PeerGalaxy Original Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring over 187,600+ monthly offerings of FREE telephone- and online-accessible peer support, recovery support, and wellness activities!  Plus 50+ warmlines, helplines, chatlines, and hotlines.  Plus workshops, webinars, job postings, resources, observances, special events, consumer input opportunities and more.

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

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If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

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Calendar Event Sorting

At the top, the 24/7/365 SAMHSA Disaster Helpline and similar links.

Next, Bundled “All Day” Events

Some organizations (like 12 step recovery programs, AA, NA, AlAnon, etc.) have so many events happening throughout the day that they need to be in a bundled listing to spare endless scrolling.  Often there is a link to look up events by zip code and other criteria.

Lastly, Time-Specific Events

So you can see what’s happening in the next hours, time specific events are tagged and listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  There can be events and warmlines operating in different time zones, though we try to list all in Oregon’s Pacific Time Zone.

Page Advancement

The calendar displays ~50 listings per page.  To advance to next page with ~50 more listings, click the right arrow in the lower left corner of the calendar


Screenshot image of the page advancing arrows at the bottom of the calendar, lower left corner.
Jun
14
Fri
2024
0 – Hotline – DH – DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends
Jun 14 all-day
0 - Hotline - DH - DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) - 24/7 - Weekdays and Weekends

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

00 – Hotline – 2SLGBT+ CRISIS CALL & TEXT SERVICES GUIDE – 24/7 Weekdays & Weekends
Jun 14 all-day

 

 

 2SLGBT+ CRISIS CALL & TEXT SERVICES GUIDE

YOUR GUIDE TO CRISIS CALL & TEXT SERVICES

 

988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline Crisis Text Line                           Youthline
Text or cal l988 Text “NATIVE” to 741741 Call 877-968-8491 or text” teen2teen” to 839863
Available 24/7 Available 24/7 Available 24/7, youth peers answering from 4pm-10pm PST.
Connects to Crisis Counselor Connects to Crisis Counselor Connects to youth peer counselors  native youth peer counselors available
For Any Person For Any Person For Youth
For any mental health Crisis For any mental health Crisis For any mental health crisis or general emotional support
Formerly known as the Suicide Prevention Lifeline, operated by SAMHSA Operated by Crisis Text Line Operated by Lines for Life

 

00 – Hotline – Boys Town National Hot Line – A 24/7 crisis, resource and referral number for kids and parents – 1-800-448-3000 – Text VOICE to 20121 @ Phone
Jun 14 all-day

 

 

 

 

 

Increasing Outreach to Teens

Teens are more connected than ever ​before and the Boys Town National Hotline® at 800-448-3000 is right there with them.

In addition to calling, teens can now text VOICE to 20121 or email hotline@boystown.org any day, any time to speak with a trained counselor.

Online resources are also available at yourlifeyourvoice.org.

 

00 – Hotline – DWIHN – Detroit Wayne Integrated Health Network – Mental Heath Crisis Help – 1-800-241-4949 – 24/7
Jun 14 all-day

Mental Health Crisis Help

The Detroit Wayne Integrated Health Network is Here to Talk. Here to Help. Our trained clinicians are standing by 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to help you.

Crisis Helpline

Helpline:(800) 241-4949 (24/7)
TTY:(800) 630-1044 (24/7)
DWIHN:(313) 833-2500 (8:00 am – 4:30 pm M-F)

DWIHN Customer Service

Monday-Friday 8:00 am – 4:30 pm
Toll-Free: 888-490-9698 or 313-833-3232
TDD/TTY: 800-630-1044
Fax: 313-833-2217 or 313-833-4280

Recipient Rights Office

Toll-Free: 888-339-5595
TDD/TTY: 888-339-5588

00 – Hotline – LIR – Love is Respect – Confidential Support for Healthy Relationships – Teens – Young Adults – Loved Ones – 866-331-9473 – 24/7
Jun 14 all-day
00 - Hotline - LIR - Love is Respect - Confidential Support for Healthy Relationships - Teens - Young Adults - Loved Ones - 866-331-9473 - 24/7

Love is Respect Advocates are available 24/7

We offer confidential support for teens, young adults, and their loved ones seeking help, resources, or information related to healthy relationships and dating abuse in the US. We’re available by text (“LOVEIS” to 22522), call (866.331.9474), or live chat online.

Terms & conditions for text services

No matter how you reach out to us, you’ll always receive one-on-one, real-time, confidential support.

Our advocates are trained on issues related to dating abuse and healthy relationships, as well as crisis intervention. When you contact us, we’ll listen to your situation, assess how you’re feeling in the moment, and help you identify what next steps may be best for you.

This might include brainstorming a safety plan together or identifying local resources to further support you, whether it’s a service provider, legal resource, counselor, or survivor network to get in touch with.

00 – Hotline – NATIONAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE HOTLINE – 800 799-7233 – 24/7 – Weekdays & Weekends
Jun 14 all-day
00 - Hotline - NATIONAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE HOTLINE - 800 799-7233 - 24/7 - Weekdays & Weekends

 

 

NATIONAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE HOTLINE

CALL

1.800.799.7233

 

TEXT

Text “START” to 87788

 

CHAT

Chat Live Now

 

SEARCH FOR RESOURCES

https://www.thehotline.org/search-our-resources/

 

00 – Hotline – NCMEC – National Center for Missing & Exploited Children – 24 Hour Hotline – 1-800-843-5678 @ phone
Jun 14 all-day
00 - Hotline - NCMEC - National Center for Missing & Exploited Children - 24 Hour Hotline  - 1-800-843-5678 @ phone

 

24-Hour Call Center 1-800-843-5678

Act immediately if you believe your child is missing.

Download this checklist of actions to be taken by families in the initial stages of a missing child case.

If you have any questions call the NCMEC at 1-800-THE-LOST® (1-800-843-5678). If you are not located in the United States, call your country’s hotline.

NCMEC is the nation’s largest and most influential child protection organization.

We lead the fight to protect children, creating vital resources for them and the people who keep them safe.

HOW NCMEC can help

When you call NCMEC, a Call Center specialist will record information about your child. A NCMEC case management team will next work directly with your family and the law enforcement agency investigating your case. They will offer technical assistance tailored to your case to help ensure all available search and recovery methods are used. As appropriate NCMEC case management teams:

  • Rapidly create and disseminate posters to help generate leads.
  • Rapidly review, analyze and disseminate leads received on 1-800-THE-LOST® (1-800-843-5678) to the investigating law enforcement agency.
  • Communicate with federal agencies to provide services to assist in the location and recovery of missing children.
  • Provide peer support, resources and empowerment from trained volunteers who have experienced a missing child incident in their own family.
  • Provide families with access to referrals they may use to help process any emotional or counseling needs.
00 – Hotline – NHTH – National Human Trafficking Hotline – 1-888-373-7888 – Confidential – 24/7 @ phone
Jun 14 all-day
00 – Hotline – RAINN – Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network – National Sexual Assault Telephone Hotline – (800) 656-4673 – 24/7 Weekdays & Weekends @ phone
Jun 14 all-day
00 - Hotline - RAINN - Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network  - National Sexual Assault Telephone Hotline  - (800) 656-4673 - 24/7 Weekdays & Weekends @ phone

 

The National Sexual Assault Hotline is available 24/7

Telephone: 800.656.HOPE (4673)

Online chat: online.rainn.org

Español: rainn.org/es

How does it work?

When you call 800.656.HOPE (4673), you’ll be routed to a local RAINN affiliate organization based on the first six digits of your phone number. Cell phone callers have the option to enter the ZIP code of their current location to more accurately locate the nearest sexual assault service provider.

Telephone Hotline Terms of Service

How can the hotline help me?

Calling the National Sexual Assault Hotline gives you access to a range of free services including:

  • Confidential support from a trained staff member
  • Support finding a local health facility that is trained to care for survivors of sexual assault and offers services like sexual assault forensic exams
  • Someone to help you talk through what happened
  • Local resources that can assist with your next steps toward healing and recovery
  • Referrals for long term support in your area
  • Information about the laws in your community
  • Basic information about medical concerns

Is it confidential?

The National Sexual Assault Hotline is a safe, confidential service. When you call the hotline, only the first six numbers of the phone number are used to route the call, and your complete phone number is never stored in our system. Most states do have laws that require local staff to contact authorities in certain situations, like if there is a child or vulnerable adult who is in danger.

While almost all callers are connected directly to a staff member or volunteer at a local sexual assault service provider, a handful of providers use an answering service after daytime business hours. This service helps manage the flow of calls. If all staff members are busy, you may choose to leave a phone number with the answering service. In this case, the number will be confidential and will be given directly to the organization’s staff member for a callback. If you reach an answering service, you can try calling back after some time has passed, or you can choose to call during regular business hours when more staff members are available. You can also access 24/7 help online by visiting online.rainn.org.

Who are the sexual assault service providers?

Sexual assault service providers are organizations or agencies dedicated to supporting survivors of sexual assault. The providers who answer calls placed to the hotline are known as RAINN affiliates. To be part of the National Sexual Assault Hotline, affiliates must agree to uphold RAINN’s confidentiality standards. That means:

  • Never releasing records or information about the call without the consent of the caller, except when obligated by law
  • Only making reports to the police or other agencies when the caller consents, unless obligated by law
  • Agreeing to RAINN’s non-discrimination policy

To learn more about how a provider can become an affiliate of the National Sexual Assault Hotline, visit the Sexual Assault Service Provider information page. Volunteer opportunities for the National Sexual Assault Hotline are coordinated through these local providers. Search for volunteer opportunities near you.

How was the National Sexual Assault Hotline created?

The National Sexual Assault Hotline was the nation’s first decentralized hotline, connecting those in need with help in their local communities. It’s made up of a network of independent sexual assault service providers, vetted by RAINN, who answer calls to a single, nationwide hotline number. Since it was first created in 1994, the National Sexual Assault Hotline (800.656.HOPE and online.rainn.org) has helped more than 3 million people affected by sexual violence.

Before the telephone hotline was created, there was no central place where survivors could get help. Local sexual assault services providers were well equipped to handle support services, but the lack of a national hotline meant the issue did not receive as much attention as it should. In response, RAINN developed a unique national hotline system to combine all the advantages of a national organization with all the abilities and expertise of local programs. One nationwide hotline number makes it easier for survivors to be connected with the help they deserve.

Anyone affected by sexual assault, whether it happened to you or someone you care about, can find support on the National Sexual Assault Hotline. You can also visit online.rainn.org to receive support via confidential online chat.

 

01 – Helpline – GR – Grad Resources – The National Grad Crisis Line – (877)-472-3457 – 24/7 – Weekdays & Weekends @ Phone
Jun 14 all-day

 

 

 

 

The National Grad Crisis Line

1.877.GRAD.HLP (1.877.472.3457)

The National Grad Crisis Line helps graduate students reach free, confidential telephone counseling, crisis intervention, suicide prevention, and information and referral services provided by specially-trained call-takers. Caring, professional staff and well-trained volunteers answer around the clock.

All counselors have completed training to understand the unique issues faced by graduate students. In addition to listening to and empathizing with a caller’s concerns, counselors assess the caller’s lethality risk, counsel, and offer various local support services and mental health resources for follow-up.

1.877.GRAD.HLP

https://gradresources.org/

Who We Are

Since 1990, Grad Resources has recognized the significant role of graduate students in America. From our studies on stress in graduate school to the painful stories of student struggles we hear every day, we understand the pressures they face. We offer services that address their personal, emotional and spiritual needs, providing online materials, meaningful connections, engaging speakers, and supportive faith-based communities that enable graduate students to flourish personally and professionally.
01 – Helpline – LFL – Lines for Life Alcohol and Drug Helpline @ 800-923-4357 – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jun 14 all-day

Alcohol and Drug Helpline

Call 800-923-4357 (24/7/365) or
Text RecoveryNow to 839863 Monday-Friday, 2-6pm PT.

Crisis Worker On the Phone

The Alcohol and Drug Helpline serves anyone who needs information, support, or access to resources and treatment for alcohol or drug use. If you or someone you know needs help, the Alcohol and Drug Helpline is free, confidential, and available for calls 24/7/365. The Alcohol and Drug Text Line is open Monday through Friday, 2pm to 6pm PST.

