PeerGalaxy Original Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring over 99,000+ monthly offerings of FREE telephone- and online-accessible peer support, recovery support + wellness activities!

Over 30+ warmlines plus webinars, workshops, job postings, special events, consumer input opportunities and more.

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

Click the Accessibility Button on the right side, halfway down in the middle, for enhanced viewing and/or access options!  Click the Translate Button in the lower left corner for language options. 

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If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

How Events are Sorted:

First, at the top of the list: SAMHSA Disaster Helpline and similar links.

Next in the list: Bundled “All Day” Events for organizations with events happening at multiple times throughout the day and/or in many formats or locations; these are bundled into a single listing to prevent endless scrolling.  Usually these offer a lookup by zip code or other criteria. 

Lastly, Time-Specific Events listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  Warmlines and places east of Oregon’s time zone tend to start earlier (e.g. 4am in Oregon is 7am in New York).

Feb
20
Tue
2024
00 – Hotline – Domestic Violence Awareness Month – NATIONAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE HOTLINE – 1.800.799.7233 – 24/7
Feb 20 all-day
00 - Hotline - Domestic Violence Awareness Month - NATIONAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE HOTLINE - 1.800.799.7233 - 24/7

 

 

NATIONAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE HOTLINE

CALL

1.800.799.7233

 

TEXT

Text “START” to 87788

 

CHAT

Chat Live Now

 

SEARCH FOR RESOURCES

https://www.thehotline.org/search-our-resources/

 

00 – Hotline – HRSA – Health Resources and Services Administration – National Maternal Mental Health Hotline -1-833-TLC-MAMA (1-833-852-6262) – en Espanol – 24/7 @ Phone
Feb 20 all-day
00 - Hotline - HRSA - Health Resources and Services Administration - National Maternal Mental Health Hotline -1-833-TLC-MAMA (1-833-852-6262) - en Espanol - 24/7 @ Phone

 

National Maternal Mental Health Hotline

24/7, free, confidential hotline for pregnant and new moms in English and Spanish

1-833-TLC-MAMA (1-833-852-6262)

About the National Maternal Mental Health Hotline

The National Maternal Mental Health Hotline provides 24/7, free, confidential support before, during, and after pregnancy. The Hotline offers callers:

  • Phone or text access to professional counselors
  • Real-time support and information
  • Response within a few minutes, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week
  • Resources
  • Referrals to local and telehealth providers and support groups
  • Culturally sensitive support
  • Counselors who speak English and Spanish
  • Interpreter services in 60 languages

Frequently Asked Questions about the National Maternal Mental Health Hotline.

Use our Partner Toolkit to promote the Hotline or order promotional materials.

Date Last Reviewed:
00 – Hotline – RAINN – Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network – National Sexual Assault Telephone Hotline – 1-800-656-4673 – 24/7 @ phone
Feb 20 all-day
00 - Hotline - RAINN - Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network  - National Sexual Assault Telephone Hotline  - 1-800-656-4673 - 24/7 @ phone

 

The National Sexual Assault Hotline is available 24/7

Telephone: 800.656.HOPE (4673)

Online chat: online.rainn.org

Español: rainn.org/es

How does it work?

When you call 800.656.HOPE (4673), you’ll be routed to a local RAINN affiliate organization based on the first six digits of your phone number. Cell phone callers have the option to enter the ZIP code of their current location to more accurately locate the nearest sexual assault service provider.

Telephone Hotline Terms of Service

How can the hotline help me?

Calling the National Sexual Assault Hotline gives you access to a range of free services including:

  • Confidential support from a trained staff member
  • Support finding a local health facility that is trained to care for survivors of sexual assault and offers services like sexual assault forensic exams
  • Someone to help you talk through what happened
  • Local resources that can assist with your next steps toward healing and recovery
  • Referrals for long term support in your area
  • Information about the laws in your community
  • Basic information about medical concerns

Is it confidential?

The National Sexual Assault Hotline is a safe, confidential service. When you call the hotline, only the first six numbers of the phone number are used to route the call, and your complete phone number is never stored in our system. Most states do have laws that require local staff to contact authorities in certain situations, like if there is a child or vulnerable adult who is in danger.

While almost all callers are connected directly to a staff member or volunteer at a local sexual assault service provider, a handful of providers use an answering service after daytime business hours. This service helps manage the flow of calls. If all staff members are busy, you may choose to leave a phone number with the answering service. In this case, the number will be confidential and will be given directly to the organization’s staff member for a callback. If you reach an answering service, you can try calling back after some time has passed, or you can choose to call during regular business hours when more staff members are available. You can also access 24/7 help online by visiting online.rainn.org.

Who are the sexual assault service providers?

Sexual assault service providers are organizations or agencies dedicated to supporting survivors of sexual assault. The providers who answer calls placed to the hotline are known as RAINN affiliates. To be part of the National Sexual Assault Hotline, affiliates must agree to uphold RAINN’s confidentiality standards. That means:

  • Never releasing records or information about the call without the consent of the caller, except when obligated by law
  • Only making reports to the police or other agencies when the caller consents, unless obligated by law
  • Agreeing to RAINN’s non-discrimination policy

To learn more about how a provider can become an affiliate of the National Sexual Assault Hotline, visit the Sexual Assault Service Provider information page. Volunteer opportunities for the National Sexual Assault Hotline are coordinated through these local providers. Search for volunteer opportunities near you.

How was the National Sexual Assault Hotline created?

The National Sexual Assault Hotline was the nation’s first decentralized hotline, connecting those in need with help in their local communities. It’s made up of a network of independent sexual assault service providers, vetted by RAINN, who answer calls to a single, nationwide hotline number. Since it was first created in 1994, the National Sexual Assault Hotline (800.656.HOPE and online.rainn.org) has helped more than 3 million people affected by sexual violence.

Before the telephone hotline was created, there was no central place where survivors could get help. Local sexual assault services providers were well equipped to handle support services, but the lack of a national hotline meant the issue did not receive as much attention as it should. In response, RAINN developed a unique national hotline system to combine all the advantages of a national organization with all the abilities and expertise of local programs. One nationwide hotline number makes it easier for survivors to be connected with the help they deserve.

Anyone affected by sexual assault, whether it happened to you or someone you care about, can find support on the National Sexual Assault Hotline. You can also visit online.rainn.org to receive support via confidential online chat.

 

01 – Helpline – DoD – Department of Defense – Safe Helpline – Helpline 877-995-5247, One-On-One Chat, Report Retaliation, Resources – 24/7 @ Phone, Text
Feb 20 all-day

 

SAFE Helpline Number on Black background

 

 

DoD Safe Helpline is the sole secure, confidential, and anonymous crisis support service specially designed for members of the Department of Defense community affected by sexual assault.

Safe Helpline Serves

Active Duty Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force Reserve component (Army National Guard, Army Reserve, Navy Reserve, Marine Corps Reserve, Air National Guard, Air Force Reserve, and DHS’s Coast Guard Reserve) members and their families.

 

 

Telephone Helpline

Need help?

Call 877-995-5247 to be connected with a trained, confidential
Safe Helpline staff member, 24/7.

DSN users can call Safe Helpline by dialing 877-995-5247.

For those unable to call toll-free or DSN, call 202-540-5962.

OCONUS Service members can call the Telephone Helpline for free from
anywhere in the world by using Voice over IP (VoIP) technology from
theSafe Helpline App.

live-help-img

Online Helpline

Need help?

Visitonline.safehelpline.org or download the Safe Helpline
app
to chat one-on-one with a trained Safe Helpline staff member
through an anonymous, secure instant-messaging format 24/7.

How can the Online Helpline help me?

You can chat one-on-one with a Safe Helpline staff member
to access a range of support services including:

  • Anonymous, confidential, crisis intervention services
  • Emotional support
  • Referrals to both military and civilian resources in your area— sexual assault response coordinators (SARCs)/sexual assault prevention and response victim advocates (SAPR VAs), Chaplain, Legal, Medical/Behavioral health care services, military police, Veterans Crisis Line, local civilian sexual assault service providers, and many others.
  • Information on military-specific policies, such as reporting options (Restricted and Unrestricted)
  • Information for family and friends of survivors
  • Information for leadership

Safe Helpline App

Safe Helpline appWhat is the Safe Helpline app?

Itunes Store Badge      Google play icon

The Safe Helpline app is a free mobile resource created to meet the unique needs of members of the Department of Defense community affected by sexual assault. By downloading the app, you can access 24/7 support through Safe Helpline’s Telephone and Online Helplines, get information and resources to help address the short- and long-term effects of sexual assault, as well as practical exercises, to help you manage your self-care. We also recognize that for many survivors stationed outside of the United States (OCONUS) additional limitations may arise when accessing resources, which is why the Safe Helpline app has been designed to give survivors access to a variety of support services and self-care exercises in a free, and convenient way.

Safe Helpline app home screen

How can the Safe Helpline app help me?

We’ve designed the app to give you a way to access any resource within the app directly from the home screen.

Chat: Access one-on-one support through the Online Helpline, 24/7 and chat directly with a Safe Helpline staff member.

Call: Connect directly to a Safe Helpline staff member for one-on-one support through the Telephone Helpline, 24/7. You can choose to make the call using Voice over IP (VoIP) or by using your cellular data. Using VoIP might be a good option for Service members who are OCONUS and may not have access to cellular service in their current location.

Learn: Within this section of the Safe Helpline app, you can access our self-paced educational programs to learn how to address the effects of sexual assault, how to support a survivor and ways Safe Helpline can support you or someone you know. All of these education programs can be completed anonymously by the user. You’ll also be able to access scenarios to give you tangible ways to step-in and support others.

Self-Care: The app allows you to easily create and use a customized self-care plan with specially designed self-care exercises. Once downloaded, you can come back to view your plan and exercises at any time, even without an Internet connection.

How do the self-care plans work?

The self-care plan is created by answering a series of six questions designed to help you focus and identify how you are feeling at that moment. Questions are answered on a sliding scale of zero (never) to five (always), and the app will recommend different exercises based on your responses. There are no “good” or “bad” answers to these questions, and responses can vary from day to day, depending on how you are feeling.

Once you’ve answered the questions on the plan, the app will suggest self-care exercises. The exercises include:

  • Guided breathing
  • Guided muscle relaxation
  • Imagining yourself at the beach
  • Focusing on the present
  • Soothing sounds, such as sounds of the forest and sounds of rain falling

We recognize the importance of keeping your information safe, so we’ve also set up a security feature that allows you to lock your self-care plans behind a privacy wall using a 6-digit pin of your choosing.

Journaling:

The Safe Helpline app allows you to journal directly in the app with weekly prompts. Taking some time out of your week to journal can give you a moment for reflection and an opportunity for self-care. You can also choose to skip any prompts or just write freely depending on how you are feeling. Some of the questions include:

  • When do you feel the most energized?
  • What do you want to let go of this week?
  • What are three things that you would do if you weren’t afraid?

Like the self-care plans, the journal entries you save are protected by a privacy wall and will allow you to lock your information behind a 6-digit pin of your choosing. You can also access and refer back to your journal without an Internet connection.

Coloring Book:

Sometimes focusing on a mindless activity can help you process difficult emotions and be grounded in the present.  To help with this, another self-care activity available on the app is a collection of six designs, ranging from easy to difficult, that allow you to paint or color your own works of art.

How is the Safe Helpline app secure, and is activity on the app traceable by third parties?

As with all Safe Helpline services, your privacy is of utmost importance, and the technology behind the Safe Helpline app was created by RAINN to protect your safety and anonymity by ensuring that no personally identifiable information (PII) is collected.

