PeerGalaxy Original Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring over 99,000+ monthly offerings of FREE telephone- and online-accessible peer support, recovery support + wellness activities!

Over 30+ warmlines plus webinars, workshops, job postings, special events, consumer input opportunities and more.

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

Click the Accessibility Button on the right side, halfway down in the middle, for enhanced viewing and/or access options!  Click the Translate Button in the lower left corner for language options. 

Your use of this site is subject to the Privacy Policy, Terms and Conditions of Use.  Reminder: Fees or charges may be charged by your carrier for sending or receiving SMS text messaging, phone, or data.

If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

How Events are Sorted:

First, at the top of the list: SAMHSA Disaster Helpline and similar links.

Next in the list: Bundled “All Day” Events for organizations with events happening at multiple times throughout the day and/or in many formats or locations; these are bundled into a single listing to prevent endless scrolling.  Usually these offer a lookup by zip code or other criteria. 

Lastly, Time-Specific Events listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  Warmlines and places east of Oregon’s time zone tend to start earlier (e.g. 4am in Oregon is 7am in New York).

Jan
30
Mon
0 – Hotline – DH – DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ 1-321-800-3323 (DEAF) – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends
Jan 30 all-day
0 - Hotline - DH - DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ 1-321-800-3323 (DEAF) - 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

01 – Helpline – LFL – Lines for Life Alcohol and Drug Helpline @ 800-923-4357 – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jan 30 all-day

Alcohol and Drug Helpline

Call 800-923-4357 (24/7/365) or
Text RecoveryNow to 839863 Monday-Friday, 2-6pm PT.

Crisis Worker On the Phone

The Alcohol and Drug Helpline serves anyone who needs information, support, or access to resources and treatment for alcohol or drug use. If you or someone you know needs help, the Alcohol and Drug Helpline is free, confidential, and available for calls 24/7/365. The Alcohol and Drug Text Line is open Monday through Friday, 2pm to 6pm PST.

Call or text us for help understanding or dealing with alcohol and drug use or addiction. When you call us, we listen and support. We provide hope, referrals, resources, and information. Our highly trained staff and volunteers provide immediate assistance, non-judgmental listening, and compassionate support that can put you on a path to healing.

Para Ayuda en Español

llama al número 1-888-628-9454

https://988lifeline.org/help-yourself/en-espanol/

 

For Youth

If you are under age 21 and would like to talk with a peer about alcohol and drug use or abuse, contact our YouthLine. YouthLine is a free, confidential, teen-to-teen crisis and help line.

Call (877) 968-8491
Text ‘teen2teen’ to 839863
Chat https://www.oregonyouthline.org
We listen. We support. We keep it to ourselves.

Visit link:

https://oregonyouthline.org/

Excerpt(s):

Teens are available to help daily from 4-10pm PST (adults are available by phone at all other times!).

YouthLine is a free teen-to-teen crisis support and help line.

YouthLine is confidential to a point- while we will never share conversations had on the lines, we are mandatory reporters. If a young person is unable to agree to safety for themselves or another person, or if abuse is occurring, YouthLine contacts other agencies to ensure the best support and safety for the young person in crisis.

02 – OPEC – Oregon Parenting Education Collaborative – Parenting Education Resources
Jan 30 all-day

 

PARENTING EDUCATION RESOURCES

OPEC has a new website! Visit health.oregonstate.edu/opec for the most update OPEC information. ORParenting.org will be phased out by the end of 2022.

OPEC HUBS IN OREGON

About OPEC Hubs

The Oregon Parenting Education Collaborative (OPEC) supports a statewide network of parenting “Hubs.” As part of their role, OPEC Hubs:

  • Provide infrastructure to support parenting education efforts across their region, serving as a “go-to” place for families and community partners related to parenting resources and programs, support professional development opportunities for parenting education professionals, and collect data
  • Foster community collaboration to coordinate parenting programs across community partners, build relationships between cross-sector partners, and leverage available resources in support of families
  • Expand access to and normalize parenting education programs through a combination of direct service and mini-grants to partner organizations to meet the needs of all families in their communities. OPEC Hubs support a blend of universal and targeted parenting programs that are evidence-/research-based and culturally-responsive

The OPEC Logic Model illustrates the strategies, outputs, and outcomes of this work.

Ready to get connected? Your local OPEC Hub can connect you with in-person and remote parenting classes, workshops, resources, and family events in your community.

OPEC Facebook Page

https://www.facebook.com/OPECParentingEd/

Select From the Counties listed below to fund your HUB

FOR PARENTING EDUCATORS

Resource Tip Sheets

Parenting Education Curricula Resources

 Training Opportunities

Research

Program Fidelity Rating Tools

Additional Resources

OPEC GRANTEE SITES

Grantee Directory

Contact information for each of the OPEC Parenting Education Hubs is listed below.


OPEC Parenting Hubs



Building Healthy Families:
Baker, Malheur, Wallowa

Maria Weer
Executive Director
541.426.9411
mweer@oregonbhf.org

Clackamas Parenting Together:
Clackamas

Chelsea Hamilton
Clackamas OPEC Hub Coordinator
503.367.9116
chamilton@co.clackamas.or.us

The Family Connection:
Jackson, Josephine

Bethanee Grace
Program Co-Coordinator
541.734.5150 ext. 1042
bgrace@socfc.org

Diana Bennington
Program Co-Coordinator
541.734.5150 ext.1050
Diana.Bennington@socfc.org

Family Resource Center of Central Oregon:
Crook, Deschutes, Jefferson

Dee Ann Lewis
Executive Director
541.389.5468
deeannl@frconline.org

Kim Pitts
Program Logistics Coordinator
541.389.5468
kimp@frconline.org

First 5 Siskiyou:
Siskiyou, CA

Karen Pautz
Executive Director
First 5 Siskiyou
530.918.7222
karenpautz@first5siskiyou.org

Four Rivers Early Learning & Parenting Hub:
Gilliam, Hood River, Sherman, Wasco, Wheeler

Christa Rude
Regional Coordinator
541.506.2255
christa.rude@cgesd.k12.or.us

Shira Skybinskyy
Parenting Hub Assistant Director
sskybinskyy@cgesd.k12.or.us

Frontier Hub:
Grant, Harney

Donna Schnitker
Hub Director
541.573.6461
schnitkd@harneyesd.k12.or.us

Patti Wright
OPEC Grant Coordinator
541.620.0622
wrightp@harneyesd.k12.or.us

LaneKids:
Lane

Claire Hambly
Education Program Manager
541.741.6000 ext 141
chambly@unitedwaylane.org

Emily Reiter
Education Program Specialist
541.741.6000
ereiter@unitedwaylane.org

Marion & Polk Early Learning Hub, Inc.:
Marion

Lisa Harnisch
Executive Director
503.967.1187
lharnisch@earlylearninghub.org

Tiffany Miller
Communication Specialist and Parent Education Associate
503.485.3291
tmiller@earlylearninghub.org

Margie Lowe
Performance and Fiscal Officer
503.559.9610
mlowe@earlylearninghub.org

Mid-Valley Parenting:
Polk, Yamhill

Brent DeMoe
Director, Family & Community Outreach
503.623.9664 ext. 2118
demoe.brent@co.polk.or.us

Stephanie Gilbert
Early Learning and Family Engagement Coordinator
503.623.9664 ext. 2368
gilbert.stephanie@co.polk.or.us

Northwest Parenting:
Clatsop, Columbia, Tillamook 

Dorothy Spence
Early Learning & Parenting Education Hub Coordinator
503.614.1682
dspence@nwresd.k12.or.us 

Elena Barreto
Regional Coordinator
503.614.1443
ebarreto@nwresd.k12.or.us

Parenting Success Network:
Benton, Linn

Mike Jerpbak
Department Chair, Parenting Education
541.917.4891
wolfej@linnbenton.edu

Sommer McLeish
Coordinator (Lincoln County)
541.557.6215
smcleish@samhealth.org

Parenting Together Washington County:
Washington

Leslie Moguil
Senior Program Coordinator
503.846.4556
leslie_moguil@co.washington.or.us

Pathways to Positive Parenting:
Coos, Curry

Charity Grover
Parenting Lead
541.266.3909
charityg@scesd.k12.or.us 

Take Root:
Douglas, Klamath, Lake

Julie Hurley
Parenting Education Coordinator
Douglas/Lake/Klamath
541.492.6607
julie.hurley@douglasesd.k12.or.us

Susan Stiles-Sumstine
Assistant Parenting Hub Coordinator
Douglas/Lake/Klamath
541.492.6604
susan.stiles-sumstine@douglasesd.k12.or.us

Sanora Hoggarth
Parenting Education Coordinator for Klamath County
sanora.hoggarth@douglasesd.k12.or.us

Umatilla Morrow Head Start, Inc.:
Morrow, Umatilla, Union

Aaron Treadwell
Executive Director
541.564.6878
atreadwe@umchs.org

Mary Lou Gutierrez
Parenting Education Coordinator
541.667.6091
mgutierr@umchs.org

Jen Goodman
Family and Community Partnership Manager (Union County)
541.786.5535
goodmajd@eou.edu

OPEC Funded Parenting Education Curriculum



Abriendo Puertas /Opening Doors

Suicide Prevention for Parents
A guide for parents and caregivers while at the hospital emergency department

 

PARENTING EDUCATION BOOK LISTS

CUTTING OUT SCREENTIME: OUR FAMILY’S EXPERIMENT January/February 2022 

Run Wild 

by David Covell 

Daniel Finds a Poem 

by Micha Archer 

What to do with a Box 

by Jane Yolen & Chris Sheban

GETTING IN TOUCH 

WITH NATURE 

March 2022 

Green Green: A Community Gardening Story by Marie Lamba 

Lola Plants a Garden / Lola planta un jardín by Anna McQuinn 

Up in the Air: Butterflies, Birds, and 

Everything Up Above 

by Zoe Armstrong 

Greenie grows a garden / Verdecito cultiva un jardín (bilingual) 

by Harriet Ziefert 

Hasta Las Rodillas / Up to My Knees 

by Grace Lin (bilingual 

*This booklist provides recommendations 

based on the content of our monthly 

parent newsletter: Parenting Together. 

https://orparenting.org/parents/newsletters/ 


GETTING MESSY 

AND BEING HANDS-ON April 2022 

Mix It Up! 

by Hervé Tullet 

Pinta Ratones 

by Ellen Stoll Walsh 

Edward Gets Messy 

by Rita Meade 

Ultimate Slime: 100 new recipes and projects for oddly satisying, Borax-free slime 

by Alyssa Jagan 

Mud 

by Mary Lyn Ray 

SIBLINGS & FRIENDS 

May 2022 

How Do Dinosaurs Stay Friends? / Cómo son buenos amigos los dinosaurios 

by Jane Yolen 

The Evil Princess vs. The Brave Knight by Jennifer Holm 

How to Apologize 

by David LaRochelle 

Maple & Willow Together / Arce y Sauce juntas 

by Lori Nichols 

Meesha Makes Friends 

by Tom Percival

GETTING CREATIVE WITH RECYCLABLES 

June 2022 

Recycle and Remake, 

edited by Hélene Hilton 

Rainbow Weaver / Tejedora del arcoíris (bilingual) 

by Linda Elovitz Marshall 

Out of the Box 

by Jemma Westing 

100 Easy STEAM Activities: awesome 

hands-on projects for aspiring artists and engineers 

by Andrea Scalzo Yi 

Recycling Crafts by Annalees Lim 

BUILDING EMPATHY USING STORYBOOKS 

July 2022 

A Kids Book About Epathy 

by Daron K. Roberts 

I am Human: A Book of Empathy 

by Susan Verde 

Caring with Bert and Ernie: A Book 

About Empathy 

by Marie-Therese Miller 

Empatía: una guia para padres e hijos by Patricia Fernández Bieberach 

Everyone… 

by Christopher Silas Neal 

 

GOING TO THE DENTIST August 2022 

ABC Dentist 

by Harriet Ziefert 

Does a Tiger Go to the Dentist? 

by Harriet Ziefert 

Max va al dentista 

by Adria F. Klein 

What to Expect When You Go to the Dentist by Heidi Eisenberg Murkoff 

Vamos al Dentista 

ALL ABOUT STRESS 

September 2022 

How Big Are Your Worries Little Bear? By Jayneen Sanders 

The Rabbit Listened 

by Cori Doerrfeld 

Breath Like a Bear: 30 Mindful 

Moments For Kids to Feel Calm and 

Focused Anytime, Anywhere 

by Kira Wiley 

Plantando semillas : la práctica del 

mindfulness con niños 

by Nhá̂t Hạnh 

Scaredy Squirrel 

by Melanie Watt

ALL ABOUT CALM 

October 2022 

Mindfulness Moments for Kids: 

Hot Cocoa Calm 

by Kira Willey 

Calm Monsters, Kind Monsters: a Sesame Street Guide to Mindfulness 

by Karen Latchana Kenney 

You Are a Lion!: And Other Fun Yoga Poses / Eres un león!: posturas de yoga para niños 

GET INTO THE KITCHEN November 2022 

Thank You, Omu! / ¡Gracias, Omu! 

by Oge Mora 

Cooking Class: 57 Fun Recipes Kids 

will Love to Make (and Eat!) 

by Deanna F. Cook 

Plaza Sésamo: C es de cocinar – recetas de nuestra comunidad 

by Susan McQuillan 

Kalamata’s Kitchen 

by Sarah Thomas 

FAMILY CELEBRATIONS December 2022 

Dumpling Day 

by Meera Sriram 

Alma and How She Got Her Name / Alma y cómo obtuvo su nombre 

by Juana Martinez-Neal 

The Heart of Mi Familia 

by Carrie Lara 

Mango, Abuela, and Me / Mango, Abuela y yo by Meg Medina 

We Are Family 

by Patricia Hegarty 

 

04 – Resource – CDC – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Opioid Recovery Resources
Jan 30 all-day

 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 

Opioid Recovery Resources

Addiction is a medical condition. Treatment can help. Recovery is possible.

Opioid addiction, also known as opioid use disorder (OUD), is a chronic and relapsing disease that can affect anyone. In fact, millions of Americans suffer from opioid addiction.

As with most other chronic diseases, addiction is treatable. If you or someone you know is struggling, treatment is available. While no single treatment method is right for everyone, recovery is possible, and help is available for opioid addiction.

Recovery is possible

Preventing overdose death and finding treatment options are the first steps to recovery. Treatment may save a life and can help people struggling with opioid addiction get their lives back on track by allowing them to counteract addiction’s powerful effects on their brain and behavior. The overall goal of treatment is to return people to productive functioning in their family, workplace, and community.

Opioid addiction treatment can vary depending on the patient’s individual needs, occur in a variety of settings, take many different forms, and last for varying lengths of time.

Evidence-based approaches to treating opioid addiction include medications and combining medications with behavioral therapy. A recovery plan that includes medication for opioid addiction increases the chance of success.

Medications used in the treatment of opioid addiction support a person’s recovery by helping to normalize brain chemistry, relieving cravings, and in some cases preventing withdrawal symptoms. The choice to include medication as part of recovery is a personal medical decision, but the evidence for medications to support successful recovery is strong.

Medications for opioid addiction include:

Buprenorphine
  • Available as dissolving tablet, cheek film, extended-release injection, or 6-month implant under the skin.
  • Can be prescribed by a doctor for use outside a clinic.
Methadone
  • Available as daily liquid.
  • Can only be used in a certified opioid treatment program setting.
Naltrexone
  • Can be prescribed by any clinician who can legally prescribe medication.
  • Only used for people who have not used opioids for at least 7–10 days.