Call or text us for help understanding or dealing with alcohol and drug use or addiction. When you call us, we listen and support. We provide hope, referrals, resources, and information. Our highly trained staff and volunteers provide immediate assistance, non-judgmental listening, and compassionate support that can put you on a path to healing.

Para Ayuda en Español

llama al número 1-888-628-9454

https://988lifeline.org/help-yourself/en-espanol/

 

For Youth

If you are under age 21 and would like to talk with a peer about alcohol and drug use or abuse, contact our YouthLine. YouthLine is a free, confidential, teen-to-teen crisis and help line.

Call (877) 968-8491
Text ‘teen2teen’ to 839863
Chat https://www.oregonyouthline.org
We listen. We support. We keep it to ourselves.

Visit link:

https://oregonyouthline.org/

Excerpt(s):

Teens are available to help daily from 4-10pm PST (adults are available by phone at all other times!).

YouthLine is a free teen-to-teen crisis support and help line.

YouthLine is confidential to a point- while we will never share conversations had on the lines, we are mandatory reporters. If a young person is unable to agree to safety for themselves or another person, or if abuse is occurring, YouthLine contacts other agencies to ensure the best support and safety for the young person in crisis.

01 – Helpline – Native and Strong Helpline – Washington State Only – 24/7
Jun 14 all-day
01 - Helpline - Native and Strong Helpline - Washington State Only - 24/7

 

Native & Strong Lifeline

Available 24/7

Dial 988 + 4

The Native & Strong Lifeline is a crisis call center operated entirely by Native staff and is available 24/7 in Washington
State. To connect with the Native & Strong Lifeline from a Washington State area code, dial 988 and press “4”.

The Native crisis counselor who answers will help with mental health crises in an empathetic and culturally connected way.
The Native & Strong Lifeline currently employs 16 Indigenous counselors from all over the United States. In addition to the training all 988 crisis counselors receive, Native & Strong counselors are trained in cultural competency, traditional forms of healing, and Native slang and language. Counselors use cultural activities, traditional medicines, and connections with elders and Native healers as a part of self-care planning with callers, in addition to clinical and community resources.

Although Native & Strong is only available in Washington State, this crisis call center can serve as a model for Tribes
that want to open their own crisis call centers nationwide.

To learn more about how Native & Strong was created, visit
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hleYKuADK70

 

01 – Linea de Ayuda – L4L – Lines For Life – En Español – Lifeline ofrece 24/7, servicios gratuitos en español @ 888-628-9454 @ Phone
Jun 14 all-day

 

Ayuda En Español

Lifeline ofrece 24/7, servicios gratuitos en español, y no es necesario hablar inglés si usted necesita ayuda.

¿Qué pasa cuando llamo?

Cuando usted llama al número 1-888-628-9454, su llamada se dirige al centro de ayuda de nuestra red disponible más cercano. Tenemos actualmente 200 centros en la red y usted hablará probablemente con uno situado en su zona. Cada centro funciona en forma independiente y tiene su propio personal calificado.

Cuando el centro contesta su llamada, usted estará hablando con una persona que le escuchará, le hará preguntas y hará todo lo que esté a su alcance para ayudarle.

Yo mismo necesito ayuda

Una persona capacitada le escuchará y hablará con usted. Si es necesario, podrá darle información sobre recursos o servicios existentes en su comunidad que podrán prestarle ayuda después de la llamada. Siempre puede usted volver a llamar al número 1-888-628-9454 si lo necesita o lo desea.

Una persona querida necesita ayuda

Si está usted preocupado por una persona que usted sabe que está pasando por una crisis o que piensa en suicidarse, nuestros centros pueden ayudarle. Una persona calificada del centro puede:

  • Darle ideas y sugerencias sobre la forma de acercarse a la persona que le preocupa. Puede ayudarle a pensar qué podría decir para alentar a esa persona querida a pedir ayuda.
  • En algunos casos, el centro puede hablar en conferencia al mismo tiempo con usted y con la persona que le preocupa.
  • Algunas comunidades tienen equipos móviles que pueden visitar a las personas en sus hogares. Si hay uno de esos equipos en su zona, nuestro centro le pondrá en contacto con él.

Llamo para pedir información sobre cuestiones de salud mental

No hace falta que esté usted en crisis para llamarnos. Nuestros centros pueden responder a preguntas generales sobre salud mental, depresión, suicidio, recursos de salud en la comunidad, y muchas cosas más. También es posible llamar para averiguar más sobre las actividades de prevención del suicidio en su zona.

Algunos datos sobre la Línea de Prevención del Suicidio y Crisis

  • Las llamadas son gratuitas desde cualquier teléfono en los Estados Unidos.
  • Nuestras líneas funcionan las 24 horas todos los días de la semana, de modo que usted puede ponerse en contacto con una persona capacitada en cualquier momento en que lo necesite.
  • Su llamada es confidencial; esto significa que la persona que le escucha hará todo lo posible por no divulgar su identidad.
  • Prestamos servicios en inglés (988) y en español (1-888-628-9454)
  • Somos la única red nacional de respuesta a situaciones de crisis con financiación del Gobierno Federal.

 

02 – Urgent Info – MAC – Mapping Action Collective – Oregon Resources and Services for Transgender Youth and Young Adults
Jun 14 all-day
02 - Urgent Info - MAC - Mapping Action Collective - Oregon Resources and Services for Transgender Youth and Young Adults

 

RESOURCES

Trans Youth and Young Adults

“These rescources selectedf from the Mapping Action Collective

( https://www.oregonyouthresourcemap.com)

Description:

Description:

541 Willamette St #310, Eugene, OR 97401

 

Description:

1132 SW 13th Ave, Portland, OR 97205

Description:

Ages: 16-24
Housing & Shelter: Homeless Youth
941 W. 7th Ave. Eugene, OR 97402
New Roads Drop-In Center: (541) 686-4310
Station 7 Youth Crisis Line: (541) 689-3111

Description:

COVID Message: Hours may be impacted by COVID. Please call for updated hours.
Eligibility: Homeless youth ages 12-21
Languages: English, Spanish
Ages: 12-21
Housing & Shelter: Housing Services
1202 SE Douglas Ave, Roseburg, OR 97470

Description:

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources
Nativity Lutheran Church, 60850 Brosterhous Rd., Bend

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources
Prineville Presbyterian Church, 1771 NW Madras Hwy, Prineville

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources
5633 SE Division St. Portland, OR 97206

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources
1144 Gateway Loop, Suite 200, Springfield, OR 97477
Crystal Falk, Director of Youth and Family Services: (541) 686-5060

Description:

COVID Message: Building temporarily closed due to COVID, please reach out via phone or email to get support.Languages: English
Ages: 16-25
Mental Health: Support Groups

Description:

Description:

3620 SE Powell Blvd, #102 Portland OR 97202​

Description:

COVID Message: Counseling and Assessments for Surgery letters are being conducted via teletherapy or phone. In-office visits are offered to existing clients on a case-by-case basis.
Cost: Brave Space primarily works with people with Oregon Health Plan insurance. If you have private insurance, please check out our resource guide for therapists who take your insurance.
Dillehunt Hall, Room 1007 3235 S.W. Pavilion Loop Portland, OR 97239

Description:

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources

Description:

Business: (541) 386-4808
24 Hour Hotline: (541) 386-6603

Description:

Description:

Basic Needs: Public Transit

Description:

Eligibility: We have only two requirements in an effort to be as inclusive as possible: 1) You identify as transgender (FTM, genderqueer, non-binary, genderfluid, gender non-conforming, and every other non-cis identity within the trans umbrella.) 2) You cannot afford to purchase a binder, or you cannot safely obtain a binder.

Description:

Are you able to pay for hair removal services out of pocket?

Are you employed and able to save some money towards hair removal services?

Are you a citizen or documented immigrant?

Do you identify as white, or do you experience white/light-skinned privilege?

If you answered YES to these questions, you may consider making space for our trans siblings who mostly answered NO. (Even if you answer YES to most or all of these questions, you are still eligible to apply.)

Description:

Eligibility: We have only two requirements in an effort to be as inclusive as possible: You identify as transgender (MTF, genderqueer, non-binary, genderfluid, gender non-conforming, and every other non-cis identity assigned male at birth within the trans umbrella.) You cannot afford to purchase femme shapewear, or you cannot safely obtain femme shapewear. We accept all requests for support, and applications are open year-round. Once you complete your application, your request will be added to our waitlist. Shipping is discrete and 100% free, and we ship internationally to 90+ countries and counting.
Cost: This program is intended to help trans folks who otherwise can not afford or access femme shapewear. We ask that you consider your access before applying.

Description:

Eligibility: You identify as transgender (FTM, MTF, non-binary, genderqueer, gender non-conforming, and all other non-cis identities). You have financial need that prevents you from affording hormone replacement therapy. You are 18 years old or older (19+ in Nebraska) at the time you apply. You live in one of the states Plume serves. You are not currently on Medicare. If you live in CO or KY, you are not currently on Medicaid.

Cost: This program is intended to help trans folks who otherwise can not afford gender-affirming surgery. We ask that you consider your access to healthcare before applying for this grant. Here are some questions to consider:Do you have health insurance coverage that is trans-inclusive?

If not, do you qualify for Medicaid?

Do you live in a state whose Medicaid plans cover HRT?

Are you employed and able to pay for HRT out of pocket?

Are there nearby clinics that offer HRT with informed consent?

Do you have reliable transportation options to access a provider?

Do you consider yourself healthy and able-bodied (i.e., not living with a chronic or long-standing illness)?

Do you identify as white, or do you experience white/light-skinned privilege?

If you answered YES to most of these questions, you may consider making space for our trans siblings who mostly answered NO. (Even if you answer YES to most or all of these questions, you are still eligible to apply.)

Minimum age served: 18

Description:

Eligibility: We have very few requirements in an effort to be as inclusive as possible: You identify as transgender (FTM, MTF, non-binary, genderqueer, gender non-conforming, and all other non-cis identities). You are 18 years of age or older at the time of your surgery, or have consent from your legal guardian(s) and healthcare provider(s). You have financial need that prevents you from affording gender-affirming surgery. You can demonstrate past attempts at affording care (i.e. saving money, fundraising, attempting to get insurance coverage). You complete your surgery in the United States with a US-based surgeon.

Cost: This program is intended to help trans folks who otherwise can not afford gender-affirming surgery. We ask that you consider your access to healthcare before applying for this grant. Here are some questions to consider:Do you have health insurance coverage that is trans-inclusive?

If not, do you qualify for Medicaid? (Learn more)

Do you have access to healthcare providers who are trans competent, and are able to travel to them to receive care?

Are you employed and able to save some money towards surgery?

Are you a citizen or documented immigrant?

Do you consider yourself healthy and able-bodied (i.e., not living with a chronic or long-standing illness)?

Do you identify as white, or do you experience white/light-skinned privilege?

If you answered YES to most of these questions, you may consider making space for our trans siblings who mostly answered NO. (Even if you answer YES to most or all of these questions, you are still eligible to apply.)

Minimum age served: 18

Description:

Eligibility: It is a benefit for eligible Health Share of Oregon members in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties.
Languages: Spanish, Russian, Mandarin, Arabic, Vietnamese, Somali, Swahili
9955 NE Glisan St, Portland, OR 97220

Description:

Basic Needs: Transportation

Description:

Basic Needs: Transportation
10055 E Burnside St, Portland, OR 97216
Energy Assistance: (503) 294-7444
Housing & Rent Assistance: (503) 721-1740

Description:

650 NW Irving St, Portland, OR 97209

Description:

Day Services & Drop-in: Mail, Laundry, & Showers
610 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97205

Description:

Call or Text: (541) 246-4046
24/7 Text (541) 246-4046

Description:

Maximum age served: 18
605 W 4th Ave, Eugene, OR 97402

Description:

Springfield: (541) 726-3714

Description:

1175 G St, Springfield, 97477

Description:

1160 Grant St, Eugene, OR 97402

Description:

3500 E 17th Ave, Eugene, 97403

Description:

Text “START” to 678678

Description:

323 E 12th Ave, Eugene, 97401

Description:

1300 Irvington Dr, Eugene, 97404

Description:

Description:

Community Resources: Veteran Services
02 – Urgent Info – MC – Multnomah County – Help for When Its Hot – Cooling Centers, Health and Safety
Jun 14 all-day

 

Help for When It’s Hot

Updated 8:20 a.m., Friday May 10, 204

 

If you need a place to cool off, check our interactive map (link is external)of library branches, community centers and interactive fountains, and make a plan to get cool during hot afternoons. Always confirm hours and locations of libraries(link is external) before you go. Remember that several libraries are closed for construction.

