PeerGalaxy Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring offerings of telephone + online peer support + wellness activities! 

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

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If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

Training Opportunities in July 2020
List Provided Courtesy of State of Oregon, Oregon Health Authority
Click here to download PDF Format, 16 pages

How Events are Sorted:

First, at the top of the list: Disaster Hotline & Oregon Safe + Strong Helpline.

Next in the list: Bundled “All Day” Events for organizations with events happening at multiple times throughout the day and/or in many formats or locations; these are bundled into a single listing to prevent endless scrolling.  Usually these offer a lookup by zip code or other criteria. 

Lastly, Time-Specific Events listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  Warmlines and places east of Oregon’s time zone tend to start earlier (e.g. 4am in Oregon is 7am in New York).

Oct
27
Wed
01 – Helpline – SSH – Safe + Strong Helpline for Behavioral, Mental and Emotional Health Support – Interpreters Available @ 1-800-923-4357 (HELP) – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free
Oct 27 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

AM – All Month – COVID-19 Coronavirus Vaccine Access Information by OHA – Oregon Health Authority – English & Español
Oct 27 all-day

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COVID-19 Vaccine Access Information

Información de acceso a la vacuna COVID-19

English & Espanol

As of April 19, 2021, all Oregonians over 16 are now eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine.
**This is a big day for the state. Many thanks to the folks on the front lines who are running vaccination sites and working so hard to get as many people as possible vaccinated.
See below for information on getting scheduled for a vaccine.
Accelerated Access to COVID-19 Vaccinations
Scheduling a Vaccination
The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has created several resources to assist individuals in planning for their COVID-19 vaccination:
How to find a COVID-19 Vaccine in Oregon
Available in Spanish at Cómo encontrar una vacuna contra el COVID-19 en Oregon
What to know before you get vaccinated
Post Vaccination: What we all need to do together
Scheduling a COVID-19 vaccine is primarily managed through the
OHA’s Get Vaccinated Oregon website.
The OHA has created a Get Vaccinated Oregon Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) page.
Multi-lingual assistance using the Get Vaccinated Oregon tool is also available by calling 211.
Some local pharmacies are offering vaccinations through a Federal Retail Pharmacy Program partnership.
Appointments can be made by visiting pharmacy websites directly:
If you need to get a vaccine through the drive-through site at PDX Airport, please go to OHSU’s COVID-19 Vaccine: Information and Appointments page.
All COVID-19 vaccine sites are dependent upon the availability of vaccine supply, which is determined by many factors, including supply at the national level and allocation at the federal and state levels.
Appointments are required.
Multnomah County maintains the COVID-19 Vaccine page which includes information options for scheduling a vaccination and resources for individuals who may need assistance scheduling an appointment due to language or barriers with technology.
Lastly, if you’re an immigrant, please know the following:
All eligible people in Oregon can get the vaccine.
You do NOT need to be a U.S. citizen to get the vaccine.
Getting the vaccine will NOT affect your immigration status or count as a public charge.
You do not need to have or provide a social security number.
You do not need to have identification.
If you need help, you can call the Safe + Strong Helpline at 1-800-923-HELP (4357).
**See active links in this bulletin by
Oregon Legislature, Speaker of the House, Rep. Tina Kotek’s
published  4/19/2021 at:

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/ORLEG/bulletins/2cd30a8

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/ORLEG/bulletins/2cd30a8

House Speaker Tina Kotek

Weekly Update: Vaccines, Session Progress, Budget Hearing

AM – All Month – Renters, Tenants and Landlords – Support, Resources, Assistance & Info – During COVID-19 Pandemic
Oct 27 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program

Information and Application For Tenants and Landlords

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program is open as of May 19th. OHCS is working with local organizations to provide more than $200 million in assistance to low-income Oregonians that have been financially impacted by COVID-19. OHCS created a partner toolkit to help communities promote this vital resource. This packet includes check lists for tenants and landlords, application information and documentation, frequently asked questions, and other helpful information related to the program.

Vista De Verificacion Del Inquilino 

Solicitud En Papel

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP) helps eligible low-income households with their past due rent and utilities. This program uses funds from the federal Emergency Rental Assistance Program, which allocated a collective total of $280 million to Oregon, the City of Portland, and multiple counties in the state. In most cases, approved applications will result in payments made directly to landlords and utility providers.

Beginning May 19, 2021, qualified renters who have experienced financial hardship due to the coronavirus pandemic, and are at risk of homelessness or housing instability, may apply for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP). This program is not a loan, which means those who receive assistance will not have to pay back funds so long as they are used as approved and not duplicating other assistance programs. Assistance is offered to all eligible renters regardless of their citizenship or immigration status, and it will not impact the recipient’s eligibility for other federally funded programs such as food stamps, Medicaid, Medicare, social security, WIC or public housing.

Renters who are eligible for the program may request rent and/or utility assistance dating back to March 13, 2020 (prior expenses are not eligible). OERAP will cover up to 12 months of past due rent and three months of forward rent, once all past due rent is paid. OERAP will also cover past due utility costs including electricity, gas, home energy services, water, sewer, trash removal, internet and bulk fuels. Costs that will NOT be covered include: homeowner costs, homeowner utilities, landlord-paid utilities, landlord-paid property taxes, property insurance, phone, and renter insurance.

If approved, in most cases, payments will be made directly to the landlord, property owner or utility company on the tenant’s behalf via direct deposit or check. OERAP funds are not first-come-first-serve. Funds will be distributed based on a formula that prioritizes applications based on need. Everyone who turns in a completed application will have their application reviewed.

Click on this link to apply for Emergency Rental Assistance

Apply for OERAP Now

To learn more about eligibility, applying and the program itself, scroll down or use the buttons below to jump to a section.

 

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
DISCLAIMER: Information is provided solely as a courtesy without guarantees or warranties of any kind whatsoever.  Use at your own risk and expense.
GS – Gender Spectrum – Online Virtual Groups for Parents and Teens – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Oct 27 all-day

logo

Gender Spectrum works to create gender sensitive and inclusive environments for all children and teens.  Gender Spectrum offers over 25 online groups for parents and teens.

In the Gender Spectrum Lounge you can find the list of groups to explore or sign up for.  There is a great variety of topics featured.

https://lounge.genderspectrum.org/groups/

Registration required.  See group description for contact information details.

Additional online groups, webinars, recordings, and events online including resources related to the pandemic at:

https://www.genderspectrum.org/articles/blog-covid-resources

Additional resources specific for schools and professionals, too.

Website:

https://www.genderspectrum.org

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/GenderSpectrum/

Twitter:

https://twitter.com/genderspectrum

 

MS – MINDSPACE – Mindfulness and Resilience Support Groups through COVID-19 @ Online via Zoom
Oct 27 all-day

 

Sponsor Logo

 

MINDSPACE offers FREE Online Support for Mindfulness and Resilience through COVID-19 Pandemic

There are a variety of online events through Mindspace pay-what-you-can series designed specifically for health-care workers looking for psychological support during the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. In each live, interactive session we will explore a different theme related to the current situation, and a corresponding mindfulness practice to help frame and navigate the situation.

The themes include:

  • Safety and grounding
  • Settling a busy mind
  • Being with difficulty
  • Connecting with purpose

The format will involve educational material, a guided, experiential practice, and time for group discussion. The course is intended to not only provide educational content and skill-teaching, but also to harness the communal support of a peer group at a time when social connection is more crucial than ever.

Events Calendar with Search Filters

https://clients.mindbodyonline.com/asp/main_enroll.asp

Register Online

You will be asked to create an online account with an email address, password and phone number.

When registering for and event you will have the option to sign-up for the full series or to choose dates you can attend.  You will also be given the option to choose your contribution amount (pay-as-you-can).

Instructions on how to join the online group will likely be sent via email upon registration.

Classes fill up fast, first come first serve.

Website:

https://www.mindspacewellbeing.com/

Excerpt(s):

Our mission at Mindspace is to inspire well-being with the transformative potential of science, wisdom, and human connection.

We believe well-being is a skill that can be learned, and that it can scale from the individual, to families, communities, and organizations of all shapes and sizes. We believe that everyone can benefit from some form of mind training, but that doesn’t mean there’s a one-size-fits-all solution. Well-being at Mindspace is about connecting with people where they are and supporting the development of skills for building a sustainable, meaningful life—at home, at work, and in the world.

FREE Online COVID-19 Support Groups

https://www.mindspacewellbeing.com/programs/online-covid-19-support-group/

Examples include:

  • Mindfulness and Resilience for Healthcare Workers
  • Adaptive Coping for Students
  • Building Resilience
  • Mindfulness and Wellbeing Tools for the New Normal
  • Navigating the New Normal: Wellbeing Practices Revisited
  • Flourishing at Work in Times of Turbulence
RRP – Recovery Resources PDX – Virtual Online Meetings – Weekdays & Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Oct 27 all-day

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Digital Recovery Resources PDX

A DATABASE OF RESOURCES AND SUPPORTS FOR PEOPLE IN RECOVERY AND PEOPLE IN NEED OF ASSISTANCE DURING THE COVID-19 CRISIS

Whether you are looking for a daily recovery meeting, a recovery yoga class, a recovery Cross Fit session, engagement with a peer specialist, or just a place to connect with your network – we’ve got you covered

RecoveryResourcesPDX.com offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.  Plus you’ll find links to recovery resources, social services, food & housing, financial resources and COVID-19 information.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily

Digital Meetings Schedule

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com/digital-meetings

Recovery Resources PDX Website:

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com

 

Excerpt(s) from website last viewed 2020 May 01:

DAILY MUTUAL AID MEETINGS 4am-9pm PST
4:00AM – 5:00AM:
RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
6:00AM – 7:00AM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
6:00AM – 7:00AM:
Eastside Sunrise (AA, All)
6:30AM – 7:30AM: Dawn Patrol (AA, All)
9:00AM – 10:00AM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
10:00AM – 11:00AM: Ben’s Friends National (All Recovery, Food & Beverage Industry, All)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: Newcomers at Noon (AA, Women Only)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: Men’s Clock Room (AA, Men Only)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: Portland Daily Double Group (AA, All)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: Surrender at Noon (AA, All)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: NW at Noon (Al-Anon, All)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
3:00PM – 4:00PM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
3:00PM – 4:00PM: Recovery In the House (NA, All, M-F)
5:00PM – 6:00PM: Portland Daily Double Group (AA, All)
5:30PM – 6:30PM: Upstairs 5:30 (AA, All)
5:30PM – 6:30PM: New Alternatives (AA, All)
6:00PM – 7:00PM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
8:00PM – 9:00PM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)

AA Intergroup National Online Meetings Directory
AA Intergroup Portland Online Meetings Directory

WEEKLY MUTUAL AID MEETINGS
MON 7:00PM – 8:15PM:
Our True Selves (ACA, All)
TUE 9:00PM – 10:00PM: Karma Kontrol (AA, All)
TUE 10:00AM – 11:00AM: Ben’s Friends Portland (All Recovery, Food & Beverage)
TUE 4:00PM – 5:00PM: RecoveryLink Women’s Meeting (All Recovery, Women Only)
TUE 7:00PM – 8:00PM: Secular ACA (ACA, All)
WED 8:00AM – 9:00AM: RecoveryLink LGBTrans* Queer+ Meeting (All Recovery, LGBTQ+)
WED 6:30PM – 8:00PM: Gentleness, Humor, Love & Respect (ACA, All)
THU 4:00PM – 5:00PM: RecoveryLink Women’s Meeting (All Recovery, Women Only)
SUN 10:00AM – 11:00AM: Beyond Belief (AA, Agnostic)

DAILY CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS
9:00AM – 10:00AM: TRG Recovery CrossFit (All Recovery, All)
2:00PM – 3:00PM: TRG Recovery CrossFit (All Recovery, All)
2:00PM – 3:00PM: Social Determinants of Recovery Workshop (All Recovery, All)
6:00PM – 7:00PM: TRG Recovery CrossFit (All Recovery, All)

WEEKLY CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS
MON 4:00PM – 5:00PM: Mindfulness Recovery Support Group (All Recovery, All)
TUE 2:00PM – 3:00PM: Recovery Yoga (All Recovery, All)
TUE 6:45PM – 7:45PM: Invitation to Change (Family and Friends, All)
WED 5:00PM – 6:00PM: Mindfulness Meditation (All Recovery, All)
FRI 4:00PM – 5:00PM: Mindfulness Recovery Support Group (All Recovery, All)
SUN 2:00PM – 3:00PM: Recovery Yoga (All Recovery, All)

Zoom Meeting How-Tos

https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/categories/200101697

Digital Meeting Safety Guidelines

https://unityrecovery.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/UR-AR-Meeting-Safety-Guidelines-and-Procedures.pdf

SWC – Social Work Career – #StandWithAAPI – Anti-Asian Racism Resources for Social Workers and Therapists
Oct 27 all-day

Rescoure Poster

#StandWithAAPI

Anti-Asian Racism Resources for Social Workers and Therapists

Sadly, hate bias incidents such as verbal harassment and physical assault against Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities in the United States have risen during the Covid-19 pandemic due to misconceptions and misinformation about the spread of the virus.

To assist in the endeavor of becoming anti-racist, this post provides some steps we can all take to help break the cycle of racism and violence, and a round-up of various anti-AAPI racism resources to help us become better informed about our AAPI communities. These include resources especially for individuals experiencing Anti-Asian/American harassment, as well as webinars, books, articles, anti-racism guides/toolkits, videos, podcasts, and worthwhile organizations to support.

Please feel free to share any additional helpful finds in the comments section of this post.

Free Anti-Asian Racism Webinars/Trainings

  • Bystander Intervention – Hollaback! and Asian Americans Advancing Justice/May 20 at 5 PM EST and May 24 at 4 PM EST – “five strategies for intervention: distract, delegate, document, delay, and direct; and how to prioritize your own safety while intervening…”
  • Bystander Intervention 2.0 – Conflict De-Escalation Workshop – Hollaback! and Asian Americans Advancing Justice/May 12 at 5PM EST and May 27 at 3 PM EST – “deeper than above-mentioned bystander intervention… how to identify potential conflict before it escalates using our “pyramid of escalation” and how to assess whether intervening is the right action for you…”
  • #StopAsianHate Panel: Advocating for Our Elders – AARP/May 6 at 3 PM EST – “learn more about the work of AAPI community-based organizations and how they are currently advocating for AAPI elders in the areas of policy, community support, and communications…”
  • The State of Asian America Today May 8 at 8 PM EST,  Where Have We Come From? on May 15 at 8PM ESTWhere Are We Going? Part 1 on May 22 at 8 PM EST and  Where Are We Going? Part 2 on May 29 at 8 PM EST – “series of online town halls from Rise: Asian Pacific America to respond to the anti-Asian hate we’re all seeing throughout our diverse communities… where we are today, where we’ve been as a community, and where we need to go, to rise up to the challenges we face in the near and remote future…
  • Understanding the Impact of COVID and Social Injustices on the Diverse AA, NH & PI Communities – Stanford University/May 10 at 2 PM EST – “challenges including historical trauma due to immigration, being a refugee, colonization, and being seen as forever foreigners, as well as fighting against the myth of the model minority…”
  • Navigating Prejudice and Internalized Prejudice – AAPA/May 12 at 8 PM EST – “experiences of being discriminated against and oppressed affect our overall well-being and sense of agency…  differentiate unhelpful collective messages such as colorism and “gender inequality is cultural” from cultural identity, so we can restore wellness and justice in our minds, homes, and communities…”
  • White Supremacy Characteristics – SURJ/May 13 at 8 PM EST – “We are all swimming in the waters of white supremacy culture. And we are not all affected in the same way… The good news is that while white supremacy culture informs us, it does not define us… It is a construct, and anything constructed can be deconstructed and replaced.”- Tema Okun… article
  • API Heritage Month: Narratives on History, Belonging & Activism – CSSW/May 17 at 6 – 7:30 PM EST – “personal stories, perspectives on history and belonging, and strategies for sustaining activism and healing…”
  • NASW-NYC B.O.L.D Talk: Mental Health & Racial TraumaMay 19 at 6 PM EST – “historical implications of racism, the mental health impact of racism on communities of color, and social work’s role in being both complicit and effective in addressing white supremacy and the ensuing trauma…”
  • Channeling Healthy Anger As a Leader – AAPA/June 16 at 8 PM EST – “Anger is often perceived as an unhealthy and unwelcome emotion. This myth of anger may block us from using this powerful emotion in healing trauma, building resilience, and lifting up the community…”

Anti-Asian Racism Webinars on Demand

For Individuals Experiencing Anti-Asian/American Harassment

Resources for Self Education about Racism Against the AAPI Community

Recommended Children Books H/T Julius Paras

[If you buy something from an affiliate link, SocialWork.Career may earn a commission.]

  • 5 Quick Ways to Analyze Children’s Books for Racism and Sexism – @LovingLittleMinds
  • Eyes That Kiss in the Corners – [affiliate link] – “New York Times Bestseller and #1 Indie Bestseller… lyrical, stunning picture book tells a story about learning to love and celebrate your Asian-shaped eyes, in the spirit of Hair Love by Matthew A. Cherry, and is a celebration of diversity…”
  • From the Stars in the Sky to the Fish in the Sea – [affiliate link] – “Miu Lan is not just any child, but one who can change into any shape they can imagine. The only problem is they can’t decide what to be: A boy or a girl? A bird or a fish? A flower or a shooting star?… one thing’s for sure: no matter what this child becomes, their mother will love them just the same…”
  • Young, Proud, and Sung-jee: A Children’s Book on Fighting Anti-Asian Racism During COVID-19 – book is free to download.