Talk with a doctor to find out what types of treatments are available in your area and what options are best for you and/or your loved one. Addiction is a chronic, relapsing disease; be sure to ask your doctor about the risk of relapse and overdose.

f you notice that someone may be struggling with opioid addiction:

  • Ask if you can help. Everyone can play a role and take action to help their loved ones in recovery. Treatment and the support and help from family, friends, co-workers, and others can make a big difference in the recovery process.
  • Be supportive, and reduce stigma. Stigma or the fear of stigma may stop someone from sharing their health condition and prevent them from seeking the health or behavioral health services and support services they need. Recognize that opioid addiction is a medical condition, not a moral failing. Stopping stigma is important to helping loved ones feel safer and healthier.
  • Carry naloxone. Naloxone can reverse overdose and prevent death. It is a non-addictive, life-saving drug that can reverse the effects of an opioid overdose when administered in time.
04 – Resources – BEAM – Black Emotional and Mental Health Collective – Girl Did You Know? – Mental Health Support Services You Can Reach Out To!
Jan 30 all-day
04 – Resources – ODHS – Oregon Department of Human Services – During COVID You are not alone
Jan 30 all-day

COVID – 19 Resources

Suicide Prevention Resources

Mental Health and Alcohol and Drug Resources

Domestic and Sexual Violence Resources

Youth Resources

Elder Resources

Financial Exploitation Prevention Resources

Reporting Abuse

DOWNLOAD THE FLYER HERE

https://govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-not-alone

04 – Resources – TAF – The Alexander Foundation – LGBTQ+ Assistance Programs, Scholarships @ apply for details
Jan 30 all-day

 

The Alexander Foundation is a non-profit, 501(c)3, all-volunteer organization whose sole focus is to give back to the LGBTQ+ community of Colorado.

ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS

COMMUNITY ASSISTANCE GRANT

This program provides assistance to those individuals who are experiencing temporary financial difficulties. Community Assistance is intended for immediate needs such as rent, security deposits, medical expenses, food, clothing, utility bills, and other basic living expenses. Assistance checks are issues only to third parties; for example, the recipient’s landlord or utility company.

Eligibility

Applicants must be:

  • Part of the LGBTQ+ community

  • Reside in Colorado

  • Pre-approved by a recognized Referral Agency

Applicants must demonstrate financial need and must not have received Community Assistance from The Alexander Foundation within the previous 12-month period. The maximum amount of assistance is $200. Individuals may only receive assistance three (3) times.

THE ROCKY MOUNTAINEERS MOTORCYCLE CLUB OF COLORADO CATASTROPHIC ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

This program is intended to provide support to those who are at risk of losing their ability to provide basic life needs due to treatment or complications related to cancer, a catastrophic illness, or a serious illness. Examples include medical care, housing, food, clothing, phones, and utilities. Unlike one-time assistance provided through the Community Assistance Program, this program provides fixed monthly assistance for up to 12 months. The amount of assistance is determined by the recipients’ needs but cannot exceed $2400 (or $200 per month).

Eligibility

Applicants must be:

  • Part of the LGBTQ+ community

  • Reside in Colorado

  • Have been diagnosed with a form of cancer, catastrophic illness, or serious injury. HIV positive status alone does not qualify someone for this program.

  • The applicant’s healthcare provider must certify the condition or diagnosis.

Applicants must demonstrate financial need, and cannot have received financial assistance from the Foundation during the previous 6 months. The “Certification of Medical Condition” must come from the applicant’s healthcare provider, and may also be e-mailed or faxed.

HOLIDAY LETTER ASSISTANCE

The Holiday Letter Assistance program provides one-time assistance during the traditional holiday season from November through December. The amount of assistance is based on need and the financial support appeal response from the community.

Eligibility

The recipient must be:

  • Part of the LGBTQ+ community

  • Reside in Colorado

  • Demonstrate financial need 

A certification from a Referral Agency must accompany the application. Individuals may receive Holiday Letter Assistance a maximum of three times. Holiday letter Assistance is issued to third parties based on the need expressed in the application.

Application Process

Three to four weeks before the deadline, The Alexander Foundation’s Assistance Programs Director will notify Referral Agencies when Holiday Letter Assistance applications are due (typically at the end of November/early December). Referring agencies are encouraged to contact The Alexander Foundation to ensure all mailed applications have been received.

HOW TO APPLY: COMMUNITY & CATASTROPHIC ASSISTANCE APPLICATION PROCESS
All Assistance Program applications MUST come from a Referral Agency. Applications are processed as they are received, and distributions occur within three to four weeks of receipt of the completed application.
 Referral Agencies must fax or e-mail assistance applications to The Alexander Foundation’s office on behalf of an applicant; mailed applications will not be accepted. To learn more about these programs, including the information required for Community Assistance and Catastrophic Assistance Grants, please contact a Referral Agency.

SCHOLARSHIPS

The Alexander Foundation was founded in 1981 as a public, non-profit, philanthropic organization. Through our three education scholarships, the foundation has continued a tradition of caring for the LGBTQ+ community to overcome barriers they may face in pursuit of academic success.

Applicants for ALL scholarships must:

  • Identify within the LGBTQ+ community

  • Be residents of Colorado

  • Be pursuing a degree at an accredited institution of higher education in the state of Colorado

Applications for ALL scholarships require:

  • A completed online application form

  • A personal essay that tells us about you and your goals, how the scholarship will help you achieve them, elaborate on your financial need, and your current or future plans for supporting the LGBTQ+ community.

  • Two signed letters of recommendation, including at least one academic reference on school letterhead.

  • A photocopy of a state or federally issued ID

 Furthermore, each scholarship has additional eligibility and application requirements. Please see below for further details about each of the three scholarship opportunities.

Applications will be accepted through March 20, 2022.

The Alexander Foundation Scholarships

Scholarships awarded from The Alexander Foundation provide financial assistance to those seeking a higher education degree from an accredited institution in the State of Colorado. Selection for awards are based on merit, need, and service to the LGBTQ+ community. Annual scholarship award amounts range from $300 to $3,000.

Eligibility and Process

In addition to the requirements listed above, each applicant must also:

  • Be pursuing a higher education degree within Colorado. However, exceptions may be made in certain instances. If you would like to apply for an exception, please elaborate in your personal essay (i.e., online program, continuing education over the summer, etc)

Applicants may apply as often as they wish; however, recipients are limited to a cumulative maximum award limit of $9,000.

The David and Sharon Alexander Scholarship

The David and Sharon Alexander Scholarship was created through a generous donation from the Alexander family. This scholarship, named for David and Sharon Alexander, serves to honor the contributions they made to furthering the education of their children, through providing funding to future generations of educators. 

Awarded annually to a student pursuing a degree that supports education and learning, recipients will receive a $1000 scholarship to be used on any school related expense. Students awarded the David and Sharon Alexander Scholarship are eligible for a continued annual award of $1000 for up to four years.

Eligibility and Process

In addition to the requirements listed above, each applicant must also:

  • Be pursuing a degree in education, higher education, counseling, school psychology, social work, special education, or a teaching certificate. Students pursuing their first degree post high school will be given preference, however, any student pursuing a degree in an education related field is encouraged to apply.

  • Demonstrate financial need in their application process.

  • Fill out an additional supplement, providing a statement that addresses the importance of education and your goals for pursuing a degree in an education related field.

Applicants who are not awarded the David and Sharon Alexander Foundation Scholarship will automatically be considered for all other Alexander Foundation Scholarships.

Apply Here

The Jordon Connor Memorial Scholarship

The Jordon Connor Memorial Scholarship was created through a generous donation from Michael & Gina Connor and Michael Alexander. The scholarship, named for Jordon Connor, serves to honor Jordon by providing funding to future generations of mental health providers dedicated to serving LGBTQ+ communities.

Awarded annually to two students pursuing a degree in a mental health-related field, recipients receive a $1,000 scholarship for any school-related expenses. Students who are awarded the Jordon Connor Memorial Scholarship are eligible for a continued annual award of $1,000 for up to four years.

Eligibility and Process

In addition to the requirements listed above, each applicant must also:

  • Be pursuing a degree in a mental health-related field (social work, psychology, counseling, etc.) at an accredited institution of higher education in the state of Colorado Students pursuing their first degree post-high school will be given preference. However, any student pursuing a degree in a mental health-related field is eligible and encouraged to apply.

  • Demonstrate financial need in their application process.

  • Fill out an additional supplement, providing a statement that addresses the importance of education and your goals for pursuing a degree in a mental health-related field.

Applicants who are not awarded the Jordon Connor Memorial Scholarship will automatically be considered for all other Alexander Foundation Scholarships.

04 – Resources – Wildfires, Air Quality, and Other Disaster Preparedness, Response & Recovery – Info and Resources (Radio Stations, Maps, Assistance and more)
Jan 30 all-day
04 - Resources - Wildfires, Air Quality, and Other Disaster Preparedness, Response & Recovery - Info and Resources (Radio Stations, Maps, Assistance and more)

WILDFIRE AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE AND RECOVERY

CALL 911 for emergency assistance.

Call 211 or visit 211info.org
for information and/or resources.

DISCLAIMER:
This information is provided solely as a courtesy without any guarantees or warranties of any kind whatsoever. Nothing in this communication, nor any content linking to or from this communication, is intended to substitute for advice or counsel from qualified professionals. You are hereby notified and advised to seek counsel from qualified professionals at your own risk and expense.

WARNING:
Never rely on any map for a decision regarding evacuation, or other precautionary actions.

When it comes to evacuation, DisasterAssistance.org says:
“Check with local tv and radio”
(7/12/2021)
Wikipedia:
Oregon Radio Stations
Oregon TV Stations

NOAA – National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration:
Oregon National Weather Radio Stations
Oregon Weather AlertsStatewide
or By County or By Zone

 

DEFINITIONS / TERMS for Warning Status or Evacuation Level

 

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

 

National Weather Service Fire Warning Statuses

RED FLAG WARNING
The National Weather Service (NWS) may issue a
Red Flag Warning
to an alert people if there are
critical fire weather conditions
happening NOW or expected VERY SOON.
Be extremely careful with open flames.
BEGIN to take action steps NOW for safety.

FIRE WEATHER WATCH
The National Weather Service (NWS) may issue a
Fire Weather Watch
to alert people if there are
critical fire weather conditions POSSIBLE
but not immediate or happening now.
BE PREPARED to take action steps SOON for safety.

Source:

National Weather Service – Fire Information
https://www.weather.gov/fire

 

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

 

Oregon Emergency Evacuation Levels

LEVEL 1: “BE READY” for potential evacuation.

Residents should be aware of the danger that exists in their area, monitor your telephone devices, local media sources, and county website to receive updated information.

This is the time for preparation and precautionary movement of persons with special needs, mobile property, pets and livestock.

If conditions worsen, public safety will issue an upgrade to a level 2 or 3 for this area.

 

LEVEL 2: “BE SET” to evacuate

You must prepare to leave at a moment’s notice

This level indicates there is significant danger in your area, and residents should either voluntarily evacuate now to a shelter or to family/friend’s home outside of the affected area.

If choosing to remain, residents need to be ready to evacuate at a moment’s notice. Residents MAY have time to gather necessary items but doing so is at their own risk.

This may be the only notice you receive.

Continue to monitor your telephone devices, local media sources, county website to receive further information. If conditions worsen, public safety will issue an upgrade to level 3 for this area and will make every attempt to return to this location with the new upgrade notice.

 

LEVEL 3: “GO” Evacuate NOW

Leave immediately!

Danger in your area is current or imminent, and you should evacuate immediately. If you choose to ignore this notice, you must understand that Public Safety Officials may not be available to assist you further.

DO NOT delay leaving to gather any belongings or make efforts to protect your home.
This may be the last notice you receive until the notice is cancelled or downgraded.

Entry to evacuated areas may be denied until conditions are deemed safe by Public Safety Officials. Local and regional media partners (digital, print, radio), public safety and county website-social media sites-call center will provide periodic updates.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

STATE OF OREGON

OREGON – OFFICE OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT – CURRENT HAZARDS DASHBOARD
Information on fires, volcanoes, earthquakes, floods, transportation, shelters and more.
plus daily report from FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Association)

https://arcg.is/140fCT

or

https://geo.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapSeries/index.html?appid=cdf61542ff574df797bdae784992cc44&folderid=d152ce8b437c47b1ba66c125a3648822

OREGON WILDFIRE SITE
https://wildfire.oregon.gov

OREGON – PUBLIC HEALTH DIVISION – CURRENT HAZARDS
(Public Health /Preparedness)

https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/PREPAREDNESS/CURRENTHAZARDS/Pages/index.aspx

OREGON – PUBLIC HEALTH DIVISION – EXTREME HEAT
(Public Health / Preparedness)

https://www.oregon.gov/oha/ph/preparedness/prepare/pages/prepareforextremeheat.aspx

 

UNITED STATES – FEDERAL / NATIONAL

READY.GOV (Preparedness, checklists, information for the whole family)
https://www.ready.gov

FEMA Locations – Search by State / Zip Code
https://www.fema.gov/locations

FEMA Service Referrals and Resources for OREGON (PDF format file)
https://www.fema.gov/sites/default/files/2020-09/fema_oregon-referral_dr-4562.pdf

DISASTER ASSISTANCE
https://www.disasterassistance.gov/

** IMMEDIATE NEEDS **
such as
SHELTER, FOOD, WATER, MEDICAL, etc.

EVACUATE OR STAY PUT?

https://www.disasterassistance.gov/information/immediate-needs/evacuate-or-stay-put

When it comes to evacuation, DisasterAssistance.org says:
“Check with local tv and radio”
(7/12/2021)

FIND EMERGENCY SHELTER
https://www.disasterassistance.gov/information/immediate-needs/emergency-shelter

EMERGENCY FOOD AND WATER
https://www.disasterassistance.gov/information/immediate-needs/emergency-food-and-water

DISASTER DISTRESS HOTLINE – TOLL FREE – MULTILINGUAL

CALL 1-800 985 5990

or

TEXT “TalkWithUs” to 66746

The Disaster Distress Helpline,
1-800-985-5990, is a 24/7, 365-day-a-year, national hotline
dedicated to providing immediate crisis counseling for people who are experiencing emotional distress related to any natural or human-caused disaster.

 

ALERTS AND INFORMATION

NEW OR-ALERT System

OR-Alert is an effort to ensure statewide access to receive alerts, warnings, and notifications (AWN) systems, enabling real-time sharing of hazard information across Oregon’s 36 counties and tribal governments. This technology also allows county emergency managers to access notification tools including FEMA’s Integrated Alerts and Warnings System (IPAWS) which is capable of issuing messaging to all cell phones in a geographic area.

This OR-Alert page will direct you to the sign up page for each county in Oregon

When it comes to evacuation, DisasterAssistance.org says:
“Check with local tv and radio”
(7/12/2021)
Wikipedia:
Oregon Radio Stations
Oregon TV Stations

NOAA – National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration:
Oregon National Weather Radio Stations
Oregon Weather AlertsStatewide
or By County or By Zone

PUBLIC ALERTS – Signup to Get Alerts
https://www.publicalerts.org/signup

Clackamas County
http://www.clackamas.us/emergency/ccens.html

Columbia County
https://www.columbia911.com/general/page/columbia-alert-network-can

Linn & Benton County
https://member.everbridge.net/index/453003085613276#/login

Marion County
https://member.everbridge.net/index/892807736721950#/login

Salem
https://www.cityofsalem.net/Pages/get-community-alerts.aspx

Multnomah County Call Aging & Disability Helpline for Assistance Registering at 503 988 3646
https://member.everbridge.net/index/453003085612905#/login

Washington County – Tigard residents can register for City Alert (https://public.coderedweb.com/CNE/1E28B1D668D7) & Washco;
other residents should register only for the Washco County Alert System
http://www.wccca.com/wcens/

FLASH ALERT messaging system – has news etc. from various sources / agencies / locations
https://www.flashalert.net/

BY OREGON COUNTY / REGION
https://www.flashalert.net/regions/portland-vancouver-salem/?CatName=Counties%2FRegional&Texting=0

METCOM911 ALERTS (Marion County)
https://www.metcom911.com/

 

DISASTER MAPS including FLOODING, WILDFIRES

FIRE MAPS by USDA USFS & NASA
(U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, U.S. Forest Service & National Aeronautical Space Administration)

FIRMS = Fire Incident Resource Management System for USA & CANADA
https://firms.modaps.eosdis.nasa.gov/usfs/

Formerly USDA USFS Active Fire Mapping
https://fsapps.nwcg.gov/afm/imagery.php

DISASTER MAPS
https://mappingsupport.com/p2/gissurfer-disaster-maps.html

CURRENT WILDLAND FIRES – USA INTERACTIVE MAP
https://mappingsupport.com/p2/gissurfer.php?center=40.749596,-111.533203&zoom=5&basemap=USA_basemap&overlay=VIIRS_24_hours,MODIS_24_hours&txtfile=https://mappingsupport.com/p2/special_maps/disaster/USA_wildland_fire.txt

Other Maps

RED CROSS SITES / REGION MAP FOR OREGON & MAP FOR OREGON & WASHINGTON
https://www.redcross.org/local/oregon/about-us/locations.html

FIRE, WEATHER & AVALANCHE CENTER – MAPS FOR WILDFIRES AND OTHER HAZARDS
https://www.fireweatheravalanche.org/fire/

The Fire, Weather & Avalanche Center’s (FWAC) mission as a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization is to build user-friendly products for the public—with an emphasis on the backcountry. We are currently building new tools all the time, but could always use support from you to bring these features to life! Our Wildfire Map shows every wildland fire burning around the country. Check to see if there are any wildfires are burning near you.