Learn about the symptoms of heat illness and how to take care of yourself and others during hot weather.

Get ready for summer weather

Now’s a good time to prepare yourself and your home for summer. Stock up on fans/air conditioners and sun-blocking curtains, sunscreen and other summer essentials. Now is also a time to make a plan for pets, older adults, kids and those with medical conditions, all of whom are more vulnerable to heat illness.

Watch: How to prepare for the heat before temperatures soar(link is external) and Cómo preparase para el calor(link is external)

If you need financial assistance to obtain an air conditioning unit or to pay an electric bill, call 211 or visit this webpage(link is external).

Stay safe while swimming

Hot temperatures combined with cold, early-season snowmelt will be dangerous for those seeking relief in lakes, rivers and creeks. Be aware of swift currents, cool water temperatures, hidden hazards and uneven bottom surfaces. Watch kids in the water to make sure they aren’t feeling adverse effects. Learn more about staying safe while swimming here.

Bookmark these links

04 – Resources – AKIDSCO – A Kids Book About School Shootings – Free
Jun 14 all-day

A Kids Book About School Shootings

Crystal Woodman Miller

Many of us are going to need to find the words to talk to the kids in our lives about tragic events like the school shooting in Uvalde, Texas. Here’s a free resource from A Kids Company About to help you do that was written by Crystal Woodman-Miller, one of the survivors of the Columbine school shooting.

I hate that we need tools like this. I can’t wait for us to have to write the book “A Kids Book About Why It’s So Hard To Buy A Gun”

Link: www.akidsco.com

There aren’t enough words to explain all the thoughts, emotions, and heartbreak that comes with yesterday’s tragedy in Uvalde. We hope this book helps everyone start somewhere.

We’re making #AKidsBookAboutSchoolShootings free for kids, grownups, and educators everywhere, so that this conversation can get started when it matters most.

FREE DOWNLOAD

A Kids Book About School Shootings by Crystal Woodman Miller:

Link: akidsco.com

 

04 – Resources – APH – American Printing House for the Blind – VisionAware – Visual Impairment Information Service
Jun 14 all-day

 

 

 

 

VisionAware

Are you or a family member having difficulty seeing? Or perhaps been diagnosed with an eye condition such as macular degeneration, cataracts, glaucoma, or diabetic retinopathy? If the answer is yes, you’re not alone: vision problems affect 25 million Americans, and they are on the rise.

VisionAware is a free, easy-to-use informational service for adults who are blind or have low vision, their families, caregivers, healthcare providers, and social service professionals. Visitors will find tips and resources on living with blindness or low vision; information on eye diseases and disorders; and a searchable, free Directory of Services.

man getting an eye exam

Eye Conditions

Some changes in vision are normal as we grow older. This section of our website can help you understand these vision changes, alert you to abnormal changes in vision, and […]

READ MORE

Man sitting on park bench with white cane holding his phone

Recreation and Leisure

From crafts, woodworking, traveling, and reading to sports and exercise, this section is full of information on the variety of activities people who are blind or low vision can engage […]

READ MORE

Person using a refreshable braille display.

Products and Technology

Discover low and high-tech solutions enabling independence at home and work, connection with friends and family, and enjoyment of hobbies and leisure activities.

READ MORE

Professionals in scrubs talking

Professionals

Find resources and techniques you can use to serve people who are blind or low vision effectively and safely, and learn key information about the impact of aging and vision […]

READ MORE

Older man wearing eyeglasses surrounded by family of various ages

Families and Friends

Do you know someone (parent or family member, neighbor, or friend) having trouble seeing? You may be wondering about blindness/ low vision and how to talk with them about it. […]

READ MORE

Woman sitting in kitchen reading braille.

Living with Blindness or Low Vision

If you are new to blindness or low vision, take the journey one day and one step at a time. Utilize our tips for adjusting to vision changes, living independently, […]

Read More

04 – Resources – BROR – Bridges Oregon – Hard of Hearing – Resources
Jun 14 all-day
04 - Resources - BROR - Bridges Oregon - Hard of Hearing  - Resources

 

Bridges Oregon

Hard of Hearing

RESOURCES

Bridges Oregon, Inc. is a nonprofit organization serving Oregonians who are Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing or face other communication barriers. It is in our mission to facilitate equity and inclusiveness and to provide a bridge to opportunities through advocacy, education and communication.

Advocacy

  • Victims’ Rights Pocket Cards (link)
  • Civil Rights Fact Sheet (link)

American Sign Language (ASL)

  • Portland Community College ASL Studies (link)
  • Sign Class (link)
  • Western Oregon University ASL Studies (link)

Children

  • Position Statement on Improving Child Protection Services for Families with Deaf Individuals (link)
  • Position Statement on Quality Foster Care Services Continuum for Deaf Children (link)
  • Position Statement on Mental Health Services for Deaf Children (link)
  • Protecting the Rights of Parents and Prospective Parents with Disabilities: Technical Assistance for State and Local Child Welfare Agencies and Court (link)

Community

  • Abolition and Disability Justice’s Guiding Principles (link)
  • Community-Based Needs Assessment (CNA) of Oregon’s Deaf and Hard of Hearing Communities: Final Report as of December 30, 2016 (link)
  • Hands and Voices of Oregon (link)
  • How many Deaf and Hard of Hearing people live in Oregon by counties (link)
  • Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (link)
  • Quota in Central Oregon (link)
  • Research & Resource Center with Deaf* community (RRCD) at Western Oregon University (link)

Crime Safety

  • Accessibility and Digital Security (link)
  • Know Your Rights ASL: Interacting with the Police (link)

Deaf-owned Businesses in Oregon

  • A5 Interpreting (link)
  • Clackamas River Growlers (link)
  • Camp Taloali (link)
  • Cymaspace (link)
  • Jennifer Jo Deily Fine Art (link)
  • King’s Hookah Lounge (link)
  • Looslea Holsteins Dairy Farm (link)
  • Pah! Restaurant (link)
  • PILEA Play (link)
  • Sign Class (link)
  • Tactile Communications (link)
  • Tim Baker’s Lawn Care (link)

DeafBlind

  • American Association of the DeafBlind (link)
  • DeafBlind Kids (link)
  • DeafBlind Interpreting: National Training & Resource Center (link)
  • Helen Keller National Center Region 10: Northwest (link)
  • Oregon Commission for the Blind (link)
  • Oregon DeafBlind Project (link)
  • National Center on DeafBlind (link)
  • Protactile Communications (link)
  • Protactile Language Interpreting: National Education Program (link)
  • For more information, please refer to the “Telecommunication” subgroup below.

Deaf with additional disabilities

  • Cerebral Palsy and Deaf Organization (link)
  • Oregon Deaf Autism (link)

Education

  • House Bill 3183 Toolkit: A Resource for Special Education Providers Regarding the Relevant Services and Placement Options for a Child Who Is Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing. August 2022. (link)
  • Language Assessment for American Sign Language (link)
  • Oregon Department of Education’s Kindergarten Ready Assessment (KRA) on Deaf and Hard of Hearing children
  • Report of 2017 House Bill 3412: Task Force on Assessments of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (referred as LEAD-K) (link)

Emergency Preparedness

  • Checklist for Emergency Responder: Ensuring Language Access and Effective Communication During Response and Recovery (link)

Hard of Hearing

  • Help to pay for Hearing Aids (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Oregon (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Lane County (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Linn and Benton (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Portland Chapter (link)

Health

  • ADA National Network: Healthcare and Face Coverings: Reducing Communication Barriers for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Patients (link)
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): Informational Videos in ASL (link)

Housing

  • Oregon ASL Realtors (link)

Hotlines

  • Aging and Disability Resource Connection of Oregon (link)
  • ASL COVID-19 Hotline (link)
  • National Deaf Domestic Violence Hotline (link)
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (link)
  • Oregon Hate Crimes and Bias Hotline (link)

Interpreters

  • File a complaint on a Healthcare Interpreter with Oregon Health Authority (link)
  • File a complaint on a certified or qualified interpreter with the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (link)
  • List of Deaf Interpreters in Oregon by Research and Resource Center with Deaf* community (RRCD) at Western Oregon University. (link)
  • List of ASL Interpreter Agencies in Oregon (link)
  • Portland Community College Interpreting Training program (link)
  • Search for certified or qualified Oregon Healthcare Interpreter (link)
  • Report a Patient Safety Issue in Medical settings e.g., an interpreter agency sends non-qualified interpreter to the appointment (link)
  • Search for certified or qualified Sign Language interpreters with the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (link)
  • Western Oregon University Online Interpreting Training program (link)

Late-Deafened

  • Association of Late-Deafened Adults (link)

Law

  • Oregon’s own version of ADA law (ORS 659a)

Law Enforcement

  • Deaf/Hard of Hearing Communication Card with Police (visor cardwallet card)
  • Community Proposal Directive for Law Enforcement Agencies (link)
  • Pullover Pal (link)
  • Oregon Legislative Update: Governor SIGNED on 5/6/2021! Proposed bill to provide “that the registered owner may request that registration cards issued for vehicles include that owner, or person operating vehicle, may be deaf or hard of hearing.” (link)

Lawsuits in Oregon (current & past)

  • Kristina Boswell v. State of Oregon, U.S.D.C. Case No. 3:22-cv-00502-MO (link)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc (2022)
  • Viewpoint to pay $225,000 to deaf job applicant Indi Matthews for employment discrimination (2022)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc: Deaf Inmate’s Disability Bias Claim (2020)
  • Disability Rights Oregon filed lawsuit on behalf of protesters with disabilities (2020)
  • Deaf prisoners: Oregon should use only certified interpreters, groups say (2019)
  • Springfield to pay $450,000 to deaf man injured by police officer (2019)
  • Ludwig v. State of Oregon: Employment Discrimination (2018)
  • DOJ sues Pacific Northwest on behalf of Oregon Veteran with Hearing Loss (2017)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc: Clackamas County Jail failed to provide ASL interpreter service for medical treatment (2017)
  • Oregon University Settles Lawsuit over Service Dog (2014)
  • Deaf inmate gets $150,000 settlement from Oregon after claiming assigned jobs were discriminatory (2014)
  • Wolfe v. City of Portland: Police did not provided ASL interpreter in response to 9-1-1 call (2012)
  • Oregon v. Mason: Portland Police did not provide ASL interpreter to translate the Miranda Warnings (1981)

*Please let us know if we missed any current or past lawsuits pertaining to deaf, deafblind, or hard of hearing Oregonians.

Legislative Bills (2023 Legislative Session)

  • Legislative Session is Closed.