Recommended Adult Books H/T Constance Grady

  • The Color of Success: Asian Americans and the Origins of the Model Minority – [affiliate link] – “mainstream America finds it so easy to ignore anti-Asian racism is the idea that Asian Americans are a “model minority”: They may not be considered white, but they’re still considered well-assimilated and upwardly mobile…”
  • Contagious Divides: Epidemics and Race in San Francisco’s Chinatown – [affiliate link] – “Trump’s repeated invocation of the false idea that Asian Americans somehow carried Covid-19 into the US has long and racist roots. Early Chinese immigrants to the US in the 19th century were repeatedly demonized as filthy disease carriers by the public health authorities of the era…”
  • Driven Out: The Forgotten War Against Chinese Americans – [affiliate link] – “Starting in 1848 and continuing into the 20th century, in towns across the American West, Chinese Americans were violently rounded up, driven out of town, or killed in a deliberate campaign of ethnic cleansing…”
  • The Making of Asian America: A History – [affiliate link] – “historian Erika Lee tracks waves of Asian immigration to the United States… Asian Americans cycle between getting labeled “good immigrants” and “bad immigrants,” depending on the mood of the political moment…”

Articles

Anti-Asian Racism Guides/Toolkits

  • Anti-Asian Racism Resource Guide for Families with Children, Young Adults or Elders – “conversations about race should begin near a child’s fifth birthday even though children begin to be aware of race when they are infants…”
  • Anti-Racism Resources for Asian Americans – “action items… Anti-Blackness in Asian Communities… Model Minority Myth and Meritocracy Lies…”
  • APALA Racial Justice Toolkit – “racial justice trainings… organizations in racial justice movement moments… resources…”
  • APALA (Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association) 2021 COVID-19 Anti-racist Resources – “legal assistance, trackers (racial profiling and hate crimes), anti-xenophobia resources…”
  • Asian American Racial Justice Toolkit – “15 modules spanning Asian American Identity, Model Minority Myth, Gender & Patriarchy, White Supremacy, Race & Working Class + Immigrant Struggles, For Black Lives, Colonialism, & Islamo-Racism… begin with people’s lived experiences… build structural awareness of why those experiences are happening, and how they are tied to the oppression of others…”
  • Asian American Racism & Mental Health Resources – Massachusetts General Hospital -“resources tailored toward students, parents, educators, mental health clinicians, and allies/the general public…”
  • Classroom Resources and Tips To Address Anti-Asian Discrimination – “Anti-AAPI racism isn’t anything new in this country. From “yellow peril” to the “model minority,” we need to educate ourselves about the history of anti-AAPI racism in this country…”
  • Combat Hate Crime Resources – “APIAHF and NAPABA toolkit translated into 25 different languages… Understanding the difference between a hate crime and hate incident… Working with law enforcement and the media… Checklist for community organizations…”
  • Learning Together – Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center – “Addressing anti-Asian racism and xenophobia… Activities and videos for students, families, and lifelong learners…Resources about Asian American and Pacific Islander voices in literature…
  • Narratives by and About Asians and Asian Americans – CSWE – “highly acclaimed contemporary literature… represent nearly a quarter of the 51 countries and territories of Asia. Intersectionality, coming of age, the precariousness of forced displacement, and layered cultural identity are some of the themes…”
  • Racial Justice in Education Resource Guide – “Racial justice — or racial equity — goes beyond “anti-racism.” It is not just the absence of discrimination and inequities, but also the presence of deliberate systems and supports to achieve and sustain racial equity through proactive and preventative measures…”

Not Much of a Reader? Check Out These Anti-Racist Videos/Movies/TV Shows/Podcasts

YouTube/TV/Film

  • Asia Rising Forever – recording of a special livestream festival event… a celebration of Asian and Asian American music and togetherness, demonstrating unity due to the pandemic and the xenophobic hate many are experiencing.
  • Asian Americans is a five-part PBS documentary series on the history of Asians in America and the ongoing role Asian Americans have played in shaping our nation’s history. The series is told through individual lives and family stories
  • #AsianAmCovidStories is a documentary series by the Asian American Documentary Network exploring Asian Americans’ experiences and challenges during the Covid-19 pandemic.
  • Celebrate Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month 2021 – PBS is offering several new films and shows featuring AAPI stories.
  • The Chinese Exclusion Act – 2018 PBS documentary examines the origin, history, and impact of the 1882 law that made it illegal for Chinese workers to come to America, and for Chinese nationals already here to become U.S. citizens.
  • Fear, Compassion or Xenophobia: Our Social Responses to Crisis – discussion on creating frameworks to fight xenophobia.
  • I Am Not Your Asian Stereotype | Canwen Xu | TEDxBoise – “In this hilarious and insightful talk, eighteen-year-old Canwen Xu shares her Asian-American story of breaking stereotypes, reaffirming stereotypes, and driving competently on her way to buy rice.”
  • Let It Not Happen Again: Lessons of the Japanese American Exclusion – “In March of 1942, 227 Japanese Americans were forcibly removed from their homes on Bainbridge Island by the US Army…”
  • Raising Global Citizens: A Panel for Parents, Caregivers, and Educators – how to best support children to be effective participants in this increasingly complex, diverse, and interconnected world.
  • Self-Love through Self-Identity | Eileen Kim | TEDxWoodbridgeHigh – “hopes to break the stigma surrounding mental illness by telling her own story as a source of empathy in order to motivate others to seek help…”
  • UNLADYLIKE2020 – series of 26 short films and a one-hour documentary profiling diverse and little-known American women from the turn of the 20th century, and contemporary women who follow in their footsteps.
  • What kind of Asian are you? – Scott plays a friendly jogger who is very interested in guessing the heritage of Stella.
  • Why Asian Americans are not the Model Minority | Alice Li | TEDxVanderbiltUniversity – “Confined within the boundaries of the model minority myth, Asian Americans are commonly perceived as a mass of indistinguishable overachievers who are all “smart” and “good at math.” However, these seemingly positive stereotypes can have a detrimental impact on not only Asian Americans, but also race relations in general. In this talk, Alice Li draws from research studies and her personal experiences to challenge the two-dimensional identity outlined by the model minority myth…”

Podcasts/Exhibits

Anti-Asian Racism Organizations to Support

  • Advancing Justice | AAJC – its mission is to advance the civil and human rights for Asian Americans and to build and promote a fair and equitable society for all.
  • APACEvotes – strives to increase access to and participation in electoral and civic affairs by registering, educating and protecting Asian American and Pacific Islander voters
  • Asian Mental Health Collective – is working to destigmatize and normalize mental health within the Asian community; Asians face culturally specific barriers when it comes to mental health.
  • Asian Pacific American Institute for Congressional Studies (APAICS) – dedicated to promoting Asian Pacific American participation and representation at all levels of the political process, from community service to elected office.
  • Stop AAPI Hate – tracks and responds to incidents of hate, violence, harassment, discrimination, shunning, and child bullying against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the United States.

Last updated: May 14, 2021

References:

Asian American Arts Alliance. How to stop AAPI hate

Cornell. (n.d.). Anti-Racism Resources for the AAPI Community

Grady, Constance. (March 18, 2021). A reading list to understand anti-Asian racism in America.

Highline College Library. Anti-Racist Resources: Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Racial Justice

National Endowment for the Humanities. (n.d.). Virtual bookshelf.

NBC News. Anti-racism resources to support Asian American, Pacific Islander community

NCAA Office of Inclusion. (n.d.) Anti-Racism resources to support the Asian American and Pacific Islander community: Websites and videos.

Stop AAPI Hate.

University of Pittsburgh. (n.d.). Antiracism Resources to Support Asian, Asian American, and Pacific Islander Communities

Anti-Asian Violence Resources

ARCMVCN – American Red Cross Militarily and Veteran Caregiver Network – Resiliency Workshop for Veterans and Their Families – Tuesday @ Online Regester For Details
Oct 27 @ 8:00 am – 8:15 am

 

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Tue, June 22, 2021

5:00 PM – 6:30 PM PDT

Stress Solutions Workshop For Veterans and Their Families

Please join us for a virtual workshop that teaches stress-management and relaxation techniques for service members, veterans and their families. This will be a live, facilitated discussion around the challenges of living through the COVID-19 outbreak. You will have an opportunity to share with others, learn and practice new skills and ask questions in a small online group. We invite you to join us on video and audio for a 1-hour conversation with a Red Cross mental health volunteer and other members of your community.

To sign up, click on the Registration Link Below:

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

 

Tobrin Hewitt:  Organizer of Red Cross Resiliency Workshop

 

 

OHA/OCA – Oregon Health Authority/Office of Consumer Activities – COVID-19 Consumer Advisory Work Group – Online – with Brandy at OCA – Wednesdays @ Online via GoToMeeting
Oct 27 @ 9:00 am – 10:00 am
OHA/OCA - Oregon Health Authority/Office of Consumer Activities - COVID-19 Consumer Advisory Work Group - Online - with Brandy at OCA - Wednesdays @ Online via GoToMeeting

OREGON HEALTH AUTHORITY (OHA), OFFICE OF CONSUMER ACTIVITIES (OCA)

COVID-19 CONSUMER ADVISORY GROUP

Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.  

https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/705621213   

You can also dial in using your phone. 

 United States: +1 (646) 749-3112   

Access Code: 705-621-213 

 

For tomorrow’s meeting, I’d like to get people’s input on a project that is being launched soon. OHA is working to launch a web site that will connect people with behavioral health supports. It’s meant to be a “one stop shop” for people seeking services. We are in the very early stages of this process, and we’re trying to design the page around the needs of the people who will use it… which means being led by the input we get from consumers and peers.

So here are some questions the web design and marketing folks have asked us to help get them started:

+ How are you feeling right now? What do you think could help? What would make you feel better?

+ Have you ever searched online for mental health or addiction recovery services?

+ What does success look like for you when it comes to mental health and recovery?

+ When looking for services & supports, what do you hope to get out of working with a treatment provider? (therapist, psychiatrist, counselor, or peer support specialist)

+ If an online portal was available to help link you to services, what types of features or tools would you find most helpful?

As  always, you’re welcome to send an email or give me a call if you can’t join our meeting tomorrow.

We’ll be putting together a consumer steering committee for this project, so if you’re interested in joining that please let me know! Thanks, all.

Brandy L. Hemsley

Director, Office of Consumer Activities

Oregon Health Authority

971-239-2942

Click here to sign up for email updates from the OCA

For more information about the OCA, visit:

www.oregon.gov/OHA/HSD/BHP/Pages/OCA.aspx

For the latest on Oregon’s COVID-19 response, visit:

https://govstatus.egov.com/OR-OHA-COVID-19

Warmline – MHAAO – Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon – Evolve Peer Support Services – Multiple Numbers -Weekdays – 9am-5pm (PST) @ Phone
Oct 27 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

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MHAAO is pleased to offer Evolve’s Peer Support by Phone for persons affected by the pandemic, wildfires, and similar issues.

Do you need someone to talk to?  We’re available for anyone to call peer support no matter what!

Happy to work with any age groups from any area.

Will make arrangements for virtual peer support if requested. 

Generally available @ 9am-5pm PST Weekdays, Monday through Friday.

See names and numbers below.

Flyer excerpt(s):
Have you been impacted by COVID-19 or the Oregon Wildfires?
Our Peer Support Specialists are here to help!
Call us Monday through Friday, 9am-5pm PST
==========
Monica Alexander
971-337-6716
Bill Beall
971-337-4550
Roman Becerra
971-930-9017
Bryan Corley
971-282-8101
Amber Hatkoff
971-352-0582
Molly Griggs
971-337-5506
Anthony Jarrard
971-337-4791
Grace Jo
503-314-3309
Amber Lakin
971-930-9404
Jenny Manzanares
971-241-1404
Howard Marlow
971-337-6293
Jesse Maxwell
971-202-6337
Larae Miller
503-719-1725
Brenda Mitchell
971-337-6715
Geoff Moser
971-202-3142
Marianne O’Neill-Tutor
971-337-6624
Tara Prince
971-413-0264
Kristina Teasley
971-930-9014
=========
Evolve is a program of Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon (MHAAO).
flyer p2

 

AMHAW – Association For Mental Health & Wellness – Grieving Adults Support Group for COVID Loss Survivors – Wednesdays @ Online via Zoom (secured)
Oct 27 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

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MHAW (Mental Health and Wellness Association) presents this series of Bereavement Support groups for COVID-19 Loss Survivors.

NOTE: Participants in any of the five COVID-19 Bereavement Support Groups must be mourning the loss of a family member or close friend who has died from COVID-19.

FREE – MHAW Grieving Adults Support Groups – Wednesday Evenings
For people who have lost a loved one to coronavirus and cannot grieve in person with their loved ones. The group will bring together others who are struggling to come to terms with the loss, to create a sense of closure, and to grieve in community.
Wednesdays, 4pm-5pm PST / 7pm-8pm EST (60 minutes)

Questions?

Call Alexis Rodgers at 631-471-7242 x1315 or arodgers@mhaw.org.

or Contact Yvonne Lyon at 516-350-7217 or ylyon@mhanc.org

Website:

Register:

http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07eh2s3rdh40e28c42&llr=m6oi4gwab&showPage=true

NOTE: After registration, you should receive a link and/or email with instructions to access the secure online ZOOM meetings.

More about the MHAW COVID-19 Bereavement Support Groups:
Excerpt(s) from
Last viewed online 2020 May 15:

People are unable to grieve the loss of loved ones in ways they are used to. No wakes for Christians. No shivas for Jews. No three-day mourning periods for Muslims.

That’s why Long Island’s two leading, county-based mental health organizations have begun offering online bereavement support groups designed to provide comfort, support, and “grief tools” to those who have lost loved ones to the COVID-19 virus. The first group begins on Tuesday, May 19, 2020.

Details can be found at www.bereavement.mhaw.org.

Mandatory social distancing has sharply curtailed people’s ability to grieve in conventional, in-person settings. In the absence of the intimate contact typically associated with the mourning process, these remote, weekly bereavement sessions aim to mollify the pain of individuals whose family members or close friends have succumbed to COVID-19.

The “COVID-19 Bereavement Support Group” initiative is hosted by the Suffolk County-based Association for Mental Health and Wellness and the Mental Health Association of Nassau County.

Guided by experienced grief counselors, the groups will convene remotely in 60- or 90-minute sessions via a secure Zoom line over the course of a four- or six-week period. There is no cost to take part and registration – which is limited to 12 participants per group – is on a first-come basis.

“As everyone can imagine, losing a loved one to the virus is a deeply painful and jarring experience,” said Michael Stoltz, C.E.O. of the Association for Mental Health and Wellness, which is headquartered in Ronkonkoma. “We’ve identified skilled and sensitive grief counselors who are well qualified to help participants build comforting pathways for healing, even in a technologically remote setting.”

“The pandemic’s restrictions largely prevent mourners from experiencing the reassuring feelings of hugs and other types of close-up contact,” said Jeffrey McQueen, Executive Director of the Hempstead-based Mental Health Association of Nassau County. “Grieving remotely can’t fully replace the face-to-face experience, but it can help reinforce feelings of hope and help fill the void.”

Participants in any of the five COVID-19 Bereavement Support Groups must be mourning the loss of a family member or close friend who has died from COVID-19.

The group categories are:

Grieving Adults Support Groups: For people who have lost a loved one to coronavirus and cannot grieve in person with their loved ones. The group will bring together others who are struggling to come to terms with the loss, to create a sense of closure, and to grieve in community. There will be two groups in this category.

Peer Bereavement Support Group: For individuals experiencing a mental health condition who have lost a loved one to coronavirus. Participants have a safe and supportive space to share their stories with others who can truly relate to their pain and experiences.

Veterans Bereavement Support Group: For Veterans and their families who have lost someone to coronavirus and cannot grieve in person with their loved ones. This group will deal with issues specific to the Veterans community.

Creative Arts Bereavement Support Group: The making of art can serve as a safe outlet for the expression of thoughts and emotions relating to death and loss. By expressing these feelings in a symbolic manner, mourners can nurture their sense of control, organization, and containment. Participants may use such art supplies as copy paper, colored pencils, markers, crayons, scissors, and glue.

Interested parties may register at www.bereavement.mhaw.org.


About the Association for Mental Health and Wellness

The Association for Mental Health and Wellness (MHAW), a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) corporation based in Ronkonkoma, NY, provides programs, services, and advocacy for people facing mental health challenges with an enhanced focus on serving military Veterans.

MHAW dates back to 1955 with the incorporation of the Mental Health Association in Suffolk County (MHA Suffolk). In 1990, Clubhouse of Suffolk was launched, providing a wide array of vocational rehabilitation services and recovery programs. With the growing need to provide services for Veterans with PTSD and other battle-related brain injuries, Clubhouse merged with MHA Suffolk and Suffolk County United Veterans in 2014 to form the Association for Mental Health and Wellness.

MHAW is committed to the core practice values of empowerment, hope, opportunity, and cultural competence. All of the agency’s direct service workers are trained in the importance of addressing health from trauma-informed and whole person perspectives with enriched understanding of the social and economic conditions that contribute to physical and mental health and substance abuse.

MHAW’s Mental Health HelpLine can be reached at 631-471-7242 ext. 2. Their web address is www.mhaw.org.

Oct
28
Thu
01 – Helpline – SSH – Safe + Strong Helpline for Behavioral, Mental and Emotional Health Support – Interpreters Available @ 1-800-923-4357 (HELP) – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free
Oct 28 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

AM – All Month – COVID-19 Coronavirus Vaccine Access Information by OHA – Oregon Health Authority – English & Español
Oct 28 all-day

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COVID-19 Vaccine Access Information

Información de acceso a la vacuna COVID-19

English & Espanol

As of April 19, 2021, all Oregonians over 16 are now eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine.
**This is a big day for the state. Many thanks to the folks on the front lines who are running vaccination sites and working so hard to get as many people as possible vaccinated.
See below for information on getting scheduled for a vaccine.
Accelerated Access to COVID-19 Vaccinations
Scheduling a Vaccination
The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has created several resources to assist individuals in planning for their COVID-19 vaccination:
How to find a COVID-19 Vaccine in Oregon
Available in Spanish at Cómo encontrar una vacuna contra el COVID-19 en Oregon
What to know before you get vaccinated
Post Vaccination: What we all need to do together
Scheduling a COVID-19 vaccine is primarily managed through the
OHA’s Get Vaccinated Oregon website.
The OHA has created a Get Vaccinated Oregon Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) page.
Multi-lingual assistance using the Get Vaccinated Oregon tool is also available by calling 211.
Some local pharmacies are offering vaccinations through a Federal Retail Pharmacy Program partnership.
Appointments can be made by visiting pharmacy websites directly:
If you need to get a vaccine through the drive-through site at PDX Airport, please go to OHSU’s COVID-19 Vaccine: Information and Appointments page.
All COVID-19 vaccine sites are dependent upon the availability of vaccine supply, which is determined by many factors, including supply at the national level and allocation at the federal and state levels.
Appointments are required.
Multnomah County maintains the COVID-19 Vaccine page which includes information options for scheduling a vaccination and resources for individuals who may need assistance scheduling an appointment due to language or barriers with technology.
Lastly, if you’re an immigrant, please know the following:
All eligible people in Oregon can get the vaccine.
You do NOT need to be a U.S. citizen to get the vaccine.
Getting the vaccine will NOT affect your immigration status or count as a public charge.
You do not need to have or provide a social security number.
You do not need to have identification.
If you need help, you can call the Safe + Strong Helpline at 1-800-923-HELP (4357).
**See active links in this bulletin by
Oregon Legislature, Speaker of the House, Rep. Tina Kotek’s
published  4/19/2021 at:

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/ORLEG/bulletins/2cd30a8

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/ORLEG/bulletins/2cd30a8

House Speaker Tina Kotek

Weekly Update: Vaccines, Session Progress, Budget Hearing

AM – All Month – Renters, Tenants and Landlords – Support, Resources, Assistance & Info – During COVID-19 Pandemic
Oct 28 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program

Information and Application For Tenants and Landlords

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program is open as of May 19th. OHCS is working with local organizations to provide more than $200 million in assistance to low-income Oregonians that have been financially impacted by COVID-19. OHCS created a partner toolkit to help communities promote this vital resource. This packet includes check lists for tenants and landlords, application information and documentation, frequently asked questions, and other helpful information related to the program.