The following precautions have been implemented to protect your privacy when using the app:

  • The app does not require an email address or any of your contact information when it is initially downloaded.
  • You have the ability to set up a pin code to protect the information you record in the self-care plans, the journal, and completed coloring book designs.
  • No information on how you use the app is ever collected or shared by Safe Helpline. This includes how often you use the app, who uses the app, or where you use the app.
  • If you are concerned that someone may be able to access the app, you can delete all journal entries, self-care plans, and completed coloring books by simply deleting the app.

While Safe Helpline has taken the steps outlined above to help increase the safety and anonymity of Safe Helpline app users, please remember that if you are using the app on a DoD or other work-related device, your employer may be able to track your usage of this app. In addition, similarly to a paper journal, Safe Helpline app journal entries may be admissible during court proceedings.

REPORT RETALIATION

Military Feedback Form

If you have questions, comments, or complaints about the services on your installation/base or provided by a Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC), victim advocate or other military staff or personnel, please use this feedback form. You can submit the form anonymously if you prefer. The information you provide on this form will be forwarded to the DoD Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO).

Retaliation

If you believe you have experienced or witnessed retaliation in any form from a peer, supervisor, or someone in your chain of command following a report of sexual assault, you can share the retaliation allegations with SAPRO using this form.

If you would like to submit a retaliation report, please report directly to the Department of Defense Inspector General (DoD IG) here.

For members of the Coast Guard who have experienced retaliation, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) IG will accept retaliation complaints as falling within the scope of their responsibilities for Whistleblower protection. Coast Guard Members who have experienced retaliation can contact the DHS IG by calling 1-800-323-8603 (toll-free) or access the Allegation Form online.

Retaliation Reporting Options to learn more about how to report relation and your options : https://www.safehelpline.org/reporting-option

RESOURCE LINKS

 

For Responders

I work with Survivors

For Leadership

I am a Commander

For Supporters of Survivors

I am a Friend, Family Member, Colleague

For Service Members Leaving the Military

I am a Transitioning Service Member

For Survivors

I am a Transitioning Service Member

 

01 – Helpline – GR – Grad Resources – The National Grad Crisis Line – 1.877.472.3457 – 24/7 @ Phone
Feb 20 all-day

 

 

 

 

The National Grad Crisis Line

1.877.GRAD.HLP (1.877.472.3457)

The National Grad Crisis Line helps graduate students reach free, confidential telephone counseling, crisis intervention, suicide prevention, and information and referral services provided by specially-trained call-takers. Caring, professional staff and well-trained volunteers answer around the clock.

All counselors have completed training to understand the unique issues faced by graduate students. In addition to listening to and empathizing with a caller’s concerns, counselors assess the caller’s lethality risk, counsel, and offer various local support services and mental health resources for follow-up.

1.877.GRAD.HLP

https://gradresources.org/

Who We Are

Since 1990, Grad Resources has recognized the significant role of graduate students in America. From our studies on stress in graduate school to the painful stories of student struggles we hear every day, we understand the pressures they face. We offer services that address their personal, emotional and spiritual needs, providing online materials, meaningful connections, engaging speakers, and supportive faith-based communities that enable graduate students to flourish personally and professionally.
01 – Helpline – PTSD/FOA – PTSD Foundation of America/Combat Trauma Help Line – 877-717- 7883 – 24/7 @ phone
Feb 20 all-day

 

 

 

 

877-717-PTSD (7873)

Combat Trauma Help Line

Mission/Vision

Mission Statement

Rooted in unwavering faith, our mission is to engage in the relentless pursuit of empowering the veteran community by creating a transformative impact that changes the trajectory of their lives.

Vision Statement

Creating a world where veterans find hope by empowering them to embrace L.I.F.E.

02 – Urgent Info – MAC – Mapping Action Collective – Oregon Resources and Services for Transgender Youth and Young Adults
Feb 20 all-day
02 - Urgent Info - MAC - Mapping Action Collective - Oregon Resources and Services for Transgender Youth and Young Adults

 

RESOURCES

Trans Youth and Young Adults

“These rescources selectedf from the Mapping Action Collective

( https://www.oregonyouthresourcemap.com)

Description:

Description:

541 Willamette St #310, Eugene, OR 97401

 

Description:

1132 SW 13th Ave, Portland, OR 97205

Description:

Ages: 16-24
Housing & Shelter: Homeless Youth
941 W. 7th Ave. Eugene, OR 97402
New Roads Drop-In Center: (541) 686-4310
Station 7 Youth Crisis Line: (541) 689-3111

Description:

COVID Message: Hours may be impacted by COVID. Please call for updated hours.
Eligibility: Homeless youth ages 12-21
Languages: English, Spanish
Ages: 12-21
Housing & Shelter: Housing Services
1202 SE Douglas Ave, Roseburg, OR 97470

Description:

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources
Nativity Lutheran Church, 60850 Brosterhous Rd., Bend

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources
Prineville Presbyterian Church, 1771 NW Madras Hwy, Prineville

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources
5633 SE Division St. Portland, OR 97206

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources
1144 Gateway Loop, Suite 200, Springfield, OR 97477
Crystal Falk, Director of Youth and Family Services: (541) 686-5060

Description:

COVID Message: Building temporarily closed due to COVID, please reach out via phone or email to get support.Languages: English
Ages: 16-25
Mental Health: Support Groups

Description:

Description:

3620 SE Powell Blvd, #102 Portland OR 97202​

Description:

COVID Message: Counseling and Assessments for Surgery letters are being conducted via teletherapy or phone. In-office visits are offered to existing clients on a case-by-case basis.
Cost: Brave Space primarily works with people with Oregon Health Plan insurance. If you have private insurance, please check out our resource guide for therapists who take your insurance.
Dillehunt Hall, Room 1007 3235 S.W. Pavilion Loop Portland, OR 97239

Description:

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources

Description:

Business: (541) 386-4808
24 Hour Hotline: (541) 386-6603

Description:

Description:

Basic Needs: Public Transit

Description:

Eligibility: We have only two requirements in an effort to be as inclusive as possible: 1) You identify as transgender (FTM, genderqueer, non-binary, genderfluid, gender non-conforming, and every other non-cis identity within the trans umbrella.) 2) You cannot afford to purchase a binder, or you cannot safely obtain a binder.

Description:

Are you able to pay for hair removal services out of pocket?

Are you employed and able to save some money towards hair removal services?

Are you a citizen or documented immigrant?

Do you identify as white, or do you experience white/light-skinned privilege?

If you answered YES to these questions, you may consider making space for our trans siblings who mostly answered NO. (Even if you answer YES to most or all of these questions, you are still eligible to apply.)

Description:

Eligibility: We have only two requirements in an effort to be as inclusive as possible: You identify as transgender (MTF, genderqueer, non-binary, genderfluid, gender non-conforming, and every other non-cis identity assigned male at birth within the trans umbrella.) You cannot afford to purchase femme shapewear, or you cannot safely obtain femme shapewear. We accept all requests for support, and applications are open year-round. Once you complete your application, your request will be added to our waitlist. Shipping is discrete and 100% free, and we ship internationally to 90+ countries and counting.
Cost: This program is intended to help trans folks who otherwise can not afford or access femme shapewear. We ask that you consider your access before applying.

Description:

Eligibility: You identify as transgender (FTM, MTF, non-binary, genderqueer, gender non-conforming, and all other non-cis identities). You have financial need that prevents you from affording hormone replacement therapy. You are 18 years old or older (19+ in Nebraska) at the time you apply. You live in one of the states Plume serves. You are not currently on Medicare. If you live in CO or KY, you are not currently on Medicaid.

Cost: This program is intended to help trans folks who otherwise can not afford gender-affirming surgery. We ask that you consider your access to healthcare before applying for this grant. Here are some questions to consider:Do you have health insurance coverage that is trans-inclusive?

If not, do you qualify for Medicaid?

Do you live in a state whose Medicaid plans cover HRT?

Are you employed and able to pay for HRT out of pocket?

Are there nearby clinics that offer HRT with informed consent?

Do you have reliable transportation options to access a provider?

Do you consider yourself healthy and able-bodied (i.e., not living with a chronic or long-standing illness)?

Do you identify as white, or do you experience white/light-skinned privilege?

If you answered YES to most of these questions, you may consider making space for our trans siblings who mostly answered NO. (Even if you answer YES to most or all of these questions, you are still eligible to apply.)

Minimum age served: 18

Description:

Eligibility: We have very few requirements in an effort to be as inclusive as possible: You identify as transgender (FTM, MTF, non-binary, genderqueer, gender non-conforming, and all other non-cis identities). You are 18 years of age or older at the time of your surgery, or have consent from your legal guardian(s) and healthcare provider(s). You have financial need that prevents you from affording gender-affirming surgery. You can demonstrate past attempts at affording care (i.e. saving money, fundraising, attempting to get insurance coverage). You complete your surgery in the United States with a US-based surgeon.

Cost: This program is intended to help trans folks who otherwise can not afford gender-affirming surgery. We ask that you consider your access to healthcare before applying for this grant. Here are some questions to consider:Do you have health insurance coverage that is trans-inclusive?

If not, do you qualify for Medicaid? (Learn more)

Do you have access to healthcare providers who are trans competent, and are able to travel to them to receive care?

Are you employed and able to save some money towards surgery?

Are you a citizen or documented immigrant?

Do you consider yourself healthy and able-bodied (i.e., not living with a chronic or long-standing illness)?

Do you identify as white, or do you experience white/light-skinned privilege?

If you answered YES to most of these questions, you may consider making space for our trans siblings who mostly answered NO. (Even if you answer YES to most or all of these questions, you are still eligible to apply.)

Minimum age served: 18

Description:

Eligibility: It is a benefit for eligible Health Share of Oregon members in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties.
Languages: Spanish, Russian, Mandarin, Arabic, Vietnamese, Somali, Swahili
9955 NE Glisan St, Portland, OR 97220

Description:

Basic Needs: Transportation

Description:

Basic Needs: Transportation
10055 E Burnside St, Portland, OR 97216
Energy Assistance: (503) 294-7444
Housing & Rent Assistance: (503) 721-1740

Description:

650 NW Irving St, Portland, OR 97209

Description:

Day Services & Drop-in: Mail, Laundry, & Showers
610 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97205

Description:

Call or Text: (541) 246-4046
24/7 Text (541) 246-4046

Description:

Maximum age served: 18
605 W 4th Ave, Eugene, OR 97402

Description:

Springfield: (541) 726-3714

Description:

1175 G St, Springfield, 97477

Description:

1160 Grant St, Eugene, OR 97402

Description:

3500 E 17th Ave, Eugene, 97403

Description:

Text “START” to 678678

Description:

323 E 12th Ave, Eugene, 97401

Description:

1300 Irvington Dr, Eugene, 97404

Description:

Description:

Community Resources: Veteran Services
02 – Urgent Information – COPP – City of Portland – Winter Weather and City of Portland Oregon Services
Feb 20 all-day

Winter Weather and City of Portland Services


You can help all Portlanders survive the freezing temperatures by checking in on neighbors, whether housed or unhoused.

If you are concerned for someone during colder conditions, such as an individual who is not dressed for the weather conditions, call the non-emergency response line at 503-823-3333 and request a welfare check.

Call 911 if someone is showing symptoms of hypothermia: shivering uncontrollably or suffering confusion, slurred speech or drowsiness. Get them somewhere warm and dry.

Call the Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) hotline at 503-988-3646 for 24-hour information and assistance to older adults, people with disabilities, and caregivers.