Legislative Bills (passed)

  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2994 Modifies requirements for health insurance coverage of hearing-related items and services. (link).
  • 2023 Regular Session. Senate Bill (SB) 569 Requires closed-captioned television receivers in public areas within places of public accommodation to display closed captioning unless exception applies. (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. Senate Bill (SB) 685 Modifies the definition of “Communication Facilitator” (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2696 Authorizes Health Licensing Office to issue sign language interpreter licenses to qualified applicants. (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2669 Bill of Rights for Deaf, DeafBlind, and Hard of Hearing Children relating to Education. (link
  • 2021 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2498. “Provides that the registered owner may request that registration cards issued for vehicles include that owner, or person operating vehicle, may be Deaf or Hard of Hearing.” (link)
  • 2021 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3183. “Requires parents of child who is deaf or deafblind or who is hard of hearing to be provided information about relevant services and placements offered by school district, education service district, regional programs and Oregon School for the Deaf whenever individualized family service plan or individualized education program is developed, revised or reviewed.” (link)
  • 2019 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3205. “Expands Telecommunication Devices Access Program to include provision of communication facilitator.” (link)
  • 2017 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3412. “Establishes Task Force on Assessments of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.” (link)

Medical

  • Oregon Health Authority COVID-19 ASL Video (link)
  • Oregon Health Authority’s Deaf/Hard of Hearing Preferred Language Card (link)
  • Oregon Health Authority’s FAQ Regarding Providing Interpreter Services to Individuals who are Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing or Individuals with Limited English Proficiency in Medical Settings (link)
  • Report a Patient Safety Issue in Medical settings e.g., no accommodation provided (link)

Mental Health

  • List of ASL Therapists in Oregon (PDF)

Safety

  • Text to 9-1-1 (link)
  • Get A Smoke Alarm by American Red Cross (link)
  • Statewide Area: Smoke Alarms for Oregonians (link)
  • Portland Area: Smoke Alarms for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Portlanders (link)
  • Bend Area: Smoke Alarms for Oregonians who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (link)

Self-Advocate

  • Civil Rights for Individuals and Advocates (link)

Seniors

  • Avamere Chestnut Lane Assisted Living for the Deaf and DeafBlind, Gresham (link)

Sister Services

  • Northwest Human Services Connection: for the Deaf, DeafBlind, & Hard of Hearing (link)

Support Groups

  • ASL access NA, AL-ANON, NAR-ANON, and AA 12-Steps Program Virtual Support Groups (link)
  • Portland Deaf Access Committee of Alcoholics Anonymous (link)

Telecommunications and Internet

  • Affordable Connectivity Program (ACP) (link)
  • DeafBlind MMX Videophone (link)
  • Free iPad, iPhone, and other equipment for Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing (link)
  • ICanConnect – Oregon (link)
  • Oregon Lifeline (link)
  • Oregon Statewide Assistive Technology Program (link)

Video Access

  • Oregon Department of Human Services’ Frequently Asked Questions in ASL (link)
  • Video Remote Interpreting (VRI) Card (link)

*Deaf – Bridges Oregon has adopted with minor adaptations, the definition of ‘Deaf’ that is used by the National Deaf Center (NDC). Bridges Oregon is using the term deaf in an all-inclusive manner, to include people who may identify as D/deaf, DeafBlind, deaf-blind, deaf with additional disabilities, hard of hearing, late-deafened, and/or persons with unilateral/bilateral hearing loss. Bridges Oregon recognizes that for many individuals, identity is fluid and can change over time or with setting. Bridges Oregon has chosen to use one term, Deaf, with the goal of recognizing experiences that are shared by all members of our diverse communities while also honoring all of our differences. Source: https://www.nationaldeafcenter.org/defining-deaf

04 – Resources – MAP – Moms for All Paths to Recovery – Mother’s Resource Group – 24/7 @ Facebook Group
Jun 14 all-day

 

Moms for All Paths to Recovery (MAP)

This is a group for moms who have or had children that are experiencing issues due to alcohol or drug use. We also have advocates, harm reductionists, and experts in the field of addiction in our camp.
We mothers often feel powerless to act on behalf of our own (and our family and children’s) best interests. But we know the antidote to powerlessness: KNOWLEDGE.
🚩 THAT’S WHY THIS IS NOT A SUPPORT GROUP 🚩.
It is a hub for information and resources that are relevant to our member audience, based on science, and driven by data.
We encourage you to engage with our community by posting relevant information: Trusted news reports, scientific articles, and any other information that would be helpful to our members in navigating this long and winding road.
Of course, data doesn’t speak for itself, and members are free to post their interpretations of the information shared here. We do not necessarily have to agree with everything that’s posted; critical conversations are important and make us stronger and wiser. So take what you need, and leave the rest behind.

Follow this link to Join

Group rules from the admins

🔹 We support Harm Reduction (meeting people where they’re at).

🔹 We do NOT believe in the concepts of “tough love,” “enabling” and “codependency.”
🔹 We support ALL Pathways to Recovery, including FDA approved medications for opioid and alcohol use disorders.
🔹 We do NOT support drug induced homicide laws. PLEASE DO NOT JOIN THIS GROUP if you are not OPEN to LEARNING more about the above or to promote anything that is contrary to our principles.
Avoid Stigmatizing Language
It’s important to ensure that the language we use to talk about substance use is respectful and compassionate. Terms like; addict, junkie, drug abusers, etc. will be deleted (we have a complete list of suggested terms in our GUIDE section). Using neutral, medically accurate terminology when describing substance use is preferred. Please use people-first language, that focuses first on the individual.
Be Kind and Courteous
We are all on this roller-coaster ride together. Please treat everyone with respect. Healthy debates are natural, but kindness is required.
Do Not Advertise or Promote Your Services
But we do welcome your opinions and any other relevant information as it pertains to our groups subject matter. This needs to be a safe space without sales. Give more to this group than you take. Self-promotion, spam, and irrelevant links aren’t allowed.
Irrelevant content will be deleted.
We Are Mothers
We are not medical professionals. Our only degree is in mothering our children through addiction. We do however, bring a wealth knowledge based on our experiences.
Do Not Ask for Mony or Post Fundraisiers
We do not allow solicitation of any kind. The only fundraiser we support is for our annual Warrior Woman Retreat and to support our LIVE giveaways.
Do Not BLOCK Group Admins
MAP is an educational group, and we encourage thoughtful discussion. The full benefit, however, cannot be gained if members block Admins who comment in the group or who post relevant content, including announcements. Members who block Admins will be removed from the Group. Posts shared into MAP by individuals who have our Admins blocked will likewise be deleted since we are unable to validate the legitimacy of the post if we cannot view the information.

 

04 – Resources – NEDA – National Eating Disorders Association – Screening – Information and Treatment Options
Jun 14 all-day
04 - Resources - NEDA - National Eating Disorders Association - Screening - Information and Treatment Options

 

 

 

 

NATIONAL EATING DISORDERS ASSOCIATION

The National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) is the largest nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting individuals and families affected by eating disorders.

In the United States, 28.8 million Americans will suffer from an eating disorder at some point in their lives. Eating disorders are serious but treatable mental and physical illnesses that can affect people of all genders, ages, races, religions, ethnicities, sexual orientations, body shapes, and weights. In fact, eating disorders have the second highest mortality rate of all mental health disorders, surpassed only by opioid use disorder.

Eating disorders are widely misunderstood illnesses and support options are often inaccessible. As a result, too many people are left feeling helpless, hopeless, and frightened. Through our programs and services, NEDA raises awareness, builds communities of support and recovery, funds research, and puts vital resources into the hands of those in need.

Our Mission

NEDA supports individuals and families affected by eating disorders, and serves as a catalyst for prevention, cures and access to quality care.

Our Vision

NEDA envisions a world without eating disorders.

Programs and Services

Whether you have been personally affected by an eating disorder or care about someone who has, NEDA’s programs and services are designed to help you find the help and support you need. Recovery is possible and we’re here to support you!

Screening Tool

This short eating disorders screening — appropriate for ages 13 and up — can help determine if it’s time to seek professional help.

Find Treatment

NEDA has a database of treatment providers across the country. Use our finder tool to locate options near you.

Where Do I Start?

You’ve decided it’s time to seek help and we’re so glad you did. NEDA is here to support you on your journey. These resources can help you take the first step to getting the help you deserve.

How Do I Help?

Having a strong support network is important to recovery. Whether you’re a loved one or a professional, there are steps you can take to offer support.

Free & Low Cost Support

Everyone deserves support for their eating concerns, and NEDA wants to connect you with resources that can help in addition to professional help. These free and low cost support options offer ways to connect with others and provide tools to promote recovery. Please note that these options do not replace professional treatment. We are listing them as additional support options to supplement recovery or maintenance.

Recovery & Relapse

Recovery from an eating disorder can take months, even years. Slips, backslides, and relapse tend to be the rule, rather than the exception. Re-learning normal eating habits and coping skills can take a long period of time and often requires lots of support from professionals, friends, and family. Moving forward is key, however slow it might be.

COVID-19 Resources

Everyone deserves support for their eating concerns, and NEDA wants to connect you with resources that can help in addition to professional help. In this time of great uncertainty and disturbance we face the added danger that isolation brings to those among us who are struggling with an eating disorder. Please refer to this list to explore recovery pathways with virtual support.

04 – Resources – OFB – Oregon Food Bank – Find Food and Resources – Links and Information
Jun 14 all-day

 

Find food near you.

Oregon Food Bank and our statewide partner network are here for you. Find free, nutritious food in communities throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington, and connect with services that support resilient communities.

Our network of food pantries and meal sites is here for everyone — inclusive of all races, gender expressions, religions, and immigration statuses.

Free food in our communities

We partner with communities and organizations throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington to make it easy for everyone to access free, nutritious food. These options are community based and accessible to all. At many free food locations, you can also connect with additional services, such as nutrition support and affordable health insurance. Learn more about free food options in your community.

 

https://www.oregonfoodbank.org/find-support

 

 

 

 

 

Double Up is Oregon’s first statewide incentive program, designed to be convenient for shoppers. The program doubles the value of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits at local farmers markets so shoppers can bring home more fresh fruits and vegetables. Double Up Food Bucks will be offered at more than 75 farmers markets across the state in 2022. The program also provides incentives for SNAP participants purchasing Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) shares from Oregon farms, and shoppers as several independently-owned rural grocery stores.

Four ways to shop with Double Up Food Bucks in Oregon!

Stretch your Food Dollars
with Double Up Food Bucks

Double Up Food Bucks allows SNAP shoppers to get DOUBLE the fruits and vegetables at CSA shares, Farmers Markets, Farm Stands, and Grocery Stores across Oregon!

How do I know if I’m eligible to use Double Up Food Bucks?

  • If you use SNAP food benefits, you can earn Double Up!
  • If you use EBT Cash benefits, unfortunately you are not eligible to earn Double Up, however you are eligible to participate in Produce Match at participating farmers markets and farm stands. Learn more.
  • Note: Some locations may require a quick sign up at a cashier or information booth

 

 

Watch the Double Up Food Bucks Explainer Video

In English

 

 

en español

 

 

Connect with other resources and support

Community organizations and government agencies offer programs that make it easier to afford food and access employment, housing, education and health care. Connect with support and services to help with your rent or mortgage, child care, health services and more at the links below.

 

04 – Resources – TIO – Trauma Informed Oregon – Resources, Training and Education.
Jun 14 all-day
04 - Resources - TIO - Trauma Informed Oregon - Resources, Training and Education.

Trauma Informed Oregon – Resources, Training and Education

 

A Guide for Youth: Understanding Trauma

This guide is designed to help youth make a connection between stressful events and the potential lasting impacts. Understanding trauma and having a framework to talk about past experiences can help in processing and asking for help. This understanding supports healing. Source: Brianne Masselli and Johanna Bergan, Youth M.O.V.E. National A Guide for Youth: Understanding Trauma

A Trauma Informed Workforce: An Introduction to Workforce Wellness

This document developed by TIO provides foundational information about workforce wellness. It provides background and definitions to assist partners that are beginning to address workforce wellness in their programs and organizations. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

A Treatment Improvement Protocol: Trauma-Informed Care in Behavioral Health Services

A SAMHSA Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) with best practice guidelines for trauma informed care. TIPs are developed by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Each TIP involves the development of topic-specific best practice guidelines for the prevention A Treatment Improvement Protocol: Trauma-Informed Care in Behavioral Health Services

ACE Score Calculator

Learn about the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) measure and its use, and calculate your ACE and resilience scores. An ACE score is a tally of different types of abuse, neglect, and other hallmarks of a rough childhood. According to the Adverse Childhood Experiences study, the rougher your childhood, the higher your ACE Score Calculator

Addressing Secondary Stress: Strong in the Broken Places

This PowerPoint presentation, with accompanying video, addresses secondary stress and the impact and solutions to vicarious traumatization in the workforce. Source: Wayne Scott, MA, LCSW Download PDF View Video

Agency Components for Trauma Informed Care

This checklist can help assess the physical environment and selected intake and service procedures in an agency setting. Source: Region 3 Behavioral Health Services, Kearney, Nebraska Download PDF

AMH Approved Evidence-Based Practices

This list is an informational tool for providers to select and implement Evidence-Based Practices (EPBs). The list represents EBPs meeting the Addictions and Mental Health Services (AMH) definition and standards for EPBs. Source: Oregon Health Authority View Resources

Applying Trauma Informed Care Principles in Home Visiting

This full-day TIO training covers the definition of trauma and trauma informed care (TIC), the neurobiology of trauma, principles of TIC, and workforce stress. Originally created for home visiting and early childhood professionals some content has been tailored for these fields. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

Attunement and Self-Assessment in Supervision

Resource developed by TIO with strategies for “tuning” in as a supervisor as well as questions you can use to assess how trauma informed the supervision is. It is not an exhaustive list but it can be helpful in doing a personal assessment. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Behaviors and Actions of Trauma Informed Leaders

This TIO TIP sheet includes a summary of data on what trauma informed care looks like in leadership, among staff, and in an organization. Characteristics of a trauma informed leader are mapped out. The qualitative data included in the TIP sheet was collected formally and informally at several TIO community Behaviors and Actions of Trauma Informed Leaders

Books for Kids

A list of books that were written for children who may be coping with adversity or trauma in their lives. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Brief Trauma Questionnaire (Adults)

The BTQ is a 10-item self-report questionnaire designed to assess traumatic exposure according to DSM-IV but specifically including only life threat/serious injury) because of the difficulty of accurately assessing subjective response. Source: National Center for PTSD, US Department of Veterans Affairs View Resource

Child and Family Law Courts Meet Brain Science

This 5-minute video depicts a call to action for the legal community to learn as much as possible about brain science to make sure our law and policy are aligned with the focus on the latest information for building the capabilities of caregivers and strengthening the communities that together form Child and Family Law Courts Meet Brain Science

Child Welfare Trauma Training Toolkit 2nd Ed.