Vista De Verificacion Del Inquilino 

Solicitud En Papel

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP) helps eligible low-income households with their past due rent and utilities. This program uses funds from the federal Emergency Rental Assistance Program, which allocated a collective total of $280 million to Oregon, the City of Portland, and multiple counties in the state. In most cases, approved applications will result in payments made directly to landlords and utility providers.

Beginning May 19, 2021, qualified renters who have experienced financial hardship due to the coronavirus pandemic, and are at risk of homelessness or housing instability, may apply for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP). This program is not a loan, which means those who receive assistance will not have to pay back funds so long as they are used as approved and not duplicating other assistance programs. Assistance is offered to all eligible renters regardless of their citizenship or immigration status, and it will not impact the recipient’s eligibility for other federally funded programs such as food stamps, Medicaid, Medicare, social security, WIC or public housing.

Renters who are eligible for the program may request rent and/or utility assistance dating back to March 13, 2020 (prior expenses are not eligible). OERAP will cover up to 12 months of past due rent and three months of forward rent, once all past due rent is paid. OERAP will also cover past due utility costs including electricity, gas, home energy services, water, sewer, trash removal, internet and bulk fuels. Costs that will NOT be covered include: homeowner costs, homeowner utilities, landlord-paid utilities, landlord-paid property taxes, property insurance, phone, and renter insurance.

If approved, in most cases, payments will be made directly to the landlord, property owner or utility company on the tenant’s behalf via direct deposit or check. OERAP funds are not first-come-first-serve. Funds will be distributed based on a formula that prioritizes applications based on need. Everyone who turns in a completed application will have their application reviewed.

Click on this link to apply for Emergency Rental Assistance

Apply for OERAP Now

To learn more about eligibility, applying and the program itself, scroll down or use the buttons below to jump to a section.

 

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
DISCLAIMER: Information is provided solely as a courtesy without guarantees or warranties of any kind whatsoever.  Use at your own risk and expense.
GS – Gender Spectrum – Online Virtual Groups for Parents and Teens – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Oct 28 all-day

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Gender Spectrum works to create gender sensitive and inclusive environments for all children and teens.  Gender Spectrum offers over 25 online groups for parents and teens.

In the Gender Spectrum Lounge you can find the list of groups to explore or sign up for.  There is a great variety of topics featured.

https://lounge.genderspectrum.org/groups/

Registration required.  See group description for contact information details.

Additional online groups, webinars, recordings, and events online including resources related to the pandemic at:

https://www.genderspectrum.org/articles/blog-covid-resources

Additional resources specific for schools and professionals, too.

Website:

https://www.genderspectrum.org

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/GenderSpectrum/

Twitter:

https://twitter.com/genderspectrum

 

MS – MINDSPACE – Mindfulness and Resilience Support Groups through COVID-19 @ Online via Zoom
Oct 28 all-day

 

Sponsor Logo

 

MINDSPACE offers FREE Online Support for Mindfulness and Resilience through COVID-19 Pandemic

There are a variety of online events through Mindspace pay-what-you-can series designed specifically for health-care workers looking for psychological support during the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. In each live, interactive session we will explore a different theme related to the current situation, and a corresponding mindfulness practice to help frame and navigate the situation.

The themes include:

  • Safety and grounding
  • Settling a busy mind
  • Being with difficulty
  • Connecting with purpose

The format will involve educational material, a guided, experiential practice, and time for group discussion. The course is intended to not only provide educational content and skill-teaching, but also to harness the communal support of a peer group at a time when social connection is more crucial than ever.

Events Calendar with Search Filters

https://clients.mindbodyonline.com/asp/main_enroll.asp

Register Online

You will be asked to create an online account with an email address, password and phone number.

When registering for and event you will have the option to sign-up for the full series or to choose dates you can attend.  You will also be given the option to choose your contribution amount (pay-as-you-can).

Instructions on how to join the online group will likely be sent via email upon registration.

Classes fill up fast, first come first serve.

Website:

https://www.mindspacewellbeing.com/

Excerpt(s):

Our mission at Mindspace is to inspire well-being with the transformative potential of science, wisdom, and human connection.

We believe well-being is a skill that can be learned, and that it can scale from the individual, to families, communities, and organizations of all shapes and sizes. We believe that everyone can benefit from some form of mind training, but that doesn’t mean there’s a one-size-fits-all solution. Well-being at Mindspace is about connecting with people where they are and supporting the development of skills for building a sustainable, meaningful life—at home, at work, and in the world.

FREE Online COVID-19 Support Groups

https://www.mindspacewellbeing.com/programs/online-covid-19-support-group/

Examples include:

  • Mindfulness and Resilience for Healthcare Workers
  • Adaptive Coping for Students
  • Building Resilience
  • Mindfulness and Wellbeing Tools for the New Normal
  • Navigating the New Normal: Wellbeing Practices Revisited
  • Flourishing at Work in Times of Turbulence
RRP – Recovery Resources PDX – Virtual Online Meetings – Weekdays & Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Oct 28 all-day

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Digital Recovery Resources PDX

A DATABASE OF RESOURCES AND SUPPORTS FOR PEOPLE IN RECOVERY AND PEOPLE IN NEED OF ASSISTANCE DURING THE COVID-19 CRISIS

Whether you are looking for a daily recovery meeting, a recovery yoga class, a recovery Cross Fit session, engagement with a peer specialist, or just a place to connect with your network – we’ve got you covered

RecoveryResourcesPDX.com offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.  Plus you’ll find links to recovery resources, social services, food & housing, financial resources and COVID-19 information.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily

Digital Meetings Schedule

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com/digital-meetings

Recovery Resources PDX Website:

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com

 

Excerpt(s) from website last viewed 2020 May 01:

DAILY MUTUAL AID MEETINGS 4am-9pm PST
4:00AM – 5:00AM:
RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
6:00AM – 7:00AM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
6:00AM – 7:00AM:
Eastside Sunrise (AA, All)
6:30AM – 7:30AM: Dawn Patrol (AA, All)
9:00AM – 10:00AM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
10:00AM – 11:00AM: Ben’s Friends National (All Recovery, Food & Beverage Industry, All)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: Newcomers at Noon (AA, Women Only)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: Men’s Clock Room (AA, Men Only)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: Portland Daily Double Group (AA, All)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: Surrender at Noon (AA, All)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: NW at Noon (Al-Anon, All)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
3:00PM – 4:00PM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
3:00PM – 4:00PM: Recovery In the House (NA, All, M-F)
5:00PM – 6:00PM: Portland Daily Double Group (AA, All)
5:30PM – 6:30PM: Upstairs 5:30 (AA, All)
5:30PM – 6:30PM: New Alternatives (AA, All)
6:00PM – 7:00PM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
8:00PM – 9:00PM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)

AA Intergroup National Online Meetings Directory
AA Intergroup Portland Online Meetings Directory

WEEKLY MUTUAL AID MEETINGS
MON 7:00PM – 8:15PM:
Our True Selves (ACA, All)
TUE 9:00PM – 10:00PM: Karma Kontrol (AA, All)
TUE 10:00AM – 11:00AM: Ben’s Friends Portland (All Recovery, Food & Beverage)
TUE 4:00PM – 5:00PM: RecoveryLink Women’s Meeting (All Recovery, Women Only)
TUE 7:00PM – 8:00PM: Secular ACA (ACA, All)
WED 8:00AM – 9:00AM: RecoveryLink LGBTrans* Queer+ Meeting (All Recovery, LGBTQ+)
WED 6:30PM – 8:00PM: Gentleness, Humor, Love & Respect (ACA, All)
THU 4:00PM – 5:00PM: RecoveryLink Women’s Meeting (All Recovery, Women Only)
SUN 10:00AM – 11:00AM: Beyond Belief (AA, Agnostic)

DAILY CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS
9:00AM – 10:00AM: TRG Recovery CrossFit (All Recovery, All)
2:00PM – 3:00PM: TRG Recovery CrossFit (All Recovery, All)
2:00PM – 3:00PM: Social Determinants of Recovery Workshop (All Recovery, All)
6:00PM – 7:00PM: TRG Recovery CrossFit (All Recovery, All)

WEEKLY CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS
MON 4:00PM – 5:00PM: Mindfulness Recovery Support Group (All Recovery, All)
TUE 2:00PM – 3:00PM: Recovery Yoga (All Recovery, All)
TUE 6:45PM – 7:45PM: Invitation to Change (Family and Friends, All)
WED 5:00PM – 6:00PM: Mindfulness Meditation (All Recovery, All)
FRI 4:00PM – 5:00PM: Mindfulness Recovery Support Group (All Recovery, All)
SUN 2:00PM – 3:00PM: Recovery Yoga (All Recovery, All)

Zoom Meeting How-Tos

https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/categories/200101697

Digital Meeting Safety Guidelines

https://unityrecovery.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/UR-AR-Meeting-Safety-Guidelines-and-Procedures.pdf

SWC – Social Work Career – #StandWithAAPI – Anti-Asian Racism Resources for Social Workers and Therapists
Oct 28 all-day

Rescoure Poster

#StandWithAAPI

Anti-Asian Racism Resources for Social Workers and Therapists

Sadly, hate bias incidents such as verbal harassment and physical assault against Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities in the United States have risen during the Covid-19 pandemic due to misconceptions and misinformation about the spread of the virus.

To assist in the endeavor of becoming anti-racist, this post provides some steps we can all take to help break the cycle of racism and violence, and a round-up of various anti-AAPI racism resources to help us become better informed about our AAPI communities. These include resources especially for individuals experiencing Anti-Asian/American harassment, as well as webinars, books, articles, anti-racism guides/toolkits, videos, podcasts, and worthwhile organizations to support.

Please feel free to share any additional helpful finds in the comments section of this post.

Free Anti-Asian Racism Webinars/Trainings

  • Bystander Intervention – Hollaback! and Asian Americans Advancing Justice/May 20 at 5 PM EST and May 24 at 4 PM EST – “five strategies for intervention: distract, delegate, document, delay, and direct; and how to prioritize your own safety while intervening…”
  • Bystander Intervention 2.0 – Conflict De-Escalation Workshop – Hollaback! and Asian Americans Advancing Justice/May 12 at 5PM EST and May 27 at 3 PM EST – “deeper than above-mentioned bystander intervention… how to identify potential conflict before it escalates using our “pyramid of escalation” and how to assess whether intervening is the right action for you…”
  • #StopAsianHate Panel: Advocating for Our Elders – AARP/May 6 at 3 PM EST – “learn more about the work of AAPI community-based organizations and how they are currently advocating for AAPI elders in the areas of policy, community support, and communications…”
  • The State of Asian America Today May 8 at 8 PM EST,  Where Have We Come From? on May 15 at 8PM ESTWhere Are We Going? Part 1 on May 22 at 8 PM EST and  Where Are We Going? Part 2 on May 29 at 8 PM EST – “series of online town halls from Rise: Asian Pacific America to respond to the anti-Asian hate we’re all seeing throughout our diverse communities… where we are today, where we’ve been as a community, and where we need to go, to rise up to the challenges we face in the near and remote future…
  • Understanding the Impact of COVID and Social Injustices on the Diverse AA, NH & PI Communities – Stanford University/May 10 at 2 PM EST – “challenges including historical trauma due to immigration, being a refugee, colonization, and being seen as forever foreigners, as well as fighting against the myth of the model minority…”
  • Navigating Prejudice and Internalized Prejudice – AAPA/May 12 at 8 PM EST – “experiences of being discriminated against and oppressed affect our overall well-being and sense of agency…  differentiate unhelpful collective messages such as colorism and “gender inequality is cultural” from cultural identity, so we can restore wellness and justice in our minds, homes, and communities…”
  • White Supremacy Characteristics – SURJ/May 13 at 8 PM EST – “We are all swimming in the waters of white supremacy culture. And we are not all affected in the same way… The good news is that while white supremacy culture informs us, it does not define us… It is a construct, and anything constructed can be deconstructed and replaced.”- Tema Okun… article
  • API Heritage Month: Narratives on History, Belonging & Activism – CSSW/May 17 at 6 – 7:30 PM EST – “personal stories, perspectives on history and belonging, and strategies for sustaining activism and healing…”
  • NASW-NYC B.O.L.D Talk: Mental Health & Racial TraumaMay 19 at 6 PM EST – “historical implications of racism, the mental health impact of racism on communities of color, and social work’s role in being both complicit and effective in addressing white supremacy and the ensuing trauma…”
  • Channeling Healthy Anger As a Leader – AAPA/June 16 at 8 PM EST – “Anger is often perceived as an unhealthy and unwelcome emotion. This myth of anger may block us from using this powerful emotion in healing trauma, building resilience, and lifting up the community…”

Anti-Asian Racism Webinars on Demand

For Individuals Experiencing Anti-Asian/American Harassment

Resources for Self Education about Racism Against the AAPI Community

Recommended Children Books H/T Julius Paras

[If you buy something from an affiliate link, SocialWork.Career may earn a commission.]

  • 5 Quick Ways to Analyze Children’s Books for Racism and Sexism – @LovingLittleMinds
  • Eyes That Kiss in the Corners – [affiliate link] – “New York Times Bestseller and #1 Indie Bestseller… lyrical, stunning picture book tells a story about learning to love and celebrate your Asian-shaped eyes, in the spirit of Hair Love by Matthew A. Cherry, and is a celebration of diversity…”
  • From the Stars in the Sky to the Fish in the Sea – [affiliate link] – “Miu Lan is not just any child, but one who can change into any shape they can imagine. The only problem is they can’t decide what to be: A boy or a girl? A bird or a fish? A flower or a shooting star?… one thing’s for sure: no matter what this child becomes, their mother will love them just the same…”
  • Young, Proud, and Sung-jee: A Children’s Book on Fighting Anti-Asian Racism During COVID-19 – book is free to download.

Recommended Adult Books H/T Constance Grady

  • The Color of Success: Asian Americans and the Origins of the Model Minority – [affiliate link] – “mainstream America finds it so easy to ignore anti-Asian racism is the idea that Asian Americans are a “model minority”: They may not be considered white, but they’re still considered well-assimilated and upwardly mobile…”
  • Contagious Divides: Epidemics and Race in San Francisco’s Chinatown – [affiliate link] – “Trump’s repeated invocation of the false idea that Asian Americans somehow carried Covid-19 into the US has long and racist roots. Early Chinese immigrants to the US in the 19th century were repeatedly demonized as filthy disease carriers by the public health authorities of the era…”
  • Driven Out: The Forgotten War Against Chinese Americans – [affiliate link] – “Starting in 1848 and continuing into the 20th century, in towns across the American West, Chinese Americans were violently rounded up, driven out of town, or killed in a deliberate campaign of ethnic cleansing…”
  • The Making of Asian America: A History – [affiliate link] – “historian Erika Lee tracks waves of Asian immigration to the United States… Asian Americans cycle between getting labeled “good immigrants” and “bad immigrants,” depending on the mood of the political moment…”

Articles

Anti-Asian Racism Guides/Toolkits

  • Anti-Asian Racism Resource Guide for Families with Children, Young Adults or Elders – “conversations about race should begin near a child’s fifth birthday even though children begin to be aware of race when they are infants…”
  • Anti-Racism Resources for Asian Americans – “action items… Anti-Blackness in Asian Communities… Model Minority Myth and Meritocracy Lies…”
  • APALA Racial Justice Toolkit – “racial justice trainings… organizations in racial justice movement moments… resources…”
  • APALA (Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association) 2021 COVID-19 Anti-racist Resources – “legal assistance, trackers (racial profiling and hate crimes), anti-xenophobia resources…”
  • Asian American Racial Justice Toolkit – “15 modules spanning Asian American Identity, Model Minority Myth, Gender & Patriarchy, White Supremacy, Race & Working Class + Immigrant Struggles, For Black Lives, Colonialism, & Islamo-Racism… begin with people’s lived experiences… build structural awareness of why those experiences are happening, and how they are tied to the oppression of others…”
  • Asian American Racism & Mental Health Resources – Massachusetts General Hospital -“resources tailored toward students, parents, educators, mental health clinicians, and allies/the general public…”
  • Classroom Resources and Tips To Address Anti-Asian Discrimination – “Anti-AAPI racism isn’t anything new in this country. From “yellow peril” to the “model minority,” we need to educate ourselves about the history of anti-AAPI racism in this country…”
  • Combat Hate Crime Resources – “APIAHF and NAPABA toolkit translated into 25 different languages… Understanding the difference between a hate crime and hate incident… Working with law enforcement and the media… Checklist for community organizations…”
  • Learning Together – Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center – “Addressing anti-Asian racism and xenophobia… Activities and videos for students, families, and lifelong learners…Resources about Asian American and Pacific Islander voices in literature…
  • Narratives by and About Asians and Asian Americans – CSWE – “highly acclaimed contemporary literature… represent nearly a quarter of the 51 countries and territories of Asia. Intersectionality, coming of age, the precariousness of forced displacement, and layered cultural identity are some of the themes…”
  • Racial Justice in Education Resource Guide – “Racial justice — or racial equity — goes beyond “anti-racism.” It is not just the absence of discrimination and inequities, but also the presence of deliberate systems and supports to achieve and sustain racial equity through proactive and preventative measures…”

Not Much of a Reader? Check Out These Anti-Racist Videos/Movies/TV Shows/Podcasts

