA: Survivors of Incest Anonymous SLAA: Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous
SMART: Self Management And Recovery Training
WA: Workaholics Anonymous
WB: Wellbriety

Meeting Details:
(C) Closed
(G) Gay
(L) Lesbian
(MO) Men Only
(SM) Secular Meeting
(WO) Women Only

Portland Alano Club Website:

logo

https://portlandalano.org/

 

3) Oregon Recovery Network features listing of Online Meetings with Links

https://oregonrecoverynetwork.org/support/

Oregon Recovery Network Website:

Oregon Recovery Network

https://www.OregonRecoveryNetwork.org

 

And… last but not least…

4) MyRecoveryLink Digital Meetings Schedule and Links

Digital Meetings Online – Every Day, 7 Days per Week, Daily at:

4am, 6am, 9am, 12pm, 3pm, 6pm and 8pm PST and other times for other meetings

https://myrecoverylink.com/digital-recovery-meetings/

MyRecoveryLink Website:

logo

https://myrecoverylink.com/

Warmline – MHAAO – Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon – Evolve Peer Support Services – Multiple Numbers -Weekdays – 9am-5pm (PST) @ Phone
Apr 23 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

logo 144h

MHAAO is pleased to offer Evolve’s Peer Support by Phone for persons affected by the pandemic, wildfires, and similar issues.

Do you need someone to talk to?  We’re available for anyone to call peer support no matter what!

Happy to work with any age groups from any area.

Will make arrangements for virtual peer support if requested. 

Generally available @ 9am-5pm PST Weekdays, Monday through Friday.

See names and numbers below.

Flyer excerpt(s):
Have you been impacted by COVID-19 or the Oregon Wildfires?
Our Peer Support Specialists are here to help!
Call us Monday through Friday, 9am-5pm PST
==========
Monica Alexander
971-337-6716
Bill Beall
971-337-4550
Roman Becerra
971-930-9017
Bryan Corley
971-282-8101
Amber Hatkoff
971-352-0582
Molly Griggs
971-337-5506
Anthony Jarrard
971-337-4791
Grace Jo
503-314-3309
Amber Lakin
971-930-9404
Jenny Manzanares
971-241-1404
Howard Marlow
971-337-6293
Jesse Maxwell
971-202-6337
Larae Miller
503-719-1725
Brenda Mitchell
971-337-6715
Geoff Moser
971-202-3142
Marianne O’Neill-Tutor
971-337-6624
Tara Prince
971-413-0264
Kristina Teasley
971-930-9014
=========
Evolve is a program of Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon (MHAAO).
flyer p2

 

Apr
24
Sat
000 Oregon Safe+Strong 24/7 Helpline 1-800-923-HELP (4357) Interpreters Available @ Phone, Toll-Free
Apr 24 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

002 Time Sensitive! – Resources & Assistance for Renters and Landlords during COVID-19 Pandemic
Apr 24 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
AR – Addictions Recovery – Virtual Online Meetings – Weekdays & Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Apr 24 all-day

Recovery Resources and Supports for Addictions Recovery During COVID-19

The following organizations provide links to daily online resources, supports and meetings for people recovering from addictions during COVID-19.  Events change daily and offerings serve a wide variety of people recovering many forms of addiction.

1) Digital Recovery – Meetings Schedule and Resources List with Links:

RecoveryResourcesPDX.com offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.  Plus you’ll find links to recovery resources, social services, food & housing, financial resources and COVID-19 information.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com/digital-meetings

Recovery Resources PDX Website:

logo

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com

 

2) The Alano Club of Portland – Meetings Schedule with Links

PortlandAlano.org offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily.

https://portlandalano.org/schedule/

Alano Club meeting types include:

AA: Alcoholics Anonymous
ACA: Adult Children of Alcoholics
Al-Anon: Families & Friends of Alcoholics
AVS: Attention Veritability Syndrome
CLA: Clutterers Anonymous
CMA: Crystal Meth Anonymous
CODA: Codependents Anonymous

COSA: Partners of Sex Addicts
DA: Debtors Anonymous
FA: Food Addicts
GA: Gamblers Anonymous
HA: Heroin Anonymous
MA: Marijuana Anonymous
NA: Narcotics Anonymous
OA: Overeaters Anonymous

RCA: Recovering Couple Anonymous
RR: Refuge Recovery
RTS: Recovery Toolkit Series
SAA: Sex Addicts Anonymous
SIA: Survivors of Incest Anonymous SLAA: Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous
SMART: Self Management And Recovery Training
WA: Workaholics Anonymous
WB: Wellbriety

Meeting Details:
(C) Closed
(G) Gay
(L) Lesbian
(MO) Men Only
(SM) Secular Meeting
(WO) Women Only

Portland Alano Club Website:

logo

https://portlandalano.org/

 

3) Oregon Recovery Network features listing of Online Meetings with Links

https://oregonrecoverynetwork.org/support/

Oregon Recovery Network Website:

Oregon Recovery Network

https://www.OregonRecoveryNetwork.org

 

And… last but not least…

4) MyRecoveryLink Digital Meetings Schedule and Links

Digital Meetings Online – Every Day, 7 Days per Week, Daily at:

4am, 6am, 9am, 12pm, 3pm, 6pm and 8pm PST and other times for other meetings

https://myrecoverylink.com/digital-recovery-meetings/

MyRecoveryLink Website:

logo

https://myrecoverylink.com/

GS – Gender Spectrum – Online Virtual Groups for Parents and Teens – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Apr 24 all-day

logo

Gender Spectrum works to create gender sensitive and inclusive environments for all children and teens.  Gender Spectrum offers over 25 online groups for parents and teens.