This curriculum is designed to teach basic knowledge, skills, and values about working with children who are in the child welfare system and who have experienced traumatic events. Source: National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2013 View Resource

Clackamas Behavioral Health Care Trauma-Informed Services Policy

An agency-wide trauma informed services policy developed by the Clackamas County Behavioral Health Division (CCBHD). Source: Clackamas County Behavioral Health Division (CCBHD) Download PDF

Clackamas County Behavioral Health Clinics Adult Consumer Services Survey

Consumer feedback survey that includes elements of trauma informed care, developed by Clackamas County Behavioral Health Clinics to help improve services and monitor progress in implementing trauma informed care. Source: Clackamas County Behavioral Health Division (CCBHD) Download PDF

Co-Regulation

Co-regulation follows attachment and precedes self-regulation in human emotional development. This presentation discusses the role of co-regulation in child-caregiver relationships, and how co-regulation can be strengthened. Source: Jean Barbre, EdD, LMFT Download PDF

Common Acronyms

A set of common acronyms related to trauma and trauma and trauma informed care, along with definitions of key terms. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Considerations for Responding to Crisis

Crisis response resource developed by TIO for agencies providing housing and shelter services to youth. Feel free to use this document in the development of your own agency trauma informed crisis response plan. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Considerations When Hiring a Trainer

Document developed by TIO that you can use to find the best trauma informed care trainer for your specific needs. It includes both reflective questions and interview questions. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

 

COVID-19 Considerations for a Trauma Informed Response for Work Settings

This TIO TIP sheet provides trauma informed considerations for work settings as we all navigate the uncharted territory and response to novel Coronavirus (COVID-19). The considerations included in the document are grounded in the principles of trauma informed care. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF Vietnamese PDF

Creating Cultures of Trauma-Informed Care (CCTIC): A Self-Assessment and Planning Protocol

This assessment tool provides guidelines for agencies or programs interested in facilitating trauma-informed modifications in their service systems. For use by administrators, providers, and survivor-consumers in the development, implementation, evaluation, and ongoing monitoring of trauma-informed programs. Source: Community Connections; Washington, D.C. Roger D. Fallot, Ph.D. and Maxine Harris, Ph.D. Download Creating Cultures of Trauma-Informed Care (CCTIC): A Self-Assessment and Planning Protocol

Crosswalk Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

Crosswalk between the TIO Standards of Practice and the OHA Trauma Informed Services Policy for organizations that are required to demonstrate compliance with the 2015 Trauma Informed Services Policy of the Oregon Health Authority (OHA). Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Dealing with Resistance to Trauma Informed Care

In any community that attempts Trauma Informed Care, some people resist the science and they resist the spending of tax dollars to help people who have been damaged by childhood trauma, also known as Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). Laura Porter from Ace Interface talks about how to respond. Source: Laura Dealing with Resistance to Trauma Informed Care

Dealing with the Effects of Trauma: A Self-Help Guide

Learn the symptoms of trauma and get ideas and strategies that can help you better cope. The information in this federally sponsored booklet can be used safely along with your other health care treatment. Source: Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Download PDF

Definitions and Additional Resources for the Standards of Practice

This document provides definitions and suggested resources to support use of the Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care. It is a downloadable and printable version (PDF) of information that appears in pop-up windows for the online version of the Standards. Each item in the Definitions and Additional Resources is Definitions and Additional Resources for the Standards of Practice

Disaster Resilience Learning Collaborative Evaluation Report

Disaster Resilience Learning Collaborative Evaluation Report: Creating Culturally-Grounded Healing Spaces by Leaders of Color for Leaders of Color is an evaluation of the Disaster Resilience Learning Collaborative (DRLC), a collaborative dedicated to creating culturally-grounded healing spaces by leaders of color and for leaders of color in disaster work. The DRLC Disaster Resilience Learning Collaborative Evaluation Report

Education Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

These guidelines have been adapted for educational settings from the Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care developed by Trauma Informed Oregon and with information from educational communities across the state provided by the Defending Childhood Initiative. These guidelines are intended to provide benchmarks for planning and monitoring progress and Education Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

Evidence Based Practices Resource Center

SAMHSA’s National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices promotes the adoption of scientifically established behavioral health interventions. Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) View Resource

For Youth by Youth: Foundations of Trauma Informed Care

This training revamps the Foundations of Trauma Informed Care training by making it more youth friendly, strengths based, and interactive. This is done by providing opportunities for young adults to engage in discussions on trauma and resilience with scenarios that relate to youth. The training also provides skills and tools For Youth by Youth: Foundations of Trauma Informed Care

Foundations of Trauma Informed Care (formerly TIC 101)

This (typically) 4 hr TIO training provides foundational knowledge appropriate for individuals across sectors and job titles. After defining key terms, including stress, trauma and systemic oppression, we explore how trauma and adversity affect individual’s access to services. Participants begin to identify how service systems, often unknowingly, retraumatize survivors of Foundations of Trauma Informed Care (formerly TIC 101)

General Parenting Resources

Check here to find books by experts in the field that may be helpful to parents and other caregivers dealing with children and youth affected by trauma. There are additional books for adult survivors of trauma who are parenting. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Gift From Within

This website for survivors of trauma has educational materials about PTSD and links to international support groups. In addition to educational material, the website has a roster of survivors who are willing to participate in an international network of peer support. Source: Gift from Within, Camden, Maine View Resource

Guide to Reviewing Existing Policies

Guide developed by TIO to help organizations review a specific policy about service exclusion through a trauma informed lens. Some of the questions in the guide may be helpful as you are developing or reviewing policies. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Healthcare Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

These Standards of Practice for healthcare settings provide a set of benchmarks for planning and monitoring progress implementation of TIC in clinic settings. The tool is an adaptation of the Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care developed for general use across health, behavioral health and related systems serving trauma Healthcare Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

Helping Teens with Traumatic Grief: Tips for Caregivers

This tip sheet from NCTSN offers ways to recognize and help your teen who may have difficulty coping after a sudden or violent death. Each teen grieves in a unique way so it’s important to understand your teen’s point of view. Source: National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) Download PDF

Historical Highlights of Trauma Informed Care

Timeline compiled by TIO of important National and Oregon-specific efforts to initiate trauma informed care. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Homeless Youth Continuum Tragedy Response Plan

The Homeless Youth Continuum created this Tragedy Response Plan as a way to support organizations in the continuum when a tragedy has occurred. This plan can be adapted to fit your organization or specific community. Source: Homeless Youth Continuum, Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Hosting a Meeting Using Principles of Trauma Informed Care

Bulleted list developed by TIO of things to do to take to prepare for and run a meeting that is trauma informed. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

Hosting a Virtual Meeting Using Trauma Informed Principles

This TIP sheet developed by TIO offers strategies for hosting virtual meetings that promote safety, power, and value. Hosting virtual meetings and trainings using SAMHSA’s six principles of trauma informed care can foster a space where participants are present & accessible, and their exposure to activation and re-traumatization is mitigated. Hosting a Virtual Meeting Using Trauma Informed Principles

 

How stress affects your brain – Madhumita Murgia

This accessible video describes how stress affects the brain and offers suggestions about how to reduce the impact. Madhumita Murgia shows how chronic stress can affect brain size, its structure, and how it functions, right down to the level of your genes. Source: TED Ed View Video

Human Resources Practices to Support TIC

List of strategies from TIO to promote trauma informed care through human resource policies and practices, including hiring, onboarding, supervision and performance reviews. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Identifying Hotspots Worksheet

A hands-on activity to walk through a critical thinking process about where and how organizations may activate a trauma response in staff or the population served. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Implementation of Trauma Informed Care

This TIO workshop is typically conducted as a working meeting, providing an opportunity for supervisors, managers and other champions of TIC a chance to identify how TIC applies to their work cross-system partnerships. A roadmap for the implementation of trauma informed care, along with TIO resources to guide the process Implementation of Trauma Informed Care

In the Gray Area of Being Suicidal

This short film shares the personal experience of a young adult experiencing suicidal thoughts along with their suggestions for wellness. Source: The Mighty View Video

International Transformational Resilience Coalition (ITRC) Climate Community of Practice Resource List

International Transformational Resilience Coalition (ITRC) Climate Community of Practice (CoP) Resource List 2022 Source: International Resilience Coalition’s 2022 Community of Practice Participants Download PDF

Intersections of Trauma Informed Care (TIC) and Diversity, Equity, Inclusion (DEI) Model

This infographic offers a model for thinking about the intersections of TIC and DEI. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Key Terms Related to Realizing the Widespread Impact of Trauma

This is a comprehensive list of terms related to realizing the widespread impact of trauma. The intention of the list is to be valuable, inclusive, and honor the array of potentially toxic experiences that exist. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon, and Trauma Informed Oregon Volunteer, Rebecca Saunders English PDF Spanish PDF

La Crianza de Los Hijos Durante COVID-19

Trauma Informed Oregon cree en el poder curativo de contar historias propias, y creemos que este poder es aún más crítico para los padres y las familias que crían a sus hijos durante la pandemia de COVID-19. Estamos muy agradecidos por la oportunidad de tener estas conversaciones con padres, cuidadores La Crianza de Los Hijos Durante COVID-19

Life Events Checklist for DSM-5 (Adults)

The LEC-5 is a self-report measure designed to screen for potentially traumatic events in a respondent’s lifetime. The LEC-5 assesses exposure to 16 events known to potentially result in PTSD or distress and includes one additional item assessing any other extraordinarily stressful event not captured in the first 16 items. Life Events Checklist for DSM-5 (Adults)

Literature on ACEs and Trauma

A list of key research articles about trauma, including studies related to prevalence, impact, and treatment, as well as information on the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Literature on Trauma Informed Care

A list of TIO’s favorite articles on trauma informed care, including early delineation of the principles of trauma informed care, the voices and perspective of trauma survivors, and seminal work in the housing field. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Looking for Trauma Specific Services?