YouTube/TV/Film

  • Asia Rising Forever – recording of a special livestream festival event… a celebration of Asian and Asian American music and togetherness, demonstrating unity due to the pandemic and the xenophobic hate many are experiencing.
  • Asian Americans is a five-part PBS documentary series on the history of Asians in America and the ongoing role Asian Americans have played in shaping our nation’s history. The series is told through individual lives and family stories
  • #AsianAmCovidStories is a documentary series by the Asian American Documentary Network exploring Asian Americans’ experiences and challenges during the Covid-19 pandemic.
  • Celebrate Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month 2021 – PBS is offering several new films and shows featuring AAPI stories.
  • The Chinese Exclusion Act – 2018 PBS documentary examines the origin, history, and impact of the 1882 law that made it illegal for Chinese workers to come to America, and for Chinese nationals already here to become U.S. citizens.
  • Fear, Compassion or Xenophobia: Our Social Responses to Crisis – discussion on creating frameworks to fight xenophobia.
  • I Am Not Your Asian Stereotype | Canwen Xu | TEDxBoise – “In this hilarious and insightful talk, eighteen-year-old Canwen Xu shares her Asian-American story of breaking stereotypes, reaffirming stereotypes, and driving competently on her way to buy rice.”
  • Let It Not Happen Again: Lessons of the Japanese American Exclusion – “In March of 1942, 227 Japanese Americans were forcibly removed from their homes on Bainbridge Island by the US Army…”
  • Raising Global Citizens: A Panel for Parents, Caregivers, and Educators – how to best support children to be effective participants in this increasingly complex, diverse, and interconnected world.
  • Self-Love through Self-Identity | Eileen Kim | TEDxWoodbridgeHigh – “hopes to break the stigma surrounding mental illness by telling her own story as a source of empathy in order to motivate others to seek help…”
  • UNLADYLIKE2020 – series of 26 short films and a one-hour documentary profiling diverse and little-known American women from the turn of the 20th century, and contemporary women who follow in their footsteps.
  • What kind of Asian are you? – Scott plays a friendly jogger who is very interested in guessing the heritage of Stella.
  • Why Asian Americans are not the Model Minority | Alice Li | TEDxVanderbiltUniversity – “Confined within the boundaries of the model minority myth, Asian Americans are commonly perceived as a mass of indistinguishable overachievers who are all “smart” and “good at math.” However, these seemingly positive stereotypes can have a detrimental impact on not only Asian Americans, but also race relations in general. In this talk, Alice Li draws from research studies and her personal experiences to challenge the two-dimensional identity outlined by the model minority myth…”

Podcasts/Exhibits

Anti-Asian Racism Organizations to Support

  • Advancing Justice | AAJC – its mission is to advance the civil and human rights for Asian Americans and to build and promote a fair and equitable society for all.
  • APACEvotes – strives to increase access to and participation in electoral and civic affairs by registering, educating and protecting Asian American and Pacific Islander voters
  • Asian Mental Health Collective – is working to destigmatize and normalize mental health within the Asian community; Asians face culturally specific barriers when it comes to mental health.
  • Asian Pacific American Institute for Congressional Studies (APAICS) – dedicated to promoting Asian Pacific American participation and representation at all levels of the political process, from community service to elected office.
  • Stop AAPI Hate – tracks and responds to incidents of hate, violence, harassment, discrimination, shunning, and child bullying against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the United States.

Last updated: May 14, 2021

References:

Asian American Arts Alliance. How to stop AAPI hate

Cornell. (n.d.). Anti-Racism Resources for the AAPI Community

Grady, Constance. (March 18, 2021). A reading list to understand anti-Asian racism in America.

Highline College Library. Anti-Racist Resources: Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Racial Justice

National Endowment for the Humanities. (n.d.). Virtual bookshelf.

NBC News. Anti-racism resources to support Asian American, Pacific Islander community

NCAA Office of Inclusion. (n.d.) Anti-Racism resources to support the Asian American and Pacific Islander community: Websites and videos.

Stop AAPI Hate.

University of Pittsburgh. (n.d.). Antiracism Resources to Support Asian, Asian American, and Pacific Islander Communities

Anti-Asian Violence Resources

Warmline – MHAAO – Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon – Evolve Peer Support Services – Multiple Numbers -Weekdays – 9am-5pm (PST) @ Phone
Oct 28 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

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MHAAO is pleased to offer Evolve’s Peer Support by Phone for persons affected by the pandemic, wildfires, and similar issues.

Do you need someone to talk to?  We’re available for anyone to call peer support no matter what!

Happy to work with any age groups from any area.

Will make arrangements for virtual peer support if requested. 

Generally available @ 9am-5pm PST Weekdays, Monday through Friday.

See names and numbers below.

Flyer excerpt(s):
Have you been impacted by COVID-19 or the Oregon Wildfires?
Our Peer Support Specialists are here to help!
Call us Monday through Friday, 9am-5pm PST
==========
Monica Alexander
971-337-6716
Bill Beall
971-337-4550
Roman Becerra
971-930-9017
Bryan Corley
971-282-8101
Amber Hatkoff
971-352-0582
Molly Griggs
971-337-5506
Anthony Jarrard
971-337-4791
Grace Jo
503-314-3309
Amber Lakin
971-930-9404
Jenny Manzanares
971-241-1404
Howard Marlow
971-337-6293
Jesse Maxwell
971-202-6337
Larae Miller
503-719-1725
Brenda Mitchell
971-337-6715
Geoff Moser
971-202-3142
Marianne O’Neill-Tutor
971-337-6624
Tara Prince
971-413-0264
Kristina Teasley
971-930-9014
=========
Evolve is a program of Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon (MHAAO).
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MHAW – Association of Mental Health And Wellness – Peer Bereavement Support Group for COVID-19 Loss Survivors – Thursdays @ Online via Zoom (secured)
Oct 28 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am

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AMHAW (Association Mental Health and Wellness) presents this series of Bereavement Support groups for COVID-19 Loss Survivors.

NOTE: Participants in any of the five COVID-19 Bereavement Support Groups must be mourning the loss of a family member or close friend who has died from COVID-19.

FREE – AMHAW Peer Bereavement Support Group
For individuals experiencing a mental health condition who have lost a loved one to coronavirus. Participants have a safe and supportive space to share their stories with others who can truly relate to their pain and experiences.

Thursdays, 10am-11am PST / 1pm-2pm EST (60 minutes).

Questions?

Call Alexis Rodgers at 631-471-7242 x1315 or arodgers@mhaw.org.

or Contact Yvonne Lyon at 516-350-7217 or ylyon@mhanc.org

Website:

Register:

https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07eh2v9gnz121f0f76&oseq=&c=&ch=

NOTE: After registration, you should receive a link and/or email with instructions to access the secure online ZOOM meetings.

More about the MHAW COVID-19 Bereavement Support Groups:
Excerpt(s) from
Last viewed online 2020 May 15:

People are unable to grieve the loss of loved ones in ways they are used to. No wakes for Christians. No shivas for Jews. No three-day mourning periods for Muslims.

That’s why Long Island’s two leading, county-based mental health organizations have begun offering online bereavement support groups designed to provide comfort, support, and “grief tools” to those who have lost loved ones to the COVID-19 virus. The first group begins on Tuesday, May 19, 2020.

Details can be found at www.bereavement.mhaw.org.

Mandatory social distancing has sharply curtailed people’s ability to grieve in conventional, in-person settings. In the absence of the intimate contact typically associated with the mourning process, these remote, weekly bereavement sessions aim to mollify the pain of individuals whose family members or close friends have succumbed to COVID-19.

The “COVID-19 Bereavement Support Group” initiative is hosted by the Suffolk County-based Association for Mental Health and Wellness and the Mental Health Association of Nassau County.

Guided by experienced grief counselors, the groups will convene remotely in 60- or 90-minute sessions via a secure Zoom line over the course of a four- or six-week period. There is no cost to take part and registration – which is limited to 12 participants per group – is on a first-come basis.

“As everyone can imagine, losing a loved one to the virus is a deeply painful and jarring experience,” said Michael Stoltz, C.E.O. of the Association for Mental Health and Wellness, which is headquartered in Ronkonkoma. “We’ve identified skilled and sensitive grief counselors who are well qualified to help participants build comforting pathways for healing, even in a technologically remote setting.”

“The pandemic’s restrictions largely prevent mourners from experiencing the reassuring feelings of hugs and other types of close-up contact,” said Jeffrey McQueen, Executive Director of the Hempstead-based Mental Health Association of Nassau County. “Grieving remotely can’t fully replace the face-to-face experience, but it can help reinforce feelings of hope and help fill the void.”

Participants in any of the five COVID-19 Bereavement Support Groups must be mourning the loss of a family member or close friend who has died from COVID-19.

The group categories are:

Grieving Adults Support Groups: For people who have lost a loved one to coronavirus and cannot grieve in person with their loved ones. The group will bring together others who are struggling to come to terms with the loss, to create a sense of closure, and to grieve in community. There will be two groups in this category.

Peer Bereavement Support Group: For individuals experiencing a mental health condition who have lost a loved one to coronavirus. Participants have a safe and supportive space to share their stories with others who can truly relate to their pain and experiences.

Veterans Bereavement Support Group: For Veterans and their families who have lost someone to coronavirus and cannot grieve in person with their loved ones. This group will deal with issues specific to the Veterans community.

Creative Arts Bereavement Support Group: The making of art can serve as a safe outlet for the expression of thoughts and emotions relating to death and loss. By expressing these feelings in a symbolic manner, mourners can nurture their sense of control, organization, and containment. Participants may use such art supplies as copy paper, colored pencils, markers, crayons, scissors, and glue.

Interested parties may register at www.bereavement.mhaw.org.


About the Association for Mental Health and Wellness

The Association for Mental Health and Wellness (MHAW), a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) corporation based in Ronkonkoma, NY, provides programs, services, and advocacy for people facing mental health challenges with an enhanced focus on serving military Veterans.

MHAW dates back to 1955 with the incorporation of the Mental Health Association in Suffolk County (MHA Suffolk). In 1990, Clubhouse of Suffolk was launched, providing a wide array of vocational rehabilitation services and recovery programs. With the growing need to provide services for Veterans with PTSD and other battle-related brain injuries, Clubhouse merged with MHA Suffolk and Suffolk County United Veterans in 2014 to form the Association for Mental Health and Wellness.

MHAW is committed to the core practice values of empowerment, hope, opportunity, and cultural competence. All of the agency’s direct service workers are trained in the importance of addressing health from trauma-informed and whole person perspectives with enriched understanding of the social and economic conditions that contribute to physical and mental health and substance abuse.

MHAW’s Mental Health HelpLine can be reached at 631-471-7242 ext. 2. Their web address is www.mhaw.org.

ROCC – Recovery Outreach Community Center – Getting Candid About Covid with Jill – Thursdays @ online via Zoom
Oct 28 @ 4:00 pm – 4:30 pm

 

logo

ROCC Salem presents online peer support

Getting Candid About Covid with Jill

Online – Saturdays 4:00PM-4:30 PM PST

In this group we will have not only have factual, science-based education but also an open conversation to answer questions and address concerns, challenges and anxieties about Covid.

Click link below to attend group. You will be asked to register on ZOOM. It’s free and fast!

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZIpcumvqjsjG92MfEqHDTHKk7hf3B01owBa

ZOOM Meeting Id: 864 5074 0919 

ROCC has peer support by phone and other online groups, too!

Peer Support is now available on the phone Seven days a week, 11:00 am to 7:00 pm (PST)

Peer support is about connecting with someone in a way that contributes to both people learning and growing. There’s no assessment, diagnosis or treatment. It’s about helping each other understand how we’ve come to know what we know, and moving toward what we want, instead of just getting away from what we don’t want.

One on One Peer support via phone is available with certified Peer Support Specialists

Peer Support Numbers 11 am-7 pm (PST)

971-718-8668 (Tuesday-Thursday)

971-718-8670 (Friday-Monday)g

To learn about ROCC’s Online Groups, visit:
http://www.roccsalem.org/online-groups

ROCC Mission Statement

Recovery Outreach Community Center (ROCC), is a safe place for people recovering from or who are interested in mental health, addiction, trauma, or other related issues. Our mission is to empower and respect others through peer-led service and peer-to-peer support. We want to encourage self-direction, personal responsibility and hope, by providing a safe place for people to share story and heal.

ROCC Principles

Principle I

The source of ROCC’s power is peer-to-peer relations. By sharing story and experiences, we lead each other into hope.

Principle II

Self-direction and personal recovery is ROCC’s goal. To be able to lead, control and choose your own recovery path will achieve a self-determined life.

Principle III

ROCC requires respectful conduct and encourages the voice of all. We must instill hope in the individual while fulfilling the values of the group.

ROCC Website:

https://www.roccsalem.org

ROCC Facebook Page:

https://www.facebook.com/ROCCSALEM/

ROCC Facebook Group for Chat:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/232944234571700/

Oct
29
Fri
01 – Helpline – SSH – Safe + Strong Helpline for Behavioral, Mental and Emotional Health Support – Interpreters Available @ 1-800-923-4357 (HELP) – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free
Oct 29 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

AM – All Month – COVID-19 Coronavirus Vaccine Access Information by OHA – Oregon Health Authority – English & Español
Oct 29 all-day

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COVID-19 Vaccine Access Information

Información de acceso a la vacuna COVID-19

English & Espanol

As of April 19, 2021, all Oregonians over 16 are now eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine.
**This is a big day for the state. Many thanks to the folks on the front lines who are running vaccination sites and working so hard to get as many people as possible vaccinated.
See below for information on getting scheduled for a vaccine.
Accelerated Access to COVID-19 Vaccinations
Scheduling a Vaccination
The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has created several resources to assist individuals in planning for their COVID-19 vaccination:
How to find a COVID-19 Vaccine in Oregon
Available in Spanish at Cómo encontrar una vacuna contra el COVID-19 en Oregon
What to know before you get vaccinated
Post Vaccination: What we all need to do together
Scheduling a COVID-19 vaccine is primarily managed through the
OHA’s Get Vaccinated Oregon website.
The OHA has created a Get Vaccinated Oregon Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) page.
Multi-lingual assistance using the Get Vaccinated Oregon tool is also available by calling 211.
Some local pharmacies are offering vaccinations through a Federal Retail Pharmacy Program partnership.
Appointments can be made by visiting pharmacy websites directly:
If you need to get a vaccine through the drive-through site at PDX Airport, please go to OHSU’s COVID-19 Vaccine: Information and Appointments page.
All COVID-19 vaccine sites are dependent upon the availability of vaccine supply, which is determined by many factors, including supply at the national level and allocation at the federal and state levels.
Appointments are required.
Multnomah County maintains the COVID-19 Vaccine page which includes information options for scheduling a vaccination and resources for individuals who may need assistance scheduling an appointment due to language or barriers with technology.
Lastly, if you’re an immigrant, please know the following:
All eligible people in Oregon can get the vaccine.
You do NOT need to be a U.S. citizen to get the vaccine.
Getting the vaccine will NOT affect your immigration status or count as a public charge.
You do not need to have or provide a social security number.
You do not need to have identification.
If you need help, you can call the Safe + Strong Helpline at 1-800-923-HELP (4357).
**See active links in this bulletin by
Oregon Legislature, Speaker of the House, Rep. Tina Kotek’s
published  4/19/2021 at:

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/ORLEG/bulletins/2cd30a8

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/ORLEG/bulletins/2cd30a8

House Speaker Tina Kotek

Weekly Update: Vaccines, Session Progress, Budget Hearing

AM – All Month – Renters, Tenants and Landlords – Support, Resources, Assistance & Info – During COVID-19 Pandemic
Oct 29 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program

Information and Application For Tenants and Landlords

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program is open as of May 19th. OHCS is working with local organizations to provide more than $200 million in assistance to low-income Oregonians that have been financially impacted by COVID-19. OHCS created a partner toolkit to help communities promote this vital resource. This packet includes check lists for tenants and landlords, application information and documentation, frequently asked questions, and other helpful information related to the program.

Vista De Verificacion Del Inquilino 

Solicitud En Papel

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP) helps eligible low-income households with their past due rent and utilities. This program uses funds from the federal Emergency Rental Assistance Program, which allocated a collective total of $280 million to Oregon, the City of Portland, and multiple counties in the state. In most cases, approved applications will result in payments made directly to landlords and utility providers.

Beginning May 19, 2021, qualified renters who have experienced financial hardship due to the coronavirus pandemic, and are at risk of homelessness or housing instability, may apply for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP). This program is not a loan, which means those who receive assistance will not have to pay back funds so long as they are used as approved and not duplicating other assistance programs. Assistance is offered to all eligible renters regardless of their citizenship or immigration status, and it will not impact the recipient’s eligibility for other federally funded programs such as food stamps, Medicaid, Medicare, social security, WIC or public housing.

Renters who are eligible for the program may request rent and/or utility assistance dating back to March 13, 2020 (prior expenses are not eligible). OERAP will cover up to 12 months of past due rent and three months of forward rent, once all past due rent is paid. OERAP will also cover past due utility costs including electricity, gas, home energy services, water, sewer, trash removal, internet and bulk fuels. Costs that will NOT be covered include: homeowner costs, homeowner utilities, landlord-paid utilities, landlord-paid property taxes, property insurance, phone, and renter insurance.

If approved, in most cases, payments will be made directly to the landlord, property owner or utility company on the tenant’s behalf via direct deposit or check. OERAP funds are not first-come-first-serve. Funds will be distributed based on a formula that prioritizes applications based on need. Everyone who turns in a completed application will have their application reviewed.

Click on this link to apply for Emergency Rental Assistance

Apply for OERAP Now

To learn more about eligibility, applying and the program itself, scroll down or use the buttons below to jump to a section.

 

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
DISCLAIMER: Information is provided solely as a courtesy without guarantees or warranties of any kind whatsoever.  Use at your own risk and expense.
MS – MINDSPACE – Mindfulness and Resilience Support Groups through COVID-19 @ Online via Zoom
Oct 29 all-day

 

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MINDSPACE offers FREE Online Support for Mindfulness and Resilience through COVID-19 Pandemic

There are a variety of online events through Mindspace pay-what-you-can series designed specifically for health-care workers looking for psychological support during the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. In each live, interactive session we will explore a different theme related to the current situation, and a corresponding mindfulness practice to help frame and navigate the situation.

The themes include:

  • Safety and grounding
  • Settling a busy mind
  • Being with difficulty
  • Connecting with purpose

The format will involve educational material, a guided, experiential practice, and time for group discussion. The course is intended to not only provide educational content and skill-teaching, but also to harness the communal support of a peer group at a time when social connection is more crucial than ever.

Events Calendar with Search Filters

https://clients.mindbodyonline.com/asp/main_enroll.asp

Register Online

You will be asked to create an online account with an email address, password and phone number.