GIS (Geographic Information Systems)

GIS Server List (links to geographic information such as cooling centers)
https://mappingsupport.com/p/surf_gis/list-federal-state-county-city-GIS-servers.pdf

 

AIR QUALITY

AirNow.gov reports air quality using the official U.S. Air Quality Index (AQI), a color-coded index designed to communicate whether air quality is healthy or unhealthy for you. When you know the AQI in your area, you can take steps to protect your health. For more information, check out the links below:

AIRNOW.GOV
https://www.airnow.gov

AIRNOW.GOV Report on Portland, Oregon Air Quality
https://www.airnow.gov/?city=Portland&state=OR&country=USA

USA INTERACTIVE AIR QUALITY MAP
https://gispub.epa.gov/airnow/

OREGON AIR QUALITY BY CITY
https://www.airnow.gov/state/?name=oregon

USA INTERACTIVE FIRE & SMOKE MAP
https://fire.airnow.gov/

CALLING 911 with a CELL PHONE

TIP: Calling 911 with a cell phone the smart way – see if you can get better coordinates in case of emergency

PROBLEM:
Coordinates may not be accurate or precise for authorities to find you if you call 911 by cell phone.

POSSIBLE IMPROVEMENT:
There may be some ways to improve this for better coordinates in case of emergency.

Check out this article on the smart way to call 911 with a cell phone
https://findmesar.com/p/pdf/smart-way-call-911-with-cell-phone.pdf

and decide if you want to consider any or all of these to get better coordinates in case of emergency:

1) changing certain settings on your device (see the article above for details),
2) downloading the app FindMeSAR to your device, and/or
3) visit https://findmesar.com in your web browser

Credit: Found this tip on: https://mappingsupport.com/

###

Excerpt(s) from another PeerGalaxy listing:

Facebook Groups for People affected by Wildfire, Smoke, etc. in Oregon plus Resource Links

To join a Facebook Group, login to Facebook on your browser. Click a link to a group (see below). Then, click JOIN. You may be asked to answer up to 3 questions. Usually these questions ask if you agree to group rules (no spam, no harassment, etc.) and if you have direct lived experience, especially if the group is closed / reserved for people with lived experience.

More groups may become available. If you have one to share, please share via email: webmail@peergalaxy.com

FACEBOOK GROUP PAGES
For people affected by recent wildfires in Oregon
1. Oregon Fires 2020 / 2021
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1481912815460351/
2. Wildfire Home Loss Peer Support Community
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1593879390927628/
3. Rising from the Ashes of the Canyon (2020)
https://www.facebook.com/groups/risefromtheashessantiamcanyon/
4. Bruler Fire 2021
https://www.facebook.com/brulerfire2021/

MORE WILDFIRE RESOURCES

The COVID-19 & Oregon Wildfire Outreach Program (COWOP)

The COVID-19 & Oregon Wildfire Outreach Program (COWOP) empowers communities by connecting people to resources and services such as COVID-19 vaccination info; food, rent, and utility assistance; emotional support; and so much more. Rebuilding lives and livelihoods after a disaster isn’t something anyone needs to do alone.

Serving Statewide

English: Call or text 971- 420-1028

Spanish: Call or text 971- 420-1018

Link: cowop2021.org

 

WILDFIRE WELLNESS TOOLKIT

https://www.cowop2021.org/en/wellness-toolkit

Excerpt(s):

The purpose of this guide is to support individuals, caregivers, and families impacted by wildfire. We hope to provide resources to improve general wellness and tools for resiliency, knowing that people with greater feelings of wellness are better equipped to support their family and community.

1. Coping with Stress
https://www.cowop2021.org/s/Wildfire_Toolkit_Issue1.pdf

2. Wildfire Resources
https://www.cowop2021.org/s/Wildfire_Toolkit_Issue2.pdf

3. Strength and Resilience
https://www.cowop2021.org/s/Wildfire_Toolkit_Issue3.pdf

4. Values: A Personal Compass
https://www.cowop2021.org/s/Wildfire_Toolkit_Issue4.pdf

5. Caregiver Edition
https://www.cowop2021.org/s/Wildfire_Toolkit_Issue5.pdf

6. Your Personal Wellness Vision
https://www.cowop2021.org/s/Wildfire_Toolkit_Issue6.pdf

 

WILDFIRE SUPPORT PHONE NUMBERS

Clackamas County Health, Housing & Human Services
1-503-655-8585

ADAPT of Douglas County
1-800-866-9780

Marion County Health & Human Services
1-503-588-5288

Jackson County Health & Human Services
1-541-774-8201

Klamath Basin Behavioral Health
1-541-883-1030

Lane County Health & Human Services
1-541-687-4000

Lincoln County Health & Human Services
1-866-266-0288

Linn County Health Services
1-800-560-5535

 

WARMLINES / HELPLINES
1. Disaster Distress Helpline offers 24/7 free and confidential disaster crisis counseling to anyone in the United States at 1-800-985-5990

2. Oregon Behavioral Health Support Line offers free confidential support to Oregonians at 1-800-923-HELP (4357)

3. Lines for Life offers 24-hour crisis support for drug addiction, alcohol abuse, and thoughts of suicide to youth, military personnel and their families, and those affected by substance abuse at 1-800-273-8255

4. David Romprey Warmline offers free confidential peer support to Oregonians week based on the framework of Intentional Peer Support.
We focus on building relationships that are mutual, explorative, and conscious of power. We don’t try to “fix” people, rather, we would love to connect with you to listen, share, and learn with you as we both move forward in our life journeys.
Daily, Monday-Sunday, 9am-11pm PST at: 1-800-698-2392

NOTE: During periods of large call volume, hold times can vary; there is usually an option to get a call back without losing your place in line.

 

OTHER RESOURCE PAGES
In addition, you may want to visit these resource pages

1. State of Oregon Wildfire Resource Website
https://wildfire.oregon.gov

2. US DHS Disaster Assistance
https://www.disasterassistance.gov

3. FEMA (Federal Emergency Management), Oregon Wildfires (EM-3542-OR) page:
https://www.fema.gov/disaster/3542
Event started 9/8/2020, Emergency declared 9/10/2020

4. FEMA Press Release:
State of Oregon and FEMA Working Together to Deliver Coordinated Wildfire Response
https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20200913/state-oregon-and-fema-working-together-deliver-coordinated-wildfire-response

5. American Red Cross Shelters
For temporary sheltering needs, Oregon wildfire survivors can find locations available at www.RedCross.org/shelter

6. Oregon Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (ORVOAD)
For verified disaster relief organizations
https://orvoad.communityos.org/cms/

7. Are you seeing signs of PTSD following the fires? Here’s what you can do from home
https://ktvl.com/news/news-10-first-alert-fire/are-you-seeing-signs-of-ptsd-following-the-fires-heres-what-you-can-do-from-home

8. Emergency Alert System review on its way in Jackson County
https://ktvl.com/station/news-10-first-alert-fire-recovery

9. Free Crisis Counseling
Free crisis counseling is available for Oregon residents affected by historic wildfire season

10. Health organization puts $500,000 toward post-fire recovery
https://mailtribune.com/news/top-stories/health-organization-puts-500000-toward-post-fire-recovery?fbclid=IwAR39JRJb7nfId4Fis2esZG_Jsuqsm_W5x_eI-bv5zXtdy-eRpwf6qp0fqGY

DISCLAIMER: Information is provided solely as a courtesy with guarantees or warranties of any kind whatsoever. Use at your own risk and expense. You are hereby notified and advised to seek counsel from qualified professionals at your own risk and expense.

 

04 Resource – SRN – Scottish Recovery Network – Peer To Peer Training Resources
Jan 30 all-day

Let’s do Peer2Peer!

Peer2Peer is adaptable and flexible. Deliver the course as a whole or focus on specific sessions.

Scottish Recovery Network gives us the framework to think and create things for ourselves.

Peer2Peer Development Programme participant

Peer2Peer training manual

Peer2Peer helps you to deliver peer training for your organisation or initiative. It is adaptable and can be tailored to suit your needs.

Download .PDF document (4 MB)

Let’s do Peer2Peer guide

The guide complements the training manual. It has been developed in collaboration with organizations already delivering Peer2Peer. It provides insights and ideas on the different ways to run and facilitate the course.

Download .PDF document (3 MB)

Creating a positive learning environment

Considerations for creating a positive learning environment for your Peer2Peer participants.

Download .PDF document (888 KB)

Example Peer2Peer course outlines

Different organisations provide examples of how they are delivering the course.

Download .PDF document (573 KB)

Budget planning

Things to consider when budgeting or sourcing funding for your Peer2Peer course.

Download .PDF document (136 KB)

Certificate of achievement (PDF)

Downloadable certificate of achievement for course participants.

Download .PDF document (182 KB)

Certificate of achievement (Word)

Downloadable certificate of achievement for course participants.

Download .DOCX document (545 KB)

Hollie: peer support and me

Hollie, a Peer Worker with Penumbra, tells us what peer support means to her. This short animation is a powerful way to show the value and impact of peer support. It is also available on our YouTube channel where you can watch, download or share the film.

Download .MP4 video (4 MB)

Values Framework for Peer Working

This publication aims to increase understanding of the peer worker role and ensure that it maintains the peer support ethos.

Download .PDF document (246 KB)

Experts by Experience Implementation Guidelines

Guidelines to support the development of Peer Worker roles in the mental health sector.

Download .PDF document (880 KB)

04 Resource – Veterans Support Groups, Resources, Education and Advocacy
Jan 30 all-day

USE THIS LINK TO OPEN THE VA WELCOME KIT

Print out your VA Welcome Kit

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned.

Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy, so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

 

LOCATE SERVICES IN OREGON

Veteran Resource Navigator

The Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs (ODVA) has a comprehensive online resource guide (VETERAN RESOURCE NAVIGATOR) available to assist veterans in finding the benefits that are most useful to their unique circumstances at this time.

Use the link below for the Veteran Resource Navigator

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

Veteran Services by County

Click on the link blow for interactive map  access resources in your county in Oregon.

Other Resources Available to Veterans and Military Service Members

DD214 & Military Records Request:

https://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records

Veteran Resource Navigator site by ODVA:

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

(Oregon)Military Help Line:  

Call 888-457-4838

VA Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255:

Press 1.VA Confidential crisis chat at net or text to 838255 

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD:

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/

Defining Discharge Status:

https://militarybenefits.info/character-of-discharge/#:~:text=There%20are%206%20types%20of,DD%20214%20must%20have%20a

How to apply for a discharge status upgrade:

https://www.va.gov/discharge-upgrade-instructions/

Oregon Supportive Services for Vets & Families (Housing):

https://caporegon.org/what-we-do/ssvf/

Clackamas County VSO’s (Veteran Service Officers):

https://www.clackamas.us/socialservices/veterans.html

Portland VA Clinic that can help with homelessness & medical care:

https://www.portland.va.gov/locations/crrc.asp

Portland VA Mental Health Clinic:

https://www.portland.va.gov/services/mentalhealth.asp

Veterans Crisis Line/ Suicide Prevention:

https://www.veteranscrisisline.net/

If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance,

please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.

Contact ODVA Headquarters

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs
700 Summer St NE
Salem, OR 97301

Web: https://www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/default.aspx

Phone: (800) 692-9666 or (503) 373-2085

Fax: (503) 373-2392

Email:orvetsbenefits@odva.state.or.us

 

 

 

 

Web Resources

Oregon Health Plan – Enrollment Page

https://www.oregon.gov/oha/hsd/ohp/pages/apply.aspx

 

SAMHSA Treatment Locator

https://findtreatment.gov/

VA National Center on PTSD

 PTSD Treatment Decision Aid

 Educational Materials

  Mobile Apps

  Whiteboard Videos

  Consultation Program

 

VA Healthcare – Community Care network

https://www.va.gov/COMMUNITYCARE/providers/Community_Care_Network.asp

 

VA’s Center for Women Veterans (CWV)

https://www.va.gov/womenvet/

Minority Veterans of America

https://www.minorityvets.org/

 

Vet Centers:

Central Oregon Vet Center

Eugene Vet Center

Grants Pass Vet Center

Portland Vet Center

Salem Vet Center

 Community Based Outpatient Clinics:

Bend CBOC

Morrow County VA Telehealth Clinic (Boardman OR)

Brookings VA Clinic

Wallowa County VA Telehealth Clinic (Enterprise OR)

Eugene Health Care Center

Eugene VA Downtown Clinic

Fairview Clinic

Grants Pass West VA CBOC

Hillsboro CBOC

Klamath Falls CBOC

La Grande CBOC

Lincoln City Clinic

North Bend VA Clinic

Community Resource and Referral Center (CRRC)

Salem CBOC

North Coast CBOC

 

Additional Resources By Phone:

Veterans Crisis Line: 800-273-8255, Press 1

Women Veterans Hotline: 855-829-663

Vet Center Call Center: 877-WAR-VETS (927-8387)

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Caregiver Support Line: 855-260-3274

Lines for Life Military Help Line:  Call 1-888-457-4838

Senior Loneliness Line:  Call 503-200-1633

The Trevor Project:  866-488-7386

PEER SUPPORT AND PEER TRAINING

USE THIS LINK TO APPLY

Online BIPOC Veteran Peer Support Specialist Training – April 2022

NAMI Multnomah is pleased to offer this Oregon Health Authority (OHA) approved Peer Support Specialist Training (PSST) for adults in Mental Health recovery. In collaboration with Cultivating a New Life LLC, we will offer the Warriors in Recovery: Forging an Alliance of Peers, Peer Support Specialist Training, 𝙨𝙥𝙚𝙘𝙞𝙛𝙞𝙘 𝙩𝙤 𝙑𝙚𝙩𝙚𝙧𝙖𝙣𝙨 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙈𝙞𝙡𝙞𝙩𝙖𝙧𝙮 𝙎𝙚𝙧𝙫𝙞𝙘𝙚 𝙈𝙚𝙢𝙗𝙚𝙧𝙨 𝙞𝙙𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙞𝙛𝙮𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙖𝙨 𝘽𝙡𝙖𝙘𝙠, 𝙄𝙣𝙙𝙞𝙜𝙚𝙣𝙤𝙪𝙨 𝙤𝙧 𝙖𝙨 𝙖 𝙥𝙚𝙧𝙨𝙤𝙣 𝙤𝙛 𝙘𝙤𝙡𝙤𝙧 (𝘽𝙄𝙋𝙊𝘾).

Warriors in Recovery: Forging an Alliance of Peers represents 44 hours of comprehensive training designed to inform and empower individuals wishing to work as peers for veterans within peer-delivered services, assisting individuals past or presently affected by mental health services, mental health system survival, addiction(s), co-occurring disorder(s), and traumatic experience(s), as they re-enter the community utilizing naturally occurring support.

The core elements of this program include wellness coping skills and WRAP training (Wellness Recovery Action Plan), all from a social justice framework with an emphasis on trauma-informed care, cultural humility model and narrative approaches. Through a narrative approach, participants will recognize the power of the stories that they tell themselves, and how to reconstruct their life narrative according to person-centered principles that will assist them in reducing the influence of problems in their lives.

Individuals who complete the 44-hour PSST training are eligible to become Oregon State Certified Peer Support Specialists for adult mental health under the Traditional Health Worker (THW) program. The training consists of 44 online classroom hours and a written exam.

This training is offered at no cost to Veterans and Active/Past Military Service Members who live, work, or volunteer in the state of Oregon.

𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗮𝗽𝗽𝗹𝗶𝗰𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗽𝗲𝗿𝗶𝗼𝗱 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝘁𝗿𝗮𝗶𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘄𝗶𝗹𝗹 𝗰𝗹𝗼𝘀𝗲 𝗮𝘁 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗲𝗻𝗱 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗱𝗮𝘆 𝗦𝘂𝗻𝗱𝗮𝘆, 𝗙𝗲𝗯𝗿𝘂𝗮𝗿𝘆 𝟮𝟴𝘁𝗵, 𝟮𝟬𝟮𝟮.

𝗧𝗿𝗮𝗶𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗥𝗲𝗾𝘂𝗶𝗿𝗲𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁𝘀

1. 𝗬𝗼𝘂 𝗺𝘂𝘀𝘁 𝗶𝗱𝗲𝗻𝘁𝗶𝗳𝘆 𝗮𝘀 𝗮 𝗽𝗲𝗲𝗿 which is defined as a self-identified person currently or formerly receiving mental health services. (𝗣𝗟𝗘𝗔𝗦𝗘 𝗡𝗢𝗧𝗘: If you do not self-identify as a peer, you will not be eligible for this training. If you identify as a family member, please go to OHA’s website to find certified Family Support Specialist Trainings in Oregon.)

2. 𝗙𝗼𝗿 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝘀𝗽𝗲𝗰𝗶𝗳𝗶𝗰 𝘁𝗿𝗮𝗶𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗴, 𝘆𝗼𝘂 𝗺𝘂𝘀𝘁:

-be a Veteran or active/past Military Service Member

-identify as Black, Indigenous or a person of color

-be at least 18 years of age

-live, work, and/or volunteer in Oregon

-not be listed on the Medicaid provider exclusion list

-have the ability to attend the entirety of the 44-hour/6 session training ONLINE

𝙏𝙧𝙖𝙞𝙣𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝘿𝙖𝙩𝙚𝙨 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙏𝙞𝙢𝙚𝙨:

-Friday, April 8th, 3:00pm-7:00pm

-Saturday, April 9th, 9:00am-5:00pm

-Sunday, April 10th, 9:00am-5:00pm

-Friday, April 22nd, 9:00am-5:00pm

-Saturday, April 23rd, 9:00am-5:00pm

-Sunday, April 24th, 9:00am-5:00pm

*𝙏𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙚 𝙖𝙧𝙚 1-𝙝𝙤𝙪𝙧 𝙡𝙪𝙣𝙘𝙝 𝙗𝙧𝙚𝙖𝙠𝙨 𝙤𝙛𝙛𝙚𝙧𝙚𝙙 𝙤𝙣 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙡𝙤𝙣𝙜𝙚𝙧 𝙙𝙖𝙮𝙨 𝙤𝙛 𝙩𝙧𝙖𝙞𝙣𝙞𝙣𝙜*

𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗮𝗽𝗽𝗹𝗶𝗰𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗽𝗲𝗿𝗶𝗼𝗱 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝘁𝗿𝗮𝗶𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘄𝗶𝗹𝗹 𝗰𝗹𝗼𝘀𝗲 𝗮𝘁 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗲𝗻𝗱 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗱𝗮𝘆 𝗦𝘂𝗻𝗱𝗮𝘆, 𝗙𝗲𝗯𝗿𝘂𝗮𝗿𝘆 𝟮𝟴𝘁𝗵, 𝟮𝟬𝟮𝟮. 𝗔𝗽𝗽𝗹𝗶𝗰𝗮𝗻𝘁𝘀 𝘄𝗶𝗹𝗹 𝗯𝗲 𝗻𝗼𝘁𝗶𝗳𝗶𝗲𝗱 𝗼𝗳 𝗱𝗲𝗰𝗶𝘀𝗶𝗼𝗻𝘀 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘁𝗿𝗮𝗶𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗯𝘆 𝗲𝗺𝗮𝗶𝗹 𝗯𝘆 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗲𝗻𝗱 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘄𝗲𝗲𝗸 𝗼𝗳 𝗠𝗮𝗿𝗰𝗵 𝟳𝘁𝗵, 𝟮𝟬𝟮𝟮.

Apply Here: BIPOC Veteran & Military Service Member PSST Application

PUBLICATIONS

Psychosocial Interventions for Older Adults With Serious Mental Illness

The guide provides considerations and strategies for interdisciplinary teams, peer specialists, clinicians, registered nurses, behavioral health organizations, and policymakers in understanding, selecting, and implementing evidence-based interventions that support older adults with serious mental illness.

Publication ID
PEP21-06-05-001
Publication Date
November 2021

Download your VA Welcome Kit

You are welcome to share this guide with friends or family members who need help with their benefits too. You can print out copies for yourself and others:

Download our guides to VA benefits and services

For Veterans

For family members

Apply for survivor benefits (PDF)

 

 

Opportunities for Engagement

  What:  Warriors in Recovery:  Forging an Alliance of Peers

Host/Coordinating Organization: NAMI Multnomah

Dates:  November 4th through 6th and 18th through 20th

Additional Information:  An OHA-approved Peer Support Specialist Training for adults in mental health recovery. This training is offered at no cost to participants and is open to Veterans across Oregon.  To apply online, please click here.  Applications are due by September 18, 2022

 

What:  Veteran Volunteer Program – flyer attached

Host/Coordinating Organization:  Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs (ODVA)

Additional Information:  Join the ODVA in implementing the new veteran volunteer program to ensure very Oregon veteran is connected to the benefits they have earned.  For additional information, or to sign up, please review the attached flyer or reach out to Mark Newell, ODVA Veteran Volunteer Coordinator by calling 503.373.2057, emailing veteranvolunteer@odva.state.or.us, or visiting the ODVA volunteer website by clicking here.

 

What:  Free Veteran Peer Support – flyer attached

Host/Coordinating Organization:  NAMI Multnomah

Additional Information:  Did you know NAMI Multnomah offers FREE veteran peer support?  Veteran Peer Support Specialists are veterans who use their personal experiences with military culture, mental health challenges, and recovery to support and inspire hope in other veterans.  Check out the attached PDF to learn more how NAMI Multnomah’s Veteran Peer Support Specialists can assist you.  To get started or learn more, contact Dan at 971.303.2671 or dfriedrich@namimultnomah.org

 

What:  Opportunity to Join NAMI Multnomah Veteran Outreach Team (repeat from 7/19/22)  

Host/Coordinating Organization: NAMI Multnomah

Additional Information:  NAMI Multnomah is looking for veterans and family members interested in volunteering. Our primary need is for folks interested in joining our Veteran Outreach Team. These volunteers will participate in tabling events and/or presentations sharing NAMI resources with communities of Veterans, family members, and those who work with Veterans. These opportunities are primarily in-person, and require proof of vaccination against COVID-19. Please reach out to Alyssa at acarnes@namimultnomah.org if you have any questions or are interested in volunteering.

 

What:  Oregon Suicide Prevention Conference (repeat from 7/19/22)

Host/Coordinating Organization:  Lines for Life

Dates:  October 11 – 13, 2022, with pre-conference trainings held on October 10, 2022

Additional Information:   OSPC 2022 – Reconnecting to Hope: Growing Responsive Communities – focuses on rebuilding and growing connections between individuals, providers, local and state resources, advocates and prevention leaders. These connections strengthen networks of community support and create systems that can respond with compassion and care to address the unique needs of individuals – lifting Oregonians to reconnect to hope when they are struggling.  Update your calendar and stay tuned for our registration announcement!  Click here to access the OSPC website.

Funding & Scholarship Opportunities

 What:  RFGA #5487 Increasing Access to Veteran and Military Peer Support Specialist Training (repeat from 7/19/22) 

Funder:  Oregon Health Authority (OHA)

Additional Information:  OHA is pleased to announce this solicitation of applications for funding Peer Support Specialist trainings.  The intention is to make in-person Peer Support Specialist trainings more accessible to military veterans living in communities designated as Rural or Frontier by the Oregon Office of Rural Health.  OHA is calling for applications from organizations who are well-positioned to provide services to military veterans and have the capacity to grow the peer-delivered services workforce in their communities.  Applications are due by 10 p.m. Aug. 31, 2022.  Please visit the OHA Veterans and Military Behavioral Health website to access application documents.

 

What:  Peer Wellness Specialist Training Scholarship Application

Funder/Coordinating Organization:  Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and Mental Health & Addiction Association of Oregon (MHAAO)

Additional Information:  Scholarships for this training cohort are supported by OHA’s Office of Equity and Inclusion to increase training accessibility across the state.  This scholarship opportunity is meant for Oregon frontier and rural communities.   Completed applications will be reviewed on a first-come, first-serve basis.  Once you complete this application, you will receive a confirmation email that it has been submitted.  Please note that the training details and materials will be shared approximately 2-4 weeks prior to the training start date for the cohort for which you have applied.  If you have any specific questions, please reach out to Training Center Manger, Emily Nelson at enelson@mhaoforegon.org.  The role of a Peer Wellness Specialist is to provide peer support, encouragement, and assistance to address physical and mental health needs.  In order to do that, it is important that the Peer Wellness Specialist has a working knowledge of the various health care and wellness resources in their community and how to access these services and resources.  Click here to access the Peer Wellness Specialist Training Scholarship Application.

 

What:  Integrated Co-Occurring Disorders Start Up Funding

Funder:  Oregon Health Authority (OHA)

Additional Information:  OHA is getting ready to develop contracts for Integrated Co-Occurring Disorders (ICOD) start up funding.  Programs that can and/or want to specialize in working with veterans who experience co-occurring disorders can contact David Corse at David.Corse@dhsoha.state.or.us

 

 

 

 

AM – All Month – Veterans Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255, Veterans and Military Families Resources and Information
Jan 30 all-day

CRISIS LINES AND WARMLINES

 

Veterans Crisis Line: 800-273-8255, Press 1

Women Veterans Hotline: 855-829-663

Vet Center Call Center: 877-WAR-VETS (927-8387)

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Caregiver Support Line: 855-260-3274

Lines for Life Military Help Line:  Call 1-888-457-4838

Senior Loneliness Line:  Call 503-200-1633

The Trevor Project:  866-488-7386

 

RESOURCES AND INFORMATION

Veteran Resource Navigator

The coronavirus pandemic has changed our world. But it has not changed Oregon’s commitment to those who served and fought for us.

This comprehensive online resource guide is meant to assist veterans from all walks of life in finding the benefits that are most useful to their unique circumstances at this time.

These benefits and resources are yours, earned through your faithful and honorable service to our nation; they are also an investment in the state of Oregon, because your success is our success.

Oregon veterans are a diverse community, but we are united in our shared service, and this has never been truer than it is today. We are all in this together, and we are not defeated. We will stand again, united.


If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance, please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.


Resources by Topic Area

COVID Economic Resources

Economic

Emergency aid, employment, disability, taxes, scams, veteran-owned businesses

COVID Housing and Food Resources

Housing and Food

Housing security and support, homelessness resources, food

COVID Education Resources

Education

Federal VA resources, Voc Rehab re-entry, GI Bill updates, apprenticeships info

COVID Resources

Other Resources

Resources for families, aging veterans, and Oregon OEM COVID-19 resources

COVID Health and Wellness Resources

Health and Wellness

Healthcare, mental health, medical transportation, crisis hotlines

COVID Agency Resources

Agency Resources

Changes and updates about ODVA’s programs and resources

 

LOCATE VETERANS SERVICES IN OREGON

 

Veteran Services by County

Click on the  map below to access resources in your county.

 

VETERANS SERVICES IN OREGON BY CATEGORY

Click on the Image Below to find services by category

 

COVID-19 ALERT – Due to COVID-19, many County Offices are limiting in-person services and are providing services by phone.

Please call your County Veteran Service Office before going in to confirm how they can best serve you during this time.

 

If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance,

please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.

Contact ODVA Headquarters

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs
700 Summer St NE
Salem, OR 97301

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned. Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy, so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

Print out your VA Welcome Kit

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned.

Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

Download your VA Welcome Kit

Feel free to share this guide with friends or family members who need help with their benefits too. You can print out copies for yourself and others:

Download our guides to VA benefits and services

For Veterans

For family members

 

Other Resources Available to Veterans and Military Service Members

DD214 & Military Records Request:

https://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records

Veteran Resource Navigator site by ODVA:

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

(Oregon)Military Help Line:  

Call 888-457-4838

VA Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255:

Press 1.VA Confidential crisis chat at net or text to 838255 

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD:

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/

Defining Discharge Status:

https://militarybenefits.info/character-of-discharge/#:~:text=There%20are%206%20types%20of,DD%20214%20must%20have%20a

How to apply for a discharge status upgrade:

https://www.va.gov/discharge-upgrade-instructions/

Oregon Supportive Services for Vets & Families (Housing):

https://caporegon.org/what-we-do/ssvf/

Clackamas County VSO’s (Veteran Service Officers):

https://www.clackamas.us/socialservices/veterans.html

Portland VA Clinic that can help with homelessness & medical care:

https://www.portland.va.gov/locations/crrc.asp

 

National Resource Directory (NRD)

https://nrd.gov/

The National Resource Directory (NRD) is a resource website that connects wounded warriors, Service Members, Veterans, their families, and caregivers to programs and services that support them. The NRD is hosted, managed, maintained, sustained and developed by the Defense Health Agency’s Recovery Coordination Program.

It provides access to services and resources at the national, state and local levels to support recovery, rehabilitation and community reintegration. Visitors can find information on a variety of topics that supply an abundance of vetted resources. For help finding resources on the site, visit the How to Use this site section of the NRD. Please see below for some of our major categories.

 

The National Recovery Directory is a partnership among the Departments of Defense, Labor, and Veterans Affairs. Information contained within the NRD is from federal, state, and local government agencies; Veteran and military service organizations; non-profit and community-based organizations; academic institutions and professional associations that provide assistance to wounded warriors and their families.

GLOSSARIES

Find definitions to commonly used terms in VA, DoD, DOL, and other federal government agencies.

NRD FACT SHEET

Get to know your NRD: why it was created, who operates it, and all the resources meant for you.

KEY CONTACTS

Find contacts in the Departments of Defense, Labor, and Veterans Affairs and Military Services.

 

 

 

 

Tue, January 25, 2022, 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM PST

ONLINE EVENT

Semper Fi & America’s Fund offers a Caregiver Support Program encompassing a variety of activities, education, support tools and resource connections designed to assist the spouses, parents, siblings, extended family members, or close friends who drop everything to care for a catastrophically wounded, critically ill or injured service member. The Caregiver Support Program provides different types of events to suit the busy schedules of our caregivers.

Join MVCN with special guest Karen Hetherington, Director of Case Management for the Semper Fi & America’s Fund, a non-profit that assists catastrophically wounded, ill and injured service members. Ms. Hetherington will share about Semper Fi & America’s Fund’s programs and answer questions.

Come learn how Semper Fi & America’s Fund can help you!

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

**Please SAVE your confirmation email as it contains information to join the Zoom group.** Check your spam or junk folder if you do not receive an email confirmation from Eventbrite.Find other peer support opportunities on our Caregiver Calendar on the MVCN website. https://www.redcross.org/caregiversVisit the safe and secure, caregiver-only Online Community available 24/7 for support. https://mvcn.force.com/login.

 

 

 

 

Dual Diagnosis Anonymous

 

 

“You protected us, now we support you!”

https://ddainc.org/dda-veterans-page/

DDA was founded by a highly decorated veteran, Corbett Monica. After serving in the Vietnam War, like other veterans, returning to home only find anguish, trauma, and remorse. After suffering from severe PTSD, OCD, survivors guilt, and addictions, Corbett found a way to transcend from destructive means with the inception of Dual Diagnosis Anonymous (DDA) providing hope and recovery through our peer support which is now his legacy.

Culturally responsive DDA’s Veterans meetings are intended to provide a safe venue to be open about depression, post-traumatic stress, alcohol and drug use, abuse, and addiction as well as serve as a resource for navigation of the telehealth system, It will encourage healthy solutions for adapting to the changing times. Specifically. the project will Improve access for Veterans and military service members to dual diagnosis services through the creation of on-line recovery support groups and on-line DDA meetings.

This project will serve Veterans throughout the state and is beginning outreach through Veterans publications, local newspapers, the VA, Veterans websites, list services, and anything else that will help identify Oregonians who can use the services.