This document developed by TIO is intended to serve as a resource to those seeking trauma specific services (TSS) and those who may be making referrals for TSS. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Making Your Voice Heard: Suggestions for Youth by Youth for use in Emergency Rooms

This tip sheet for youth by youth gives tips and resources for collaborating and engaging with providers so that youth and young adults can better get their needs met. The resource was developed by TIO’s Oregon Trauma Advocates Coalition (OTAC). OTAC is comprised of youth from around Oregon who are Making Your Voice Heard: Suggestions for Youth by Youth for use in Emergency Rooms

Mindfulness and Neural Integration: Daniel Siegel, MD

In this video, Dr. Daniel Siegel explores how relationships and reflection support the development of resilience in children and serve as the basic ‘3 R’s” of a new internal education of the mind. Source: TEDxStudioCityED View Video

Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support

A 12-item self-report measure of social support, using a 7-point scale from ‘very strongly agree’ to ‘very strongly disagree.’ Source: Zimet, Dahlem, Zimet & Farley, 1988 Download PDF

Nadine Burke Harris: How childhood trauma affects health across a lifetime

Childhood trauma isn’t something you just get over as you grow up. Pediatrician Nadine Burke Harris explains that the repeated stress of abuse, neglect and parents struggling with mental health or substance abuse issues has real, tangible effects on the development of the brain. Source: TED Talk View Video

National Child Traumatic Stress Network Empirically Supported Treatments and Promising Practices

The fact sheets linked from this page offer descriptive summaries of some of the clinical treatments, mental health interventions, and other trauma-informed service approaches that the NCTSN and its various centers have developed and/or implemented as a means of promoting the Network’s mission of raising the standard of care for National Child Traumatic Stress Network Empirically Supported Treatments and Promising Practices

National Child Traumatic Stress Network Standardized Measures to Assess Complex Trauma

The NCTSN’s database of tools that measure children’s experiences of trauma, their reactions to it, and other mental health and trauma-related issues. Source: National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) View Resource

Neighborhood Emergency Teams (NETs)

This City of Portland run program trains residents to provide emergency disaster assistance within their own neighborhoods. Their website also offers many resources and tools for getting organized and being prepared in an emergency. Source: Planning for Resilience & Emergency Preparedness (PREP) View Website PDF

Road Map to Trauma Informed Care

Check out the TIO Road Map to TIC, which offers phases to the implementation process. Each phase contains a marker(s) along the road that is integral to implementing that phase. When clicking on the road or phase sign, a hover box provides a description of that phase and leads you Road Map to Trauma Informed Care

SAMHSA’s Concept of Trauma and Guidance for a Trauma-Informed Approach

This document provides a working concept of trauma and a trauma-informed approach applicable across an array of service systems and stakeholder groups. In this paper, SAMHSA puts forth a framework for the behavioral health specialty sectors that can be adapted to other sectors such as child welfare, education, criminal and SAMHSA’s Concept of Trauma and Guidance for a Trauma-Informed Approach

Social Emotional Learning Resources

This list of resources in English and Spanish contains culturally-responsive, anti-racist information on Social Emotional Learning for educators, parents/guardians, and students. Editable Document Download PDF

Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

These Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care developed by TIO provide benchmarks for planning and monitoring progress and a means to highlight accomplishments as organizations work towards implementing trauma informed care. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon View Resource Spanish PDF

State of Connecticut Department of Children and Families – Trauma-Informed Care

This site provides a list of effective interventions for children and youth who experience symptoms related to trauma. Source: Department of Children and Families, Connecticut View Resource

Staying Connected while Physically Distancing

This TIO TIP sheet includes resources to support social connection while physical distancing during COVID-19. Physical distancing does not have to equate to social isolation. With a variety of technologies, virtual socializing is easier than ever before. Use video calling to socialize with family and friends, host a happy hour Staying Connected while Physically Distancing

Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (children and youth)

The SDQ is a brief behavioral screening questionnaire about 3-16 year olds. It exists in several versions to meet the needs of researchers, clinicians and educationalists. Source: YouthinMind View Resource

Summary of the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study

This handout briefly summarizes the ACE study, conducted by researchers from Kaiser Permanente and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) to study how adversity in childhood predicts adult physical, mental, and social well-being. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF Spanish PDF Russian PDF

Supporting Each Other and Ourselves: Trauma Informed Peer Support

This training is designed for people who provide peer recovery and support services and peer wellness services. Building on Foundations of Trauma Informed Care, the focus of this training is to help those who access services gain a better understanding of how their body responds to trauma and chronic stress Supporting Each Other and Ourselves: Trauma Informed Peer Support

Talking About Trauma and Suicide in Public Meetings

Recommendations from TIO to assist in preparing, facilitating and responding in a meeting when sharing personal experiences that may cause distress and trauma, to reflect a trauma informed approach. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Download PDF

The Anatomy of a Trauma Informed Script

This TIP sheet developed by TIO provides tools for making communication trauma informed. The resource maps out the key components that make a script (or set of words) trauma informed. A trauma informed script will help you stay regulated when you are delivering difficult news or getting hard questions. Source: The Anatomy of a Trauma Informed Script

The Child PTSD Symptom Scale (8 – 18yo)

The CPSS is a 26-item self-report measure that assesses PTSD diagnostic criteria and symptom severity in children ages 8 to 18. It includes 2 event items, 17 symptom items, and 7 functional impairment items. Source: National Center for PTSD, US Department of Veterans Affairs View Resource

The Impact of Trauma on Regulation

This presentation discusses types and degrees of trauma and their effect on beliefs, behaviors, emotional health, and more. Various brain functions and how they are affected by trauma are also discussed. Source: Diane Wagenhals, Program Director for Lakeside Global Institute Download PDF

The Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (8 – 18yo)

The JVQ is designed to gather information on a broad range of victimizations that may occur in childhood. It can enhance the assessment of any child or adolescent by providing a quantified description of all of the major forms of offenses against youth. Either youth or parents can complete the The Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (8 – 18yo)

The Magnitude of the Solution

A PowerPoint presentation focusing on risk, co-occurring problems, public costs, and high leverage solutions to childhood adversity. Source: Laura Porter, ACE Interface Download PDF

Through Our Eyes: Children, Violence, and Trauma

This video series discusses how violence and trauma affect children, including the serious and long-lasting consequences for their physical and mental health; signs that a child may be exposed to violence or trauma; and the staggering cost of child maltreatment to families, communities, and the nation. Victims lend their voices Through Our Eyes: Children, Violence, and Trauma

TIO Introduction to Trauma Informed Care Training Modules

These free online training modules have been created to increase access to foundational training so that the key guiding principles of trauma informed care are accessible to everyone. These four modules are self-guided and self-administered. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon View Training

To Live to See the Great Day that Dawns: Preventing Suicide by American Indian and Alaska Native Youth

This suicide prevention manual assists tribes and communities in developing effective and culturally appropriate suicide prevention plans for American Indian and Alaska Native teens and young adults. Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Download PDF

Train the Trainer Presentation in Spanish Definiciones (Key Terms in Spanish)

This Powerpoint document was produced by Trauma Informed Oregon. It is part of Train the Trainer presentation in Spanish with Definiciones — Key terms in Spanish. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Transformational Resilience Program

Learn about climate disruption and trauma and how to develop preventative resilience skills. The Resource Innovation Group (TRIG) is a non-partisan non-profit organization affiliated with the Sustainability Institute at Willamette University. TRIG’s mission is to address the human causes, impacts, and solutions to complex socio-economic-ecological challenges, with a special emphasis on climate Transformational Resilience Program

Trauma Education Statement

A workshop activity to help participants begin to view challenging behavior through a ‘trauma lens’, i.e., with heightened awareness of the role and impact of trauma. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care – Framework for Action

A graphic that depicts the principles of trauma informed care along with the role and major activities of Trauma Informed Oregon. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

Trauma Informed Care for Autistic Survivors

Disabled individuals and individuals with disabilities experience high rates of interpersonal violence and other negative life experiences which can lead to trauma. Additionally, due to systemic ableism and other forms of oppression individuals experiencing disability can have difficulty getting access to supportive services. An important part of providing trauma informed Trauma Informed Care for Autistic Survivors

Trauma Informed Care for Survivors With Disabilities

Disabled individuals and individuals with disabilities experience high rates of interpersonal violence and other negative life experiences which can lead to trauma. Additionally, due to systemic ableism and other forms of oppression individuals experiencing disability can have difficulty getting access to supportive services. An important part of providing trauma informed Trauma Informed Care for Survivors With Disabilities

Trauma Informed Care in the Classroom: A Resource Guide for Educators in Higher Learning

TIP sheet from TIO on how to create academic environments that are trauma informed. The TIP sheet aims to provide educators with tools that acknowledge the diverse backgrounds of each student that enters their classroom in order to enhance learning opportunities for all. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care Supervision: Questions and Ideas Table

Table developed by TIO that includes ideas and questions to help supervisors implement trauma informed care in their supervision practices. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care Workgroup Meeting Guidelines

List of questions from TIO to help set guidelines for Workgroup meetings. As TIC Workgroups form and begin to gather information, identify opportunities, set priorities for change, and propose solutions, there are a number of considerations that can help keep the process on track. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Neuro Takeaways

A brief bulleted list of key facts about the neuroscience of trauma as it relates to trauma informed care. Source: Julie Rosenzweig, PhD, Regional Research Institute, Portland State University Download PDF

Trauma Informed Oregon Survey Tools

This PDF lists and describes different survey tools TIO regularly offers organizations interested in TIC. Feel free to reach out to info@traumainformedoregon.org if you would like a copy or guidance for how to use these surveys Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Parenting During COVID-19

Trauma Informed Oregon believes in the healing power of telling one’s story, and we think that this power is even more critical for parents and families raising children during the COVID-19 pandemic. We were so grateful for the opportunity to hold discussions with parents, caregivers and providers to learn more Trauma Informed Parenting During COVID-19

Trauma Informed System Change Instrument Scoring Guide and Psychometrics: Organizational Trauma Informed Change

This tool provides psychometric information and the scoring protocol for child welfare agencies using the Trauma Informed System Change Instrument: Organizational change Self-Evaluation. Source: Southwest Michigan Children’s Trauma Assessment Center Download PDF

Trauma Informed System Change Instrument: Organizational Change Self-Evaluation – The Current System

This organizational assessment was created for child welfare agencies to track system change at a service provider level, at an agency level, and at the county system level. Source: Southwest Michigan Children’s Trauma Assessment Center Download PDF

Trauma Lens Exercise

This table developed by TIO provides examples of how you can reframe challenging behaviors through a trauma lens. The examples in the table are some of the most frequently reported in Trauma Informed Oregon (TIO) trainings and include challenging behaviors from service recipients and staff. It also includes challenging environmental Trauma Lens Exercise

Trauma Specific Services: A Resource for Implementation and Use

Learn about trauma specific services (TSS) and their role in treating individuals affected by trauma, as well as how to implement, seek out, and evaluate these services. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma-Informed Organizational Toolkit for Homeless Services

This organizational assessment was created to provide programs with a roadmap for becoming trauma-informed. The Toolkit offers homeless service providers with concrete guidelines for how to modify their practices and policies to ensure that they are responding appropriately to the needs of families who have experienced traumatic stress. Source: The Trauma-Informed Organizational Toolkit for Homeless Services

Traumatic Events Screening Inventory for Children

The TESI-C assesses a child’s experience of a variety of potential traumatic events including current and previous injuries, hospitalizations, domestic violence, community violence, disasters, accidents, physical abuse, and sexual abuse. The revised 24-item version (also known as the TESI-CRF-R; Ippen et al., 2002) is more developmentally sensitive to the traumatic Traumatic Events Screening Inventory for Children

Wellness Relapse Prevention Plan

This workshop exercise helps training participants to identify warning signs of excess stress or secondary trauma in their work and to create a plan to address it effectively. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

What is Trauma Informed Care?