When registering for and event you will have the option to sign-up for the full series or to choose dates you can attend.  You will also be given the option to choose your contribution amount (pay-as-you-can).

Instructions on how to join the online group will likely be sent via email upon registration.

Classes fill up fast, first come first serve.

Website:

https://www.mindspacewellbeing.com/

Excerpt(s):

Our mission at Mindspace is to inspire well-being with the transformative potential of science, wisdom, and human connection.

We believe well-being is a skill that can be learned, and that it can scale from the individual, to families, communities, and organizations of all shapes and sizes. We believe that everyone can benefit from some form of mind training, but that doesn’t mean there’s a one-size-fits-all solution. Well-being at Mindspace is about connecting with people where they are and supporting the development of skills for building a sustainable, meaningful life—at home, at work, and in the world.

FREE Online COVID-19 Support Groups

https://www.mindspacewellbeing.com/programs/online-covid-19-support-group/

Examples include:

  • Mindfulness and Resilience for Healthcare Workers
  • Adaptive Coping for Students
  • Building Resilience
  • Mindfulness and Wellbeing Tools for the New Normal
  • Navigating the New Normal: Wellbeing Practices Revisited
  • Flourishing at Work in Times of Turbulence
RRP – Recovery Resources PDX – Virtual Online Meetings – Weekdays & Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Oct 29 all-day

logo

Digital Recovery Resources PDX

A DATABASE OF RESOURCES AND SUPPORTS FOR PEOPLE IN RECOVERY AND PEOPLE IN NEED OF ASSISTANCE DURING THE COVID-19 CRISIS

Whether you are looking for a daily recovery meeting, a recovery yoga class, a recovery Cross Fit session, engagement with a peer specialist, or just a place to connect with your network – we’ve got you covered

RecoveryResourcesPDX.com offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.  Plus you’ll find links to recovery resources, social services, food & housing, financial resources and COVID-19 information.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily

Digital Meetings Schedule

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com/digital-meetings

Recovery Resources PDX Website:

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com

 

Excerpt(s) from website last viewed 2020 May 01:

DAILY MUTUAL AID MEETINGS 4am-9pm PST
4:00AM – 5:00AM:
RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
6:00AM – 7:00AM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
6:00AM – 7:00AM:
Eastside Sunrise (AA, All)
6:30AM – 7:30AM: Dawn Patrol (AA, All)
9:00AM – 10:00AM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
10:00AM – 11:00AM: Ben’s Friends National (All Recovery, Food & Beverage Industry, All)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: Newcomers at Noon (AA, Women Only)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: Men’s Clock Room (AA, Men Only)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: Portland Daily Double Group (AA, All)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: Surrender at Noon (AA, All)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: NW at Noon (Al-Anon, All)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
3:00PM – 4:00PM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
3:00PM – 4:00PM: Recovery In the House (NA, All, M-F)
5:00PM – 6:00PM: Portland Daily Double Group (AA, All)
5:30PM – 6:30PM: Upstairs 5:30 (AA, All)
5:30PM – 6:30PM: New Alternatives (AA, All)
6:00PM – 7:00PM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
8:00PM – 9:00PM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)

AA Intergroup National Online Meetings Directory
AA Intergroup Portland Online Meetings Directory

WEEKLY MUTUAL AID MEETINGS
MON 7:00PM – 8:15PM:
Our True Selves (ACA, All)
TUE 9:00PM – 10:00PM: Karma Kontrol (AA, All)
TUE 10:00AM – 11:00AM: Ben’s Friends Portland (All Recovery, Food & Beverage)
TUE 4:00PM – 5:00PM: RecoveryLink Women’s Meeting (All Recovery, Women Only)
TUE 7:00PM – 8:00PM: Secular ACA (ACA, All)
WED 8:00AM – 9:00AM: RecoveryLink LGBTrans* Queer+ Meeting (All Recovery, LGBTQ+)
WED 6:30PM – 8:00PM: Gentleness, Humor, Love & Respect (ACA, All)
THU 4:00PM – 5:00PM: RecoveryLink Women’s Meeting (All Recovery, Women Only)
SUN 10:00AM – 11:00AM: Beyond Belief (AA, Agnostic)

DAILY CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS
9:00AM – 10:00AM: TRG Recovery CrossFit (All Recovery, All)
2:00PM – 3:00PM: TRG Recovery CrossFit (All Recovery, All)
2:00PM – 3:00PM: Social Determinants of Recovery Workshop (All Recovery, All)
6:00PM – 7:00PM: TRG Recovery CrossFit (All Recovery, All)

WEEKLY CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS
MON 4:00PM – 5:00PM: Mindfulness Recovery Support Group (All Recovery, All)
TUE 2:00PM – 3:00PM: Recovery Yoga (All Recovery, All)
TUE 6:45PM – 7:45PM: Invitation to Change (Family and Friends, All)
WED 5:00PM – 6:00PM: Mindfulness Meditation (All Recovery, All)
FRI 4:00PM – 5:00PM: Mindfulness Recovery Support Group (All Recovery, All)
SUN 2:00PM – 3:00PM: Recovery Yoga (All Recovery, All)

Zoom Meeting How-Tos

https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/categories/200101697

Digital Meeting Safety Guidelines

https://unityrecovery.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/UR-AR-Meeting-Safety-Guidelines-and-Procedures.pdf

SWC – Social Work Career – #StandWithAAPI – Anti-Asian Racism Resources for Social Workers and Therapists
Oct 29 all-day

Rescoure Poster

#StandWithAAPI

Anti-Asian Racism Resources for Social Workers and Therapists

Sadly, hate bias incidents such as verbal harassment and physical assault against Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities in the United States have risen during the Covid-19 pandemic due to misconceptions and misinformation about the spread of the virus.

To assist in the endeavor of becoming anti-racist, this post provides some steps we can all take to help break the cycle of racism and violence, and a round-up of various anti-AAPI racism resources to help us become better informed about our AAPI communities. These include resources especially for individuals experiencing Anti-Asian/American harassment, as well as webinars, books, articles, anti-racism guides/toolkits, videos, podcasts, and worthwhile organizations to support.

Please feel free to share any additional helpful finds in the comments section of this post.

Free Anti-Asian Racism Webinars/Trainings

  • Bystander Intervention – Hollaback! and Asian Americans Advancing Justice/May 20 at 5 PM EST and May 24 at 4 PM EST – “five strategies for intervention: distract, delegate, document, delay, and direct; and how to prioritize your own safety while intervening…”
  • Bystander Intervention 2.0 – Conflict De-Escalation Workshop – Hollaback! and Asian Americans Advancing Justice/May 12 at 5PM EST and May 27 at 3 PM EST – “deeper than above-mentioned bystander intervention… how to identify potential conflict before it escalates using our “pyramid of escalation” and how to assess whether intervening is the right action for you…”
  • #StopAsianHate Panel: Advocating for Our Elders – AARP/May 6 at 3 PM EST – “learn more about the work of AAPI community-based organizations and how they are currently advocating for AAPI elders in the areas of policy, community support, and communications…”
  • The State of Asian America Today May 8 at 8 PM EST,  Where Have We Come From? on May 15 at 8PM ESTWhere Are We Going? Part 1 on May 22 at 8 PM EST and  Where Are We Going? Part 2 on May 29 at 8 PM EST – “series of online town halls from Rise: Asian Pacific America to respond to the anti-Asian hate we’re all seeing throughout our diverse communities… where we are today, where we’ve been as a community, and where we need to go, to rise up to the challenges we face in the near and remote future…
  • Understanding the Impact of COVID and Social Injustices on the Diverse AA, NH & PI Communities – Stanford University/May 10 at 2 PM EST – “challenges including historical trauma due to immigration, being a refugee, colonization, and being seen as forever foreigners, as well as fighting against the myth of the model minority…”
  • Navigating Prejudice and Internalized Prejudice – AAPA/May 12 at 8 PM EST – “experiences of being discriminated against and oppressed affect our overall well-being and sense of agency…  differentiate unhelpful collective messages such as colorism and “gender inequality is cultural” from cultural identity, so we can restore wellness and justice in our minds, homes, and communities…”
  • White Supremacy Characteristics – SURJ/May 13 at 8 PM EST – “We are all swimming in the waters of white supremacy culture. And we are not all affected in the same way… The good news is that while white supremacy culture informs us, it does not define us… It is a construct, and anything constructed can be deconstructed and replaced.”- Tema Okun… article
  • API Heritage Month: Narratives on History, Belonging & Activism – CSSW/May 17 at 6 – 7:30 PM EST – “personal stories, perspectives on history and belonging, and strategies for sustaining activism and healing…”
  • NASW-NYC B.O.L.D Talk: Mental Health & Racial TraumaMay 19 at 6 PM EST – “historical implications of racism, the mental health impact of racism on communities of color, and social work’s role in being both complicit and effective in addressing white supremacy and the ensuing trauma…”
  • Channeling Healthy Anger As a Leader – AAPA/June 16 at 8 PM EST – “Anger is often perceived as an unhealthy and unwelcome emotion. This myth of anger may block us from using this powerful emotion in healing trauma, building resilience, and lifting up the community…”

Anti-Asian Racism Webinars on Demand

For Individuals Experiencing Anti-Asian/American Harassment

Resources for Self Education about Racism Against the AAPI Community

Recommended Children Books H/T Julius Paras

[If you buy something from an affiliate link, SocialWork.Career may earn a commission.]

  • 5 Quick Ways to Analyze Children’s Books for Racism and Sexism – @LovingLittleMinds
  • Eyes That Kiss in the Corners – [affiliate link] – “New York Times Bestseller and #1 Indie Bestseller… lyrical, stunning picture book tells a story about learning to love and celebrate your Asian-shaped eyes, in the spirit of Hair Love by Matthew A. Cherry, and is a celebration of diversity…”
  • From the Stars in the Sky to the Fish in the Sea – [affiliate link] – “Miu Lan is not just any child, but one who can change into any shape they can imagine. The only problem is they can’t decide what to be: A boy or a girl? A bird or a fish? A flower or a shooting star?… one thing’s for sure: no matter what this child becomes, their mother will love them just the same…”
  • Young, Proud, and Sung-jee: A Children’s Book on Fighting Anti-Asian Racism During COVID-19 – book is free to download.

Recommended Adult Books H/T Constance Grady

  • The Color of Success: Asian Americans and the Origins of the Model Minority – [affiliate link] – “mainstream America finds it so easy to ignore anti-Asian racism is the idea that Asian Americans are a “model minority”: They may not be considered white, but they’re still considered well-assimilated and upwardly mobile…”
  • Contagious Divides: Epidemics and Race in San Francisco’s Chinatown – [affiliate link] – “Trump’s repeated invocation of the false idea that Asian Americans somehow carried Covid-19 into the US has long and racist roots. Early Chinese immigrants to the US in the 19th century were repeatedly demonized as filthy disease carriers by the public health authorities of the era…”
  • Driven Out: The Forgotten War Against Chinese Americans – [affiliate link] – “Starting in 1848 and continuing into the 20th century, in towns across the American West, Chinese Americans were violently rounded up, driven out of town, or killed in a deliberate campaign of ethnic cleansing…”
  • The Making of Asian America: A History – [affiliate link] – “historian Erika Lee tracks waves of Asian immigration to the United States… Asian Americans cycle between getting labeled “good immigrants” and “bad immigrants,” depending on the mood of the political moment…”

Articles

Anti-Asian Racism Guides/Toolkits

  • Anti-Asian Racism Resource Guide for Families with Children, Young Adults or Elders – “conversations about race should begin near a child’s fifth birthday even though children begin to be aware of race when they are infants…”
  • Anti-Racism Resources for Asian Americans – “action items… Anti-Blackness in Asian Communities… Model Minority Myth and Meritocracy Lies…”
  • APALA Racial Justice Toolkit – “racial justice trainings… organizations in racial justice movement moments… resources…”
  • APALA (Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association) 2021 COVID-19 Anti-racist Resources – “legal assistance, trackers (racial profiling and hate crimes), anti-xenophobia resources…”
  • Asian American Racial Justice Toolkit – “15 modules spanning Asian American Identity, Model Minority Myth, Gender & Patriarchy, White Supremacy, Race & Working Class + Immigrant Struggles, For Black Lives, Colonialism, & Islamo-Racism… begin with people’s lived experiences… build structural awareness of why those experiences are happening, and how they are tied to the oppression of others…”
  • Asian American Racism & Mental Health Resources – Massachusetts General Hospital -“resources tailored toward students, parents, educators, mental health clinicians, and allies/the general public…”
  • Classroom Resources and Tips To Address Anti-Asian Discrimination – “Anti-AAPI racism isn’t anything new in this country. From “yellow peril” to the “model minority,” we need to educate ourselves about the history of anti-AAPI racism in this country…”
  • Combat Hate Crime Resources – “APIAHF and NAPABA toolkit translated into 25 different languages… Understanding the difference between a hate crime and hate incident… Working with law enforcement and the media… Checklist for community organizations…”
  • Learning Together – Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center – “Addressing anti-Asian racism and xenophobia… Activities and videos for students, families, and lifelong learners…Resources about Asian American and Pacific Islander voices in literature…
  • Narratives by and About Asians and Asian Americans – CSWE – “highly acclaimed contemporary literature… represent nearly a quarter of the 51 countries and territories of Asia. Intersectionality, coming of age, the precariousness of forced displacement, and layered cultural identity are some of the themes…”
  • Racial Justice in Education Resource Guide – “Racial justice — or racial equity — goes beyond “anti-racism.” It is not just the absence of discrimination and inequities, but also the presence of deliberate systems and supports to achieve and sustain racial equity through proactive and preventative measures…”

Not Much of a Reader? Check Out These Anti-Racist Videos/Movies/TV Shows/Podcasts

YouTube/TV/Film

  • Asia Rising Forever – recording of a special livestream festival event… a celebration of Asian and Asian American music and togetherness, demonstrating unity due to the pandemic and the xenophobic hate many are experiencing.
  • Asian Americans is a five-part PBS documentary series on the history of Asians in America and the ongoing role Asian Americans have played in shaping our nation’s history. The series is told through individual lives and family stories
  • #AsianAmCovidStories is a documentary series by the Asian American Documentary Network exploring Asian Americans’ experiences and challenges during the Covid-19 pandemic.
  • Celebrate Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month 2021 – PBS is offering several new films and shows featuring AAPI stories.
  • The Chinese Exclusion Act – 2018 PBS documentary examines the origin, history, and impact of the 1882 law that made it illegal for Chinese workers to come to America, and for Chinese nationals already here to become U.S. citizens.
  • Fear, Compassion or Xenophobia: Our Social Responses to Crisis – discussion on creating frameworks to fight xenophobia.
  • I Am Not Your Asian Stereotype | Canwen Xu | TEDxBoise – “In this hilarious and insightful talk, eighteen-year-old Canwen Xu shares her Asian-American story of breaking stereotypes, reaffirming stereotypes, and driving competently on her way to buy rice.”
  • Let It Not Happen Again: Lessons of the Japanese American Exclusion – “In March of 1942, 227 Japanese Americans were forcibly removed from their homes on Bainbridge Island by the US Army…”
  • Raising Global Citizens: A Panel for Parents, Caregivers, and Educators – how to best support children to be effective participants in this increasingly complex, diverse, and interconnected world.
  • Self-Love through Self-Identity | Eileen Kim | TEDxWoodbridgeHigh – “hopes to break the stigma surrounding mental illness by telling her own story as a source of empathy in order to motivate others to seek help…”
  • UNLADYLIKE2020 – series of 26 short films and a one-hour documentary profiling diverse and little-known American women from the turn of the 20th century, and contemporary women who follow in their footsteps.
  • What kind of Asian are you? – Scott plays a friendly jogger who is very interested in guessing the heritage of Stella.
  • Why Asian Americans are not the Model Minority | Alice Li | TEDxVanderbiltUniversity – “Confined within the boundaries of the model minority myth, Asian Americans are commonly perceived as a mass of indistinguishable overachievers who are all “smart” and “good at math.” However, these seemingly positive stereotypes can have a detrimental impact on not only Asian Americans, but also race relations in general. In this talk, Alice Li draws from research studies and her personal experiences to challenge the two-dimensional identity outlined by the model minority myth…”

Podcasts/Exhibits

Anti-Asian Racism Organizations to Support

  • Advancing Justice | AAJC – its mission is to advance the civil and human rights for Asian Americans and to build and promote a fair and equitable society for all.
  • APACEvotes – strives to increase access to and participation in electoral and civic affairs by registering, educating and protecting Asian American and Pacific Islander voters
  • Asian Mental Health Collective – is working to destigmatize and normalize mental health within the Asian community; Asians face culturally specific barriers when it comes to mental health.
  • Asian Pacific American Institute for Congressional Studies (APAICS) – dedicated to promoting Asian Pacific American participation and representation at all levels of the political process, from community service to elected office.
  • Stop AAPI Hate – tracks and responds to incidents of hate, violence, harassment, discrimination, shunning, and child bullying against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the United States.

Last updated: May 14, 2021

References:

Asian American Arts Alliance. How to stop AAPI hate

Cornell. (n.d.). Anti-Racism Resources for the AAPI Community

Grady, Constance. (March 18, 2021). A reading list to understand anti-Asian racism in America.

Highline College Library. Anti-Racist Resources: Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Racial Justice

National Endowment for the Humanities. (n.d.). Virtual bookshelf.

NBC News. Anti-racism resources to support Asian American, Pacific Islander community

NCAA Office of Inclusion. (n.d.) Anti-Racism resources to support the Asian American and Pacific Islander community: Websites and videos.

Stop AAPI Hate.

University of Pittsburgh. (n.d.). Antiracism Resources to Support Asian, Asian American, and Pacific Islander Communities

Anti-Asian Violence Resources

Warmline – MHAAO – Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon – Evolve Peer Support Services – Multiple Numbers -Weekdays – 9am-5pm (PST) @ Phone
Oct 29 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

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MHAAO is pleased to offer Evolve’s Peer Support by Phone for persons affected by the pandemic, wildfires, and similar issues.

Do you need someone to talk to?  We’re available for anyone to call peer support no matter what!

Happy to work with any age groups from any area.

Will make arrangements for virtual peer support if requested. 

Generally available @ 9am-5pm PST Weekdays, Monday through Friday.

See names and numbers below.