 

Help for people experiencing homelessness

To find your nearest warming shelter or learn about volunteering at a shelter, go to Multnomah County’s “Care for when it’s cold” page.

People seeking shelter can also dial 2-1-1 for the information on shelter locations and if they need transportation to a shelter. All sites are accessible to people with disabilities. Pets are allowed at all locations.

There is also current information on how you can volunteer at a warming shelter.

Go to 211info.org/donations to find lists of providers and their needs for winter gear – hats, coats, gloves, sleeping bags and socks, etc. Many providers include online shopping links along with their lists, making donating more convenient than ever. You can donate right from your phone or computer in just a few minutes. You can help by donating life-saving winter gear early in the season, so outreach teams will have them on hand when conditions turn especially cold.

Working with partners, the Joint Office of Homeless Services (joint effort of the City of Portland and Multnomah County) will monitor conditions and open severe weather shelters when certain thresholds are met.

In addition to the severe-weather beds that open only when certain weather thresholds are met, the Joint Office of Homeless Services also funds more than 1,300 year-round and winter shelter beds open every night during the cold season. These beds are open day after day, no matter the forecast. Other community partners also add winter shelter capacity.

Outreach teams — including those from Transition Projects, JOIN, Janus Youth, Cascadia Behavioral Health and the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office HOPE team — are also in the community, making contact with vulnerable populations, providing resources and sharing information about severe weather and year-round shelters.

You can also go to tprojects.org and sign up with Transition Projects to train as a warming shelter volunteer. Transition Projects is one of the community partners paid through the Joint Office of Homeless Services to staff severe weather shelters on the coldest or snowiest nights of the year.

Remember, we can make a difference when we work together to keep our neighbors safe, warm and dry this winter.

Our Benson bubbler water fountains are a critical drinking water source for people living outside,but they can be hazardous during cold weather as the water can leak on the sidewalks and freeze. During freezing weather events, we will turn most of them off for safety, but will keep some in operation so that they’re accessible to those that need them.

 

Road closures and transportation updates

PBOT Ready Yeti Cartoon

Get the latest severe weather travel tips, road closures, chain advisories and more on the Portland Bureau of Transportation’s Winter Weather webpage. PBOT serves as the City’s hub for real-time information to help you stay safe and get where you need to go during winter weather events.

Check highway conditions before you go at TripCheck.com

Check trimet.org for the latest bus and MAX service information before you go.

 

Parks and community centers

Are you planning to visit your favorite City park or attend a class or activity at a community or arts center? Check Portland Parks & Recreation’s Inclement Weather Policy and Closures or call 503-823-2533 for information.

 

Protect plumbing, report water main breaks and other service impacts

Cartoon of two Water Bureau employees turning off a water main in winter weather

Learn how to prepare your home plumbing for winter weather.

Check out The Water Blog for news about winter weather impacts to water. Be our eyes and ears! If you think you’ve spotted a broken main, call our 24-hour emergency line at 503-823-4874. Crews are ready to respond to emergencies, including water main breaks, 24 hours a day, and seven days a week.

 

Tree emergencies

Three workers stand outside on a snow covered street looking up at a fallen tree that takes up the entire top half of the photo.

Portland Parks & Recreation (PP&R) Urban Forestry crews respond to hazardous situations and emergency needs citywide resulting from severe weather in Portland.

Report tree emergencies on City property, including public streets and roads, by calling 503-823-TREE (8733) and pressing 1. If phone lines are busy, consider reporting online using the PDX Reporter website.

For non-emergency, tree-related questions, email trees@portlandoregon.gov

Please be patient. Urban Forestry crews are minimizing safety risks and clearing the largest debris first. Emergency dispatchers are available 24 hours per day, seven days a week.

For info on what constitutes a tree emergency and more info, please visit portland.gov/trees/tree-concerns-and-problems/tree-emergency  

Watch this video to learn more about how Urban Forestry crews help you through severe weather.

IMPORTANT:

  • If a tree emergency situation involves downed wires please contact your utility provider first. PP&R Urban Forestry staff are unable to respond until electrical hazards have been addressed. For road closures visit PBOT’s webpage.
  • Please avoid calling for NON-emergency issues during severe weather as crews are focused on reopening major roads and thoroughfares in Portland and will work their way down into neighborhood streets and roads.

General maintenance involving trees on private property or on adjacent rights-of-way is the responsibility of the property owner, who should call a private arborist for any tree-related issue.

  • Large Branches & Trunks:
    • For larger branches or stumps, contact your garbage and recycling company to get a cost estimate for a special bulky waste pickup.
    • Or find pick-up and drop-off options through Metro’s Find A Recycler tool: type in your home address and search for “branches” or “stumps.” Or call 503-234-3000 to speak with a Metro recycling specialist (Monday – Friday, 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.).
    • If you see a woodpile that City of Portland crews assembled for later removal; that is standard protocol. It may take weeks for our capacity to allow for staff to remove the debris, as we deal with those more than 700 tree emergencies citywide.
  • Small Branches (up to 3 feet long and under 4 inches thick):
    • For wood debris on sidewalk, it’s the responsibility of the adjacent property owners.
    • If your yard or sidewalk are filled with tree branches after the snow melts, you can fill your green compost bin with branches up to 3 feet long and under 4 inches thick. You can also set out extra bags, bundles or cans of branches for $3.75 per bag, bundle, or can (The maximum size is 32 gallons and 45 pounds per bag/bundle/can)
    • Additionally, please consider contacting a Tree Care Provider or lawn care professional to assist with your debris pile.

 

Flooding

Situated along the Columbia and Willamette rivers with numerous waterways within its borders, Portland is susceptible to flooding, especially during the winter months when we receive most of our rain.

Visit the Flooding in Portland webpage for resources and information on how to prepare and be safe, where Portland’s floodplains are, and what the City is doing for flood prevention.

 

Home safety advice from Fire & Rescue

Graphic that says: fuel engines, generators, stoves, grills, etc., never indoors

Home heating can be a source of many hazards. From electric heaters to wood stoves, there are steps you can take to minimize your risk of a fire. For more information on how you can keep yourself and your loved ones safe in your home during winter weather, visit Portland Fire & Rescue’s Winter Fire Safety Tips or PF&R’s Twitter account for space heaterfireplace and other fire safety tips.

Stay safe when heating rooms in your home. Local fire departments report an uptick in families using space heaters to keep rooms warm. Alternative sources of fuel or electricity for heating or cooking can cause carbon monoxide to build up — in a home, garage, or camper — and to poison the people and animals inside.

 

Garbage, recycling and compost collection

Snow and Ice Garbage and Recycling Pickup Snowman

In case of snow or ice, leave your bins at the curb. Your garbage company will come as soon as they can. Learn more.

 

Building inspections

Inclement weather may affect some building inspections from the Bureau of Development Services. Check the Bureau of Development Services’ web page and social media channels for the latest information on services affected by snow and ice.

 

General preparedness for winter weather

Graphic that says: Charge and gather medicine, water, food, flashlights, batteries, chargers and warm gear.

Questions on how to prepare for snow, ice, wind, and other winter weather? Visit PublicAlerts.org’s winter weather resource webpage with information on how to stay safe and get help before, during, and after a storm.

 

Sign up for public emergency alerts

Sign up for public emergency alerts at PublicAlerts so you know when an emergency is happening in the Portland-Vancouver Region. Getting info quickly gives you power to take action. It could save your life and the lives of your loved ones.

 

Sidewalks should be shoveled

Graphic that reads: signs your neighbor might need help; pets out all night, no lights inside, mailbox overflowing, not answering phone

Property owners or tenants are responsible for shoveling the snow and removing ice from in front of their homes and businesses. Check in with neighbors who might need a hand. Some elderly homeowners or people with disabilities may have physical challenges or risk injury in the snow and ice.

 

The Big Pipe Tracker

The Big Pipe Tracker allows people to see how Portland’s Big Pipe system fills up and prevents combined sewer overflows to the Willamette River. The online gauge, updated every 15 minutes, also lets viewers be the first to know if a rare overflow does occur.

02 – Urgent Information – Oregon Winter Warming Shelters And Resources
Feb 20 all-day

If you are looking for other resources, call 211 or use our online database or mobile app.

CURRENT ALERTS

STATEWIDE: Due to cold temperatures across the state, additional shelters and resources may be available. Call 2-1-1 or CLICK HERE for information on open shelters and transportation options.

MULTNOMAH COUNTY: A Severe Weather Alert is in effect for Multnomah County Tuesday, January 16, 2024. Call 2-1-1 or CLICK HERE for information on open shelters and transportation options.

Multnomah County Volunteers Needed: Multnomah County urgently needs volunteers to staff warming shelters: All are needed and anyone is encouraged — especially people who have volunteered before and those with experience in human services and health-related settings. If you are able to help your community today, please sign up here.

Multnomah County Donations: Shelter & outreach providers in Multnomah County are requesting winter gear in preparation for the winter season — for information on what to donate and where, visit our donations page!

ICE STORM EXPECTED

JANUARY 16th, 2024.

Oregon Health Plan (OHP) and Travel Help

OHP pays for travel you need to get health care that OHP covers. This is called “non-emergent medical transportation” (NEMT). NEMT:

  • Can be travel to get health care services covered by OHP. Travel can be by taxi, bus or a local ride service.
  • Can also help pay for travel costs, such as gas, meals and lodging. 
  • Is only for members with OHP Plus (BMM, BMH, BMD) benefits.

OHP will only pay your travel costs if your ride service approves them before you go to your appointment or pharmacy.

To Get Help, Call Your Local Ride Service.

To find your local ride service, type your county name in the Search box below. You will see the ride services for local coordinated care organizations and open card (fee-for-service) members. You can also view OHA’s map of local ride services.

  • Ride services are also known as “brokerages.” They help OHP members get NEMT services.
  • If you need help, call your ride service before the day of your health care appointment or pharmacy visit.
Check with your CCO and/or NEMT provider.
Look under “RIDE SERVICE” for the matching CCO to get OHP Member Ride Service contact information

Click Here To Find Ride Services

PacificSource Community Solutions will cover transportation for OHP members to and from warming centers while the weather advisory is in effect. Members can also request a ride to another person’s home (such as a family member’s or friend’s) that has heat in order to stay warm during the active weather advisory
To schedule a ride, members should call our Non-Emergency Medical Transportation (NEMT) broker for the Marion-Polk region
TriMet in Portland will not turn people away who can’t afford to pay to get to a warming shelter.
Cherriots in Salem may provide free rides to / from warming shelters
If people lost food in power outage, you have up to 10 days to file with Oregon DHS (SNAP Benefits) to request additional/replacement funds
SNAP recipients must request replacement benefits within 10 days of food loss. They may request replacement food benefits equal to one month of the normal benefit amount for the household.

Replacement benefits can be requested by calling Oregon eligibility customer service at (800) 699-9075 or emailing SSP.StatewideWorkshare@dhsoha.state.or.us.

Extra help can also be found at local food banks. See the Oregon Food Bank website to find a location near you.