 

More Ways to Connect

Join our Private Online Group

DDA Veterans Resource Group and Chatroom: www.facebook.com/groups/345810496697764

In Person Meetings

 

Wednesdays 5pm to 7pm

1520 Sherman Ave North Bend, OR 97459

Online Meetings

 

Tuesdays 12pm-1pm Pacific Time Zone

Join Zoom Meeting https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84398341923 Meeting ID: 843 9834 1923

By Phone

Give our Central Office a call at (503)-222-6484

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES AND LINKS

VA National Center on PTSD

                PTSD Treatment Decision Aid

                Educational Materials

                Mobile Apps

                Whiteboard Videos

                Consultation Program

 

VA Healthcare – Community Care network

Minority Veterans of America

https://www.minorityvets.org/

 

Vet Centers:

Central Oregon Vet Center

Eugene Vet Center

Grants Pass Vet Center

Portland Vet Center

Salem Vet Center

 

Community Based Outpatient Clinics:

Bend CBOC

Morrow County VA Telehealth Clinic (Boardman OR)

Brookings VA Clinic

Wallowa County VA Telehealth Clinic (Enterprise OR)

Eugene Health Care Center

Eugene VA Downtown Clinic

Fairview Clinic

Grants Pass West VA CBOC

Hillsboro CBOC

Klamath Falls CBOC

La Grande CBOC

Lincoln City Clinic

North Bend VA Clinic

Community Resource and Referral Center (CRRC)

Salem CBOC

North Coast CBOC

 

Military Children Resources

Military kids face unique psychological challenges related to military life. Compared to their non-military peers, military kids are many times more likely to move multiple times during their school careers and have a parent absent for long periods of time in potentially dangerous locations – factors that can greatly stress military kids’ mental health.

The Defense Health Agency maintains two online resources to support military children use the links povided below:

  • Military Kids Connect is an online community specifically for military children ages 6-17, and provides access to age-appropriate resources for military kids and also for parents, caregivers, and educators to help them understand and support military kids at home and in school.
  • Sesame Street for Military Families is a free, bilingual (English and Spanish) website where families can find information and multimedia resources on the topics of military deployments, multiple deployments, homecomings, injuries, grief, and self-expression.
AM – All Month – COVID-19 Coronavirus Vaccine Access Information by OHA – Oregon Health Authority – English & Español
Jan 30 all-day

Sponsor Logo

COVID-19 Vaccine Access Information

Información de acceso a la vacuna COVID-19

English & Espanol

As of April 19, 2021, all Oregonians over 16 are now eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine.
**This is a big day for the state. Many thanks to the folks on the front lines who are running vaccination sites and working so hard to get as many people as possible vaccinated.
See below for information on getting scheduled for a vaccine.
Accelerated Access to COVID-19 Vaccinations
Scheduling a Vaccination
The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has created several resources to assist individuals in planning for their COVID-19 vaccination:
How to find a COVID-19 Vaccine in Oregon
Available in Spanish at Cómo encontrar una vacuna contra el COVID-19 en Oregon
What to know before you get vaccinated
Post Vaccination: What we all need to do together
Scheduling a COVID-19 vaccine is primarily managed through the
OHA’s Get Vaccinated Oregon website.
The OHA has created a Get Vaccinated Oregon Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) page.
Multi-lingual assistance using the Get Vaccinated Oregon tool is also available by calling 211.
Some local pharmacies are offering vaccinations through a Federal Retail Pharmacy Program partnership.
Appointments can be made by visiting pharmacy websites directly:
If you need to get a vaccine through the drive-through site at PDX Airport, please go to OHSU’s COVID-19 Vaccine: Information and Appointments page.
All COVID-19 vaccine sites are dependent upon the availability of vaccine supply, which is determined by many factors, including supply at the national level and allocation at the federal and state levels.
Appointments are required.
Multnomah County maintains the COVID-19 Vaccine page which includes information options for scheduling a vaccination and resources for individuals who may need assistance scheduling an appointment due to language or barriers with technology.
Lastly, if you’re an immigrant, please know the following:
All eligible people in Oregon can get the vaccine.
You do NOT need to be a U.S. citizen to get the vaccine.
Getting the vaccine will NOT affect your immigration status or count as a public charge.
You do not need to have or provide a social security number.
You do not need to have identification.
If you need help, you can call the Safe + Strong Helpline at 1-800-923-HELP (4357).
**See active links in this bulletin by
Oregon Legislature, Speaker of the House, Rep. Tina Kotek’s
published  4/19/2021 at:

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/ORLEG/bulletins/2cd30a8

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/ORLEG/bulletins/2cd30a8

House Speaker Tina Kotek

Weekly Update: Vaccines, Session Progress, Budget Hearing

AM – All Month – Dry January 2023 – Information and Resources
Jan 30 all-day
AM - All Month - Dry January 2023  -  Information and Resources

 

Dry January 

Information and Resources

What is Dry January?

Dry January is a public initiative that encourages people to give up drinking alcohol for 31 days. An organization called Alcohol Change UK is credited with starting the movement in 2013.

Although similar initiatives have taken place throughout history.

The Finnish government launched a campaign called “Sober January” in 1942 as part of the war effort. Since that time, different people have publicly participated in similar experiments.

But in 2014, Alcohol Change UK made it official by trademarking the term “Dry January” and thus a movement was born.

Let’s talk about why people do it and what to expect.

Dry January: Your Complete Guide

Dry January Benefits

If you’re deciding whether to participate in Dry January this year, a good place to start is by examining all the benefits of taking an extended break from drinking. Some of the biggest benefits of completing Dry January include:

  • Improved digestion
  • Better quality sleep
  • Weight loss
  • Saving money
  • Improved focus and mental clarity
  • Healthier, glowing skin
  • Stronger immune system

There are more benefits, of course, but these are some of the most commonly reported. Let’s dive into a few of these in more detail.

1. You’ll repair your leaky gut.

Alcohol is highly inflammatory and damages the intestinal lining, which leads to increased permeability known as “leaky gut”.

A 2021 study examined the effects of alcohol on the liver and other organs of the body. The results showed that after 3-weeks of abstinence from drinking, subjects saw a complete recovery of gut barrier function.

The intestinal lining isn’t the only part of your digestive system negatively impacted.

Alcohol also does damage to your gut, including disrupting the gut microbiota. After one month, you won’t likely see a full reversal of gut dysbiosis, but it’s long enough to significantly increase the number of healthy bacteria in the gut.

This will improve your physical health, immune system, and mood.

2. You might lose weight.

Alcohol can lead to weight gain for a number of reasons. That’s because alcohol:

Depending on your consumption habits and drink of choice (I’m looking at you cider and beer), you’ll likely be dropping thousands of empty, liquid calories from your diet which your waistline will surely thank you for.

Aside from the calories gained from the alcohol itself, we are also eliminating whatever fried, greasy foods you like to scarf down after a night of binge drinking.

Will a month of sobriety lead to weight loss?

As long as you don’t replace alcohol with sugary drinks and snacks for 31 days, it’s possible! About 58% of past Dry January participants report losing weight.

3. You’ll sleep better.

Who doesn’t want better sleep? Ever notice how you always feel tired when you wake up the day after drinking? Even if you’ve been asleep for eight or more hours?

It’s because alcohol disrupts the most restorative phase of sleep. Even though alcohol acts as a depressant, causing us to “pass out,” we’re not getting high-quality sleep.

That’s because in the second half of the night, as alcohol leaves our system, our bodies experience rebound arousal, which makes for more fitful sleep and frequent waking up.

In a 2018 University of Sussex study of the effects of participating in Dry January, a whopping 71% of participants reported improved sleep.

4. You’ll save money.

Drinking is expensive. Depending on where you live, you could be paying upwards of $12 or $15 for one cocktail.

Those add up.

I don’t know about you, but in my heaviest drinking days, it was nothing to spend up to 20% of my income just on drinks and cigarettes. Add that to whatever terrible food you’re having delivered at 11 pm and you’ve got a recipe for, “Where the hell did all my money go?”

In that same 2018 study from the University of Sussex, 88% of Dry January participants reported saving money.

5. Your skin might improve.

Alcohol is a diuretic and very inflammatory – two things that are terrible for your skin. Not only does alcohol give your skin a dry, red, puffy appearance but it also speeds up the aging process.

As a result, drinking even moderate amounts of alcohol regularly (the equivalent of one drink per day) can lead to:

  • Dilated vessels
  • Dull, lackluster complexion
  • Rosacea
  • Acne
  • Loose skin
  • Fine lines and wrinkles

In the aforementioned University of Sussex study, 54% of Dry January participants reported better-looking skin.

By taking a month off from drinking, you’ll give your skin a much-needed chance to recuperate. Use this time to get high-quality sleep, stay hydrated, and repair your gut health (which also impacts your skin’s appearance).

6. You’ll beat those colds faster.

A healthy immune system is a terrible thing to waste, which is essentially what we do every time we grab drinks with our friends. Alcohol does your immune system zero favors and since January is the height of cold and flu season in most places, your body will appreciate the boost.

A 2018 study examined the benefits of Dry January, and 65% of participants reported improvement in overall health. Beyond immune system benefits, taking a month-long break from drinking can lead to healthy changes in the gut, liver, and cardiovascular system.

Want to learn more about how alcohol harms your immune system? Check out this video:

7. You’ll feel better.

Alcohol makes depression and anxiety worse. Taking a break can help you improve your mood and stress levels.

Did you know that drinking any amount of alcohol chronically (including one unit of alcohol per night or a few drinks every Friday) disrupts your Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal axis (HPA)?

This is the body system responsible for maintaining the physiological balance between what you do and don’t perceive as stressful. When you drink any amount of alcohol regularly, you increase the amount of cortisol that is released at baseline when you are not drinking.

Translation?

Alcohol makes you more stressed. Which is ironic considering how many people drink alcohol to relax.

Taking a month-long break from alcohol can help you return your baseline stress levels to normal and become less emotionally reactive.

Plus, no more dealing with the dreaded hangxiety after a night of heavy drinking.

8. You’ll change your relationship with alcohol.

Even if you decide to resume drinking after completing Dry January, there’s a good chance you will drink less in the future.

A follow-up study to the University of Sussex research showed that six months after completing Dry January, participants drank alcohol on fewer days per week and consumed fewer units of alcohol when they did drink.

Additional Dry January Benefits

These are just a few benefits you might experience.

If you’re looking for additional motivation, visit “The Top Benefits of Quitting Alcohol (Even Temporarily)” for a more comprehensive breakdown of why ditching alcohol for a month or more is good for you.

Dry January Tips

Nothing worth doing comes easily. Such is the case with abstaining from alcohol for a month, especially if you’re a regular or semi-regular drinker.

Quitting alcohol for one month is not as simple as saying, “Well I just won’t drink.” There will be internal and external pressures on you to cave before the 31 days are over and you need a plan for managing them.

This is especially true for gray area drinkers and people who have an unhealthy relationship with alcohol.

Because I want you to succeed and reach February 1st with an entire month of sobriety under your belt, I’m supplying you with a comprehensive list of Dry January tips to prepare for the weeks ahead.

But first, a word of caution:

If you abuse alcohol or think you might be an alcoholic, you should consult with a medical doctor before attempting Dry January (or quitting). I’ll include a quiz at the end of this article to help you determine if you’re at risk.

Quitting alcohol unsupervised can be medically dangerous for some people who suffer from alcohol use disorder. You can experience life-threatening withdrawal symptoms like DTs and may require a medical detox.

This is not (and should not) deter you from getting sober and quitting alcohol. But it is to encourage you to take the risks very seriously and reach out to your doctor.

With that, on to our Dry January tips.

1. Know your “why” for completing Dry January.

You will come back to this repeatedly throughout the month. Why are you doing Dry January? Get as granular and specific as possible.

I recommend writing this information down in a journal or making a list and placing it somewhere you can see, like your refrigerator or bathroom mirror.

Here are some ideas to get you started.

“I want to do Dry January to…”

  • Feel healthier
  • Save money
  • Be more productive
  • Focus on my mental health
  • Focus on my physical health
  • Change my relationship with alcohol
  • Spend more quality time with my kids and family

Something motivated you to take on this challenge. What was it?

Another approach you can take is to imagine who you will be on February 1st after completing 31 days of sobriety.

Who do you want to be on the other side of this month? How is she or he different from the person reading this right now?

Write it all out and put it somewhere for safekeeping. You can even set little reminders in your phone to ping you throughout the month, to remind you why you’re doing this and motivate you to keep going.

2. Identify your triggers.

The next thing you’ll want to do is take time to identify and list all of your triggers. You will be surprised by how many you have.

There are obvious things like getting an invitation to happy hour or a party where there will be lots of drinking. It’s like getting invited to a bakery when you’re off bread.

But there are subtle triggers that can derail you just as easily.

How triggers work:

Alcohol hijacks the reward system in our brains. We drink, and it gives us an artificial dopamine boost, which our brains like (at least first). This is perceived as a reward. We are hardwired to repeat behaviors that give us rewards.

One of the ways our brain does this is by registering signals and cues in anticipation of those rewards. We walk into a room and smell food cooking, which activates a memory of a delicious meal, and now our mouths are watering, and we can’t think of anything else.

We’re now giddy with anticipation for the meal. We might even do a little happy dance as it’s brought to the table.

Alcohol triggers:

Alcohol works the same way. What are the sounds, smells, environments, and cues that trigger the anticipation of a drink in your life?

Sometimes these are happy or “positive” things like walking into your favorite bar or showing up to a party with friends. Other times, these are negative situations like having a fight with a partner or experiencing a stressful day at work.

In both cases, we feel a strong craving to drink alcohol.

There are quirky triggers, too. Let’s say you have a habit of drinking wine while you cook. The first time you go to cook a meal without a glass of wine will feel a little triggering. Your brain will say, “Wait a minute! This is not how we usually do this.”

Maybe you like to come home after work and sit down in your favorite chair and have a beer. The minute you get home and look at your chair, your brain is going to light up in anticipation of that beer.

This is when alcohol cravings come into play.

3. Make a plan for managing cravings.

Alcohol cravings are going to happen during Dry January.

But you can prepare for them! Once you know your triggers, you can make a plan for dealing with the inevitable craving that will threaten your ability to complete Dry January successfully.

Let’s go back to the “I drink wine when I cook” scenario. If you know you’re going to crave a glass of wine when you cook, there are a few things you can do ahead of time to ensure you don’t cave.

  1. Remove wine from your house.
  2. Have a replacement drink available.
  3. Try cooking something new, so your attention is more focused on the cooking and less on the absence of wine.

This is a good time to experiment with options. Some people find that pouring a non-alcoholic spritzer into a wine glass scratches the itch. Other people have the opposite experience and get triggered even further.

When it comes to anticipating your cravings, you need to experiment with ways to change the habit of drinking.

Figure out what works for you.

A quick explainer on habits:

Dry January is challenging because you’re attacking a behavior on two fronts.

There’s the habitual aspect of your drinking and the compulsion to drink that comes from how alcohol reshapes our brain circuitry and neurochemistry to want to drink more.

The good news is there are things you can proactively do to tackle the habitual side of drinking.

Change your environment: Remove alcohol from your house and avoid going to alcohol-centered places like bars and clubs, at least in the beginning.

Change your routine: If you associate drinking with coming home and sitting in your comfy chair, change that routine. Run errands after work instead. Sit in a different part of the house. These seem like small things, but you’re trying to disrupt the habit loop that you’ve attached to drinking.

  • Know your cues: Understand your drinking cues. For me, 4:30 pm on a Friday was a big one. That was the normal happy hour time. What are yours?
  • Change your habit loops: If you know that 4:30 pm on a Friday is going to be alcohol craving central, then make a new plan for that time. Schedule a class at the gym or arrange to have dinner with a friend who knows you’re not drinking. Find a way to disrupt the loop.

Anticipating your cravings and triggers and actively making a plan for dealing with them is your best defense against drinking.

4. Keep yourself busy.

One of the biggest saboteurs of sobriety is boredom.

If you do not actively plan to replace your drinking activities with something else, you’ll find yourself home on the couch, bored to tears, and ready to give up.

Guess what happens to people who find themselves in this emotional space?

There are many ways to have fun without alcohol, but if your social life is usually wrapped up in drinking, it can be hard to see them.

That’s why thinking about what you’ll do instead of drinking before starting Dry January is a great idea.