Flyer excerpt(s):
Have you been impacted by COVID-19 or the Oregon Wildfires?
Our Peer Support Specialists are here to help!
Call us Monday through Friday, 9am-5pm PST
==========
Monica Alexander
971-337-6716
Bill Beall
971-337-4550
Roman Becerra
971-930-9017
Bryan Corley
971-282-8101
Amber Hatkoff
971-352-0582
Molly Griggs
971-337-5506
Anthony Jarrard
971-337-4791
Grace Jo
503-314-3309
Amber Lakin
971-930-9404
Jenny Manzanares
971-241-1404
Howard Marlow
971-337-6293
Jesse Maxwell
971-202-6337
Larae Miller
503-719-1725
Brenda Mitchell
971-337-6715
Geoff Moser
971-202-3142
Marianne O’Neill-Tutor
971-337-6624
Tara Prince
971-413-0264
Kristina Teasley
971-930-9014
=========
Evolve is a program of Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon (MHAAO).
flyer p2

 

Oct
30
Sat
01 – Helpline – SSH – Safe + Strong Helpline for Behavioral, Mental and Emotional Health Support – Interpreters Available @ 1-800-923-4357 (HELP) – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free
Oct 30 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

AM – All Month – COVID-19 Coronavirus Vaccine Access Information by OHA – Oregon Health Authority – English & Español
Oct 30 all-day

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COVID-19 Vaccine Access Information

Información de acceso a la vacuna COVID-19

English & Espanol

As of April 19, 2021, all Oregonians over 16 are now eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine.
**This is a big day for the state. Many thanks to the folks on the front lines who are running vaccination sites and working so hard to get as many people as possible vaccinated.
See below for information on getting scheduled for a vaccine.
Accelerated Access to COVID-19 Vaccinations
Scheduling a Vaccination
The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has created several resources to assist individuals in planning for their COVID-19 vaccination:
How to find a COVID-19 Vaccine in Oregon
Available in Spanish at Cómo encontrar una vacuna contra el COVID-19 en Oregon
What to know before you get vaccinated
Post Vaccination: What we all need to do together
Scheduling a COVID-19 vaccine is primarily managed through the
OHA’s Get Vaccinated Oregon website.
The OHA has created a Get Vaccinated Oregon Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) page.
Multi-lingual assistance using the Get Vaccinated Oregon tool is also available by calling 211.
Some local pharmacies are offering vaccinations through a Federal Retail Pharmacy Program partnership.
Appointments can be made by visiting pharmacy websites directly:
If you need to get a vaccine through the drive-through site at PDX Airport, please go to OHSU’s COVID-19 Vaccine: Information and Appointments page.
All COVID-19 vaccine sites are dependent upon the availability of vaccine supply, which is determined by many factors, including supply at the national level and allocation at the federal and state levels.
Appointments are required.
Multnomah County maintains the COVID-19 Vaccine page which includes information options for scheduling a vaccination and resources for individuals who may need assistance scheduling an appointment due to language or barriers with technology.
Lastly, if you’re an immigrant, please know the following:
All eligible people in Oregon can get the vaccine.
You do NOT need to be a U.S. citizen to get the vaccine.
Getting the vaccine will NOT affect your immigration status or count as a public charge.
You do not need to have or provide a social security number.
You do not need to have identification.
If you need help, you can call the Safe + Strong Helpline at 1-800-923-HELP (4357).
**See active links in this bulletin by
Oregon Legislature, Speaker of the House, Rep. Tina Kotek’s
published  4/19/2021 at:

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/ORLEG/bulletins/2cd30a8

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/ORLEG/bulletins/2cd30a8

House Speaker Tina Kotek

Weekly Update: Vaccines, Session Progress, Budget Hearing

AM – All Month – Renters, Tenants and Landlords – Support, Resources, Assistance & Info – During COVID-19 Pandemic
Oct 30 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program

Information and Application For Tenants and Landlords

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program is open as of May 19th. OHCS is working with local organizations to provide more than $200 million in assistance to low-income Oregonians that have been financially impacted by COVID-19. OHCS created a partner toolkit to help communities promote this vital resource. This packet includes check lists for tenants and landlords, application information and documentation, frequently asked questions, and other helpful information related to the program.

Vista De Verificacion Del Inquilino 

Solicitud En Papel

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP) helps eligible low-income households with their past due rent and utilities. This program uses funds from the federal Emergency Rental Assistance Program, which allocated a collective total of $280 million to Oregon, the City of Portland, and multiple counties in the state. In most cases, approved applications will result in payments made directly to landlords and utility providers.

Beginning May 19, 2021, qualified renters who have experienced financial hardship due to the coronavirus pandemic, and are at risk of homelessness or housing instability, may apply for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP). This program is not a loan, which means those who receive assistance will not have to pay back funds so long as they are used as approved and not duplicating other assistance programs. Assistance is offered to all eligible renters regardless of their citizenship or immigration status, and it will not impact the recipient’s eligibility for other federally funded programs such as food stamps, Medicaid, Medicare, social security, WIC or public housing.

Renters who are eligible for the program may request rent and/or utility assistance dating back to March 13, 2020 (prior expenses are not eligible). OERAP will cover up to 12 months of past due rent and three months of forward rent, once all past due rent is paid. OERAP will also cover past due utility costs including electricity, gas, home energy services, water, sewer, trash removal, internet and bulk fuels. Costs that will NOT be covered include: homeowner costs, homeowner utilities, landlord-paid utilities, landlord-paid property taxes, property insurance, phone, and renter insurance.

If approved, in most cases, payments will be made directly to the landlord, property owner or utility company on the tenant’s behalf via direct deposit or check. OERAP funds are not first-come-first-serve. Funds will be distributed based on a formula that prioritizes applications based on need. Everyone who turns in a completed application will have their application reviewed.

Click on this link to apply for Emergency Rental Assistance

Apply for OERAP Now

To learn more about eligibility, applying and the program itself, scroll down or use the buttons below to jump to a section.

 

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
DISCLAIMER: Information is provided solely as a courtesy without guarantees or warranties of any kind whatsoever.  Use at your own risk and expense.
GS – Gender Spectrum – Online Virtual Groups for Parents and Teens – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Oct 30 all-day

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Gender Spectrum works to create gender sensitive and inclusive environments for all children and teens.  Gender Spectrum offers over 25 online groups for parents and teens.

In the Gender Spectrum Lounge you can find the list of groups to explore or sign up for.  There is a great variety of topics featured.

https://lounge.genderspectrum.org/groups/

Registration required.  See group description for contact information details.

Additional online groups, webinars, recordings, and events online including resources related to the pandemic at:

https://www.genderspectrum.org/articles/blog-covid-resources

Additional resources specific for schools and professionals, too.

Website:

https://www.genderspectrum.org

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/GenderSpectrum/

Twitter:

https://twitter.com/genderspectrum

 

MS – MINDSPACE – Mindfulness and Resilience Support Groups through COVID-19 @ Online via Zoom
Oct 30 all-day

 

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MINDSPACE offers FREE Online Support for Mindfulness and Resilience through COVID-19 Pandemic

There are a variety of online events through Mindspace pay-what-you-can series designed specifically for health-care workers looking for psychological support during the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. In each live, interactive session we will explore a different theme related to the current situation, and a corresponding mindfulness practice to help frame and navigate the situation.

The themes include:

  • Safety and grounding
  • Settling a busy mind
  • Being with difficulty
  • Connecting with purpose

The format will involve educational material, a guided, experiential practice, and time for group discussion. The course is intended to not only provide educational content and skill-teaching, but also to harness the communal support of a peer group at a time when social connection is more crucial than ever.

Events Calendar with Search Filters

https://clients.mindbodyonline.com/asp/main_enroll.asp

Register Online

You will be asked to create an online account with an email address, password and phone number.

When registering for and event you will have the option to sign-up for the full series or to choose dates you can attend.  You will also be given the option to choose your contribution amount (pay-as-you-can).

Instructions on how to join the online group will likely be sent via email upon registration.

Classes fill up fast, first come first serve.

Website:

https://www.mindspacewellbeing.com/

Excerpt(s):

Our mission at Mindspace is to inspire well-being with the transformative potential of science, wisdom, and human connection.

We believe well-being is a skill that can be learned, and that it can scale from the individual, to families, communities, and organizations of all shapes and sizes. We believe that everyone can benefit from some form of mind training, but that doesn’t mean there’s a one-size-fits-all solution. Well-being at Mindspace is about connecting with people where they are and supporting the development of skills for building a sustainable, meaningful life—at home, at work, and in the world.

FREE Online COVID-19 Support Groups

https://www.mindspacewellbeing.com/programs/online-covid-19-support-group/

Examples include:

  • Mindfulness and Resilience for Healthcare Workers
  • Adaptive Coping for Students
  • Building Resilience
  • Mindfulness and Wellbeing Tools for the New Normal
  • Navigating the New Normal: Wellbeing Practices Revisited
  • Flourishing at Work in Times of Turbulence
RRP – Recovery Resources PDX – Virtual Online Meetings – Weekdays & Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Oct 30 all-day

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Digital Recovery Resources PDX

A DATABASE OF RESOURCES AND SUPPORTS FOR PEOPLE IN RECOVERY AND PEOPLE IN NEED OF ASSISTANCE DURING THE COVID-19 CRISIS

Whether you are looking for a daily recovery meeting, a recovery yoga class, a recovery Cross Fit session, engagement with a peer specialist, or just a place to connect with your network – we’ve got you covered

RecoveryResourcesPDX.com offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.  Plus you’ll find links to recovery resources, social services, food & housing, financial resources and COVID-19 information.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily

Digital Meetings Schedule

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com/digital-meetings

Recovery Resources PDX Website:

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com

 

Excerpt(s) from website last viewed 2020 May 01:

DAILY MUTUAL AID MEETINGS 4am-9pm PST
4:00AM – 5:00AM:
RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
6:00AM – 7:00AM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
6:00AM – 7:00AM:
Eastside Sunrise (AA, All)
6:30AM – 7:30AM: Dawn Patrol (AA, All)
9:00AM – 10:00AM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
10:00AM – 11:00AM: Ben’s Friends National (All Recovery, Food & Beverage Industry, All)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: Newcomers at Noon (AA, Women Only)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: Men’s Clock Room (AA, Men Only)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: Portland Daily Double Group (AA, All)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: Surrender at Noon (AA, All)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: NW at Noon (Al-Anon, All)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
3:00PM – 4:00PM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
3:00PM – 4:00PM: Recovery In the House (NA, All, M-F)
5:00PM – 6:00PM: Portland Daily Double Group (AA, All)
5:30PM – 6:30PM: Upstairs 5:30 (AA, All)
5:30PM – 6:30PM: New Alternatives (AA, All)
6:00PM – 7:00PM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
8:00PM – 9:00PM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)

AA Intergroup National Online Meetings Directory
AA Intergroup Portland Online Meetings Directory

WEEKLY MUTUAL AID MEETINGS
MON 7:00PM – 8:15PM:
Our True Selves (ACA, All)
TUE 9:00PM – 10:00PM: Karma Kontrol (AA, All)
TUE 10:00AM – 11:00AM: Ben’s Friends Portland (All Recovery, Food & Beverage)
TUE 4:00PM – 5:00PM: RecoveryLink Women’s Meeting (All Recovery, Women Only)
TUE 7:00PM – 8:00PM: Secular ACA (ACA, All)
WED 8:00AM – 9:00AM: RecoveryLink LGBTrans* Queer+ Meeting (All Recovery, LGBTQ+)
WED 6:30PM – 8:00PM: Gentleness, Humor, Love & Respect (ACA, All)
THU 4:00PM – 5:00PM: RecoveryLink Women’s Meeting (All Recovery, Women Only)
SUN 10:00AM – 11:00AM: Beyond Belief (AA, Agnostic)

DAILY CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS
9:00AM – 10:00AM: TRG Recovery CrossFit (All Recovery, All)
2:00PM – 3:00PM: TRG Recovery CrossFit (All Recovery, All)
2:00PM – 3:00PM: Social Determinants of Recovery Workshop (All Recovery, All)
6:00PM – 7:00PM: TRG Recovery CrossFit (All Recovery, All)

WEEKLY CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS
MON 4:00PM – 5:00PM: Mindfulness Recovery Support Group (All Recovery, All)
TUE 2:00PM – 3:00PM: Recovery Yoga (All Recovery, All)
TUE 6:45PM – 7:45PM: Invitation to Change (Family and Friends, All)
WED 5:00PM – 6:00PM: Mindfulness Meditation (All Recovery, All)
FRI 4:00PM – 5:00PM: Mindfulness Recovery Support Group (All Recovery, All)
SUN 2:00PM – 3:00PM: Recovery Yoga (All Recovery, All)

Zoom Meeting How-Tos

https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/categories/200101697

Digital Meeting Safety Guidelines

https://unityrecovery.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/UR-AR-Meeting-Safety-Guidelines-and-Procedures.pdf

SWC – Social Work Career – #StandWithAAPI – Anti-Asian Racism Resources for Social Workers and Therapists
Oct 30 all-day

Rescoure Poster

#StandWithAAPI

Anti-Asian Racism Resources for Social Workers and Therapists

Sadly, hate bias incidents such as verbal harassment and physical assault against Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities in the United States have risen during the Covid-19 pandemic due to misconceptions and misinformation about the spread of the virus.

To assist in the endeavor of becoming anti-racist, this post provides some steps we can all take to help break the cycle of racism and violence, and a round-up of various anti-AAPI racism resources to help us become better informed about our AAPI communities. These include resources especially for individuals experiencing Anti-Asian/American harassment, as well as webinars, books, articles, anti-racism guides/toolkits, videos, podcasts, and worthwhile organizations to support.

Please feel free to share any additional helpful finds in the comments section of this post.

Free Anti-Asian Racism Webinars/Trainings

  • Bystander Intervention – Hollaback! and Asian Americans Advancing Justice/May 20 at 5 PM EST and May 24 at 4 PM EST – “five strategies for intervention: distract, delegate, document, delay, and direct; and how to prioritize your own safety while intervening…”
  • Bystander Intervention 2.0 – Conflict De-Escalation Workshop – Hollaback! and Asian Americans Advancing Justice/May 12 at 5PM EST and May 27 at 3 PM EST – “deeper than above-mentioned bystander intervention… how to identify potential conflict before it escalates using our “pyramid of escalation” and how to assess whether intervening is the right action for you…”
  • #StopAsianHate Panel: Advocating for Our Elders – AARP/May 6 at 3 PM EST – “learn more about the work of AAPI community-based organizations and how they are currently advocating for AAPI elders in the areas of policy, community support, and communications…”
  • The State of Asian America Today May 8 at 8 PM EST,  Where Have We Come From? on May 15 at 8PM ESTWhere Are We Going? Part 1 on May 22 at 8 PM EST and  Where Are We Going? Part 2 on May 29 at 8 PM EST – “series of online town halls from Rise: Asian Pacific America to respond to the anti-Asian hate we’re all seeing throughout our diverse communities… where we are today, where we’ve been as a community, and where we need to go, to rise up to the challenges we face in the near and remote future…
  • Understanding the Impact of COVID and Social Injustices on the Diverse AA, NH & PI Communities – Stanford University/May 10 at 2 PM EST – “challenges including historical trauma due to immigration, being a refugee, colonization, and being seen as forever foreigners, as well as fighting against the myth of the model minority…”
  • Navigating Prejudice and Internalized Prejudice – AAPA/May 12 at 8 PM EST – “experiences of being discriminated against and oppressed affect our overall well-being and sense of agency…  differentiate unhelpful collective messages such as colorism and “gender inequality is cultural” from cultural identity, so we can restore wellness and justice in our minds, homes, and communities…”
  • White Supremacy Characteristics – SURJ/May 13 at 8 PM EST – “We are all swimming in the waters of white supremacy culture. And we are not all affected in the same way… The good news is that while white supremacy culture informs us, it does not define us… It is a construct, and anything constructed can be deconstructed and replaced.”- Tema Okun… article
  • API Heritage Month: Narratives on History, Belonging & Activism – CSSW/May 17 at 6 – 7:30 PM EST – “personal stories, perspectives on history and belonging, and strategies for sustaining activism and healing…”
  • NASW-NYC B.O.L.D Talk: Mental Health & Racial TraumaMay 19 at 6 PM EST – “historical implications of racism, the mental health impact of racism on communities of color, and social work’s role in being both complicit and effective in addressing white supremacy and the ensuing trauma…”
  • Channeling Healthy Anger As a Leader – AAPA/June 16 at 8 PM EST – “Anger is often perceived as an unhealthy and unwelcome emotion. This myth of anger may block us from using this powerful emotion in healing trauma, building resilience, and lifting up the community…”

Anti-Asian Racism Webinars on Demand

For Individuals Experiencing Anti-Asian/American Harassment

Resources for Self Education about Racism Against the AAPI Community

Recommended Children Books H/T Julius Paras

[If you buy something from an affiliate link, SocialWork.Career may earn a commission.]

  • 5 Quick Ways to Analyze Children’s Books for Racism and Sexism – @LovingLittleMinds
  • Eyes That Kiss in the Corners – [affiliate link] – “New York Times Bestseller and #1 Indie Bestseller… lyrical, stunning picture book tells a story about learning to love and celebrate your Asian-shaped eyes, in the spirit of Hair Love by Matthew A. Cherry, and is a celebration of diversity…”
  • From the Stars in the Sky to the Fish in the Sea – [affiliate link] – “Miu Lan is not just any child, but one who can change into any shape they can imagine. The only problem is they can’t decide what to be: A boy or a girl? A bird or a fish? A flower or a shooting star?… one thing’s for sure: no matter what this child becomes, their mother will love them just the same…”
  • Young, Proud, and Sung-jee: A Children’s Book on Fighting Anti-Asian Racism During COVID-19 – book is free to download.