****************************************************************************

Winter and Severe Weather Resources

BAKER COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

BENTON COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

CLARK COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

CLACKAMAS COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

CLATSOP COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

COLUMBIA COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

COOS COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

COWLITZ COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

CROOK COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

CURRY COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

DESCHUTES COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

DOUGLAS COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

GILLIAM COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

GRANT COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

HARNEY COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

HOOD RIVER COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

JACKSON COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

JEFFERSON COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

JOSEPHINE COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

KLAMATH COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

LAKE COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

LANE COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

LINCOLN COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

LINN COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

MALHEUR COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

MARION COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

MORROW COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

MULTNOMAH COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

POLK COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

SHERMAN COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

SKAMANIA COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

TILLAMOOK COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

UMATILLA COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

UNION COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

WAHKIAKUM COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

WALLOWA COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

WASCO COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

WASHINGTON COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

WHEELER COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

YAMHILL COUNTY

Click here for warming centers listed in the 211info database

CALL 211 or 1-866-698-6155 or TTY: dial 711 and call 1-866-698-6155, 24 hours per day / 7 days per week
TEXT your zip code to 898211 (TXT211), Monday-Friday 9am-5pm
EMAIL help@211info.org, Monday-Friday 9am-5pm
(Language interpreters available by phone; text and email in Spanish and English)

During times of emergency incident response, 211info’s answer rate may vary.

Winter Warming Shelters in the Portland, OR area

As winter sets in and temperatures drop, we all need a safe and comfortable resting place. For those experiencing houselessness, finding shelter can be difficult. Aside from year-round shelters, Multnomah and surrounding counties offer winter-specific warming centers. Warming centers have specific weather criteria that must be met for them to open. The requirements vary by county and establishment. Most warming centers offer a warm meal, and some offer a warm beverage. Also, some centers allow pets but check the rules as they are different at each establishment. If someone is unsheltered during extreme weather and whose life appears to be in danger, please call 911. For winter and severe weather resources relating to particular counties, call 211 or visit their website.

Multnomah County

Warming shelters open when temperatures are forecasted at 25 degrees or below, forecasters predict an inch or more of snow, overnight temperatures drop below 32 degrees with an inch of driving rain, or when other conditions such as severe wind chills or extreme temperature fluctuations occur. For further information and up-to-date resources, please visit the following links:

Washington County

The Washington County Winter Shelter Program runs from November 1 until May 31. There are multiple locations available throughout the winter. For access to housing and shelter resources, contact Community Connect at 503-640-3263. For more information, click the links below:

Clackamas County

Clackamas County opens overnight warming shelters when the weather is predicted to be 33 degrees or lower or when other conditions, such as snow, wind, and flooding, make sleeping outdoors hazardous. For up-to-date information, please visit the links below:

 

 

 

 

 

CITY OF SALEM OREGON

HOUSING AND WARMING SHELTER RESOURCES

Salem Warming Network

Temporary shelter locations and warming centers are located across Salem for regular overnight or drop in housing. They are considered temporary because the property is not intended to be used as a long term overnight shelter location and only activated during the coldest winter nights.

Safe Vehicle Parking Program and Other Shelter Options

Salem’s Safe Vehicle Parking Program connects people who are seeking a safe overnight parking space- using their own vehicle.

Salem/Keizer Shelter Providers

Family Promise of the Mid-Willamette Valley
1055 Edgewater Street Northwest
503-370-9752

The ARCHES Project
615 Commercial Street NE
503-399-9080

The Salvation Army Family Services Building
1997 Front Street NE
503-585-6688

St Francis Shelter
1820 Berry Street SE
503-588-0428

Simonka Place
5119 RIver Road N
Keizer, OR
503-362-7487

Taylor House Youth Shelter
971-273-7300

Union Gospel Mission of Salem
345 Commercial Street NE
503-362-3983

United Way Safe Sleep
1910 Front Street
503-816-3409

Women at the Well Grace House
1243 Peace Street SE
971-600-3627

Church @ the Park
2410 Turner Road SE
971-375-7491

HOST – Resource Center and Transitional Living Program
1115 Liberty Street NE
503-588-5825

Mount Angel Shelter Locations

St Joseph Shelter
925 South Main Street
503-845-6147

Complete a Local Service Assessment for Housing

ARCHES
503-399- 9080

Mid-Valley Resources

Mid-Valley Resources provides links to find resources in our region. You’ll find bothsearchable and printable resource lists.

Locate a Shelter

National and Local Search Portal through HUD

The Department of Housing and Urban Development HUD has recently released an online search tool intended to assist individuals in need locate shelter and service providers. In addition to the searchable online tool, shelters may be accessed using the contact information below.

03 – Jobs/Career Fairs, Events, Openings and Internships – 2024 @ Application Instructions Provided
Feb 20 all-day

 

 

 

 

 

 

JOB / CAREER FAIRS, EVENTS, OPENINGS, AND INTERNSHIPS 2024

Peer Support, Recovery & Wellness

NOTE: Information here is provided solely as a courtesy without any guarantees or warranties or liability of any kind whatsoever.  Use at your own risk and expense.

If you learn of any opportunities not listed here, please share via social media or email: webmail@peergalaxy.com.

NW Instituto Latino

We are hiring! We are seeking Bilingual Recovery Center Support Staff in Washington County! Please send a cover letter & resume to dmichael@nwilpdx.com

¡Estamos contratando! ¡Estamos buscando un Personal de Apoyo Bilingüe para El Centro de Recuperación en el condado de Washington! Envíe una carta de presentación y un currículum a dmichael@nwilpdx.com

We are hiring! We are seeking Bilingual Recovery Center Support Staff in Washington County! Please send a cover letter & resume to dmichael@nwilpdx.com

Position Description Recovery Center Support Staff

Position Description Mentor Job Description

MHAAO – Mental Health and Addiction Association of Oregon is recruiting for several positions.  For more details visit the link below:

* MHAAO Careers

Oregon Peer Warmline / CCS – Community Counseling Solutions

* CCS Job Openings Page

Folktime

* FOLKTIME Career Page

Multnomah County Crisis Assessment & Treatment Center (CATC)

Telecare CATC Overview

Telecare CATC Careers

Lines for Life:

* Lines for Life – Jobs Page

JOB BOARDS

MHACCBO – Mental Health and Addictions Certification Credentialing Board of Oregon

MHACCBO Job Board

State of Oregon

* State of Oregon – Jobs Page

Partners in Diversity

Jobs Board

Indeed.com

Job Board for Peer Support Specialist positions

Job Board for Certified Recovery Mentor positions

MAC’S LIST features many nonprofit opportunities

MAC’S List

04 – Resources – AKIDSCO – A Kids Book About School Shootings – Free
Feb 20 all-day

A Kids Book About School Shootings

Crystal Woodman Miller

Many of us are going to need to find the words to talk to the kids in our lives about tragic events like the school shooting in Uvalde, Texas. Here’s a free resource from A Kids Company About to help you do that was written by Crystal Woodman-Miller, one of the survivors of the Columbine school shooting.

I hate that we need tools like this. I can’t wait for us to have to write the book “A Kids Book About Why It’s So Hard To Buy A Gun”

Link: www.akidsco.com

There aren’t enough words to explain all the thoughts, emotions, and heartbreak that comes with yesterday’s tragedy in Uvalde. We hope this book helps everyone start somewhere.

We’re making #AKidsBookAboutSchoolShootings free for kids, grownups, and educators everywhere, so that this conversation can get started when it matters most.

FREE DOWNLOAD

A Kids Book About School Shootings by Crystal Woodman Miller:

Link: akidsco.com

 

04 – Resources – MAP – Moms for All Paths to Recovery – Mother’s Resource Group – 24/7 @ Facebook Group
Feb 20 all-day

 

Moms for All Paths to Recovery (MAP)

This is a group for moms who have or had children that are experiencing issues due to alcohol or drug use. We also have advocates, harm reductionists, and experts in the field of addiction in our camp.
We mothers often feel powerless to act on behalf of our own (and our family and children’s) best interests. But we know the antidote to powerlessness: KNOWLEDGE.
🚩 THAT’S WHY THIS IS NOT A SUPPORT GROUP 🚩.
It is a hub for information and resources that are relevant to our member audience, based on science, and driven by data.
We encourage you to engage with our community by posting relevant information: Trusted news reports, scientific articles, and any other information that would be helpful to our members in navigating this long and winding road.
Of course, data doesn’t speak for itself, and members are free to post their interpretations of the information shared here. We do not necessarily have to agree with everything that’s posted; critical conversations are important and make us stronger and wiser. So take what you need, and leave the rest behind.

Follow this link to Join

Group rules from the admins

🔹 We support Harm Reduction (meeting people where they’re at).

🔹 We do NOT believe in the concepts of “tough love,” “enabling” and “codependency.”
🔹 We support ALL Pathways to Recovery, including FDA approved medications for opioid and alcohol use disorders.
🔹 We do NOT support drug induced homicide laws. PLEASE DO NOT JOIN THIS GROUP if you are not OPEN to LEARNING more about the above or to promote anything that is contrary to our principles.
Avoid Stigmatizing Language
It’s important to ensure that the language we use to talk about substance use is respectful and compassionate. Terms like; addict, junkie, drug abusers, etc. will be deleted (we have a complete list of suggested terms in our GUIDE section). Using neutral, medically accurate terminology when describing substance use is preferred. Please use people-first language, that focuses first on the individual.
Be Kind and Courteous
We are all on this roller-coaster ride together. Please treat everyone with respect. Healthy debates are natural, but kindness is required.
Do Not Advertise or Promote Your Services
But we do welcome your opinions and any other relevant information as it pertains to our groups subject matter. This needs to be a safe space without sales. Give more to this group than you take. Self-promotion, spam, and irrelevant links aren’t allowed.
Irrelevant content will be deleted.
We Are Mothers
We are not medical professionals. Our only degree is in mothering our children through addiction. We do however, bring a wealth knowledge based on our experiences.
Do Not Ask for Mony or Post Fundraisiers
We do not allow solicitation of any kind. The only fundraiser we support is for our annual Warrior Woman Retreat and to support our LIVE giveaways.
Do Not BLOCK Group Admins
MAP is an educational group, and we encourage thoughtful discussion. The full benefit, however, cannot be gained if members block Admins who comment in the group or who post relevant content, including announcements. Members who block Admins will be removed from the Group. Posts shared into MAP by individuals who have our Admins blocked will likewise be deleted since we are unable to validate the legitimacy of the post if we cannot view the information.

 

04 – Resources – NEDA – National Eating Disorders Association – Screening – Information and Treatment Options
Feb 20 all-day
04 - Resources - NEDA - National Eating Disorders Association - Screening - Information and Treatment Options

 

 

 

 

NATIONAL EATING DISORDERS ASSOCIATION

The National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) is the largest nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting individuals and families affected by eating disorders.

In the United States, 28.8 million Americans will suffer from an eating disorder at some point in their lives. Eating disorders are serious but treatable mental and physical illnesses that can affect people of all genders, ages, races, religions, ethnicities, sexual orientations, body shapes, and weights. In fact, eating disorders have the second highest mortality rate of all mental health disorders, surpassed only by opioid use disorder.

Eating disorders are widely misunderstood illnesses and support options are often inaccessible. As a result, too many people are left feeling helpless, hopeless, and frightened. Through our programs and services, NEDA raises awareness, builds communities of support and recovery, funds research, and puts vital resources into the hands of those in need.

Our Mission

NEDA supports individuals and families affected by eating disorders, and serves as a catalyst for prevention, cures and access to quality care.

Our Vision

NEDA envisions a world without eating disorders.

Programs and Services

Whether you have been personally affected by an eating disorder or care about someone who has, NEDA’s programs and services are designed to help you find the help and support you need. Recovery is possible and we’re here to support you!

Screening Tool

This short eating disorders screening — appropriate for ages 13 and up — can help determine if it’s time to seek professional help.

Find Treatment

NEDA has a database of treatment providers across the country. Use our finder tool to locate options near you.