Some ideas include:

  • Starting a new fitness class.
  • Learning a new skill (like taking a woodworking course).
  • Booking tickets to a live show.
  • Going to museums.
  • Planning more daytime activities like going to the park or shopping with friends.
  • Booking a spa day.

Put together a list of things to do that will remove you from temptation.

The first Saturday morning you wake up after successfully avoiding happy hour is the most magical “I can do anything” feeling. It is 100% worth it.

The more you reap the rewards of not drinking, the more motivation you’ll have to keep going.

5. Have a support system in place.

Dry January is really hard. Before you start, set up your sobriety support network.

It can be as simple as having a friend or family member you can reach out to in times of temptation for moral support.

Or you can join an online community, like our Soberish private Facebook group, to connect with people on a similar path as you.

Some people recognize ahead of time that their relationship with alcohol is complex, and they start counseling or decide to attend group sessions like AA or SMART Recovery. A lot of people do both.

Or you can do a more formalized program, like Annie Grace’s 100 Days of Lasting Change (affiliate link). If you’re unfamiliar with Annie Grace, she is the author of This Naked Mind, a book I highly recommend to anyone who wants to change their relationship with alcohol.

She is a brilliant mind in the sobriety space, and a trusted alternative to more traditional approaches to quitting alcohol.

During Dry January, you’ll want people to talk to who understand this experience. Take some time to join a few groups or sign up with a counselor now so you’re ready to go once January hits.

6. Remember your “why” on difficult days.

Our Dry January tips come full circle with #6. On days you want to give up and drink, revisit your reasons for participating in Dry January.

What did you want to achieve? What motivates you to make this big change?

Spend time reconnecting with your reasons. This is especially important in the second half of the month when the initial excitement and novelty of Dry January wears off.

This happens to a lot of us, right?

We start a new year and set all these amazing goals, maybe pay for a new gym membership, excited for what’s to come. And then, boom! Reality sets in.

The new habit becomes hard, our motivation declines, and we drop our resolutions like so many good intentions before them.

Sometimes taking time to reconnect with that core motivation is enough to reignite that spark that made you want to start.

Additional Dry January Resources

I think education is one of the most important resources in sobriety, including temporary stints like Dry January.

Why not take this time to lean into understanding your relationship with alcohol?

If you want to learn more about the benefits of Dry January and tips and tools for completing the month successfully, this list of resources can help. Bookmark this page to refer back to throughout the month.

If you’re a reader, I have a list of books that helped jumpstart my own recovery, as well as a list of five recovery memoirs that helped me get through my first month of not drinking.

The recovery memoirs alone dramatically changed my perspective on drinking. Highly recommend.

Additionally, I think you’ll find a lot of benefits from these resources. I’ve grouped them according to topic.

Sobriety and Alcohol Addiction

Mental Health

Goals and Habits

 

AM – All Month – OAPS – Oregon Alliance to Prevent Suicide – Oregon LGBTQ2SIA+ Suicide Prevention – Youth Resources – Family Resources
Jan 30 all-day

The Oregon Alliance to Prevent Suicide has created a county-based LGBTQ+ Youth Resource List.  ( 14 Pages in PDF Format) 

>>> Check it out here <<<

and share with partners.

The Oregon Alliance to Prevent Suicide

Statewide Suicide Prevention Liaison:
Annette Marcus
Email:amarcus@aocmhp.org
Phone: (503) 399-7201

Suicide Prevention Project Specialist:
Jennifer Fraga
Email: jfraga@aocmhp.org
Phone: (503) 399-7201

MORE OREGON RESCOURCES

Crisis & Support Lines

OREGON LGBTQ CRISIS LINES

Local, state, national and LGBTQ crisis and support resources.

CRISIS & SUPPORT LINES

If you are experiencing a life-threatening emergency, please call 911.

If you or a friend are experiencing suicidal thoughts or are having a crisis and need support, contact Oregon’s Lines for Life: 800-273-8255.

Lines for Life will connect you with 24-hr crisis lines that provide crisis intervention and targeted support for youth, families, older adults, military service members and veterans for mental health crises and support, suicide prevention, help with addiction and recovery and racial equity and support – in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority.

English: 800-273-8255
En español: 888-628-9454
TTY: 800-799-4TTY (4889)

Oregon YouthLine: 877-968-8491.

Oregon YouthLine is a peer crisis line for youth ages 21 and younger. Teens are available to help daily, 4 to 10 p.m. Pacific Time (off-hour calls answered by adult call counselors) or chat online at the YouthLine website.

Text:teen2teen” to 839863
Chat online: at YouthLine website

24/7 Crisis Text Line: Text 741741 with the message “Home” for support any time, night or day.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline – National suicide prevention support, available 24/7. Call: 800-273-8255.

Nacional de Prevención del Suicidioin Spanish call: 888-628-9454.

LGBTQ CRISIS LINES & ONLINE CHAT

Trevor Lifeline (for LGBTQ youth) 24 hours: 1-866-488-7386.

TrevorChat is available 24/7 days a week, or you can text the word “START” to 678-678, available 24/7.

CHAT SPACE FOR LGBTQ YOUTH

Q Chat Space is an online community chat for LGBTQ youth and teens who are questioning their identity, ages 13-19, facilitated by staff and volunteers from LGBTQ community centers around the country. Provides a place to connect and get access to information and resources. Q Chat Space is a program of CenterLink, the national organization for LGBTQ community centers.

Oregon Child Abuse Hotline – to report child abuse and neglect call: 855-503-SAFE (7233), available 24/7.

PARENT SUPPORT LINES

Reach Out Oregon WarmlineParent Support Line call: 833-732-2467, Monday – Friday 12-7 pm PST (except for holidays).

A parent / caregiver support service that provides peer support, access to services and referrals for parents and caregivers with a child or youth experiencing emotional, behavioral and mental health challenges. The warmline is a project of Reach Out Oregon and the Oregon Family Support Network.

 

Oregon-Based LGBTQ Services& Support

OREGON LGBTQ RESOURCES & SUPPORTS

Selected resources listed on this website focus on providing services and support to reduce mental health risks and promote well-being for LGBTQ young people.

RESOURCES FOR PEOPLE OF COLOR

Asian Pacific Island Pride
Non-profit organization that serves LGBTQ API communities in greater Portland and provides safe and supportive environments to celebrate, educate and bring communities together. apipride@gmail.com

Native American Youth and Family Center (NAYA)
A multi-service agency that provides a wide range of services and supports for Native American children, youth, adults and families, including Two-Spirit and LGBTQ support groups and events.

PDX Latinx Pride – Pride events in Portland for the Latinx LGBTQ community, families and allies. Central facebook page provides a space to connect throughout the year – www.facebook.com/PDXlatinxpride

Portland Two-Spirit Society
P2SS is a social, cultural, educational, resource group for the LGBTIQ Native American/Alaskan Natives and their families; to come together and share, connect, reclaim, and restore culture and community.

Sankofa Collective Northwest
Sankofa provides support, education and advocacy for Black families, friends and LGBTQ people through monthly support groups, faith outreach, mini-grants and an annual Portland Black Pride celebration. Sankofa began as the first African American chapter of PFLAG in the U.S. and relaunched as the Sankofa Collective Northwest in 2016.

Utopia PDX – United Territories of Pacific Islanders Alliance Portland
Portland chapter of a nonprofit organization by and for queer and trans Pacific Islanders that provides support, community organizing, political engagement, and cultural stewardship. https://www.facebook.com/utopiaportland

 

YOUTH RESOURCES – STATE ACCESS

SMYRC (Sexual & Gender Minority Youth Resource Center)
SMYRC’s on-site center in Portland provides a safe, supervised, harassment-free space for sexual and gender minority youth ages 13-23 who participate in positive activities such as art, music, community organizing, open mic nights, drag shows, and support groups and receive services including case management, resource referral, counseling, and education. Through Bridge 13, SMYRC provides LGBTQ trainings, educational workshops and consultations for social support staff, health professionals, youth providers, and educators. SMRYC also helps families and youth find local resources in their communities that support LGBTQ youth and families.

Oregon Queer Youth Summit
A conference held by and for queer and trans identified youth and their allies from the state of Oregon. Leadership development and organizing events happens year-round.

SCHOOL RESOURCES – STATEWIDE

Oregon Safe Schools & Communities Coalition (OSSCC)
A coalition of public and private organizations in Oregon that supports community efforts to reduce youth suicide and risk behaviors for LGBTQ youth. Provides education, data collection, and support services to create safe schools and communities for youth, teachers, and families.

GSA (Genders & Sexualities Alliance) School Clubs
GSA school clubs are available in many Oregon schools to provide support for LGBTQ students and allies and to provide education and events to promote safer schools and communities. Individual GSAs are listed by county and by school. (See National listings for information on GSA Network – a national organization that provides education and training to help students and local GSA clubs in schools to advocate for safer schools and policies to protect LGBTQ students from harassment and victimization.)

GLSEN Oregon
State chapter of the national organization that works to ensure safe schools for all students. GLSEN’s state chapter supports students and educators to adopt LGBTQ-affirming public policy, plan teacher trainings, and hold events for students, educators, parents, and allies.

FAMILY RESOURCES

Basic Rights Oregon Fierce Families Network
Advocates for public policy that meets the needs of a breadth of the LGBTQ communities. Provides and distributes resources to help families understand their LGBTQ+ children.

Pride Foundation Scholarship Program
Community foundation that funds LGBTQ programs and supports in the Northwest, and funds scholarships for LGBTQ student leaders.

YOUTH & FAMILY RESOURCES BY COUNTY

BENTON COUNTY

Cheldelin Middle School Pride Club
Cheldelin Middle School sponsored group that provides a confidential, safe space for students to support each other.

Corvallis High School Sexuality And Gender Alliance (SAGA)
A Corvallis High School sponsored GSA group that promotes understanding, acceptance and inclusion of all.

CLACKAMAS COUNTY

Clackamas High School GSA
A Clackamas High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

Milwaukie High School & Milwaukie Academy of the Arts Queer-Straight Alliance
A Milwaukie High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

The Living Room
A safe space that provides peer support and youth drop-in services, resources to promote personal growth and leadership skills, to build relationships and promote positive development of LGBTQ youth and allies.

Youth ERA Clackamas
A youth-focused program of services that includes a drop-in center, crisis services, online support, wrap around services, training and technical assistance for youth-serving groups and agencies.

CLATSOP COUNTY

Astoria High School Rainbow Alliance (GSA)
An Astoria High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

Lower Columbia Q Center
A community center that provides a range of resources and support activities for LGBTQ youth and adults, including youth support and educational activities.

Seaside High School GSA
A Seaside High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

COLUMBIA COUNTY

Scappoose High School FLATH/GSA
A Scappoose High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

COOS COUNTY

PFLAG Coos Bay/South Coast
A Coos Bay/South Coast chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

Youth ERA Coos
A youth-focused program of services that includes a drop-in center, crisis services, online support, wrap around services, training and technical assistance for youth-serving groups and agencies.

CROOK COUNTY

PFLAG Central Oregon
A Central Oregon chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

PFLAG Prineville
A Prineville chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

CURRY COUNTY

Brookings-Harbor High School LGBTQ+ and Straight Alliance Club
A Brookings-Harbor High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

PFLAG Curry County
Curry County chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

DESCHUTES COUNTY

PFLAG Central Oregon
A Central Oregon chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

Mountain View High School GSA
A Mountain View High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

DOUGLAS COUNTY

PFLAG Douglas County
A Douglas County chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

HOOD RIVER COUNTY

Hood River Valley High School GSA
A Hood River Valley High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

JACKSON COUNTY

Lotus Rising Project
A community organization in Southern Oregon that provides activities and services for LGBTQ youth and adults.

Phoenix High School GSA
A Phoenix High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

Youth ERA Medford
A youth-focused program of services that includes a drop-in center, crisis services, online support, wrap around services, training and technical assistance for youth-serving groups and agencies.

JOSEPHINE COUNTY

Grants Pass High School Southern Oregon Pride (GSA)
A Grants Pass High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

PFLAG Grants Pass
A Grants Pass chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

LANE COUNTY

Churchill High School GSA
A Churchill High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

Sheldon High School GSA
A Sheldon High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

South Eugene High School GSA
A South Eugene High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

Trans*Ponder
A Lane County parent support group for families and caregivers with gender diverse children.

Willamette High School GSA
A Willamette High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion. https://www.facebook.com/Willamette-High-School-GSA-273630792665482

Youth ERA Eugene
A youth-focused program of services that includes a drop-in center, crisis services, online support, wrap around services, training and technical assistance for youth-serving groups and agencies.

LINCOLN COUNTY

Newport High School GSA
A Newport High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

PFLAG Oregon Central Coast
Oregon Central Coast chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

The Bravery Center
A resource center that provides a safe space for LGBTQ+ youth, ages 14-24, in Lincoln County.

LINN COUNTY

Intersection Connection via Zoom
A support group for area middle and high school students with regular meetings held on Zoom.

Out-N-About
A support group for high school-aged LGBTQ youth in Linn and Benton with regular meetings via Zoom.

MARION COUNTY

PFLAG Salem
Salem chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

Rainbow Youth
Support groups for middle and high school students in Marion and Polk Counties. Services include social activities, and individual support.

Youth ERA Salem
A youth-focused program of services that includes a drop-in center, crisis services, online support, wrap around services, training and technical assistance for youth-serving groups and agencies.

MULTNOMAH COUNTY

Asian Pacific Island Pride
Non-profit organization that serves LGBTQ API communities in greater Portland and provides safe and supportive environments to celebrate, educate and bring communities together. apipride@gmail.com

Brave Space, LLC
An organization that provides counseling and support and facilitates access to knowledgeable providers for transgender and genderqueer young people, adults and their families.

Bridging Voices
A chorus for LGBTQ+ and allied youth, ages 13-21 in a safe, accessible place for youth to experience empowerment and unity through music. Bridging Voices is Portland’s first LGBTQ+ and Allied Youth Chorus and is one of the largest choruses of its kind.

Cascade AIDS Project (CAP)
A multi-service agency that provides a range of health, education housing and peer support services for adults. Also provides services for youth. Includes Prism Health that provides gender affirming care.

Native American Youth and Family Center (NAYA)
A multi-service agency that provides a wide range of services and supports for Native American children, youth, adults and families, including Two-Spirit and LGBTQ support groups and events.

OHSU Transgender Health Program
Health care services for transgender for gender diverse children, youth and adults at Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU). Provides information, referrals and access to resources.

Outside In Transgender Health Services
Health care and social services for youth experiencing homelessness and others. Provides an LGBTQ affirming medical clinic, transgender care, housing assistance, a Queer Zone group and a community drop-in center.

P:ear
Organization that provides a safe space, food, recreation, and mentorship through art, barista, and bike mechanic programs for youth who are experiencing homelessness and unstable housing.

PFLAG Portland
Portland chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

Portland Two-Spirit Society
P2SS is a social, cultural, educational, resource group for the LGBTIQ Native American/Alaskan Natives and their families; to come together and share, connect, reclaim, and restore culture and community.

Prism Healthcare Clinic
Health care agency that provides a wide range of services for LGBTQ people, including primary care and behavioral health services and counseling, gender-affirming care and STI testing.

Q Center
Portland’s LGBTQ community center. Provides a range of support groups, activities and a directory of local LGBTQ resources and referrals. Support groups are provided for adults related to gender identity, addiction recovery, veterans, seniors and a support group for youth under age 18.

Quest Center for Integrative Health
Health center that provides health and mental health care to youth and adults that includes counseling, LGBTQ health services, HIV services and wellness care.

Sankofa Collective Northwest
Sankofa provides support, education and advocacy for Black families, friends and LGBTQ people through monthly support groups, faith outreach, mini-grants and an annual Portland Black Pride celebration. Sankofa began as the first African American chapter of PFLAG in the U.S. and relaunched as the Sankofa Collective Northwest in 2016.

SMYRC (Sexual & Gender Minority Youth Resource Center)
SMYRC’s on-site center in Portland provides a safe, supervised, harassment-free space for sexual and gender minority youth ages 13-23 who participate in positive activities such as art, music, community organizing, open mic nights, drag shows, and support groups and receive services including case management, resource referral, counseling, and education. Through Bridge 13, SMYRC provides LGBTQ trainings, educational workshops and consultations for social support staff, health professionals, youth providers, and educators.