In the Gender Spectrum Lounge you can find the list of groups to explore or sign up for.  There is a great variety of topics featured.

https://lounge.genderspectrum.org/groups/

Registration required.  See group description for contact information details.

Additional online groups, webinars, recordings, and events online including resources related to the pandemic at:

https://www.genderspectrum.org/articles/blog-covid-resources

Additional resources specific for schools and professionals, too.

Website:

https://www.genderspectrum.org

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/GenderSpectrum/

Twitter:

https://twitter.com/genderspectrum

 

Warmline – MHAAO – Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon – Evolve Peer Support Services – Multiple Numbers -Weekdays – 9am-5pm (PST) @ Phone
Apr 24 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

logo 144h

MHAAO is pleased to offer Evolve’s Peer Support by Phone for persons affected by the pandemic, wildfires, and similar issues.

Do you need someone to talk to?  We’re available for anyone to call peer support no matter what!

Happy to work with any age groups from any area.

Will make arrangements for virtual peer support if requested. 

Generally available @ 9am-5pm PST Weekdays, Monday through Friday.

See names and numbers below.

Flyer excerpt(s):
Have you been impacted by COVID-19 or the Oregon Wildfires?
Our Peer Support Specialists are here to help!
Call us Monday through Friday, 9am-5pm PST
==========
Monica Alexander
971-337-6716
Bill Beall
971-337-4550
Roman Becerra
971-930-9017
Bryan Corley
971-282-8101
Amber Hatkoff
971-352-0582
Molly Griggs
971-337-5506
Anthony Jarrard
971-337-4791
Grace Jo
503-314-3309
Amber Lakin
971-930-9404
Jenny Manzanares
971-241-1404
Howard Marlow
971-337-6293
Jesse Maxwell
971-202-6337
Larae Miller
503-719-1725
Brenda Mitchell
971-337-6715
Geoff Moser
971-202-3142
Marianne O’Neill-Tutor
971-337-6624
Tara Prince
971-413-0264
Kristina Teasley
971-930-9014
=========
Evolve is a program of Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon (MHAAO).
flyer p2

 

4D – 4D Recovery – Quarantine Support for People in Recovery – Saturdays @ Online Via ZOOM
Apr 24 @ 8:00 pm – 9:00 pm

4D Recovery (4th Dimension) hosts Quarantine Support Group for People in Recovery

logo

Saturdays from 8-9pm PST (60 minutes)

This is a an online peer support group for persons in recovery experiencing the effects of quarantine with the COVID-19 pandemic.

We want you to feel safe, welcome and heard.

If you have any questions or would like to get involved, contact Heather by phone at (971) 407-8196.

To join via Zoom:

https://zoom.us/meeting/709664735?occurrence=1586314800000

Apr
25
Sun
000 Oregon Safe+Strong 24/7 Helpline 1-800-923-HELP (4357) Interpreters Available @ Phone, Toll-Free
Apr 25 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

002 Time Sensitive! – Resources & Assistance for Renters and Landlords during COVID-19 Pandemic
Apr 25 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
AR – Addictions Recovery – Virtual Online Meetings – Weekdays & Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Apr 25 all-day

Recovery Resources and Supports for Addictions Recovery During COVID-19

The following organizations provide links to daily online resources, supports and meetings for people recovering from addictions during COVID-19.  Events change daily and offerings serve a wide variety of people recovering many forms of addiction.

1) Digital Recovery – Meetings Schedule and Resources List with Links:

RecoveryResourcesPDX.com offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.  Plus you’ll find links to recovery resources, social services, food & housing, financial resources and COVID-19 information.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com/digital-meetings

Recovery Resources PDX Website:

logo

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com

 

2) The Alano Club of Portland – Meetings Schedule with Links

PortlandAlano.org offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily.

https://portlandalano.org/schedule/

Alano Club meeting types include:

AA: Alcoholics Anonymous
ACA: Adult Children of Alcoholics
Al-Anon: Families & Friends of Alcoholics
AVS: Attention Veritability Syndrome
CLA: Clutterers Anonymous
CMA: Crystal Meth Anonymous
CODA: Codependents Anonymous

COSA: Partners of Sex Addicts
DA: Debtors Anonymous
FA: Food Addicts
GA: Gamblers Anonymous
HA: Heroin Anonymous
MA: Marijuana Anonymous
NA: Narcotics Anonymous
OA: Overeaters Anonymous

RCA: Recovering Couple Anonymous
RR: Refuge Recovery
RTS: Recovery Toolkit Series
SAA: Sex Addicts Anonymous
SIA: Survivors of Incest Anonymous SLAA: Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous
SMART: Self Management And Recovery Training
WA: Workaholics Anonymous
WB: Wellbriety

Meeting Details:
(C) Closed
(G) Gay
(L) Lesbian
(MO) Men Only
(SM) Secular Meeting
(WO) Women Only

Portland Alano Club Website:

logo

https://portlandalano.org/

 

3) Oregon Recovery Network features listing of Online Meetings with Links

https://oregonrecoverynetwork.org/support/

Oregon Recovery Network Website:

Oregon Recovery Network

https://www.OregonRecoveryNetwork.org

 

And… last but not least…

4) MyRecoveryLink Digital Meetings Schedule and Links

Digital Meetings Online – Every Day, 7 Days per Week, Daily at:

4am, 6am, 9am, 12pm, 3pm, 6pm and 8pm PST and other times for other meetings

https://myrecoverylink.com/digital-recovery-meetings/

MyRecoveryLink Website:

logo

https://myrecoverylink.com/