Where Do I Start?

You’ve decided it’s time to seek help and we’re so glad you did. NEDA is here to support you on your journey. These resources can help you take the first step to getting the help you deserve.

How Do I Help?

Having a strong support network is important to recovery. Whether you’re a loved one or a professional, there are steps you can take to offer support.

Free & Low Cost Support

Everyone deserves support for their eating concerns, and NEDA wants to connect you with resources that can help in addition to professional help. These free and low cost support options offer ways to connect with others and provide tools to promote recovery. Please note that these options do not replace professional treatment. We are listing them as additional support options to supplement recovery or maintenance.

Recovery & Relapse

Recovery from an eating disorder can take months, even years. Slips, backslides, and relapse tend to be the rule, rather than the exception. Re-learning normal eating habits and coping skills can take a long period of time and often requires lots of support from professionals, friends, and family. Moving forward is key, however slow it might be.

COVID-19 Resources

Everyone deserves support for their eating concerns, and NEDA wants to connect you with resources that can help in addition to professional help. In this time of great uncertainty and disturbance we face the added danger that isolation brings to those among us who are struggling with an eating disorder. Please refer to this list to explore recovery pathways with virtual support.

04 – Resources – VA & ODVA – Veterans Support Groups, Resources, Education, Mental Health and Advocacy
Feb 20 all-day

USE THIS LINK TO OPEN THE VA WELCOME KIT

Print out your VA Welcome Kit

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned.

Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy, so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

LOCATE SERVICES IN OREGON

Veteran Resource Navigator

The Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs (ODVA) has a comprehensive online resource guide (VETERAN RESOURCE NAVIGATOR) available to assist veterans in finding the benefits that are most useful to their unique circumstances at this time.

Use the link below for the Veteran Resource Navigator

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

Veteran Services by County

Click on the link blow for interactive map  access resources in your county in Oregon.

Other Resources Available to Veterans and Military Service Members

DD214 & Military Records Request:

https://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records

Veteran Resource Navigator site by ODVA:

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

(Oregon)Military Help Line:  

Call 888-457-4838

VA Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255:

Press 1.VA Confidential crisis chat at net or text to 838255 

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD:

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/

Defining Discharge Status:

https://militarybenefits.info/character-of-discharge/#:~:text=There%20are%206%20types%20of,DD%20214%20must%20have%20a

How to apply for a discharge status upgrade:

https://www.va.gov/discharge-upgrade-instructions/

Oregon Supportive Services for Vets & Families (Housing):

https://caporegon.org/what-we-do/ssvf/

Clackamas County VSO’s (Veteran Service Officers):

https://www.clackamas.us/socialservices/veterans.html

Portland VA Clinic that can help with homelessness & medical care:

https://www.portland.va.gov/locations/crrc.asp

Portland VA Mental Health Clinic:

https://www.portland.va.gov/services/mentalhealth.asp

Veterans Crisis Line/ Suicide Prevention:

https://www.veteranscrisisline.net/

If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance,

please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.

Contact ODVA Headquarters

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs
700 Summer St NE
Salem, OR 97301

Web: https://www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/default.aspx

Phone: (800) 692-9666 or (503) 373-2085

Fax: (503) 373-2392

Email:orvetsbenefits@odva.state.or.us

Web Resources

Oregon Health Plan – Enrollment Page

https://www.oregon.gov/oha/hsd/ohp/pages/apply.aspx

 

SAMHSA Treatment Locator

https://findtreatment.gov/

VA National Center on PTSD

 PTSD Treatment Decision Aid

 Educational Materials

  Mobile Apps

  Whiteboard Videos

  Consultation Program

 

VA Healthcare – Community Care network

https://www.va.gov/COMMUNITYCARE/providers/Community_Care_Network.asp

 

VA’s Center for Women Veterans (CWV)

https://www.va.gov/womenvet/

Minority Veterans of America

https://www.minorityvets.org/

 

Vet Centers:

Central Oregon Vet Center

Eugene Vet Center

Grants Pass Vet Center

Portland Vet Center

Salem Vet Center

 Community Based Outpatient Clinics:

Bend CBOC

Morrow County VA Telehealth Clinic (Boardman OR)

Brookings VA Clinic

Wallowa County VA Telehealth Clinic (Enterprise OR)

Eugene Health Care Center

Eugene VA Downtown Clinic

Fairview Clinic

Grants Pass West VA CBOC

Hillsboro CBOC

Klamath Falls CBOC

La Grande CBOC

Lincoln City Clinic

North Bend VA Clinic

Community Resource and Referral Center (CRRC)

Salem CBOC

North Coast CBOC

 

Additional Resources By Phone:

Veterans Crisis Line: 800-273-8255, Press 1

Women Veterans Hotline: 855-829-663

Vet Center Call Center: 877-WAR-VETS (927-8387)

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Caregiver Support Line: 855-260-3274

Lines for Life Military Help Line:  Call 1-888-457-4838

Senior Loneliness Line:  Call 503-200-1633

The Trevor Project:  866-488-7386

PEER SUPPORT AND PEER TRAINING

USE THIS LINK TO APPLY

PTSD Self Screening

This self-screen can help you find out if your feelings and behaviors may be related to PTSD.

Only a trained provider can diagnose PTSD. Your responses here are private and secure—they are not collected or shared. You may take a screenshot or print this screen to share with a provider.

Do not take the self-screen for someone else. If you are concerned that someone you care about might have PTSD, please share this screen with them instead.

Start Screen

PTSD Information Voice Mail: (802) 296-6300
Email: ncptsd@va.gov
Also see: VA Mental Health

04 – Resources – Workplace Violence Resources – Assistance,Training, Information, Links
Feb 20 all-day
04 - Resources - Workplace Violence Resources - Assistance,Training, Information, Links

Workplace Violence

Assistance,Training, Information, Links

Responding To Violence

Recovery in the Aftermath of Workplace Violence: Guidance for Supervisors by SAMHSA
Supervisor Training by Canopy

Victim Connect Resource Map

LINK: https://victimconnect.org/resources/search-resources/

Victim Connect Resource Center can be reached by phone or text at 1-855-4-VICTIM or by chat for more information or assistance in locating services that can help after you lose a loved one or are experiencing grief.

Workplace Grief, Loss and Stress

OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

LINK: https://www.osha.gov/workplace-violence

LINK: Preventing Workplace Violence in Healthcare

LINK: OSHA’s Guidelines for Preventing Workplace Violence for Healthcare and Social Service Workers. The Guidelines describe the five components of an effective workplace violence prevention program, with extensive examples.

LINK: Guidelines for Preventing Workplace Violence for Healthcare and Social Service Workers (EPUB | MOBI).  OSHA Publication 3148, (2016).

LINK: Home Healthcare Workers: How to Prevent Violence on the Job. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 2012-118, (February 2012).

LINK: Workplace Violence Prevention Strategies and Research Needs. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 2006-144, (September 2006).

LINK: Violence on the Job CDC and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 2004-100d, (2004). Provides streaming video resources that discuss practical measures for identifying risk factors for violence at work, and taking strategic action to keep employees safe. Based on extensive NIOSH research, supplemented with information from other authoritative sources. Transcript also available.

LINK: Stress… at Work. CDC & U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 99-101, (1999). Highlights knowledge about the causes of stress at work and outlines steps that can be taken to prevent job stress.

LINK: Preventing Homicide in the Workplace. CDC & U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 93-109, (May 1995). Helps employers and employees to identify high-risk occupations and workplaces, informs employers and employees about their risks, encourages employers and employees to evaluate risk factors in their workplaces and implement protective measures, and encourages researchers to gather more detailed information about occupational homicide and to develop and evaluate protective measures.

Link: Occupational Violence. CDC & U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Workplace Safety and Health Topic. Provides basic information on workplace violence, including risk factors and prevention strategies.

Link: Dealing with Workplace Violence: A Guide for Agency Planners (PDF). U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). Assists those who are responsible for establishing workplace violence initiatives at their agencies. This handbook is the result of a cooperative effort of many federal agencies sharing their expertise in preventing and dealing with workplace violence.

TOOLKIT & LINKS
Training and Education

Resources and Assistance for Employees

LINK: State of Oregon, Dept. of Justice (ODOJ), Victim Assistance Program / Crime Victim & Survivor Services 

PHONE: 503-378-5348 Ext. 1

LINK: Oregon Department of Justice, Crime Victim Compensation Program

Trauma Informed Oregon – Resources, Training and Education

A Guide for Youth: Understanding Trauma

This guide is designed to help youth make a connection between stressful events and the potential lasting impacts. Understanding trauma and having a framework to talk about past experiences can help in processing and asking for help. This understanding supports healing. Source: Brianne Masselli and Johanna Bergan, Youth M.O.V.E. National A Guide for Youth: Understanding Trauma

A Trauma Informed Workforce: An Introduction to Workforce Wellness

This document developed by TIO provides foundational information about workforce wellness. It provides background and definitions to assist partners that are beginning to address workforce wellness in their programs and organizations. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

A Treatment Improvement Protocol: Trauma-Informed Care in Behavioral Health Services

A SAMHSA Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) with best practice guidelines for trauma informed care. TIPs are developed by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Each TIP involves the development of topic-specific best practice guidelines for the prevention A Treatment Improvement Protocol: Trauma-Informed Care in Behavioral Health Services

ACE Score Calculator

Learn about the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) measure and its use, and calculate your ACE and resilience scores. An ACE score is a tally of different types of abuse, neglect, and other hallmarks of a rough childhood. According to the Adverse Childhood Experiences study, the rougher your childhood, the higher your ACE Score Calculator

Addressing Secondary Stress: Strong in the Broken Places

This PowerPoint presentation, with accompanying video, addresses secondary stress and the impact and solutions to vicarious traumatization in the workforce. Source: Wayne Scott, MA, LCSW Download PDF View Video

Agency Components for Trauma Informed Care

This checklist can help assess the physical environment and selected intake and service procedures in an agency setting. Source: Region 3 Behavioral Health Services, Kearney, Nebraska Download PDF

AMH Approved Evidence-Based Practices

This list is an informational tool for providers to select and implement Evidence-Based Practices (EPBs). The list represents EBPs meeting the Addictions and Mental Health Services (AMH) definition and standards for EPBs. Source: Oregon Health Authority View Resources

Applying Trauma Informed Care Principles in Home Visiting

This full-day TIO training covers the definition of trauma and trauma informed care (TIC), the neurobiology of trauma, principles of TIC, and workforce stress. Originally created for home visiting and early childhood professionals some content has been tailored for these fields. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

Attunement and Self-Assessment in Supervision

Resource developed by TIO with strategies for “tuning” in as a supervisor as well as questions you can use to assess how trauma informed the supervision is. It is not an exhaustive list but it can be helpful in doing a personal assessment. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Behaviors and Actions of Trauma Informed Leaders

This TIO TIP sheet includes a summary of data on what trauma informed care looks like in leadership, among staff, and in an organization. Characteristics of a trauma informed leader are mapped out. The qualitative data included in the TIP sheet was collected formally and informally at several TIO community Behaviors and Actions of Trauma Informed Leaders

Books for Kids

A list of books that were written for children who may be coping with adversity or trauma in their lives. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Brief Trauma Questionnaire (Adults)

The BTQ is a 10-item self-report questionnaire designed to assess traumatic exposure according to DSM-IV but specifically including only life threat/serious injury) because of the difficulty of accurately assessing subjective response. Source: National Center for PTSD, US Department of Veterans Affairs View Resource

Child and Family Law Courts Meet Brain Science

This 5-minute video depicts a call to action for the legal community to learn as much as possible about brain science to make sure our law and policy are aligned with the focus on the latest information for building the capabilities of caregivers and strengthening the communities that together form Child and Family Law Courts Meet Brain Science

Child Welfare Trauma Training Toolkit 2nd Ed.