TransActive Gender Project
A program at Lewis & Clark that provides services and support for transgender and gender diverse children, youth, and families, including support groups for children and youth (ages 4-18), caregivers and families, as well as advocacy, counseling and referrals.

POLK COUNTY

Dallas High School GSA
A Dallas High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion. https://www.facebook.com/Dallas-High-School-GSA-702785019853083

PFLAG Salem
A Salem chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

Rainbow Youth
Organization that provides safe and welcoming spaces for LGBTQIA+ youth and their friends to find connection, support, and friendship in Marion and Polk Counties. Provides support meetings for middle and high-school aged youth, ages 18 and under.

UMATILLA COUNTY

PFLAG Pendelton
Pendelton chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

UNION COUNTY

PFLAG Union County
Union County chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents. https://www.facebook.com/PflagUnionCounty

WALLOWA COUNTY

Safe Harbors
Community organization that provides education and outreach with crisis intervention and advocacy services for survivors of domestic, sexual and dating violence for youth and adults.

WASHINGTON COUNTY

Beaverton High School GSA
A Beaverton High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

Hillsboro High School GSA
A Hillsboro High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

Sherwood High School Sexuality & Gender Alliance (SAGA)
A Sherwood High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

 

 

Research-Based Publications for Families withLGBTQ Children

EVIDENCE-BASED FAMILY GUIDANCE RESOURCES

The evidence-based resources included here were developed by the Family Acceptance Project (FAP) and are rooted in FAP’s groundbreaking research with LGBTQ youth, young adults and families. This research and guidance from the lived experiences of ethnically, racially and religiously diverse families with LGBTQ young people enabled FAP to develop the first evidence-based family support model to prevent health risks and promote well-being for LGBTQ children and youth. FAP continues to produce a series of evidence-based resources to help to decrease health risks and promote well-being for LGBTQ children and youth.

FAMILY EDUCATION BOOKLETS

“Best Practice” Resources for Suicide Prevention for LGBTQ Youth
(English, Spanish & Chinese and a growing series of faith-based versions)

Key information from FAP’s research on how families can help support their lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBTQ) children to reduce health risks and support positive development. These family education booklets have been designated as “Best Practice” resources for suicide prevention for LGBTQ young people by the Best Practices Registry for Suicide Prevention.

HEALTHY FUTURES POSTER SERIES

Available from FAP in 10 languages, including English, Spanish, Chinese (traditional and simplified), Hindi, Korean, Japanese, Punjabi, Tagalog and Vietnamese. Other versions are in development.

Series of 3 posters that tell the “story” of family accepting and rejecting behaviors and show how these behaviors contribute to serious health risks including suicidal behavior and drug use and how they help protect against risk and promote well-being. Each poster includes common accepting and rejecting behaviors that are expressed across diverse cultures. The posters are available to download free in 4 sizes and include the camera-ready art to take to a commercial printer.

DEVELOPING THE FIELD OF FAMILY SUPPORT FOR LGBTQ CHILDREN & YOUTH

Providing Services & Support

Although it may seem surprising to many people who are concerned about the health and well-being of children and youth, before the Family Acceptance Project was established 20 years ago, no one had studied LGBTQ young people and families. As a result, many mainstream services, including government agencies, have not included services and support for diverse families with LGBTQ children. As the Family Acceptance Project has shown, families can learn to support their LGBTQ children when services are provided in ways that are culturally relevant for them. Culturally appropriate services are needed to help families learn to support their LGBTQ children to reduce serious health risks, strengthen families and support positive development. Use this website to learn about these issues to provide support for LGBTQ children, youth and families – urgently needed now as LGBTQ young people and families are coping with the losses from Covid-19.

FAITH COMMUNITIES AND THE WELL-BEING OF LGBTQ YOUTH

A publication for faith communities and families on supporting LGBTQ youth to prevent mental health risks and to increase support, published by the Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry. GAP is a professional organization of thought leaders in the field of psychiatry who provide guidance on addressing critical emerging mental health issues.

Selected National LGBTQ Services& Support

NATIONAL LGBTQ RESOURCES & SUPPORTS

Selected resources listed on this website focus on providing services and support to reduce mental health risks and promote well-being for LGBTQ young people.

ACCESS TO LGBTQ COMMUNITY CENTERS & LOCAL RESOURCES ACROSS THE U.S.

CenterLink
CenterLink is a nonprofit organization that provides capacity building and connects more than 270 LGBTQ community centers across the U.S. in 45 states, Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia, as well as several other countries. CenterLink provides a searchable database of LGBTQ centers where LGBTQ people, families, providers and others can find and access LGBTQ services in their communities, including counseling and support services.

Family Acceptance Project
The Family Acceptance Project (FAP) is a research, education and training program that helps ethnically, racially and religiously diverse families to support their LGBTQ children. FAP conducted the first research on LGBTQ youth and families and developed the first evidence-based family support model to help families to decrease rejection and health risks and to increase support and well-being for LGBTQ young people. FAP provides training for agencies, families, providers and religious leaders on increasing family support to reduce risk for suicide, homelessness and other serious health risks and using FAP’s multilingual educational materials and family support framework, also available online.

PFLAG
PFLAG is a national organization with 400 chapters across the U.S. that provides education and support for parents, families, and friends of LGBTQ people through individual and peer support groups, public education and advocacy. Parents and others can search PFLAG’s website to find chapters and support in local communities, in person and online. Local Oregon PFLAG chapters are listed by county under Oregon-Based LGBTQ Services & Support.

TransFamilies
TransFamilies provides support services and education for transgender people and their families, including an annual conference for families and their transgender children (Gender Odyssey). Formerly called Gender Diversity, TransFamilies provides online parent support groups in English & Spanish, a transgender youth leadership program and youth support groups, as well as training for schools and organizations.

Gender Spectrum 
Gender Spectrum provides education and support for families with transgender and gender diverse children and youth, support groups and an annual conference for children, youth and families. Gender Spectrum also provides training for schools and organizations working with children and teens.

SCHOOL-BASED RESOURCES

GSA Network – Genders & Sexualities Alliance (GSA) Network
GSA Network is a national youth-led organization that provides networking and support for GSAs – school clubs that provide education, peer support and activities to promote safer schools. GSA Network connects LGBTQ+ youth and school-based GSA clubs through peer support, leadership development, community organizing and advocacy and works with a network of 40 statewide organizations representing more than 4,000 GSA clubs across the country. GSAs in Oregon schools are listed by county under Oregon-Based LGBTQ Services & Support.

GLSEN
GLSEN is a national network of educators, students, and local GLSEN Chapters that work to promote safe schools for LGBTQ students. GLSEN provides resources for educators and students, conducts school climate research, provides guidance on comprehensive school policies and information on bullying and school safety.

Safe Schools Coalition
The Safe Schools Coalition is a public-private partnership in Washington State that was among the first school-based initiatives to support LGBTQ students. The Coalition hosts a longstanding website with resources to help promote safe schools and to implement its mission of “helping schools become safe places where every family can belong, where every educator can teach, and where every child can learn, regardless of gender, gender identity or sexual orientation.”

Campus Pride
Campus Pride is a national organization working to create a safer college environment for LGBTQ students by developing resources, programs and services to support LGBTQ and ally students on college campuses across the U.S. This includes hosting Camp Pride, a summer leadership camp for LGBTQ and ally students to learn campus strategies to develop supportive campus environments and leadership skills, LGBTQ college fairs and information on the campus safety, visibility and affirmation for LGBTQ students.

FAITH-BASED ORGANIZATIONS

Affirmation LGBTQ Mormons Families & Friends
An international organization that promotes understanding, acceptance, and self-determination for individuals with diverse sexual orientations, gender identities and expressions for current and former members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Provides allyship, ministering, and educational resources and an annual international conference.

Beloved Arise
An organization that provides resources and support to empower LGBTQ teens across Christian denominations through youth programs, advocacy and ally engagement opportunities and resources for other faith-based organizations.

Brethren Mennonite Council
A nonprofit group that is committed to providing mutual support for families with gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex members. This includes LGBTQ people, families and allies, to worship, educate and provide mutual support

DignityUSA
A national Catholic organization that provides support for people of all sexual orientations, genders, and gender identities—especially gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender persons. Provides opportunities for worship, service, education and social justice.

Equally Blessed
A coalition of Call to Action, DignityUSA, and New Ways Ministry that seeks to educate and inspire Catholics to take action on behalf of LGBTQ and intersex people, their families and friends.

Eshel
An organization that works with individuals, families, and the Orthodox Jewish community to support LGBTQ members. Eshel has chapters in cities in the U.S. and Canada that provide activities, parent retreats, a speakers bureau and access to LGBTQ resources in the U.S. and Israel.

Freed Hearts
A Christian organization that helps parents, LGBTQ people, educators, therapists, and churches to create safe spaces, inspiration and encouragement. Provides resources ranging from books, podcasts, video courses and social media, including a YouTube Channel.

Friends for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Concerns
A North American Quaker faith community that holds online gatherings and worship.

Fortunate Families
A national Catholic organization and parent network that supports LGBTQ family members and facilitates conversations with bishops, pastors and Catholic Church leadership through sharing personal stories and working to establish Catholic LGBTQ Ministries in dioceses, parishes, educational institutions, and communities.

Galva – 108
An international, nonprofit religious organization – Gay & Lesbian Vaishnava Association – that provides information and support to LGBTI Vaishnavas and Hindus, their friends, and other interested persons.

Jewish Queer Youth
A group that supports and empowers LGBTQ youth in the Jewish community with a focus on teens and young adults from Orthodox, Chasidic, and Sephardic communities. Provides Drop-In Center, and services for parents, teens, and families.

Keshet
An organization that works for the full equality of LGBTQ Jews and families. Helps Jewish organizations with the skills to build LGBTQ-affirming communities, spaces for queer Jewish youth, and advances for LGBTQ rights. Offers professional development, training and consultation, youth initiatives, programs for LGBTQ Jews of Color, leadership projects and community learning.

Many Voices
A Black church movement for gay and transgender justice. Equips and brings forward Black leaders that support LGBT equality and justice through educational workshops, seminars, and dialogues – in-person and online.

Mama Dragons
An organization founded by Mormon mothers with LGBTQ children that supports, educates, and empowers mothers of LGBTQ children through a private Facebook and regional groups to support and advocate for their LGBTQ children.

Muslim Alliance for Sexual and Gender Diversity
An organization that works to support, empower and connect LGBTQ Muslims. Provides educational classes, retreats, advocacy, and resources including lectures, films video, podcasts, and blogs.

Muslims for Progressive Values
An organization that reflects Islam as a source of dignity, justice, compassion, and love for all. Offers spiritual counseling, chaplain endorsement and lectures and speaking engagements. Provides support for LGBTQ people and access to resources.

Q Christian Fellowship
An organization that cultivates radical belonging among LGBTQ+ people and allies through an annual conference, community groups, Parent Summit, and a variety of resources.

United Church of Christ LGBT Ministries
Christian religious organization that includes local churches and a global ministry. Has a specific ministry to LGBTQ people and families.

Unity Fellowship Church Movement
Unity Fellowship Church Movement is the first affirming and welcoming Black church for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender persons with several congregations across the U.S. Members of the public can RSVP to attend services online.

AM – All Month – ODVA – Oregon Dept of Veterans Affairs – Veterans Resource number (1-800-698-2411) & Veteran Resource Listings
Jan 30 all-day

 

Veteran Resource Navigator

The Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs (ODVA) has a comprehensive online resource guide (VETERAN RESOURCE NAVIGATOR) available to assist veterans in finding the benefits that are most useful to their unique circumstances at this time.

 

Use the link below for the Veteran Resource Navigator

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx)

 

USE THIS LINK TO OPEN THE VA WELCOME KIT

Print out your VA Welcome Kit

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned.

Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy, so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

Download your VA Welcome Kit

You are welcome to share this guide with friends or family members who need help with their benefits too. You can print out copies for yourself and others:

Download our guides to VA benefits and services

For Veterans

For family members

Other Resources Available to Veterans and Military Service Members

DD214 & Military Records Request:

https://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records

Veteran Resource Navigator site by ODVA:

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

(Oregon)Military Help Line:  

Call 888-457-4838

VA Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255:

Press 1.VA Confidential crisis chat at net or text to 838255 

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD:

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/

Defining Discharge Status:

https://militarybenefits.info/character-of-discharge/#:~:text=There%20are%206%20types%20of,DD%20214%20must%20have%20a

How to apply for a discharge status upgrade:

https://www.va.gov/discharge-upgrade-instructions/

Oregon Supportive Services for Vets & Families (Housing):

https://caporegon.org/what-we-do/ssvf/

Clackamas County VSO’s (Veteran Service Officers):

https://www.clackamas.us/socialservices/veterans.html

Portland VA Clinic that can help with homelessness & medical care:

https://www.portland.va.gov/locations/crrc.asp

Portland VA Mental Health Clinic:

https://www.portland.va.gov/services/mentalhealth.asp

Veterans Crisis Line/ Suicide Prevention:

https://www.veteranscrisisline.net/

 

If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance,

please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.

 

Contact ODVA Headquarters

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs
700 Summer St NE
Salem, OR 97301

Web: https://www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/default.aspx

Phone: (800) 692-9666 or (503) 373-2085

Fax: (503) 373-2392

Email:orvetsbenefits@odva.state.or.us

AM – All Month – Veteran Quick Resource List by NAMI Multnomah – Weekdays & Weekends
Jan 30 all-day

Oregon Veterans Resources may include but not be limited to:

>> DROP IN RESOURCE LIST

 

VA Community Resource & Referral Center (CRRC)

308 SW 1st Ave

Portland, OR 97204

503- 808-1256 or 800-949-1004 Ext: 51256

WEEKDAYS 8 A.M. TO 3 P.M.

THURSDAYS 10 A.M. TO 3 P.M.

Transition Projects Day Center at Bud Clark Commons

650 NW Irving Street

Portland, OR 97209

MONDAY – FRIDAY 7 A.M. TO 7 P.M.

WEEKENDS 8 A.M. TO 4 P.M.

Multnomah County Veterans’ Services Offices (VSO)*

Lincoln Building

421 SW Oak Street, Room 100

Portland, OR 97204

EVERY TUESDAY: 9 A.M. TO 12:00 P.M.

EVERY FRIDAY: 9 A.M. TO 12:00 P.M.

 

East Area Office

600 NE 8th Street, Room 100\

Gresham, OR 97030

EVERY THURSDAY 9:00 A.M. TO 11:30 A.M.

 

North / Northeast Area Office

5325 NE Martin Luther King Blvd

Portland, OR 97239

EVERY FRIDAY 2:00 P.M. TO 4:00 P.M.

Portland VA Medical Center

3710 SW U.S. Veterans Hospital Road

Portland, OR 97239

EVERY TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, AND THURSDAY 1:00 P.M. TO 3:30 P.M.

*Walk-ins are unavailable at all Multnomah County VSO locations on the last working day of every month due to VA claims deadlines.

>> CALL RESOURCE LIST

 

211Info
Dial: 2-1-1

Transition Projects Veterans Hotline
855-425-5544

Multnomah County Veterans’ Services
503-988-VETS (8387)

   Email: veteran.services@multco.us

   Call or email any time to schedule an appointment or see VSO drop-in hours.

Veterans Crisis Line
800-273-8255

Call Center for Homeless Veterans
877-424-3838

Multnomah County Veterans’ Services Aging, Disability & Veteran Services Helpline
503-988-3646

 

>>WEB RESOURCE LIST

https://www.quickresourceguide.veteran 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

QuickResourceGuide.Veteran

BRMA – Brown Mamas – The Ultimate List of Support Groups for Black Moms
Jan 30 all-day

 

The Ultimate List of Support Groups for Black Moms

Brown Mamas – Pittsburgh & U.S.  – Brown Mamas, Inc. has been around for seven years in the Pittsburgh region.  Brown Mamas began in the living room of Muffy Mendoza.  What started as 5 moms has grown to over 4000  Our mamas love our Pittsburgh chapter so much that we are expanding.  If you are mom who is ready to not just find her tribe, but to inspire other mothers and be the change she wants to see in her community, click here to learn more about starting your own Brown Mamas chapter.