This document developed by TIO provides general information about trauma informed care (TIC) especially for individuals new to this topic. Included are guiding considerations, principles and definitions offered by experts in the field. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

What One Thing Can You Do Feedback Questionnaire

Workshop activity to help participants consider concrete action steps to implement trauma informed care in their organizations. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

What You Really Need to Know About Being a Trauma-Informed Organization

A PowerPoint presentation from the National Council for organizations seeking to implement the principles of trauma informed care. The recording of the webinar is no longer available, but you can download the slide by clicking on “View the Slides.” Source: National Council for Behavioral Health webinar, Kristi McClure and Cheryl What You Really Need to Know About Being a Trauma-Informed Organization

 

Trauma Education Statement

A workshop activity to help participants begin to view challenging behavior through a ‘trauma lens’, i.e., with heightened awareness of the role and impact of trauma. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care – Framework for Action

A graphic that depicts the principles of trauma informed care along with the role and major activities of Trauma Informed Oregon. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

Trauma Informed Care for Autistic Survivors

Disabled individuals and individuals with disabilities experience high rates of interpersonal violence and other negative life experiences which can lead to trauma. Additionally, due to systemic ableism and other forms of oppression individuals experiencing disability can have difficulty getting access to supportive services. An important part of providing trauma informed Trauma Informed Care for Autistic Survivors

Trauma Informed Care for Survivors With Disabilities

Disabled individuals and individuals with disabilities experience high rates of interpersonal violence and other negative life experiences which can lead to trauma. Additionally, due to systemic ableism and other forms of oppression individuals experiencing disability can have difficulty getting access to supportive services. An important part of providing trauma informed Trauma Informed Care for Survivors With Disabilities

Trauma Informed Care in the Classroom: A Resource Guide for Educators in Higher Learning

TIP sheet from TIO on how to create academic environments that are trauma informed. The TIP sheet aims to provide educators with tools that acknowledge the diverse backgrounds of each student that enters their classroom in order to enhance learning opportunities for all. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care Supervision: Questions and Ideas Table

Table developed by TIO that includes ideas and questions to help supervisors implement trauma informed care in their supervision practices. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care Workgroup Meeting Guidelines

List of questions from TIO to help set guidelines for Workgroup meetings. As TIC Workgroups form and begin to gather information, identify opportunities, set priorities for change, and propose solutions, there are a number of considerations that can help keep the process on track. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Neuro Takeaways

A brief bulleted list of key facts about the neuroscience of trauma as it relates to trauma informed care. Source: Julie Rosenzweig, PhD, Regional Research Institute, Portland State University Download PDF

Trauma Informed Oregon Survey Tools

This PDF lists and describes different survey tools TIO regularly offers organizations interested in TIC. Feel free to reach out to info@traumainformedoregon.org if you would like a copy or guidance for how to use these surveys Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Parenting During COVID-19

Trauma Informed Oregon believes in the healing power of telling one’s story, and we think that this power is even more critical for parents and families raising children during the COVID-19 pandemic. We were so grateful for the opportunity to hold discussions with parents, caregivers and providers to learn more Trauma Informed Parenting During COVID-19

Trauma Informed System Change Instrument Scoring Guide and Psychometrics: Organizational Trauma Informed Change

This tool provides psychometric information and the scoring protocol for child welfare agencies using the Trauma Informed System Change Instrument: Organizational change Self-Evaluation. Source: Southwest Michigan Children’s Trauma Assessment Center Download PDF

Trauma Informed System Change Instrument: Organizational Change Self-Evaluation – The Current System

This organizational assessment was created for child welfare agencies to track system change at a service provider level, at an agency level, and at the county system level. Source: Southwest Michigan Children’s Trauma Assessment Center Download PDF

Trauma Lens Exercise

This table developed by TIO provides examples of how you can reframe challenging behaviors through a trauma lens. The examples in the table are some of the most frequently reported in Trauma Informed Oregon (TIO) trainings and include challenging behaviors from service recipients and staff. It also includes challenging environmental Trauma Lens Exercise

Trauma Specific Services: A Resource for Implementation and Use

Learn about trauma specific services (TSS) and their role in treating individuals affected by trauma, as well as how to implement, seek out, and evaluate these services. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma-Informed Organizational Toolkit for Homeless Services

This organizational assessment was created to provide programs with a roadmap for becoming trauma-informed. The Toolkit offers homeless service providers with concrete guidelines for how to modify their practices and policies to ensure that they are responding appropriately to the needs of families who have experienced traumatic stress. Source: The Trauma-Informed Organizational Toolkit for Homeless Services

Traumatic Events Screening Inventory for Children

The TESI-C assesses a child’s experience of a variety of potential traumatic events including current and previous injuries, hospitalizations, domestic violence, community violence, disasters, accidents, physical abuse, and sexual abuse. The revised 24-item version (also known as the TESI-CRF-R; Ippen et al., 2002) is more developmentally sensitive to the traumatic Traumatic Events Screening Inventory for Children

Wellness Relapse Prevention Plan

This workshop exercise helps training participants to identify warning signs of excess stress or secondary trauma in their work and to create a plan to address it effectively. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

What is Trauma Informed Care?

This document developed by TIO provides general information about trauma informed care (TIC) especially for individuals new to this topic. Included are guiding considerations, principles and definitions offered by experts in the field. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

What One Thing Can You Do Feedback Questionnaire

Workshop activity to help participants consider concrete action steps to implement trauma informed care in their organizations. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

What You Really Need to Know About Being a Trauma-Informed Organization

A PowerPoint presentation from the National Council for organizations seeking to implement the principles of trauma informed care. The recording of the webinar is no longer available, but you can download the slide by clicking on “View the Slides.” Source: National Council for Behavioral Health webinar, Kristi McClure and Cheryl What You Really Need to Know About Being a Trauma-Informed Organization

 

 

04 – Resources – Transitions to Adulthood Center for Research Transitions – Top 10 Most Popular Young Adult Mental Health Resources in 2023
Jun 14 all-day
04 - Resources - Transitions to Adulthood Center for Research Transitions - Top 10 Most Popular Young Adult  Mental Health Resources in 2023

Our Top 10 Most Popular Young Adult

Mental Health Resources in 2023

 

My Must Have Papers: Managing the Paperwork of Adulting

Managing the paperwork that comes along with “Adulting” is not fun. Our Young Adult Advisory Board and Family Advisory Board set out to make that task a little easier in this tip sheet.

“My Must Have Papers – Managing the Paperwork of Adulting” Tip Sheet. Also available as a comic, “Passport to Adulting: Managing Your Paperwork”.
STAY Tuned Podcast 10 Too Sick to Work Breaking the Narrative

Too Sick to Work? Breaking the Narrative – Podcast

STAY Tuned is a podcast made for and by young adults with mental health conditions. In Episode 10, Dr. Michelle Mullen discussed her work on preventing disability, why the language used to describe the mental health of young adults is so key and what can be done to change the narrative of self-blame.

Episode 10: “Too Sick to Work?” Breaking the Narrative.

All Episodes of S.T.A.Y. Tuned: Supporting Transition-Age Youth Podcast.

3 Tips to Improve Communications with Your Young Adult

This popular tip sheet for families includes 3 specific tips that can help you have better conversations and better relationships with the youth & young adults in your life. It’s worth reading and worth sharing! Read and download 3 Tips to Improve Communications with your Youth & Young Adult.

Accommodations at Work: What Do I Need to Know?

Work can be hard for young adults. And a mental health condition can make things complicated. Accommodations at your workplace can be one helpful solution. But what are they? Our new tip sheet, “Accommodations at Work: What Do I Need to Know?” can help young adults figure that out.

Applying for a Job: The Young Adults Guide, Revised 2023

This tip sheet is a good starting point for your young adult in their job search journey, covers many topics including resumes, job search boards, interviewing and follow-up. It also includes some great networking resources. Read and download “Applying for a Job – The Young Adult’s Guide” Tip Sheet.

Factors that Influence the Continuous Pursuit of Education, Training, and Employment among Young Adults with Serious Mental Health Conditions

This research brief describes the patterns of education, training, and employment activities for young adults with serious mental health conditions, and identifies factors that hinder or facilitate their ability to consistently pursue these activities. These findings can inform efforts to improve their long-term career trajectories. The “Factors” Research Brief.

STAY Tuned Podcast Episode 6: “We’re Working On It”

Join our conversation with Emma Narkewicz, MPA as we talk about Pre-employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) in MA and dive into what it’s like being a young adult with mental health conditions entering the workforce and sustaining a career. Podcast episode 6: “We’re working on it!”.

Youth are Empowered by Leading Their Own IEP Meetings

Our comic series shows them how to do that. These comics walk young adults through how to participate fully, and lead, their IEP meetings. In the final comic, Mateo is moving towards graduation and prepping for his last IEP meeting of his high school career. Adulting Shorts Series, The “TEA” on IEPs

Engaging Young Adults in Work & School

Our free training for providers shares key info & resources related to the importance of engaging young adults in work and school endeavors, and strategies for doing this work. You also get an inside look into programs that are supporting young adults moving to adulthood.

Engaging Young Adults in Work & School – Training for Providers.

5 Ways Working Helps Me With My Mental Health

This popular blog post is an insightful read and reminder that employment can help manage your mental health and be a powerful tool in recovery. Read Five Ways Working Helps Me Manage My Mental Health Condition.

04 – Resources – VA & ODVA – Veterans Support Groups, Resources, Education, Mental Health and Advocacy
Jun 14 all-day

USE THIS LINK TO OPEN THE VA WELCOME KIT

Print out your VA Welcome Kit

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned.

Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy, so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

LOCATE SERVICES IN OREGON

Veteran Resource Navigator

The Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs (ODVA) has a comprehensive online resource guide (VETERAN RESOURCE NAVIGATOR) available to assist veterans in finding the benefits that are most useful to their unique circumstances at this time.

Use the link below for the Veteran Resource Navigator

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

Veteran Services by County

Click on the link blow for interactive map  access resources in your county in Oregon.

Other Resources Available to Veterans and Military Service Members

DD214 & Military Records Request:

https://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records

Veteran Resource Navigator site by ODVA:

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

(Oregon)Military Help Line:  

Call 888-457-4838

VA Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255:

Press 1.VA Confidential crisis chat at net or text to 838255 

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD:

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/

Defining Discharge Status:

https://militarybenefits.info/character-of-discharge/#:~:text=There%20are%206%20types%20of,DD%20214%20must%20have%20a

How to apply for a discharge status upgrade:

https://www.va.gov/discharge-upgrade-instructions/

Oregon Supportive Services for Vets & Families (Housing):

https://caporegon.org/what-we-do/ssvf/

Clackamas County VSO’s (Veteran Service Officers):

https://www.clackamas.us/socialservices/veterans.html

Portland VA Clinic that can help with homelessness & medical care:

https://www.portland.va.gov/locations/crrc.asp

Portland VA Mental Health Clinic:

https://www.portland.va.gov/services/mentalhealth.asp

Veterans Crisis Line/ Suicide Prevention:

https://www.veteranscrisisline.net/

If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance,

please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.

Contact ODVA Headquarters

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs
700 Summer St NE
Salem, OR 97301

Web: https://www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/default.aspx

Phone: (800) 692-9666 or (503) 373-2085

Fax: (503) 373-2392

Email:orvetsbenefits@odva.state.or.us

Web Resources

Oregon Health Plan – Enrollment Page

https://www.oregon.gov/oha/hsd/ohp/pages/apply.aspx

 

SAMHSA Treatment Locator

https://findtreatment.gov/

VA National Center on PTSD

 PTSD Treatment Decision Aid

 Educational Materials

  Mobile Apps

  Whiteboard Videos

  Consultation Program

 

VA Healthcare – Community Care network

https://www.va.gov/COMMUNITYCARE/providers/Community_Care_Network.asp

 

VA’s Center for Women Veterans (CWV)

https://www.va.gov/womenvet/

Minority Veterans of America

https://www.minorityvets.org/

 

Vet Centers:

Central Oregon Vet Center

Eugene Vet Center

Grants Pass Vet Center

Portland Vet Center

Salem Vet Center

 Community Based Outpatient Clinics:

Bend CBOC

Morrow County VA Telehealth Clinic (Boardman OR)

Brookings VA Clinic

Wallowa County VA Telehealth Clinic (Enterprise OR)

Eugene Health Care Center

Eugene VA Downtown Clinic

Fairview Clinic

Grants Pass West VA CBOC

Hillsboro CBOC

Klamath Falls CBOC

La Grande CBOC

Lincoln City Clinic

North Bend VA Clinic

Community Resource and Referral Center (CRRC)

Salem CBOC

North Coast CBOC

 

Additional Resources By Phone:

Veterans Crisis Line: 800-273-8255, Press 1

Women Veterans Hotline: 855-829-663

Vet Center Call Center: 877-WAR-VETS (927-8387)

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Caregiver Support Line: 855-260-3274

Lines for Life Military Help Line:  Call 1-888-457-4838

Senior Loneliness Line:  Call 503-200-1633

The Trevor Project:  866-488-7386

PEER SUPPORT AND PEER TRAINING

USE THIS LINK TO APPLY

PTSD Self Screening

This self-screen can help you find out if your feelings and behaviors may be related to PTSD.

Only a trained provider can diagnose PTSD. Your responses here are private and secure—they are not collected or shared. You may take a screenshot or print this screen to share with a provider.

Do not take the self-screen for someone else. If you are concerned that someone you care about might have PTSD, please share this screen with them instead.