This curriculum is designed to teach basic knowledge, skills, and values about working with children who are in the child welfare system and who have experienced traumatic events. Source: National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2013 View Resource

Clackamas Behavioral Health Care Trauma-Informed Services Policy

An agency-wide trauma informed services policy developed by the Clackamas County Behavioral Health Division (CCBHD). Source: Clackamas County Behavioral Health Division (CCBHD) Download PDF

Clackamas County Behavioral Health Clinics Adult Consumer Services Survey

Consumer feedback survey that includes elements of trauma informed care, developed by Clackamas County Behavioral Health Clinics to help improve services and monitor progress in implementing trauma informed care. Source: Clackamas County Behavioral Health Division (CCBHD) Download PDF

Co-Regulation

Co-regulation follows attachment and precedes self-regulation in human emotional development. This presentation discusses the role of co-regulation in child-caregiver relationships, and how co-regulation can be strengthened. Source: Jean Barbre, EdD, LMFT Download PDF

Common Acronyms

A set of common acronyms related to trauma and trauma and trauma informed care, along with definitions of key terms. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Considerations for Responding to Crisis

Crisis response resource developed by TIO for agencies providing housing and shelter services to youth. Feel free to use this document in the development of your own agency trauma informed crisis response plan. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Considerations When Hiring a Trainer

Document developed by TIO that you can use to find the best trauma informed care trainer for your specific needs. It includes both reflective questions and interview questions. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

COVID-19 Considerations for a Trauma Informed Response for Work Settings

This TIO TIP sheet provides trauma informed considerations for work settings as we all navigate the uncharted territory and response to novel Coronavirus (COVID-19). The considerations included in the document are grounded in the principles of trauma informed care. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF Vietnamese PDF

Creating Cultures of Trauma-Informed Care (CCTIC): A Self-Assessment and Planning Protocol

This assessment tool provides guidelines for agencies or programs interested in facilitating trauma-informed modifications in their service systems. For use by administrators, providers, and survivor-consumers in the development, implementation, evaluation, and ongoing monitoring of trauma-informed programs. Source: Community Connections; Washington, D.C. Roger D. Fallot, Ph.D. and Maxine Harris, Ph.D. Download Creating Cultures of Trauma-Informed Care (CCTIC): A Self-Assessment and Planning Protocol

Crosswalk Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

Crosswalk between the TIO Standards of Practice and the OHA Trauma Informed Services Policy for organizations that are required to demonstrate compliance with the 2015 Trauma Informed Services Policy of the Oregon Health Authority (OHA). Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Dealing with Resistance to Trauma Informed Care

In any community that attempts Trauma Informed Care, some people resist the science and they resist the spending of tax dollars to help people who have been damaged by childhood trauma, also known as Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). Laura Porter from Ace Interface talks about how to respond. Source: Laura Dealing with Resistance to Trauma Informed Care

Dealing with the Effects of Trauma: A Self-Help Guide

Learn the symptoms of trauma and get ideas and strategies that can help you better cope. The information in this federally sponsored booklet can be used safely along with your other health care treatment. Source: Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Download PDF

Definitions and Additional Resources for the Standards of Practice

This document provides definitions and suggested resources to support use of the Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care. It is a downloadable and printable version (PDF) of information that appears in pop-up windows for the online version of the Standards. Each item in the Definitions and Additional Resources is Definitions and Additional Resources for the Standards of Practice

Disaster Resilience Learning Collaborative Evaluation Report

Disaster Resilience Learning Collaborative Evaluation Report: Creating Culturally-Grounded Healing Spaces by Leaders of Color for Leaders of Color is an evaluation of the Disaster Resilience Learning Collaborative (DRLC), a collaborative dedicated to creating culturally-grounded healing spaces by leaders of color and for leaders of color in disaster work. The DRLC Disaster Resilience Learning Collaborative Evaluation Report

Education Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

These guidelines have been adapted for educational settings from the Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care developed by Trauma Informed Oregon and with information from educational communities across the state provided by the Defending Childhood Initiative. These guidelines are intended to provide benchmarks for planning and monitoring progress and Education Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

Evidence Based Practices Resource Center

SAMHSA’s National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices promotes the adoption of scientifically established behavioral health interventions. Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) View Resource

For Youth by Youth: Foundations of Trauma Informed Care

This training revamps the Foundations of Trauma Informed Care training by making it more youth friendly, strengths based, and interactive. This is done by providing opportunities for young adults to engage in discussions on trauma and resilience with scenarios that relate to youth. The training also provides skills and tools For Youth by Youth: Foundations of Trauma Informed Care

Foundations of Trauma Informed Care (formerly TIC 101)

This (typically) 4 hr TIO training provides foundational knowledge appropriate for individuals across sectors and job titles. After defining key terms, including stress, trauma and systemic oppression, we explore how trauma and adversity affect individual’s access to services. Participants begin to identify how service systems, often unknowingly, retraumatize survivors of Foundations of Trauma Informed Care (formerly TIC 101)

General Parenting Resources

Check here to find books by experts in the field that may be helpful to parents and other caregivers dealing with children and youth affected by trauma. There are additional books for adult survivors of trauma who are parenting. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Gift From Within

This website for survivors of trauma has educational materials about PTSD and links to international support groups. In addition to educational material, the website has a roster of survivors who are willing to participate in an international network of peer support. Source: Gift from Within, Camden, Maine View Resource

Guide to Reviewing Existing Policies

Guide developed by TIO to help organizations review a specific policy about service exclusion through a trauma informed lens. Some of the questions in the guide may be helpful as you are developing or reviewing policies. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Healthcare Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

These Standards of Practice for healthcare settings provide a set of benchmarks for planning and monitoring progress implementation of TIC in clinic settings. The tool is an adaptation of the Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care developed for general use across health, behavioral health and related systems serving trauma Healthcare Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

Helping Teens with Traumatic Grief: Tips for Caregivers

This tip sheet from NCTSN offers ways to recognize and help your teen who may have difficulty coping after a sudden or violent death. Each teen grieves in a unique way so it’s important to understand your teen’s point of view. Source: National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) Download PDF

Historical Highlights of Trauma Informed Care

Timeline compiled by TIO of important National and Oregon-specific efforts to initiate trauma informed care. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Homeless Youth Continuum Tragedy Response Plan

The Homeless Youth Continuum created this Tragedy Response Plan as a way to support organizations in the continuum when a tragedy has occurred. This plan can be adapted to fit your organization or specific community. Source: Homeless Youth Continuum, Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Hosting a Meeting Using Principles of Trauma Informed Care

Bulleted list developed by TIO of things to do to take to prepare for and run a meeting that is trauma informed. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

Hosting a Virtual Meeting Using Trauma Informed Principles

This TIP sheet developed by TIO offers strategies for hosting virtual meetings that promote safety, power, and value. Hosting virtual meetings and trainings using SAMHSA’s six principles of trauma informed care can foster a space where participants are present & accessible, and their exposure to activation and re-traumatization is mitigated. Hosting a Virtual Meeting Using Trauma Informed Principles

How stress affects your brain – Madhumita Murgia

This accessible video describes how stress affects the brain and offers suggestions about how to reduce the impact. Madhumita Murgia shows how chronic stress can affect brain size, its structure, and how it functions, right down to the level of your genes. Source: TED Ed View Video

Human Resources Practices to Support TIC

List of strategies from TIO to promote trauma informed care through human resource policies and practices, including hiring, onboarding, supervision and performance reviews. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Identifying Hotspots Worksheet

A hands-on activity to walk through a critical thinking process about where and how organizations may activate a trauma response in staff or the population served. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Implementation of Trauma Informed Care

This TIO workshop is typically conducted as a working meeting, providing an opportunity for supervisors, managers and other champions of TIC a chance to identify how TIC applies to their work cross-system partnerships. A roadmap for the implementation of trauma informed care, along with TIO resources to guide the process Implementation of Trauma Informed Care

In the Gray Area of Being Suicidal

This short film shares the personal experience of a young adult experiencing suicidal thoughts along with their suggestions for wellness. Source: The Mighty View Video

International Transformational Resilience Coalition (ITRC) Climate Community of Practice Resource List

International Transformational Resilience Coalition (ITRC) Climate Community of Practice (CoP) Resource List 2022 Source: International Resilience Coalition’s 2022 Community of Practice Participants Download PDF

Intersections of Trauma Informed Care (TIC) and Diversity, Equity, Inclusion (DEI) Model

This infographic offers a model for thinking about the intersections of TIC and DEI. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Key Terms Related to Realizing the Widespread Impact of Trauma

This is a comprehensive list of terms related to realizing the widespread impact of trauma. The intention of the list is to be valuable, inclusive, and honor the array of potentially toxic experiences that exist. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon, and Trauma Informed Oregon Volunteer, Rebecca Saunders English PDF Spanish PDF

La Crianza de Los Hijos Durante COVID-19

Trauma Informed Oregon cree en el poder curativo de contar historias propias, y creemos que este poder es aún más crítico para los padres y las familias que crían a sus hijos durante la pandemia de COVID-19. Estamos muy agradecidos por la oportunidad de tener estas conversaciones con padres, cuidadores La Crianza de Los Hijos Durante COVID-19

Life Events Checklist for DSM-5 (Adults)

The LEC-5 is a self-report measure designed to screen for potentially traumatic events in a respondent’s lifetime. The LEC-5 assesses exposure to 16 events known to potentially result in PTSD or distress and includes one additional item assessing any other extraordinarily stressful event not captured in the first 16 items. Life Events Checklist for DSM-5 (Adults)

Literature on ACEs and Trauma

A list of key research articles about trauma, including studies related to prevalence, impact, and treatment, as well as information on the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Literature on Trauma Informed Care

A list of TIO’s favorite articles on trauma informed care, including early delineation of the principles of trauma informed care, the voices and perspective of trauma survivors, and seminal work in the housing field. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Looking for Trauma Specific Services?

This document developed by TIO is intended to serve as a resource to those seeking trauma specific services (TSS) and those who may be making referrals for TSS. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Making Your Voice Heard: Suggestions for Youth by Youth for use in Emergency Rooms

This tip sheet for youth by youth gives tips and resources for collaborating and engaging with providers so that youth and young adults can better get their needs met. The resource was developed by TIO’s Oregon Trauma Advocates Coalition (OTAC). OTAC is comprised of youth from around Oregon who are Making Your Voice Heard: Suggestions for Youth by Youth for use in Emergency Rooms

Mindfulness and Neural Integration: Daniel Siegel, MD

In this video, Dr. Daniel Siegel explores how relationships and reflection support the development of resilience in children and serve as the basic ‘3 R’s” of a new internal education of the mind. Source: TEDxStudioCityED View Video

Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support

A 12-item self-report measure of social support, using a 7-point scale from ‘very strongly agree’ to ‘very strongly disagree.’ Source: Zimet, Dahlem, Zimet & Farley, 1988 Download PDF

Nadine Burke Harris: How childhood trauma affects health across a lifetime

Childhood trauma isn’t something you just get over as you grow up. Pediatrician Nadine Burke Harris explains that the repeated stress of abuse, neglect and parents struggling with mental health or substance abuse issues has real, tangible effects on the development of the brain. Source: TED Talk View Video

National Child Traumatic Stress Network Empirically Supported Treatments and Promising Practices

The fact sheets linked from this page offer descriptive summaries of some of the clinical treatments, mental health interventions, and other trauma-informed service approaches that the NCTSN and its various centers have developed and/or implemented as a means of promoting the Network’s mission of raising the standard of care for National Child Traumatic Stress Network Empirically Supported Treatments and Promising Practices

National Child Traumatic Stress Network Standardized Measures to Assess Complex Trauma

The NCTSN’s database of tools that measure children’s experiences of trauma, their reactions to it, and other mental health and trauma-related issues. Source: National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) View Resource

Neighborhood Emergency Teams (NETs)

This City of Portland run program trains residents to provide emergency disaster assistance within their own neighborhoods. Their website also offers many resources and tools for getting organized and being prepared in an emergency. Source: Planning for Resilience & Emergency Preparedness (PREP) View Website PDF

Road Map to Trauma Informed Care

Check out the TIO Road Map to TIC, which offers phases to the implementation process. Each phase contains a marker(s) along the road that is integral to implementing that phase. When clicking on the road or phase sign, a hover box provides a description of that phase and leads you Road Map to Trauma Informed Care

SAMHSA’s Concept of Trauma and Guidance for a Trauma-Informed Approach

This document provides a working concept of trauma and a trauma-informed approach applicable across an array of service systems and stakeholder groups. In this paper, SAMHSA puts forth a framework for the behavioral health specialty sectors that can be adapted to other sectors such as child welfare, education, criminal and SAMHSA’s Concept of Trauma and Guidance for a Trauma-Informed Approach

Social Emotional Learning Resources

This list of resources in English and Spanish contains culturally-responsive, anti-racist information on Social Emotional Learning for educators, parents/guardians, and students. Editable Document Download PDF

Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

These Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care developed by TIO provide benchmarks for planning and monitoring progress and a means to highlight accomplishments as organizations work towards implementing trauma informed care. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon View Resource Spanish PDF

State of Connecticut Department of Children and Families – Trauma-Informed Care

This site provides a list of effective interventions for children and youth who experience symptoms related to trauma. Source: Department of Children and Families, Connecticut View Resource

Staying Connected while Physically Distancing

This TIO TIP sheet includes resources to support social connection while physical distancing during COVID-19. Physical distancing does not have to equate to social isolation. With a variety of technologies, virtual socializing is easier than ever before. Use video calling to socialize with family and friends, host a happy hour Staying Connected while Physically Distancing

Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (children and youth)

The SDQ is a brief behavioral screening questionnaire about 3-16 year olds. It exists in several versions to meet the needs of researchers, clinicians and educationalists. Source: YouthinMind View Resource

Summary of the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study

This handout briefly summarizes the ACE study, conducted by researchers from Kaiser Permanente and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) to study how adversity in childhood predicts adult physical, mental, and social well-being. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF Spanish PDF Russian PDF

Supporting Each Other and Ourselves: Trauma Informed Peer Support

This training is designed for people who provide peer recovery and support services and peer wellness services. Building on Foundations of Trauma Informed Care, the focus of this training is to help those who access services gain a better understanding of how their body responds to trauma and chronic stress Supporting Each Other and Ourselves: Trauma Informed Peer Support

Talking About Trauma and Suicide in Public Meetings

Recommendations from TIO to assist in preparing, facilitating and responding in a meeting when sharing personal experiences that may cause distress and trauma, to reflect a trauma informed approach. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Download PDF

The Anatomy of a Trauma Informed Script

This TIP sheet developed by TIO provides tools for making communication trauma informed. The resource maps out the key components that make a script (or set of words) trauma informed. A trauma informed script will help you stay regulated when you are delivering difficult news or getting hard questions. Source: The Anatomy of a Trauma Informed Script

The Child PTSD Symptom Scale (8 – 18yo)

The CPSS is a 26-item self-report measure that assesses PTSD diagnostic criteria and symptom severity in children ages 8 to 18. It includes 2 event items, 17 symptom items, and 7 functional impairment items. Source: National Center for PTSD, US Department of Veterans Affairs View Resource

The Impact of Trauma on Regulation

This presentation discusses types and degrees of trauma and their effect on beliefs, behaviors, emotional health, and more. Various brain functions and how they are affected by trauma are also discussed. Source: Diane Wagenhals, Program Director for Lakeside Global Institute Download PDF

The Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (8 – 18yo)

The JVQ is designed to gather information on a broad range of victimizations that may occur in childhood. It can enhance the assessment of any child or adolescent by providing a quantified description of all of the major forms of offenses against youth. Either youth or parents can complete the The Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (8 – 18yo)

The Magnitude of the Solution

A PowerPoint presentation focusing on risk, co-occurring problems, public costs, and high leverage solutions to childhood adversity. Source: Laura Porter, ACE Interface Download PDF

Through Our Eyes: Children, Violence, and Trauma

This video series discusses how violence and trauma affect children, including the serious and long-lasting consequences for their physical and mental health; signs that a child may be exposed to violence or trauma; and the staggering cost of child maltreatment to families, communities, and the nation. Victims lend their voices Through Our Eyes: Children, Violence, and Trauma

TIO Introduction to Trauma Informed Care Training Modules

These free online training modules have been created to increase access to foundational training so that the key guiding principles of trauma informed care are accessible to everyone. These four modules are self-guided and self-administered. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon View Training

To Live to See the Great Day that Dawns: Preventing Suicide by American Indian and Alaska Native Youth

This suicide prevention manual assists tribes and communities in developing effective and culturally appropriate suicide prevention plans for American Indian and Alaska Native teens and young adults. Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Download PDF

Train the Trainer Presentation in Spanish Definiciones (Key Terms in Spanish)

This Powerpoint document was produced by Trauma Informed Oregon. It is part of Train the Trainer presentation in Spanish with Definiciones — Key terms in Spanish. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Transformational Resilience Program

Learn about climate disruption and trauma and how to develop preventative resilience skills. The Resource Innovation Group (TRIG) is a non-partisan non-profit organization affiliated with the Sustainability Institute at Willamette University. TRIG’s mission is to address the human causes, impacts, and solutions to complex socio-economic-ecological challenges, with a special emphasis on climate Transformational Resilience Program

Trauma Education Statement

A workshop activity to help participants begin to view challenging behavior through a ‘trauma lens’, i.e., with heightened awareness of the role and impact of trauma. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care – Framework for Action

A graphic that depicts the principles of trauma informed care along with the role and major activities of Trauma Informed Oregon. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

Trauma Informed Care for Autistic Survivors

Disabled individuals and individuals with disabilities experience high rates of interpersonal violence and other negative life experiences which can lead to trauma. Additionally, due to systemic ableism and other forms of oppression individuals experiencing disability can have difficulty getting access to supportive services. An important part of providing trauma informed Trauma Informed Care for Autistic Survivors

Trauma Informed Care for Survivors With Disabilities

Disabled individuals and individuals with disabilities experience high rates of interpersonal violence and other negative life experiences which can lead to trauma. Additionally, due to systemic ableism and other forms of oppression individuals experiencing disability can have difficulty getting access to supportive services. An important part of providing trauma informed Trauma Informed Care for Survivors With Disabilities

Trauma Informed Care in the Classroom: A Resource Guide for Educators in Higher Learning

TIP sheet from TIO on how to create academic environments that are trauma informed. The TIP sheet aims to provide educators with tools that acknowledge the diverse backgrounds of each student that enters their classroom in order to enhance learning opportunities for all. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care Supervision: Questions and Ideas Table

Table developed by TIO that includes ideas and questions to help supervisors implement trauma informed care in their supervision practices. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care Workgroup Meeting Guidelines

List of questions from TIO to help set guidelines for Workgroup meetings. As TIC Workgroups form and begin to gather information, identify opportunities, set priorities for change, and propose solutions, there are a number of considerations that can help keep the process on track. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Neuro Takeaways

A brief bulleted list of key facts about the neuroscience of trauma as it relates to trauma informed care. Source: Julie Rosenzweig, PhD, Regional Research Institute, Portland State University Download PDF

Trauma Informed Oregon Survey Tools

This PDF lists and describes different survey tools TIO regularly offers organizations interested in TIC. Feel free to reach out to info@traumainformedoregon.org if you would like a copy or guidance for how to use these surveys Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Parenting During COVID-19

Trauma Informed Oregon believes in the healing power of telling one’s story, and we think that this power is even more critical for parents and families raising children during the COVID-19 pandemic. We were so grateful for the opportunity to hold discussions with parents, caregivers and providers to learn more Trauma Informed Parenting During COVID-19

Trauma Informed System Change Instrument Scoring Guide and Psychometrics: Organizational Trauma Informed Change

This tool provides psychometric information and the scoring protocol for child welfare agencies using the Trauma Informed System Change Instrument: Organizational change Self-Evaluation. Source: Southwest Michigan Children’s Trauma Assessment Center Download PDF

Trauma Informed System Change Instrument: Organizational Change Self-Evaluation – The Current System

This organizational assessment was created for child welfare agencies to track system change at a service provider level, at an agency level, and at the county system level. Source: Southwest Michigan Children’s Trauma Assessment Center Download PDF

Trauma Lens Exercise

This table developed by TIO provides examples of how you can reframe challenging behaviors through a trauma lens. The examples in the table are some of the most frequently reported in Trauma Informed Oregon (TIO) trainings and include challenging behaviors from service recipients and staff. It also includes challenging environmental Trauma Lens Exercise

Trauma Specific Services: A Resource for Implementation and Use

Learn about trauma specific services (TSS) and their role in treating individuals affected by trauma, as well as how to implement, seek out, and evaluate these services. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma-Informed Organizational Toolkit for Homeless Services

This organizational assessment was created to provide programs with a roadmap for becoming trauma-informed. The Toolkit offers homeless service providers with concrete guidelines for how to modify their practices and policies to ensure that they are responding appropriately to the needs of families who have experienced traumatic stress. Source: The Trauma-Informed Organizational Toolkit for Homeless Services

Traumatic Events Screening Inventory for Children

The TESI-C assesses a child’s experience of a variety of potential traumatic events including current and previous injuries, hospitalizations, domestic violence, community violence, disasters, accidents, physical abuse, and sexual abuse. The revised 24-item version (also known as the TESI-CRF-R; Ippen et al., 2002) is more developmentally sensitive to the traumatic Traumatic Events Screening Inventory for Children

Wellness Relapse Prevention Plan

This workshop exercise helps training participants to identify warning signs of excess stress or secondary trauma in their work and to create a plan to address it effectively. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

What is Trauma Informed Care?

This document developed by TIO provides general information about trauma informed care (TIC) especially for individuals new to this topic. Included are guiding considerations, principles and definitions offered by experts in the field. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

What One Thing Can You Do Feedback Questionnaire

Workshop activity to help participants consider concrete action steps to implement trauma informed care in their organizations. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

What You Really Need to Know About Being a Trauma-Informed Organization

A PowerPoint presentation from the National Council for organizations seeking to implement the principles of trauma informed care. The recording of the webinar is no longer available, but you can download the slide by clicking on “View the Slides.” Source: National Council for Behavioral Health webinar, Kristi McClure and Cheryl What You Really Need to Know About Being a Trauma-Informed Organization

Trauma Education Statement

A workshop activity to help participants begin to view challenging behavior through a ‘trauma lens’, i.e., with heightened awareness of the role and impact of trauma. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care – Framework for Action

A graphic that depicts the principles of trauma informed care along with the role and major activities of Trauma Informed Oregon. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

Trauma Informed Care for Autistic Survivors

Disabled individuals and individuals with disabilities experience high rates of interpersonal violence and other negative life experiences which can lead to trauma. Additionally, due to systemic ableism and other forms of oppression individuals experiencing disability can have difficulty getting access to supportive services. An important part of providing trauma informed Trauma Informed Care for Autistic Survivors

Trauma Informed Care for Survivors With Disabilities

Disabled individuals and individuals with disabilities experience high rates of interpersonal violence and other negative life experiences which can lead to trauma. Additionally, due to systemic ableism and other forms of oppression individuals experiencing disability can have difficulty getting access to supportive services. An important part of providing trauma informed Trauma Informed Care for Survivors With Disabilities

Trauma Informed Care in the Classroom: A Resource Guide for Educators in Higher Learning

TIP sheet from TIO on how to create academic environments that are trauma informed. The TIP sheet aims to provide educators with tools that acknowledge the diverse backgrounds of each student that enters their classroom in order to enhance learning opportunities for all. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care Supervision: Questions and Ideas Table

Table developed by TIO that includes ideas and questions to help supervisors implement trauma informed care in their supervision practices. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care Workgroup Meeting Guidelines

List of questions from TIO to help set guidelines for Workgroup meetings. As TIC Workgroups form and begin to gather information, identify opportunities, set priorities for change, and propose solutions, there are a number of considerations that can help keep the process on track. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Neuro Takeaways

A brief bulleted list of key facts about the neuroscience of trauma as it relates to trauma informed care. Source: Julie Rosenzweig, PhD, Regional Research Institute, Portland State University Download PDF

Trauma Informed Oregon Survey Tools

This PDF lists and describes different survey tools TIO regularly offers organizations interested in TIC. Feel free to reach out to info@traumainformedoregon.org if you would like a copy or guidance for how to use these surveys Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Parenting During COVID-19

Trauma Informed Oregon believes in the healing power of telling one’s story, and we think that this power is even more critical for parents and families raising children during the COVID-19 pandemic. We were so grateful for the opportunity to hold discussions with parents, caregivers and providers to learn more Trauma Informed Parenting During COVID-19

Trauma Informed System Change Instrument Scoring Guide and Psychometrics: Organizational Trauma Informed Change

This tool provides psychometric information and the scoring protocol for child welfare agencies using the Trauma Informed System Change Instrument: Organizational change Self-Evaluation. Source: Southwest Michigan Children’s Trauma Assessment Center Download PDF

Trauma Informed System Change Instrument: Organizational Change Self-Evaluation – The Current System

This organizational assessment was created for child welfare agencies to track system change at a service provider level, at an agency level, and at the county system level. Source: Southwest Michigan Children’s Trauma Assessment Center Download PDF

Trauma Lens Exercise

This table developed by TIO provides examples of how you can reframe challenging behaviors through a trauma lens. The examples in the table are some of the most frequently reported in Trauma Informed Oregon (TIO) trainings and include challenging behaviors from service recipients and staff. It also includes challenging environmental Trauma Lens Exercise

Trauma Specific Services: A Resource for Implementation and Use

Learn about trauma specific services (TSS) and their role in treating individuals affected by trauma, as well as how to implement, seek out, and evaluate these services. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma-Informed Organizational Toolkit for Homeless Services

This organizational assessment was created to provide programs with a roadmap for becoming trauma-informed. The Toolkit offers homeless service providers with concrete guidelines for how to modify their practices and policies to ensure that they are responding appropriately to the needs of families who have experienced traumatic stress. Source: The Trauma-Informed Organizational Toolkit for Homeless Services

Traumatic Events Screening Inventory for Children

The TESI-C assesses a child’s experience of a variety of potential traumatic events including current and previous injuries, hospitalizations, domestic violence, community violence, disasters, accidents, physical abuse, and sexual abuse. The revised 24-item version (also known as the TESI-CRF-R; Ippen et al., 2002) is more developmentally sensitive to the traumatic Traumatic Events Screening Inventory for Children

Wellness Relapse Prevention Plan

This workshop exercise helps training participants to identify warning signs of excess stress or secondary trauma in their work and to create a plan to address it effectively. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

What is Trauma Informed Care?

This document developed by TIO provides general information about trauma informed care (TIC) especially for individuals new to this topic. Included are guiding considerations, principles and definitions offered by experts in the field. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

What One Thing Can You Do Feedback Questionnaire

Workshop activity to help participants consider concrete action steps to implement trauma informed care in their organizations. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

What You Really Need to Know About Being a Trauma-Informed Organization

A PowerPoint presentation from the National Council for organizations seeking to implement the principles of trauma informed care. The recording of the webinar is no longer available, but you can download the slide by clicking on “View the Slides.” Source: National Council for Behavioral Health webinar, Kristi McClure and Cheryl What You Really Need to Know About Being a Trauma-Informed Organization

Other Articles and Resources
Support Grieving Co-Workers
05 – Warmline – TTP – The Treavor Project – TrevorLifeline – Call 1-866-488-7386 or Text – “START” to 678-678 – 24/7 @ phone
Feb 20 all-day
05 - Warmline - TTP - The Treavor Project - TrevorLifeline -  Call 1-866-488-7386 or Text - "START" to 678-678 - 24/7 @ phone

 

Trevor Lifeline

 

TO CALL THE LIFELINE

Call 1-866-488-7386

 

TO TEXT THE LIFELINE

 “START” to 678-678

or use this link TEXT

 

FOR ONLINE CHAT

Click to Start Chat

About TrevorLifeline

TrevorLifeline offers 24/7, free and confidential support by phone, text message (SMS) and online chat. We support LGBTQ+ young people in the U.S. and Mexico who may be experiencing emotional distress related to gender & sexual identity, loneliness, relationships, suicide, supporting a friend or family member.

As part of our commitment to preventing suicide, we are available to help you if you are considering suicide or harming yourself, or if you are noticing warning signs in a friend or family member.

When you reach out to us you will talk with one our friendly and supportive volunteers who are experienced in how to help people in your situation. They will listen to you, unpack your story and feelings, and work with you to help you through your challenges. We are open 24 hours a day, every day of the week. We are always available to talk with you.

 

 

 

 

4 – Resource – GOBHI – Greater Oregon Behavioral Health, Inc.- Eastern Oregon Universtiy Scholarships
Feb 20 all-day

 

 

 

 

Exciting News for EOU Students! 🌟 Eastern Oregon University has received a generous $100,000 grant from Greater Oregon Behavioral Health, Inc. (GOBHI) to offer scholarships for students studying anthropology/sociology or psychology. This initiative aims to support those who plan to work in eastern Oregon after graduation, especially low-income students. It’s part of a strategy to boost mental health resources in our rural communities. Thanks to GOBHI, more opportunities are now open for future mental health professionals. Learn more at eou.edu and gobhi.org.

4 – Resources – OFB – Oregon Food Bank – Find Food and Resources – Links and Information
Feb 20 all-day

 

Find food near you.

Oregon Food Bank and our statewide partner network are here for you. Find free, nutritious food in communities throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington, and connect with services that support resilient communities.

Our network of food pantries and meal sites is here for everyone — inclusive of all races, gender expressions, religions, and immigration statuses.

Free food in our communities

We partner with communities and organizations throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington to make it easy for everyone to access free, nutritious food. These options are community based and accessible to all. At many free food locations, you can also connect with additional services, such as nutrition support and affordable health insurance. Learn more about free food options in your community.

 

https://www.oregonfoodbank.org/find-support

 

 

 

 

 

Double Up is Oregon’s first statewide incentive program, designed to be convenient for shoppers. The program doubles the value of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits at local farmers markets so shoppers can bring home more fresh fruits and vegetables. Double Up Food Bucks will be offered at more than 75 farmers markets across the state in 2022. The program also provides incentives for SNAP participants purchasing Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) shares from Oregon farms, and shoppers as several independently-owned rural grocery stores.

Four ways to shop with Double Up Food Bucks in Oregon!

Stretch your Food Dollars
with Double Up Food Bucks

Double Up Food Bucks allows SNAP shoppers to get DOUBLE the fruits and vegetables at CSA shares, Farmers Markets, Farm Stands, and Grocery Stores across Oregon!

How do I know if I’m eligible to use Double Up Food Bucks?

  • If you use SNAP food benefits, you can earn Double Up!
  • If you use EBT Cash benefits, unfortunately you are not eligible to earn Double Up, however you are eligible to participate in Produce Match at participating farmers markets and farm stands. Learn more.
  • Note: Some locations may require a quick sign up at a cashier or information booth

 

 

Watch the Double Up Food Bucks Explainer Video

In English

 

 

en español

 

 

Connect with other resources and support

Community organizations and government agencies offer programs that make it easier to afford food and access employment, housing, education and health care. Connect with support and services to help with your rent or mortgage, child care, health services and more at the links below.

 

4 – Resources – Transitions to Adulthood Center for Research Transitions – Top 10 Most Popular Young Adult Mental Health Resources in 2023
Feb 20 all-day
4 - Resources - Transitions to Adulthood Center for Research Transitions - Top 10 Most Popular Young Adult  Mental Health Resources in 2023

Our Top 10 Most Popular Young Adult

Mental Health Resources in 2023

 

My Must Have Papers: Managing the Paperwork of Adulting

Managing the paperwork that comes along with “Adulting” is not fun. Our Young Adult Advisory Board and Family Advisory Board set out to make that task a little easier in this tip sheet.

“My Must Have Papers – Managing the Paperwork of Adulting” Tip Sheet. Also available as a comic, “Passport to Adulting: Managing Your Paperwork”.
STAY Tuned Podcast 10 Too Sick to Work Breaking the Narrative

Too Sick to Work? Breaking the Narrative – Podcast

STAY Tuned is a podcast made for and by young adults with mental health conditions. In Episode 10, Dr. Michelle Mullen discussed her work on preventing disability, why the language used to describe the mental health of young adults is so key and what can be done to change the narrative of self-blame.

Episode 10: “Too Sick to Work?” Breaking the Narrative.

All Episodes of S.T.A.Y. Tuned: Supporting Transition-Age Youth Podcast.

3 Tips to Improve Communications with Your Young Adult

This popular tip sheet for families includes 3 specific tips that can help you have better conversations and better relationships with the youth & young adults in your life. It’s worth reading and worth sharing! Read and download 3 Tips to Improve Communications with your Youth & Young Adult.

Accommodations at Work: What Do I Need to Know?

Work can be hard for young adults. And a mental health condition can make things complicated. Accommodations at your workplace can be one helpful solution. But what are they? Our new tip sheet, “Accommodations at Work: What Do I Need to Know?” can help young adults figure that out.

Applying for a Job: The Young Adults Guide, Revised 2023

This tip sheet is a good starting point for your young adult in their job search journey, covers many topics including resumes, job search boards, interviewing and follow-up. It also includes some great networking resources. Read and download “Applying for a Job – The Young Adult’s Guide” Tip Sheet.

Factors that Influence the Continuous Pursuit of Education, Training, and Employment among Young Adults with Serious Mental Health Conditions

This research brief describes the patterns of education, training, and employment activities for young adults with serious mental health conditions, and identifies factors that hinder or facilitate their ability to consistently pursue these activities. These findings can inform efforts to improve their long-term career trajectories. The “Factors” Research Brief.

STAY Tuned Podcast Episode 6: “We’re Working On It”

Join our conversation with Emma Narkewicz, MPA as we talk about Pre-employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) in MA and dive into what it’s like being a young adult with mental health conditions entering the workforce and sustaining a career. Podcast episode 6: “We’re working on it!”.

Youth are Empowered by Leading Their Own IEP Meetings

Our comic series shows them how to do that. These comics walk young adults throu