Black Moms Connect – Canada & U.S.

Mommin’ Society – North Carolina & Online

Moms of Black Boys United – Atlanta & Online

Moms Make It Work – NYC

Mocha Moms, Inc. – U.S. (seriously, everywhere)

Whine & Cheese – 27 Chapters in U.S. (including D.C., PA, South Carolina, New York, etc.)

Black Women Do Breastfeed

Motherwork by Mater Mea – NYC

Beautiful Brown Girls Brunch Club – New Jersey

District Motherhued’s DMV MomTribe – D.C. Metro Area

Soul Food for Your Baby – Hawthorne, Calif.

Black Moms Blog Events – Atlanta, GA

Birthing Beautiful Communities – Cleveland, OH

Tessera Collective – Online, Self-Care Support

Melanin Mommies – Pittsburgh, PA

Pittsburgh Black Breastfeeding Circle –

Not-So Melinated Support Groups for Black Moms

Moms Club

La Leche League

Circle of Moms

Meetup.com

Facebook Support Groups for Black Moms

Black Stay-At-Home Mom Village

Black Moms Connection

Black Moms in Charge

Single Black Mothers

Moms of Black Daughters

Moms of Black Sons

Black Moms in College & Beyond

Breast Milk Donation for Black Moms

Sisterhood for Young Black Moms

CGAA – Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous – Support Meetings, Support Chat for Family and Friends, Resources – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online Via ZOOM
Jan 30 all-day

 

Who We Are

Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous is a fellowship of people who support each other in recovering from the problems resulting from excessive game playing. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop video gaming, which is completely up to you. CGAA has no dues or fees. Our groups share their collective experience and the principles that helped them, but CGAA has no experts, hierarchy, or required beliefs. We have etiquette and traditions, but no strict rules.
If you are struggling with compulsive gaming, leave your contact info at 970-364-3497 and a CGAA member will call you back
Or email us at helpline@cgaa.info
For other issues, contact us at support@cgaa.info

 

ZOOM MEETINGS

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 
ZOOM MEETING

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 

Gamers Find A Local Support Group

Use the link below to get more information about local groups and a notification when a local meeting is started. Due to the COVID pandemic, most meetings are currently held in an outdoor setting or online.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LOCAL GROUP FINDER TOOL

 

CONTACT GROUPS IN OREGON BY LOCATION

 

 

SUPPORT FOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS

What Can I Do?

Video gaming is a common pastime. To many people, it is surprising that it can become a serious addiction, that is, an activity that is engaged in compulsively, without control or concern for consequences.

Video gaming addiction is a very serious problem that is harmful to everyone it touches. Since everyone involved suffers from it, everyone involved needs some help. Here are some important things to know.

First, no one is responsible for someone else’s compulsive gaming. As the Al-Anon slogan goes, “I didn’t cause it, I can’t control it, and I can’t cure it.”

You didn’t cause it.

Some people partly blame themselves for the dysfunctional behavior of their family members, particularly with addicts who are very quick to shift responsibility off themselves and blame others. Perhaps you played games with your loved one, purchased games, or encouraged it, thinking it was a harmless leisure activity. Maybe you’ve been involved in some conflict and wonder if that has driven him or her to hide away in gaming. But no one is responsible for another person’s behavior or mental disorders.

You can’t control it.

You may have already tried to talk to your friend or family member. Perhaps you have bargained with them, or given ultimatums. You have tried to help them see what damage they are doing to themselves and others. And none of it has worked. This is baffling to you. Why don’t they seem to understand or care? Why can’t they see what is obvious to you? This is actually a symptom of the disease of addiction, one that destines efforts for control to failure.

You can’t cure it.

We all would like to believe that we have the ability to help those we love. We often think that if we can just get the right information, figure out the right thing to say or do, perhaps change something about ourselves, we can fix the problem. People should be able to solve their own problems. Why can’t we do that with this one? There is a simple reason. There is no cure for addiction. It requires treatment. The recovery process is long and difficult. And there is only one person who can start that process, the one who is gaming compulsively. There are things you can do. Here are some suggestions that you may want to consider, that other family members and friends have found helpful.

Get information.

The literature of recovery fellowships for family and friends of addicts (such as Al-Anon) has much helpful guidance, some of which is available online as well. There are people who have been in situations very similar to yours, who have learned much from them, and who are willing to share the lessons learned, their experience, strength and hope. We hope you avail yourself of such resources.

Detach with love.

Putting energy into arguing with someone who is playing compulsively will not help either of you. Your loved one has a serious problem that you are powerless to control or cure, and that they will not get help until they want it. As much as you love someone, you cannot force this process on another person.

Stop enabling.

Paradoxically, at the same time people are arguing with, bargaining with or shaming a compulsive gamer, they are often (perhaps without realizing it) supporting the addiction in many ways. Anything that shields an addict from the consequences of his or her behavior is enabling, and can include such basic things as providing food, shelter, money, companionship, housekeeping, and covering for employment and legal difficulties. Helping a compulsive gamer keep up an appearance of normalcy is helping him or her continue in the destructive behavior. While you cannot change him or her, you can make changes for yourself. You can shift your energy away from enabling behaviors and toward meeting your own needs.

Take care of yourself.

Whether or not your loved one ever stops gaming, you deserve to have a healthy and happy life. Once you have accepted that you are powerless over their gaming behavior, you can begin to focus on what you can do for yourself, to accomplish your own goals. With the help of others who have been where you are, you can learn to set healthy boundaries and stick to them.

Join our WhatsApp Chat Site for Family and Friends!

Game-Anon

WhatsApp Group Invite

Visit whatsapp.com/dl on your mobile phone to install.

By installing WhatsApp, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

 

Chat Using A Macintosh

 

Mac OS X 10.10 and higher. WhatsApp must be installed on your phone.

By clicking the Download button, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

DOWNLOAD FOR MAC OS X

Download for Windows 8 and higher (64-bit)
Download for Windows 8 and higher (32-bit)

 

 


Things To Do Instead of Gaming

One of the things we were trying to do with our gaming was meet some basic needs. If we do not meet those needs in normal healthy ways, we will suffer much stronger urges to game again. Some basic needs to cover are social needs, self expression, creativity, a sense of challenge and accomplishment, stress relief, a sense of purpose and meaning, and a sense of safety through control and predictability.

Here are some ideas for activities that will help meet these needs, reduce cravings, help with recovery from addiction, and fill some of the hours freed from compulsive gaming.

Please don’t let the length of this list overwhelm you. The idea is not to start ten new things and try to change everything all at once. We seek small bits of progress, not perfection. A good place to start is to put first things first. What need is currently most important? What’s right in front of me? What opportunity has come my way recently? If we take steps of small improvement with one or two areas each day, we are moving in the right direction.

Stress Relief

  • Talking with a sponsor or recovery buddy, CGAA meetings, or step work
  • Getting outside for fresh air and sunlight by taking a walk or doing some outdoor work
  • Meditation, coloring, craft work, journaling, or reading

Sense of safety through freedom, control, and predictability

  • Goal setting
  • Counseling or psychotherapy
  • Home organization, renovation, or spring cleaning

Sense of purpose, meaning, and self-respect

  • Supporting and growing the larger CGAA fellowship through service work like helping run a meeting, starting a local meeting, doing outreach to professionals, or attending CGAA business meetings
  • Attending a spiritual group like meditation, yoga, spiritual retreat, or religious gathering
  • Doing volunteer work like teaching, helping others, animal care, or building community places
  • Caring for a pet, house plants, or garden

Social needs

  • Attending CGAA meetings, connecting outside of meetings, reaching out to newcomers, or calling someone
  • Joining a hobby group like theater, a hiking group, art workshop, book club, public speaking, board games or card game group
  • Hosting a fun event like board games night or karaoke
  • Playing team sports, taking up martial arts, or playing one-on-one sports
  • Going to fun events like concerts, dances, or events on meetup.com
  • Calling up, video conferencing, or visiting with friends, family, neighbors, or other communities

Self expression and creativity

  • Journaling, opening up to a CGAA sponsor, or sharing openly in a meeting
  • Art work like drawing, photography, sculpting, or creative writing
  • Performance art like theater, singing, playing music, or writing music

Sense of challenge and accomplishment

  • Working the steps with a sponsor
  • Crafts like woodworking, origami, knitting
  • Outdoor activities like gardening, geocaching, bird watching, star gazing, tracking, plant identification, survival skills, or boating
  • Learning something like a foreign language, dancing, magic tricks, mechanical repair, cooking, a musical instrument, or computer programming
  • Career goals like getting a new job, starting a business, enrolling in school, or taking classes

Reconnection to one’s body and whole self

  • Meditating on breath, sounds, or bodily sensations
  • Exercise like walking, hiking, swimming, cycling, yoga, jogging, going to a gym, or playing a sport

If you are in your first week or two off of games, it’s likely that few of these ideas will appeal to you. That’s normal. Until our minds and bodies have some time to heal, we have low interest, energy, and motivation. This list will probably not give you something that you can plug in place of video games and immediately throw yourself into with the same zeal. This list is meant to help us explore new ways of spending our time, meeting our needs, and connecting with people. Find a few that hold some appeal and try taking some small steps in their direction. If you can’t seem to think of anything fun to do except game, you can come back to this list, find the most appealing thing, and just take a couple of little steps in its direction.

Consider setting reminders for yourself or keeping a schedule of your time and new activities. It is important to appreciate the small victories of exercising willpower, regaining motivation, and socializing. It helps to discuss our progress and the challenges we experience with a CGAA sponsor, recovery buddy, personal counselor, or therapist.

Rediscovering What is Fun

It is normal to think that nothing but gaming sounds fun. For most of us, our years of compulsive gaming warped and narrowed our idea of fun. As small children, it meant almost anything new or interesting or social or even mildly rewarding. Years of pulling the dopamine lever with video games changed our concept of fun to require instant gratification, frequent rewards, clear and constant progress, excitement, intense visuals, control, and/or predictability.

Part of recovery is letting our concept of fun expand back outward to a wide world of possible new challenges and experiences, many of which are calm and subtle compared to video games. It takes time to overcome withdrawals and heal from the damage, but the change does happen if we abstain from all gaming long term and focus on new pursuits and improving our lives. This list has many activities that do not meet the old, narrow, warped idea of “fun,” but those of us who persist at exploring them do find many to be gratifying and enjoyable.

Take, for example, a hike up a mountain. To a group of hikers excited to venture into the wilderness with friends and see wildlife and panoramic views from on high, all while getting a great workout, it’s a ton of fun. To someone who is uninterested in hiking, out of shape, and focused on every little unpleasant aspect of it, it’s a torturous death march. It is exactly the same hike in either case. The difference is in the attitude and conditioning.

The same is true with every item of these lists. Whether or not an activity sounds fun or torturous depends entirely upon attitude and conditioning. Every one of them has the potential to be gratifying and enjoyable if we adopt a positive attitude, try to have fun, and persist at it, especially when we involve friends and like-minded people.

ORN – Oregon Recovery Network – Virtual Online Meetings – Weekdays & Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Jan 30 all-day

Oregon Recovery Network

 

Oregon Recovery Network features listing of Online Meetings with Links

The Oregon Recovery Network is partnering with Recover Together With Google to provide Oregonians one centralized location with the latest state and local recovery resources and COVID-19 information so that our community can come out of this crisis stronger than ever.

Website

https://oregonrecoverynetwork.org/support/

Excerpt(s):

4D – 4th Dimension Recovery Center Resources
4Ds Love Wins LGBTQ+ NA Meeting Mondays 5:30-6:30 Zoom https://zoom.us/j/904315993
4D’s Lava Lamp Ladies Women’s AA Meeting Thursdays 8-9pm Zoom https://zoom.us/j/249508105
4D’s HA HA meeting Saturdays 6:30-7:30pm Zoom https://zoom.us/j/719330497
4D’s Cleveland Group NA half-hour NA meeting Tuesdays 7-7:30pm Zoom https://zoom.us/j/822021875
4D’s Recovery Yoga Recovery Yoga Everyday 8:00 AM Zoom https://zoom.us/j/729575100
4D’s Nite Owls Late Night AA Meeting Everyday 11pm- 12am Zoom http://zoom.us/j/331051272
4D’s Salty Bunch AA Meeting Wednesday 8-9pm Zoom http://zoom.us/j/688715448
4D’s FNYP Friday Night Young People AA Meeting Friday 8-9pm Zoom https://zoom.us/j/914913374
4D’s No More Meth’n Around Young People’s CMA Meeting Mondays 9-10pm Zoom https://zoom.us/j/239777719

From Darkness to Light Women’s NA Meeting (normally held at Wasco 4D) Fridays 6-7pm Zoom https://zoom.us/j/633668699

Crystal Meth Anonymous Resources
Monday CMA Zoom No More Spundays / No More Methin’ Around Combined Meeting Mondays 8:30 PM Zoom https://zoom.us/j/400934411
Wecovery Wednesday Zoom Wecovery Wednesdays CMA Meeting Wednesdays 7:30 PM Zoom https://zoom.us/j/860655748
Thursday Solution Zoom The Thursday Solution CMA Meetings Thursdays 7:00 PM Zoom https://zoom.us/j/119446711
Freedom Friday Zoom Freedom Friday Zoom Meeting Fridays 9:00 PM Zoom https://zoom.us/j/676350141
Speedboat Zoom Speedboat CMA Zoom Meeting Saturdays 7:00 PM Zoom https://zoom.us/j/876369800
SOS – Serenity on Sundays Zoom SOS CMA Zoom Meeting Sundays 1:00 PM Zoom https://zoom.us/j/126291145For any meeting changes please check the Oregon Crystal Meth Anonymous Site

SMART Recovery
SMART Recovery SMART Recovery with Brad (formerly at Providence Milwaukie) Saturdays 10:00am-11:30am Zoom https://smartrecovery.zoom.us/j/207780647
SMART Recovery SMART Recovery with Brad (formerly at Willamette Falls Hospital) Wednesdays 7:00pm-8:30pm Zoom https://smartrecovery.zoom.us/j/207780647
SMART Recovery SMART Recovery with Judy (formerly at West Hills Unitarian Universalist Fellowship) Mondays 7:00pm-8:30pm Zoom https://smartrecovery.zoom.us/j/801882186

Narcotics Anonymous
Quarantined NA NA Every Day 5pm (Portland) Zoom https://zoom.us/j/332641205
NA@Home Living NA Mondays 1am-2am BlueJeans https://bluejeans.com/611333554
UKNA Online Meeting NA Mondays 12:30-2pm Go to Meet https://www.gotomeet.me/ukna
More Will Be Revealed NA Mondays 3-4pm Phone tel: (712)770-4160 ex: 472548#
Phili No Matter What NA Mondays 4-6pm Zoom https://zoom.us/j/351229189
NA@Home LunchTime NA Mondays 7-8pm BlueJeans https://bluejeans.com/907613904

For additional meetings and meeting changes please view the

Portland Area Virtual NA Meeting List

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1m2t0B-wrLdCY5KwMhnU2vBjKdHd8sDVJ_-SP-ULm0AM/edit#gid=0

DDA – Dual Diagnosis Anonymous
DDA Meeting Mondays 10-11am Zoom https://zoom.us/j/373756106
DDA Meeting Mondays 5-6pm Zoom https://zoom.us/j/597932554
DDA Meeting Tuesdays 10-11am Zoom https://zoom.us/j/510712003
DDA Meeting Tuesdays 5-6pm Zoom https://zoom.us/j/268498372
DDA Meeting Wednesdays 10-11am Zoom https://zoom.us/j/373756106
DDA Meeting Thursdays 10-11am Zoom https://zoom.us/j/510712003
DDA Meeting Thursdays 5-6pm Zoom https://zoom.us/j/268498372
DDA Meeting Fridays 10-11am Zoom https://zoom.us/j/373756106
DDA Meeting Fridays 5-6pm Zoom https://zoom.us/j/597932554
DDA Meeting Saturdays 10:30-11:30am Zoom https://zoom.us/j/146152218

Tempest Recovery Meetings
Portland Bridge Club Bridge Club Meeting for Portland Members Tuesdays 7-9pm Tempest Link
Tempest Support Group Support Group for Tempest Newcomers Multiple 1-2pm