Recommended Adult Books H/T Constance Grady

  • The Color of Success: Asian Americans and the Origins of the Model Minority – [affiliate link] – “mainstream America finds it so easy to ignore anti-Asian racism is the idea that Asian Americans are a “model minority”: They may not be considered white, but they’re still considered well-assimilated and upwardly mobile…”
  • Contagious Divides: Epidemics and Race in San Francisco’s Chinatown – [affiliate link] – “Trump’s repeated invocation of the false idea that Asian Americans somehow carried Covid-19 into the US has long and racist roots. Early Chinese immigrants to the US in the 19th century were repeatedly demonized as filthy disease carriers by the public health authorities of the era…”
  • Driven Out: The Forgotten War Against Chinese Americans – [affiliate link] – “Starting in 1848 and continuing into the 20th century, in towns across the American West, Chinese Americans were violently rounded up, driven out of town, or killed in a deliberate campaign of ethnic cleansing…”
  • The Making of Asian America: A History – [affiliate link] – “historian Erika Lee tracks waves of Asian immigration to the United States… Asian Americans cycle between getting labeled “good immigrants” and “bad immigrants,” depending on the mood of the political moment…”

Articles

Anti-Asian Racism Guides/Toolkits

  • Anti-Asian Racism Resource Guide for Families with Children, Young Adults or Elders – “conversations about race should begin near a child’s fifth birthday even though children begin to be aware of race when they are infants…”
  • Anti-Racism Resources for Asian Americans – “action items… Anti-Blackness in Asian Communities… Model Minority Myth and Meritocracy Lies…”
  • APALA Racial Justice Toolkit – “racial justice trainings… organizations in racial justice movement moments… resources…”
  • APALA (Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association) 2021 COVID-19 Anti-racist Resources – “legal assistance, trackers (racial profiling and hate crimes), anti-xenophobia resources…”
  • Asian American Racial Justice Toolkit – “15 modules spanning Asian American Identity, Model Minority Myth, Gender & Patriarchy, White Supremacy, Race & Working Class + Immigrant Struggles, For Black Lives, Colonialism, & Islamo-Racism… begin with people’s lived experiences… build structural awareness of why those experiences are happening, and how they are tied to the oppression of others…”
  • Asian American Racism & Mental Health Resources – Massachusetts General Hospital -“resources tailored toward students, parents, educators, mental health clinicians, and allies/the general public…”
  • Classroom Resources and Tips To Address Anti-Asian Discrimination – “Anti-AAPI racism isn’t anything new in this country. From “yellow peril” to the “model minority,” we need to educate ourselves about the history of anti-AAPI racism in this country…”
  • Combat Hate Crime Resources – “APIAHF and NAPABA toolkit translated into 25 different languages… Understanding the difference between a hate crime and hate incident… Working with law enforcement and the media… Checklist for community organizations…”
  • Learning Together – Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center – “Addressing anti-Asian racism and xenophobia… Activities and videos for students, families, and lifelong learners…Resources about Asian American and Pacific Islander voices in literature…
  • Narratives by and About Asians and Asian Americans – CSWE – “highly acclaimed contemporary literature… represent nearly a quarter of the 51 countries and territories of Asia. Intersectionality, coming of age, the precariousness of forced displacement, and layered cultural identity are some of the themes…”
  • Racial Justice in Education Resource Guide – “Racial justice — or racial equity — goes beyond “anti-racism.” It is not just the absence of discrimination and inequities, but also the presence of deliberate systems and supports to achieve and sustain racial equity through proactive and preventative measures…”

Not Much of a Reader? Check Out These Anti-Racist Videos/Movies/TV Shows/Podcasts

YouTube/TV/Film

  • Asia Rising Forever – recording of a special livestream festival event… a celebration of Asian and Asian American music and togetherness, demonstrating unity due to the pandemic and the xenophobic hate many are experiencing.
  • Asian Americans is a five-part PBS documentary series on the history of Asians in America and the ongoing role Asian Americans have played in shaping our nation’s history. The series is told through individual lives and family stories
  • #AsianAmCovidStories is a documentary series by the Asian American Documentary Network exploring Asian Americans’ experiences and challenges during the Covid-19 pandemic.
  • Celebrate Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month 2021 – PBS is offering several new films and shows featuring AAPI stories.
  • The Chinese Exclusion Act – 2018 PBS documentary examines the origin, history, and impact of the 1882 law that made it illegal for Chinese workers to come to America, and for Chinese nationals already here to become U.S. citizens.
  • Fear, Compassion or Xenophobia: Our Social Responses to Crisis – discussion on creating frameworks to fight xenophobia.
  • I Am Not Your Asian Stereotype | Canwen Xu | TEDxBoise – “In this hilarious and insightful talk, eighteen-year-old Canwen Xu shares her Asian-American story of breaking stereotypes, reaffirming stereotypes, and driving competently on her way to buy rice.”
  • Let It Not Happen Again: Lessons of the Japanese American Exclusion – “In March of 1942, 227 Japanese Americans were forcibly removed from their homes on Bainbridge Island by the US Army…”
  • Raising Global Citizens: A Panel for Parents, Caregivers, and Educators – how to best support children to be effective participants in this increasingly complex, diverse, and interconnected world.
  • Self-Love through Self-Identity | Eileen Kim | TEDxWoodbridgeHigh – “hopes to break the stigma surrounding mental illness by telling her own story as a source of empathy in order to motivate others to seek help…”
  • UNLADYLIKE2020 – series of 26 short films and a one-hour documentary profiling diverse and little-known American women from the turn of the 20th century, and contemporary women who follow in their footsteps.
  • What kind of Asian are you? – Scott plays a friendly jogger who is very interested in guessing the heritage of Stella.
  • Why Asian Americans are not the Model Minority | Alice Li | TEDxVanderbiltUniversity – “Confined within the boundaries of the model minority myth, Asian Americans are commonly perceived as a mass of indistinguishable overachievers who are all “smart” and “good at math.” However, these seemingly positive stereotypes can have a detrimental impact on not only Asian Americans, but also race relations in general. In this talk, Alice Li draws from research studies and her personal experiences to challenge the two-dimensional identity outlined by the model minority myth…”

Podcasts/Exhibits

Anti-Asian Racism Organizations to Support

  • Advancing Justice | AAJC – its mission is to advance the civil and human rights for Asian Americans and to build and promote a fair and equitable society for all.
  • APACEvotes – strives to increase access to and participation in electoral and civic affairs by registering, educating and protecting Asian American and Pacific Islander voters
  • Asian Mental Health Collective – is working to destigmatize and normalize mental health within the Asian community; Asians face culturally specific barriers when it comes to mental health.
  • Asian Pacific American Institute for Congressional Studies (APAICS) – dedicated to promoting Asian Pacific American participation and representation at all levels of the political process, from community service to elected office.
  • Stop AAPI Hate – tracks and responds to incidents of hate, violence, harassment, discrimination, shunning, and child bullying against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the United States.

Last updated: May 14, 2021

References:

Asian American Arts Alliance. How to stop AAPI hate

Cornell. (n.d.). Anti-Racism Resources for the AAPI Community

Grady, Constance. (March 18, 2021). A reading list to understand anti-Asian racism in America.

Highline College Library. Anti-Racist Resources: Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Racial Justice

National Endowment for the Humanities. (n.d.). Virtual bookshelf.

NBC News. Anti-racism resources to support Asian American, Pacific Islander community

NCAA Office of Inclusion. (n.d.) Anti-Racism resources to support the Asian American and Pacific Islander community: Websites and videos.

Stop AAPI Hate.

University of Pittsburgh. (n.d.). Antiracism Resources to Support Asian, Asian American, and Pacific Islander Communities

Anti-Asian Violence Resources

4D – 4th Dimension Recovery Center – Hosts Quarantine Support for People in Recovery – Saturdays @ Online Via ZOOM
Oct 30 @ 8:00 pm – 9:00 pm

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4D – 4th Dimension Recovery Center –

Hosts Quarantine Support for People in Recovery

Saturdays from 8:00pm-9:00pm(PST)

This is a an online peer support group for persons in recovery experiencing the effects of quarantine with the COVID-19 pandemic.

We want you to feel safe, welcome and heard.

If you have any questions or would like to get involved, contact Heather by phone at (971) 407-8196.

 

To join via Zoom:

https://zoom.us/meeting/709664735?occurrence=1586314800000

Oct
31
Sun
01 – Helpline – SSH – Safe + Strong Helpline for Behavioral, Mental and Emotional Health Support – Interpreters Available @ 1-800-923-4357 (HELP) – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free
Oct 31 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

AM – All Month – COVID-19 Coronavirus Vaccine Access Information by OHA – Oregon Health Authority – English & Español
Oct 31 all-day

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COVID-19 Vaccine Access Information

Información de acceso a la vacuna COVID-19

English & Espanol

As of April 19, 2021, all Oregonians over 16 are now eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine.
**This is a big day for the state. Many thanks to the folks on the front lines who are running vaccination sites and working so hard to get as many people as possible vaccinated.
See below for information on getting scheduled for a vaccine.
Accelerated Access to COVID-19 Vaccinations
Scheduling a Vaccination
The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has created several resources to assist individuals in planning for their COVID-19 vaccination:
How to find a COVID-19 Vaccine in Oregon
Available in Spanish at Cómo encontrar una vacuna contra el COVID-19 en Oregon
What to know before you get vaccinated
Post Vaccination: What we all need to do together
Scheduling a COVID-19 vaccine is primarily managed through the
OHA’s Get Vaccinated Oregon website.
The OHA has created a Get Vaccinated Oregon Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) page.
Multi-lingual assistance using the Get Vaccinated Oregon tool is also available by calling 211.
Some local pharmacies are offering vaccinations through a Federal Retail Pharmacy Program partnership.
Appointments can be made by visiting pharmacy websites directly:
If you need to get a vaccine through the drive-through site at PDX Airport, please go to OHSU’s COVID-19 Vaccine: Information and Appointments page.
All COVID-19 vaccine sites are dependent upon the availability of vaccine supply, which is determined by many factors, including supply at the national level and allocation at the federal and state levels.
Appointments are required.
Multnomah County maintains the COVID-19 Vaccine page which includes information options for scheduling a vaccination and resources for individuals who may need assistance scheduling an appointment due to language or barriers with technology.
Lastly, if you’re an immigrant, please know the following:
All eligible people in Oregon can get the vaccine.
You do NOT need to be a U.S. citizen to get the vaccine.
Getting the vaccine will NOT affect your immigration status or count as a public charge.
You do not need to have or provide a social security number.
You do not need to have identification.
If you need help, you can call the Safe + Strong Helpline at 1-800-923-HELP (4357).
**See active links in this bulletin by
Oregon Legislature, Speaker of the House, Rep. Tina Kotek’s
published  4/19/2021 at:

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/ORLEG/bulletins/2cd30a8

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/ORLEG/bulletins/2cd30a8

House Speaker Tina Kotek

Weekly Update: Vaccines, Session Progress, Budget Hearing

AM – All Month – Renters, Tenants and Landlords – Support, Resources, Assistance & Info – During COVID-19 Pandemic
Oct 31 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program

Information and Application For Tenants and Landlords

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program is open as of May 19th. OHCS is working with local organizations to provide more than $200 million in assistance to low-income Oregonians that have been financially impacted by COVID-19. OHCS created a partner toolkit to help communities promote this vital resource. This packet includes check lists for tenants and landlords, application information and documentation, frequently asked questions, and other helpful information related to the program.

Vista De Verificacion Del Inquilino 

Solicitud En Papel

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP) helps eligible low-income households with their past due rent and utilities. This program uses funds from the federal Emergency Rental Assistance Program, which allocated a collective total of $280 million to Oregon, the City of Portland, and multiple counties in the state. In most cases, approved applications will result in payments made directly to landlords and utility providers.

Beginning May 19, 2021, qualified renters who have experienced financial hardship due to the coronavirus pandemic, and are at risk of homelessness or housing instability, may apply for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP). This program is not a loan, which means those who receive assistance will not have to pay back funds so long as they are used as approved and not duplicating other assistance programs. Assistance is offered to all eligible renters regardless of their citizenship or immigration status, and it will not impact the recipient’s eligibility for other federally funded programs such as food stamps, Medicaid, Medicare, social security, WIC or public housing.

Renters who are eligible for the program may request rent and/or utility assistance dating back to March 13, 2020 (prior expenses are not eligible). OERAP will cover up to 12 months of past due rent and three months of forward rent, once all past due rent is paid. OERAP will also cover past due utility costs including electricity, gas, home energy services, water, sewer, trash removal, internet and bulk fuels. Costs that will NOT be covered include: homeowner costs, homeowner utilities, landlord-paid utilities, landlord-paid property taxes, property insurance, phone, and renter insurance.

If approved, in most cases, payments will be made directly to the landlord, property owner or utility company on the tenant’s behalf via direct deposit or check. OERAP funds are not first-come-first-serve. Funds will be distributed based on a formula that prioritizes applications based on need. Everyone who turns in a completed application will have their application reviewed.

Click on this link to apply for Emergency Rental Assistance

Apply for OERAP Now

To learn more about eligibility, applying and the program itself, scroll down or use the buttons below to jump to a section.

 

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
DISCLAIMER: Information is provided solely as a courtesy without guarantees or warranties of any kind whatsoever.  Use at your own risk and expense.
GS – Gender Spectrum – Online Virtual Groups for Parents and Teens – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Oct 31 all-day

logo

Gender Spectrum works to create gender sensitive and inclusive environments for all children and teens.  Gender Spectrum offers over 25 online groups for parents and teens.

In the Gender Spectrum Lounge you can find the list of groups to explore or sign up for.  There is a great variety of topics featured.

https://lounge.genderspectrum.org/groups/

Registration required.  See group description for contact information details.

Additional online groups, webinars, recordings, and events online including resources related to the pandemic at:

https://www.genderspectrum.org/articles/blog-covid-resources

Additional resources specific for schools and professionals, too.

Website:

https://www.genderspectrum.org

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/GenderSpectrum/

Twitter:

https://twitter.com/genderspectrum

 

MS – MINDSPACE – Mindfulness and Resilience Support Groups through COVID-19 @ Online via Zoom
Oct 31 all-day

 

Sponsor Logo

 

MINDSPACE offers FREE Online Support for Mindfulness and Resilience through COVID-19 Pandemic

There are a variety of online events through Mindspace pay-what-you-can series designed specifically for health-care workers looking for psychological support during the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. In each live, interactive session we will explore a different theme related to the current situation, and a corresponding mindfulness practice to help frame and navigate the situation.

The themes include:

  • Safety and grounding
  • Settling a busy mind
  • Being with difficulty
  • Connecting with purpose

The format will involve educational material, a guided, experiential practice, and time for group discussion. The course is intended to not only provide educational content and skill-teaching, but also to harness the communal support of a peer group at a time when social connection is more crucial than ever.

Events Calendar with Search Filters

https://clients.mindbodyonline.com/asp/main_enroll.asp

Register Online

You will be asked to create an online account with an email address, password and phone number.

When registering for and event you will have the option to sign-up for the full series or to choose dates you can attend.  You will also be given the option to choose your contribution amount (pay-as-you-can).

Instructions on how to join the online group will likely be sent via email upon registration.

Classes fill up fast, first come first serve.

Website:

https://www.mindspacewellbeing.com/

Excerpt(s):

Our mission at Mindspace is to inspire well-being with the transformative potential of science, wisdom, and human connection.

We believe well-being is a skill that can be learned, and that it can scale from the individual, to families, communities, and organizations of all shapes and sizes. We believe that everyone can benefit from some form of mind training, but that doesn’t mean there’s a one-size-fits-all solution. Well-being at Mindspace is about connecting with people where they are and supporting the development of skills for building a sustainable, meaningful life—at home, at work, and in the world.

FREE Online COVID-19 Support Groups

https://www.mindspacewellbeing.com/programs/online-covid-19-support-group/

Examples include:

  • Mindfulness and Resilience for Healthcare Workers
  • Adaptive Coping for Students
  • Building Resilience
  • Mindfulness and Wellbeing Tools for the New Normal
  • Navigating the New Normal: Wellbeing Practices Revisited
  • Flourishing at Work in Times of Turbulence
RRP – Recovery Resources PDX – Virtual Online Meetings – Weekdays & Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Oct 31 all-day

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Digital Recovery Resources PDX

A DATABASE OF RESOURCES AND SUPPORTS FOR PEOPLE IN RECOVERY AND PEOPLE IN NEED OF ASSISTANCE DURING THE COVID-19 CRISIS

Whether you are looking for a daily recovery meeting, a recovery yoga class, a recovery Cross Fit session, engagement with a peer specialist, or just a place to connect with your network – we’ve got you covered

RecoveryResourcesPDX.com offers this daily schedule with links to a variety of online recovery meetings and events.  Plus you’ll find links to recovery resources, social services, food & housing, financial resources and COVID-19 information.

NOTE: Meeting rooms open 15 minutes prior to official start times.  All times are listed in Pacific Standard Time. Events and meeting times vary daily

Digital Meetings Schedule

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com/digital-meetings

Recovery Resources PDX Website:

https://recoveryresourcespdx.com

 

Excerpt(s) from website last viewed 2020 May 01:

DAILY MUTUAL AID MEETINGS 4am-9pm PST
4:00AM – 5:00AM:
RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
6:00AM – 7:00AM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
6:00AM – 7:00AM:
Eastside Sunrise (AA, All)
6:30AM – 7:30AM: Dawn Patrol (AA, All)
9:00AM – 10:00AM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
10:00AM – 11:00AM: Ben’s Friends National (All Recovery, Food & Beverage Industry, All)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: Newcomers at Noon (AA, Women Only)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: Men’s Clock Room (AA, Men Only)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: Portland Daily Double Group (AA, All)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: Surrender at Noon (AA, All)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: NW at Noon (Al-Anon, All)
12:00PM – 1:00PM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
3:00PM – 4:00PM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
3:00PM – 4:00PM: Recovery In the House (NA, All, M-F)
5:00PM – 6:00PM: Portland Daily Double Group (AA, All)
5:30PM – 6:30PM: Upstairs 5:30 (AA, All)
5:30PM – 6:30PM: New Alternatives (AA, All)
6:00PM – 7:00PM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)
8:00PM – 9:00PM: RecoveryLink All-Recovery Meeting (All Recovery, All)

AA Intergroup National Online Meetings Directory
AA Intergroup Portland Online Meetings Directory

WEEKLY MUTUAL AID MEETINGS
MON 7:00PM – 8:15PM:
Our True Selves (ACA, All)
TUE 9:00PM – 10:00PM: Karma Kontrol (AA, All)
TUE 10:00AM – 11:00AM: Ben’s Friends Portland (All Recovery, Food & Beverage)
TUE 4:00PM – 5:00PM: RecoveryLink Women’s Meeting (All Recovery, Women Only)
TUE 7:00PM – 8:00PM: Secular ACA (ACA, All)
WED 8:00AM – 9:00AM: RecoveryLink LGBTrans* Queer+ Meeting (All Recovery, LGBTQ+)
WED 6:30PM – 8:00PM: Gentleness, Humor, Love & Respect (ACA, All)
THU 4:00PM – 5:00PM: RecoveryLink Women’s Meeting (All Recovery, Women Only)
SUN 10:00AM – 11:00AM: Beyond Belief (AA, Agnostic)

DAILY CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS
9:00AM – 10:00AM: TRG Recovery CrossFit (All Recovery, All)
2:00PM – 3:00PM: TRG Recovery CrossFit (All Recovery, All)
2:00PM – 3:00PM: Social Determinants of Recovery Workshop (All Recovery, All)
6:00PM – 7:00PM: TRG Recovery CrossFit (All Recovery, All)

WEEKLY CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS
MON 4:00PM – 5:00PM: Mindfulness Recovery Support Group (All Recovery, All)
TUE 2:00PM – 3:00PM: Recovery Yoga (All Recovery, All)
TUE 6:45PM – 7:45PM: Invitation to Change (Family and Friends, All)
WED 5:00PM – 6:00PM: Mindfulness Meditation (All Recovery, All)
FRI 4:00PM – 5:00PM: Mindfulness Recovery Support Group (All Recovery, All)
SUN 2:00PM – 3:00PM: Recovery Yoga (All Recovery, All)

Zoom Meeting How-Tos

https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/categories/200101697

Digital Meeting Safety Guidelines

https://unityrecovery.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/UR-AR-Meeting-Safety-Guidelines-and-Procedures.pdf

SWC – Social Work Career – #StandWithAAPI – Anti-Asian Racism Resources for Social Workers and Therapists
Oct 31 all-day

Rescoure Poster

#StandWithAAPI

Anti-Asian Racism Resources for Social Workers and Therapists

Sadly, hate bias incidents such as verbal harassment and physical assault against Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities in the United States have risen during the Covid-19 pandemic due to misconceptions and misinformation about the spread of the virus.