Start Screen

PTSD Information Voice Mail: (802) 296-6300
Email: ncptsd@va.gov
Also see: VA Mental Health

05 – Warmline – LFL – Lines for Life – Military Helpline – (888) 457-4838 – Weekdays and Weekends – 24/7 @ Phone
Jun 14 all-day

 

 

The Military Helpline serves 24-hours a day

CALL:  (888) 457-4838 (24/7/365)

TEXT:  MIL1 to 839863 (8am-11pm PST daily)

The Military Helpline, available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, provides compassionate, confidential crisis intervention and referral among the military community.

The line is answered by a highly trained staff and a dedicated team of volunteer crisis workers, many of whom have a military background. All possess a strong understanding of the serious issues that can impact service members, veterans and their families, including the loss of a job, family strife, home foreclosure, post-traumatic stress, and other medical and health care concerns.

The Military Helpline has your back. (888) 457-4838

Download informational material about the Military Helpline:

– Informational Packet (5 pages/922K)
 Flyer (691K)

The Military Helpline is a service of Lines for Life, a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to preventing substance abuse and suicide.

Administrative Office
5100 SW Macadam Avenue, Suite 400
Portland, OR 97239
info@LinesForLife.org
p 503.244.5211 or 800.282.7035

05 – Warmline – TTP – The Treavor Project – Trevor Lifeline – Call 1-866-488-7386 or Text – “START” to 678-678 – 24/7 – Weekdays & Weekdays @ phone
Jun 14 all-day
05 - Warmline - TTP - The Treavor Project - Trevor Lifeline -  Call 1-866-488-7386 or Text - "START" to 678-678 - 24/7 - Weekdays & Weekdays @ phone

 

Trevor Lifeline

 

TO CALL THE LIFELINE

Call 1-866-488-7386

 

TO TEXT THE LIFELINE

 “START” to 678-678

or use this link TEXT

 

FOR ONLINE CHAT

Click to Start Chat

About TrevorLifeline

TrevorLifeline offers 24/7, free and confidential support by phone, text message (SMS) and online chat. We support LGBTQ+ young people in the U.S. and Mexico who may be experiencing emotional distress related to gender & sexual identity, loneliness, relationships, suicide, supporting a friend or family member.

As part of our commitment to preventing suicide, we are available to help you if you are considering suicide or harming yourself, or if you are noticing warning signs in a friend or family member.

When you reach out to us you will talk with one our friendly and supportive volunteers who are experienced in how to help people in your situation. They will listen to you, unpack your story and feelings, and work with you to help you through your challenges. We are open 24 hours a day, every day of the week. We are always available to talk with you.

 

 

 

 

05 -Warmline – FACT Oregon – FACT Oregon Support Line – Support for Families with Children Experience Disabilities – Call 503-786-6082 or Text 541-695-5416 – Support Team Responds in 48 -72 Hours – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Call or Text
Jun 14 all-day

Support Line

FACT Oregon’s Support Line is staffed by parents of youth experiencing disability, and we’re here to help!

Wherever you are on your journey, from birth through young adulthood, we are here to answer your questions and help find resources to support your child’s academic, emotional, and physical growth and well-being! Collectively, our team has the lived experience and professional training needed to support families through many different milestones. Let us help you carve a path forward to a whole full life! We welcome questions about early childhood, special education (we’re the designated statewide Parent Information and Training Center), intellectual and developmental disability services, behavior and communication, self-determination and supported decision making, and so much more! If we don’t know the answer, we’ll try our best to help you find it!

Get Support!

Call or text 503-786-6082 or 541-695-5416

Email us at support@factoregon.org or apoyo@factoregon.org

Someone from our support team will call you back, usually within 48-72 hours. Or, if you’d like, you can choose a time to talk from our calendar by clicking below.

 

To Schedule a Support Call Use The Link Below

Para programar una llamada de soporte, use el siguiente enlace
08 – Observance – National Runaway Prevention Month – Crisis Line, Chat line, Text, Advocacy, Transporation – 24/7
Jun 14 all-day
08 - Observance - National Runaway Prevention Month - Crisis Line, Chat line, Text, Advocacy, Transporation - 24/7

 

 

 

 

 

The team at the National Runaway Safeline is there for you and offers a range of support services 24/7.

• Hotline – Call 1-800-RUNAWAY (1-800-786-2929) to speak with a trained NRS staff member or volunteer who will listen and support you.


• Live Chat – Our live chat service is a quick and easy way to connect with a compassionate person who will answer your questions and provide help.


• Email – When you email NRS’s Crisis Services team, you can expect a response as soon as possible.


• Forum – Post questions or comments to the NRS forum, scroll through past posts and invite others to share their experiences with you.


• Resource Referrals – Using the nation’s largest database of agencies and services that support young people, NRS refers youth and families to local resources, such as shelters, mental health services, food pantries and more.


• Home Free – In partnership with Greyhound Lines, Inc., the Home Free program reunites youth with their family or guardian through a free bus ticket home or to a safe alternative living arrangement. Learn more here.


• Mediation and Message Service – NRS helps reestablish healthy lines of communication for youth and their parents/guardians through mediated conference calls and a message service.

BRMA – Brown Mamas – The Ultimate List of Support Groups for Black Moms
Jun 14 all-day

 

The Ultimate List of Support Groups for Black Moms

Brown Mamas – Pittsburgh & U.S.  – Brown Mamas, Inc. has been around for seven years in the Pittsburgh region.  Brown Mamas began in the living room of Muffy Mendoza.  What started as 5 moms has grown to over 4000  Our mamas love our Pittsburgh chapter so much that we are expanding.  If you are mom who is ready to not just find her tribe, but to inspire other mothers and be the change she wants to see in her community, click here to learn more about starting your own Brown Mamas chapter.

Black Moms Connect – Canada & U.S.

Mommin’ Society – North Carolina & Online

Moms of Black Boys United – Atlanta & Online

Moms Make It Work – NYC

Mocha Moms, Inc. – U.S. (seriously, everywhere)

Whine & Cheese – 27 Chapters in U.S. (including D.C., PA, South Carolina, New York, etc.)

Black Women Do Breastfeed

Motherwork by Mater Mea – NYC

Beautiful Brown Girls Brunch Club – New Jersey

District Motherhued’s DMV MomTribe – D.C. Metro Area

Soul Food for Your Baby – Hawthorne, Calif.

Black Moms Blog Events – Atlanta, GA

Birthing Beautiful Communities – Cleveland, OH

Tessera Collective – Online, Self-Care Support

Melanin Mommies – Pittsburgh, PA

Pittsburgh Black Breastfeeding Circle –

Not-So Melinated Support Groups for Black Moms

Moms Club

La Leche League

Circle of Moms

Meetup.com

Facebook Support Groups for Black Moms

Black Stay-At-Home Mom Village

Black Moms Connection

Black Moms in Charge

Single Black Mothers

Moms of Black Daughters

Moms of Black Sons

Black Moms in College & Beyond

Breast Milk Donation for Black Moms

Sisterhood for Young Black Moms

CGAA – Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous – Support Meetings, Support Chat for Family and Friends, Resources – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online Via ZOOM
Jun 14 all-day

 

Who We Are

Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous is a fellowship of people who support each other in recovering from the problems resulting from excessive game playing. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop video gaming, which is completely up to you. CGAA has no dues or fees. Our groups share their collective experience and the principles that helped them, but CGAA has no experts, hierarchy, or required beliefs. We have etiquette and traditions, but no strict rules.
If you are struggling with compulsive gaming, leave your contact info at 970-364-3497 and a CGAA member will call you back
Or email us at helpline@cgaa.info
For other issues, contact us at support@cgaa.info

 

ZOOM MEETINGS

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 
ZOOM MEETING

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 

Gamers Find A Local Support Group

Use the link below to get more information about local groups and a notification when a local meeting is started. Due to the COVID pandemic, most meetings are currently held in an outdoor setting or online.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LOCAL GROUP FINDER TOOL

 

CONTACT GROUPS IN OREGON BY LOCATION

 

 

SUPPORT FOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS

What Can I Do?

Video gaming is a common pastime. To many people, it is surprising that it can become a serious addiction, that is, an activity that is engaged in compulsively, without control or concern for consequences.

Video gaming addiction is a very serious problem that is harmful to everyone it touches. Since everyone involved suffers from it, everyone involved needs some help. Here are some important things to know.

First, no one is responsible for someone else’s compulsive gaming. As the Al-Anon slogan goes, “I didn’t cause it, I can’t control it, and I can’t cure it.”

You didn’t cause it.

Some people partly blame themselves for the dysfunctional behavior of their family members, particularly with addicts who are very quick to shift responsibility off themselves and blame others. Perhaps you played games with your loved one, purchased games, or encouraged it, thinking it was a harmless leisure activity. Maybe you’ve been involved in some conflict and wonder if that has driven him or her to hide away in gaming. But no one is responsible for another person’s behavior or mental disorders.

You can’t control it.

You may have already tried to talk to your friend or family member. Perhaps you have bargained with them, or given ultimatums. You have tried to help them see what damage they are doing to themselves and others. And none of it has worked. This is baffling to you. Why don’t they seem to understand or care? Why can’t they see what is obvious to you? This is actually a symptom of the disease of addiction, one that destines efforts for control to failure.

You can’t cure it.

We all would like to believe that we have the ability to help those we love. We often think that if we can just get the right information, figure out the right thing to say or do, perhaps change something about ourselves, we can fix the problem. People should be able to solve their own problems. Why can’t we do that with this one? There is a simple reason. There is no cure for addiction. It requires treatment. The recovery process is long and difficult. And there is only one person who can start that process, the one who is gaming compulsively. There are things you can do. Here are some suggestions that you may want to consider, that other family members and friends have found helpful.

Get information.

The literature of recovery fellowships for family and friends of addicts (such as Al-Anon) has much helpful guidance, some of which is available online as well. There are people who have been in situations very similar to yours, who have learned much from them, and who are willing to share the lessons learned, their experience, strength and hope. We hope you avail yourself of such resources.

Detach with love.

Putting energy into arguing with someone who is playing compulsively will not help either of you. Your loved one has a serious problem that you are powerless to control or cure, and that they will not get help until they want it. As much as you love someone, you cannot force this process on another person.

Stop enabling.

Paradoxically, at the same time people are arguing with, bargaining with or shaming a compulsive gamer, they are often (perhaps without realizing it) supporting the addiction in many ways. Anything that shields an addict from the consequences of his or her behavior is enabling, and can include such basic things as providing food, shelter, money, companionship, housekeeping, and covering for employment and legal difficulties. Helping a compulsive gamer keep up an appearance of normalcy is helping him or her continue in the destructive behavior. While you cannot change him or her, you can make changes for yourself. You can shift your energy away from enabling behaviors and toward meeting your own needs.

Take care of yourself.

Whether or not your loved one ever stops gaming, you deserve to have a healthy and happy life. Once you have accepted that you are powerless over their gaming behavior, you can begin to focus on what you can do for yourself, to accomplish your own goals. With the help of others who have been where you are, you can learn to set healthy boundaries and stick to them.

Join our WhatsApp Chat Site for Family and Friends!

Game-Anon

WhatsApp Group Invite

Visit whatsapp.com/dl on your mobile phone to install.

By installing WhatsApp, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

 

Chat Using A Macintosh

 

Mac OS X 10.10 and higher. WhatsApp must be installed on your phone.

By clicking the Download button, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

DOWNLOAD FOR MAC OS X

Download for Windows 8 and higher (64-bit)
Download for Windows 8 and higher (32-bit)

 

 


Things To Do Instead of Gaming

One of the things we were trying to do with our gaming was meet some basic needs. If we do not meet those needs in normal healthy ways, we will suffer much stronger urges to game again. Some basic needs to cover are social needs, self expression, creativity, a sense of challenge and accomplishment, stress relief, a sense of purpose and meaning, and a sense of safety through control and predictability.

Here are some ideas for activities that will help meet these needs, reduce cravings, help with recovery from addiction, and fill some of the hours freed from compulsive gaming.

Please don’t let the length of this list overwhelm you. The idea is not to start ten new things and try to change everything all at once. We seek small bits of progress, not perfection. A good place to start is to put first things first. What need is currently most important? What’s right in front of me? What opportunity has come my way recently? If we take steps of small improvement with one or two areas each day, we are moving in the right direction.