To assist in the endeavor of becoming anti-racist, this post provides some steps we can all take to help break the cycle of racism and violence, and a round-up of various anti-AAPI racism resources to help us become better informed about our AAPI communities. These include resources especially for individuals experiencing Anti-Asian/American harassment, as well as webinars, books, articles, anti-racism guides/toolkits, videos, podcasts, and worthwhile organizations to support.

Please feel free to share any additional helpful finds in the comments section of this post.

Free Anti-Asian Racism Webinars/Trainings

  • Bystander Intervention – Hollaback! and Asian Americans Advancing Justice/May 20 at 5 PM EST and May 24 at 4 PM EST – “five strategies for intervention: distract, delegate, document, delay, and direct; and how to prioritize your own safety while intervening…”
  • Bystander Intervention 2.0 – Conflict De-Escalation Workshop – Hollaback! and Asian Americans Advancing Justice/May 12 at 5PM EST and May 27 at 3 PM EST – “deeper than above-mentioned bystander intervention… how to identify potential conflict before it escalates using our “pyramid of escalation” and how to assess whether intervening is the right action for you…”
  • #StopAsianHate Panel: Advocating for Our Elders – AARP/May 6 at 3 PM EST – “learn more about the work of AAPI community-based organizations and how they are currently advocating for AAPI elders in the areas of policy, community support, and communications…”
  • The State of Asian America Today May 8 at 8 PM EST,  Where Have We Come From? on May 15 at 8PM ESTWhere Are We Going? Part 1 on May 22 at 8 PM EST and  Where Are We Going? Part 2 on May 29 at 8 PM EST – “series of online town halls from Rise: Asian Pacific America to respond to the anti-Asian hate we’re all seeing throughout our diverse communities… where we are today, where we’ve been as a community, and where we need to go, to rise up to the challenges we face in the near and remote future…
  • Understanding the Impact of COVID and Social Injustices on the Diverse AA, NH & PI Communities – Stanford University/May 10 at 2 PM EST – “challenges including historical trauma due to immigration, being a refugee, colonization, and being seen as forever foreigners, as well as fighting against the myth of the model minority…”
  • Navigating Prejudice and Internalized Prejudice – AAPA/May 12 at 8 PM EST – “experiences of being discriminated against and oppressed affect our overall well-being and sense of agency…  differentiate unhelpful collective messages such as colorism and “gender inequality is cultural” from cultural identity, so we can restore wellness and justice in our minds, homes, and communities…”
  • White Supremacy Characteristics – SURJ/May 13 at 8 PM EST – “We are all swimming in the waters of white supremacy culture. And we are not all affected in the same way… The good news is that while white supremacy culture informs us, it does not define us… It is a construct, and anything constructed can be deconstructed and replaced.”- Tema Okun… article
  • API Heritage Month: Narratives on History, Belonging & Activism – CSSW/May 17 at 6 – 7:30 PM EST – “personal stories, perspectives on history and belonging, and strategies for sustaining activism and healing…”
  • NASW-NYC B.O.L.D Talk: Mental Health & Racial TraumaMay 19 at 6 PM EST – “historical implications of racism, the mental health impact of racism on communities of color, and social work’s role in being both complicit and effective in addressing white supremacy and the ensuing trauma…”
  • Channeling Healthy Anger As a Leader – AAPA/June 16 at 8 PM EST – “Anger is often perceived as an unhealthy and unwelcome emotion. This myth of anger may block us from using this powerful emotion in healing trauma, building resilience, and lifting up the community…”

Anti-Asian Racism Webinars on Demand

For Individuals Experiencing Anti-Asian/American Harassment

Resources for Self Education about Racism Against the AAPI Community

Recommended Children Books H/T Julius Paras

[If you buy something from an affiliate link, SocialWork.Career may earn a commission.]

  • 5 Quick Ways to Analyze Children’s Books for Racism and Sexism – @LovingLittleMinds
  • Eyes That Kiss in the Corners – [affiliate link] – “New York Times Bestseller and #1 Indie Bestseller… lyrical, stunning picture book tells a story about learning to love and celebrate your Asian-shaped eyes, in the spirit of Hair Love by Matthew A. Cherry, and is a celebration of diversity…”
  • From the Stars in the Sky to the Fish in the Sea – [affiliate link] – “Miu Lan is not just any child, but one who can change into any shape they can imagine. The only problem is they can’t decide what to be: A boy or a girl? A bird or a fish? A flower or a shooting star?… one thing’s for sure: no matter what this child becomes, their mother will love them just the same…”
  • Young, Proud, and Sung-jee: A Children’s Book on Fighting Anti-Asian Racism During COVID-19 – book is free to download.

Recommended Adult Books H/T Constance Grady

  • The Color of Success: Asian Americans and the Origins of the Model Minority – [affiliate link] – “mainstream America finds it so easy to ignore anti-Asian racism is the idea that Asian Americans are a “model minority”: They may not be considered white, but they’re still considered well-assimilated and upwardly mobile…”
  • Contagious Divides: Epidemics and Race in San Francisco’s Chinatown – [affiliate link] – “Trump’s repeated invocation of the false idea that Asian Americans somehow carried Covid-19 into the US has long and racist roots. Early Chinese immigrants to the US in the 19th century were repeatedly demonized as filthy disease carriers by the public health authorities of the era…”
  • Driven Out: The Forgotten War Against Chinese Americans – [affiliate link] – “Starting in 1848 and continuing into the 20th century, in towns across the American West, Chinese Americans were violently rounded up, driven out of town, or killed in a deliberate campaign of ethnic cleansing…”
  • The Making of Asian America: A History – [affiliate link] – “historian Erika Lee tracks waves of Asian immigration to the United States… Asian Americans cycle between getting labeled “good immigrants” and “bad immigrants,” depending on the mood of the political moment…”

Articles

Anti-Asian Racism Guides/Toolkits

  • Anti-Asian Racism Resource Guide for Families with Children, Young Adults or Elders – “conversations about race should begin near a child’s fifth birthday even though children begin to be aware of race when they are infants…”
  • Anti-Racism Resources for Asian Americans – “action items… Anti-Blackness in Asian Communities… Model Minority Myth and Meritocracy Lies…”
  • APALA Racial Justice Toolkit – “racial justice trainings… organizations in racial justice movement moments… resources…”
  • APALA (Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association) 2021 COVID-19 Anti-racist Resources – “legal assistance, trackers (racial profiling and hate crimes), anti-xenophobia resources…”
  • Asian American Racial Justice Toolkit – “15 modules spanning Asian American Identity, Model Minority Myth, Gender & Patriarchy, White Supremacy, Race & Working Class + Immigrant Struggles, For Black Lives, Colonialism, & Islamo-Racism… begin with people’s lived experiences… build structural awareness of why those experiences are happening, and how they are tied to the oppression of others…”
  • Asian American Racism & Mental Health Resources – Massachusetts General Hospital -“resources tailored toward students, parents, educators, mental health clinicians, and allies/the general public…”
  • Classroom Resources and Tips To Address Anti-Asian Discrimination – “Anti-AAPI racism isn’t anything new in this country. From “yellow peril” to the “model minority,” we need to educate ourselves about the history of anti-AAPI racism in this country…”
  • Combat Hate Crime Resources – “APIAHF and NAPABA toolkit translated into 25 different languages… Understanding the difference between a hate crime and hate incident… Working with law enforcement and the media… Checklist for community organizations…”
  • Learning Together – Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center – “Addressing anti-Asian racism and xenophobia… Activities and videos for students, families, and lifelong learners…Resources about Asian American and Pacific Islander voices in literature…
  • Narratives by and About Asians and Asian Americans – CSWE – “highly acclaimed contemporary literature… represent nearly a quarter of the 51 countries and territories of Asia. Intersectionality, coming of age, the precariousness of forced displacement, and layered cultural identity are some of the themes…”
  • Racial Justice in Education Resource Guide – “Racial justice — or racial equity — goes beyond “anti-racism.” It is not just the absence of discrimination and inequities, but also the presence of deliberate systems and supports to achieve and sustain racial equity through proactive and preventative measures…”

Not Much of a Reader? Check Out These Anti-Racist Videos/Movies/TV Shows/Podcasts

YouTube/TV/Film

  • Asia Rising Forever – recording of a special livestream festival event… a celebration of Asian and Asian American music and togetherness, demonstrating unity due to the pandemic and the xenophobic hate many are experiencing.
  • Asian Americans is a five-part PBS documentary series on the history of Asians in America and the ongoing role Asian Americans have played in shaping our nation’s history. The series is told through individual lives and family stories
  • #AsianAmCovidStories is a documentary series by the Asian American Documentary Network exploring Asian Americans’ experiences and challenges during the Covid-19 pandemic.
  • Celebrate Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month 2021 – PBS is offering several new films and shows featuring AAPI stories.
  • The Chinese Exclusion Act – 2018 PBS documentary examines the origin, history, and impact of the 1882 law that made it illegal for Chinese workers to come to America, and for Chinese nationals already here to become U.S. citizens.
  • Fear, Compassion or Xenophobia: Our Social Responses to Crisis – discussion on creating frameworks to fight xenophobia.
  • I Am Not Your Asian Stereotype | Canwen Xu | TEDxBoise – “In this hilarious and insightful talk, eighteen-year-old Canwen Xu shares her Asian-American story of breaking stereotypes, reaffirming stereotypes, and driving competently on her way to buy rice.”
  • Let It Not Happen Again: Lessons of the Japanese American Exclusion – “In March of 1942, 227 Japanese Americans were forcibly removed from their homes on Bainbridge Island by the US Army…”
  • Raising Global Citizens: A Panel for Parents, Caregivers, and Educators – how to best support children to be effective participants in this increasingly complex, diverse, and interconnected world.
  • Self-Love through Self-Identity | Eileen Kim | TEDxWoodbridgeHigh – “hopes to break the stigma surrounding mental illness by telling her own story as a source of empathy in order to motivate others to seek help…”
  • UNLADYLIKE2020 – series of 26 short films and a one-hour documentary profiling diverse and little-known American women from the turn of the 20th century, and contemporary women who follow in their footsteps.
  • What kind of Asian are you? – Scott plays a friendly jogger who is very interested in guessing the heritage of Stella.
  • Why Asian Americans are not the Model Minority | Alice Li | TEDxVanderbiltUniversity – “Confined within the boundaries of the model minority myth, Asian Americans are commonly perceived as a mass of indistinguishable overachievers who are all “smart” and “good at math.” However, these seemingly positive stereotypes can have a detrimental impact on not only Asian Americans, but also race relations in general. In this talk, Alice Li draws from research studies and her personal experiences to challenge the two-dimensional identity outlined by the model minority myth…”

Podcasts/Exhibits

Anti-Asian Racism Organizations to Support

  • Advancing Justice | AAJC – its mission is to advance the civil and human rights for Asian Americans and to build and promote a fair and equitable society for all.
  • APACEvotes – strives to increase access to and participation in electoral and civic affairs by registering, educating and protecting Asian American and Pacific Islander voters
  • Asian Mental Health Collective – is working to destigmatize and normalize mental health within the Asian community; Asians face culturally specific barriers when it comes to mental health.
  • Asian Pacific American Institute for Congressional Studies (APAICS) – dedicated to promoting Asian Pacific American participation and representation at all levels of the political process, from community service to elected office.
  • Stop AAPI Hate – tracks and responds to incidents of hate, violence, harassment, discrimination, shunning, and child bullying against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the United States.

Last updated: May 14, 2021

References:

Asian American Arts Alliance. How to stop AAPI hate

Cornell. (n.d.). Anti-Racism Resources for the AAPI Community

Grady, Constance. (March 18, 2021). A reading list to understand anti-Asian racism in America.

Highline College Library. Anti-Racist Resources: Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Racial Justice

National Endowment for the Humanities. (n.d.). Virtual bookshelf.

NBC News. Anti-racism resources to support Asian American, Pacific Islander community

NCAA Office of Inclusion. (n.d.) Anti-Racism resources to support the Asian American and Pacific Islander community: Websites and videos.

Stop AAPI Hate.

University of Pittsburgh. (n.d.). Antiracism Resources to Support Asian, Asian American, and Pacific Islander Communities

Anti-Asian Violence Resources

Nov
1
Mon
01 – Helpline – SSH – Safe + Strong Helpline for Behavioral, Mental and Emotional Health Support – Interpreters Available @ 1-800-923-4357 (HELP) – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free
Nov 1 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

AM – All Month – COVID-19 Coronavirus Vaccine Access Information by OHA – Oregon Health Authority – English & Español
Nov 1 all-day

Sponsor Logo

COVID-19 Vaccine Access Information

Información de acceso a la vacuna COVID-19

English & Espanol

As of April 19, 2021, all Oregonians over 16 are now eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine.
**This is a big day for the state. Many thanks to the folks on the front lines who are running vaccination sites and working so hard to get as many people as possible vaccinated.
See below for information on getting scheduled for a vaccine.
Accelerated Access to COVID-19 Vaccinations
Scheduling a Vaccination
The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has created several resources to assist individuals in planning for their COVID-19 vaccination:
How to find a COVID-19 Vaccine in Oregon
Available in Spanish at Cómo encontrar una vacuna contra el COVID-19 en Oregon
What to know before you get vaccinated
Post Vaccination: What we all need to do together
Scheduling a COVID-19 vaccine is primarily managed through the
OHA’s Get Vaccinated Oregon website.
The OHA has created a Get Vaccinated Oregon Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) page.
Multi-lingual assistance using the Get Vaccinated Oregon tool is also available by calling 211.
Some local pharmacies are offering vaccinations through a Federal Retail Pharmacy Program partnership.
Appointments can be made by visiting pharmacy websites directly:
If you need to get a vaccine through the drive-through site at PDX Airport, please go to OHSU’s COVID-19 Vaccine: Information and Appointments page.
All COVID-19 vaccine sites are dependent upon the availability of vaccine supply, which is determined by many factors, including supply at the national level and allocation at the federal and state levels.
Appointments are required.
Multnomah County maintains the COVID-19 Vaccine page which includes information options for scheduling a vaccination and resources for individuals who may need assistance scheduling an appointment due to language or barriers with technology.
Lastly, if you’re an immigrant, please know the following:
All eligible people in Oregon can get the vaccine.
You do NOT need to be a U.S. citizen to get the vaccine.
Getting the vaccine will NOT affect your immigration status or count as a public charge.
You do not need to have or provide a social security number.
You do not need to have identification.
If you need help, you can call the Safe + Strong Helpline at 1-800-923-HELP (4357).
**See active links in this bulletin by
Oregon Legislature, Speaker of the House, Rep. Tina Kotek’s
published  4/19/2021 at:

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/ORLEG/bulletins/2cd30a8

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/ORLEG/bulletins/2cd30a8

House Speaker Tina Kotek

Weekly Update: Vaccines, Session Progress, Budget Hearing

AM – All Month – Renters, Tenants and Landlords – Support, Resources, Assistance & Info – During COVID-19 Pandemic
Nov 1 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program

Information and Application For Tenants and Landlords

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program is open as of May 19th. OHCS is working with local organizations to provide more than $200 million in assistance to low-income Oregonians that have been financially impacted by COVID-19. OHCS created a partner toolkit to help communities promote this vital resource. This packet includes check lists for tenants and landlords, application information and documentation, frequently asked questions, and other helpful information related to the program.

Vista De Verificacion Del Inquilino 

Solicitud En Papel

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP) helps eligible low-income households with their past due rent and utilities. This program uses funds from the federal Emergency Rental Assistance Program, which allocated a collective total of $280 million to Oregon, the City of Portland, and multiple counties in the state. In most cases, approved applications will result in payments made directly to landlords and utility providers.

Beginning May 19, 2021, qualified renters who have experienced financial hardship due to the coronavirus pandemic, and are at risk of homelessness or housing instability, may apply for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP). This program is not a loan, which means those who receive assistance will not have to pay back funds so long as they are used as approved and not duplicating other assistance programs. Assistance is offered to all eligible renters regardless of their citizenship or immigration status, and it will not impact the recipient’s eligibility for other federally funded programs such as food stamps, Medicaid, Medicare, social security, WIC or public housing.

Renters who are eligible for the program may request rent and/or utility assistance dating back to March 13, 2020 (prior expenses are not eligible). OERAP will cover up to 12 months of past due rent and three months of forward rent, once all past due rent is paid. OERAP will also cover past due utility costs including electricity, gas, home energy services, water, sewer, trash removal, internet and bulk fuels. Costs that will NOT be covered include: homeowner costs, homeowner utilities, landlord-paid utilities, landlord-paid property taxes, property insurance, phone, and renter insurance.

If approved, in most cases, payments will be made directly to the landlord, property owner or utility company on the tenant’s behalf via direct deposit or check. OERAP funds are not first-come-first-serve. Funds will be distributed based on a formula that prioritizes applications based on need. Everyone who turns in a completed application will have their application reviewed.

Click on this link to apply for Emergency Rental Assistance

Apply for OERAP Now

To learn more about eligibility, applying and the program itself, scroll down or use the buttons below to jump to a section.

 

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficultie