PeerGalaxy Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring over 82,000 monthly offerings of FREE telephone- and online-accessible peer support, recovery support + wellness activities!

Over 30+ warmlines plus webinars, workshops, job postings, special events, consumer input opportunities and more.

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

Click the Accessibility Button on the right side, halfway down in the middle, for enhanced viewing and/or access options!  Click the Translate Button in the lower left corner for language options. 

Your use of this site is subject to the Privacy Policy, Terms and Conditions of Use.  Reminder: Fees or charges may be charged by your carrier for sending or receiving SMS text messaging, phone, or data.

If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

Training Opportunities in July 2020
List Provided Courtesy of State of Oregon, Oregon Health Authority
Click here to download PDF Format, 16 pages

How Events are Sorted:

First, at the top of the list: Disaster Hotline & Oregon Safe + Strong Helpline.

Next in the list: Bundled “All Day” Events for organizations with events happening at multiple times throughout the day and/or in many formats or locations; these are bundled into a single listing to prevent endless scrolling.  Usually these offer a lookup by zip code or other criteria. 

Lastly, Time-Specific Events listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  Warmlines and places east of Oregon’s time zone tend to start earlier (e.g. 4am in Oregon is 7am in New York).

Jun
26
Sun
04 – Resources – AM – All Month – Pride Month – Online Events, Resources, Hotlines and Support Groups
Jun 26 all-day

Gay Pride Banner

 

Pride Month

Online Events, Resources, and Support Groups

We celebrate Pride Month in June to honor the 1969 Stonewall Uprising and to commemorate the positive impact the LGBTQ+ community has had on our world.

Online Support Groups

Family Equality Council

Family Equality Council connects and supports LGBTQ parents and their kids. The organization works to ensure equality for these families by influencing change in other people’s minds and building a community of acceptance for all families.

The LGBTQ National Help Center

The LGBTQ National Help Center is a non-profit organization dedicated to addressing the needs of LGBTQ people as well as those still questioning their sexuality and struggling with gender identity. This organization has more than 15,000 local resources in different cities and towns all over the country.

Mens group

Men’s Group is an online support group specifically for LGBTQ men. It is tailored to offering emotional support to create a positive community and start conversations and forums where gay men can share their life stresses in a safe space. As one of the most active online forums for men, it is the perfect place to interact with other community members who have gone through similar LGBTQ issues and have managed to find their way through.

 

 

Organizations Offering Resources for the LGBTQ+ Community

 

Resources for Providers

Articles of Interest

 

Mental Health Technology Transfer Center Products

Transgender Mental Health: Co-Conspiratorship – Hosted by the Northwest MHTTC, this recorded webinar provides a community-defined and evidence-based foundation for mental health providers serving queer and transgender communities. Centering anti-racism, community lived experience, and an interdisciplinary framework, this webinar explores strengths, weaknesses, and best practices of mental health care for queer and transgender communities.

Working with Transgender Patients in Integrated Care – Hosted by the Mountain Plains MHTTC, this two-part recorded webinar series focuses on how to effectively implement trans-affirmative care for transgender and nonbinary patients.

The Latinx LGBT+ Community: The Consequences of Intersectionality and the Use of the Affirmative Model for Latinx Populations – Hosted by the National Hispanic and Latino MHTTC, this recorded webinar discusses the Minority Stress Model, the excessive stress to which individuals of stigmatized social categories are exposed as a result of their social position, and its impact on mental health. The presenter also discusses the LGBTQ+ Affirmative Model as a recommended approach to work with Latinx LGBTQ+ communities with mental health challenges.

Desk Guide: Building Your Toolkit to Serve the LGBTQ Community  – Created by the Great Lakes MHTTC, this guide is based on material presented by Dr. Amney Harper on April 9, 2021, and outlines tools for providers to help LGBTQ+ patients navigate disparities and achieve a fulfilling, emotionally healthy life.

Jun
27
Mon
01 – Support Line – L4L Racial Equity Support Line – BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free – Lines for Life – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Jun 27 all-day
01 - Support Line - L4L Racial Equity Support Line - BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free - Lines for Life - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis / Support Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 8:30am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Toll-Free Access

If you need toll-free access, call any line at Lines for Life and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line during its operating hours.

For example, you can call the Suicide Prevention Crisis Line @ 1-877-273-8255 or the Safe+Strong Helpline @ 1-800-923-4457 and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line between 8:30am and 5pm PST.

04 – Resources – AM – All Month – Pride Month – Online Events, Resources, Hotlines and Support Groups
Jun 27 all-day

Gay Pride Banner

 

Pride Month

Online Events, Resources, and Support Groups

We celebrate Pride Month in June to honor the 1969 Stonewall Uprising and to commemorate the positive impact the LGBTQ+ community has had on our world.

Online Support Groups

Family Equality Council

Family Equality Council connects and supports LGBTQ parents and their kids. The organization works to ensure equality for these families by influencing change in other people’s minds and building a community of acceptance for all families.

The LGBTQ National Help Center

The LGBTQ National Help Center is a non-profit organization dedicated to addressing the needs of LGBTQ people as well as those still questioning their sexuality and struggling with gender identity. This organization has more than 15,000 local resources in different cities and towns all over the country.

Mens group

Men’s Group is an online support group specifically for LGBTQ men. It is tailored to offering emotional support to create a positive community and start conversations and forums where gay men can share their life stresses in a safe space. As one of the most active online forums for men, it is the perfect place to interact with other community members who have gone through similar LGBTQ issues and have managed to find their way through.

 

 

Organizations Offering Resources for the LGBTQ+ Community

 

Resources for Providers

Articles of Interest

 

Mental Health Technology Transfer Center Products

Transgender Mental Health: Co-Conspiratorship – Hosted by the Northwest MHTTC, this recorded webinar provides a community-defined and evidence-based foundation for mental health providers serving queer and transgender communities. Centering anti-racism, community lived experience, and an interdisciplinary framework, this webinar explores strengths, weaknesses, and best practices of mental health care for queer and transgender communities.

Working with Transgender Patients in Integrated Care – Hosted by the Mountain Plains MHTTC, this two-part recorded webinar series focuses on how to effectively implement trans-affirmative care for transgender and nonbinary patients.

The Latinx LGBT+ Community: The Consequences of Intersectionality and the Use of the Affirmative Model for Latinx Populations – Hosted by the National Hispanic and Latino MHTTC, this recorded webinar discusses the Minority Stress Model, the excessive stress to which individuals of stigmatized social categories are exposed as a result of their social position, and its impact on mental health. The presenter also discusses the LGBTQ+ Affirmative Model as a recommended approach to work with Latinx LGBTQ+ communities with mental health challenges.

Desk Guide: Building Your Toolkit to Serve the LGBTQ Community  – Created by the Great Lakes MHTTC, this guide is based on material presented by Dr. Amney Harper on April 9, 2021, and outlines tools for providers to help LGBTQ+ patients navigate disparities and achieve a fulfilling, emotionally healthy life.

Warmline – ODOJ – Oregon Department of Justice – Non-Emergency Bias Response Hotline – 1-844-924-BIAS (1-844-924-2427) 9am to 5pm PST Monday – Friday
Jun 27 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Non-Emergency Bias Response Hotline

9am to 5pm Pacific time, Monday – Friday

Were you targeted with bias due to your race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, or religion?

Make a report, receive support, learn about your options

1-844-924-BIAS (1-844-924-2427) 9am to 5pm Pacific time, Monday – Friday.

Trauma-informed operators are standing by. Interpreters in over 240 languages.

After hours? Leave a message and we’ll return your call.

Hearing Impaired? Dial 711 for Oregon Relay.

You can also submit a report online.

What happens when I call the Bias Response Hotline or make a report online?

The Bias Response Hotline is here to help you understand your options, make choices about next steps, and receive support in the aftermath of experiencing or witnessing bias. 

If you call the Bias Response Hotline, you are connecting with trauma-informed hotline advocates who are trained in crisis intervention and can provide bias response advocacy, including assistance in reporting a bias crime to law enforcement. For more information, see What Happens on the Hotline? and Reporting Bias Crime to Law Enforcement.

Read more about how Oregon is tracking bias crimes and incidents.

Download Bias Hotline infographic

Jun
28
Tue
01 – Support Line – L4L Racial Equity Support Line – BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free – Lines for Life – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Jun 28 all-day
01 - Support Line - L4L Racial Equity Support Line - BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free - Lines for Life - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis / Support Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 8:30am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Toll-Free Access

If you need toll-free access, call any line at Lines for Life and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line during its operating hours.

For example, you can call the Suicide Prevention Crisis Line @ 1-877-273-8255 or the Safe+Strong Helpline @ 1-800-923-4457 and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line between 8:30am and 5pm PST.

04 – Resources – AM – All Month – Pride Month – Online Events, Resources, Hotlines and Support Groups
Jun 28 all-day

Gay Pride Banner

 

Pride Month

Online Events, Resources, and Support Groups

We celebrate Pride Month in June to honor the 1969 Stonewall Uprising and to commemorate the positive impact the LGBTQ+ community has had on our world.

Online Support Groups

Family Equality Council

Family Equality Council connects and supports LGBTQ parents and their kids. The organization works to ensure equality for these families by influencing change in other people’s minds and building a community of acceptance for all families.

The LGBTQ National Help Center

The LGBTQ National Help Center is a non-profit organization dedicated to addressing the needs of LGBTQ people as well as those still questioning their sexuality and struggling with gender identity. This organization has more than 15,000 local resources in different cities and towns all over the country.

Mens group

Men’s Group is an online support group specifically for LGBTQ men. It is tailored to offering emotional support to create a positive community and start conversations and forums where gay men can share their life stresses in a safe space. As one of the most active online forums for men, it is the perfect place to interact with other community members who have gone through similar LGBTQ issues and have managed to find their way through.

 

 

Organizations Offering Resources for the LGBTQ+ Community

 

Resources for Providers

Articles of Interest

 

Mental Health Technology Transfer Center Products

Transgender Mental Health: Co-Conspiratorship – Hosted by the Northwest MHTTC, this recorded webinar provides a community-defined and evidence-based foundation for mental health providers serving queer and transgender communities. Centering anti-racism, community lived experience, and an interdisciplinary framework, this webinar explores strengths, weaknesses, and best practices of mental health care for queer and transgender communities.

Working with Transgender Patients in Integrated Care – Hosted by the Mountain Plains MHTTC, this two-part recorded webinar series focuses on how to effectively implement trans-affirmative care for transgender and nonbinary patients.

The Latinx LGBT+ Community: The Consequences of Intersectionality and the Use of the Affirmative Model for Latinx Populations – Hosted by the National Hispanic and Latino MHTTC, this recorded webinar discusses the Minority Stress Model, the excessive stress to which individuals of stigmatized social categories are exposed as a result of their social position, and its impact on mental health. The presenter also discusses the LGBTQ+ Affirmative Model as a recommended approach to work with Latinx LGBTQ+ communities with mental health challenges.

Desk Guide: Building Your Toolkit to Serve the LGBTQ Community  – Created by the Great Lakes MHTTC, this guide is based on material presented by Dr. Amney Harper on April 9, 2021, and outlines tools for providers to help LGBTQ+ patients navigate disparities and achieve a fulfilling, emotionally healthy life.

Warmline – ODOJ – Oregon Department of Justice – Non-Emergency Bias Response Hotline – 1-844-924-BIAS (1-844-924-2427) 9am to 5pm PST Monday – Friday
Jun 28 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Non-Emergency Bias Response Hotline

9am to 5pm Pacific time, Monday – Friday

Were you targeted with bias due to your race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, or religion?

Make a report, receive support, learn about your options

1-844-924-BIAS (1-844-924-2427) 9am to 5pm Pacific time, Monday – Friday.

Trauma-informed operators are standing by. Interpreters in over 240 languages.

After hours? Leave a message and we’ll return your call.

Hearing Impaired? Dial 711 for Oregon Relay.

You can also submit a report online.

What happens when I call the Bias Response Hotline or make a report online?

The Bias Response Hotline is here to help you understand your options, make choices about next steps, and receive support in the aftermath of experiencing or witnessing bias. 

If you call the Bias Response Hotline, you are connecting with trauma-informed hotline advocates who are trained in crisis intervention and can provide bias response advocacy, including assistance in reporting a bias crime to law enforcement. For more information, see What Happens on the Hotline? and Reporting Bias Crime to Law Enforcement.

Read more about how Oregon is tracking bias crimes and incidents.

Download Bias Hotline infographic

Jun
29
Wed
01 – Support Line – L4L Racial Equity Support Line – BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free – Lines for Life – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Jun 29 all-day
01 - Support Line - L4L Racial Equity Support Line - BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free - Lines for Life - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis / Support Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 8:30am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Toll-Free Access

If you need toll-free access, call any line at Lines for Life and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line during its operating hours.

For example, you can call the Suicide Prevention Crisis Line @ 1-877-273-8255 or the Safe+Strong Helpline @ 1-800-923-4457 and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line between 8:30am and 5pm PST.

04 – Resources – AM – All Month – Pride Month – Online Events, Resources, Hotlines and Support Groups
Jun 29 all-day

Gay Pride Banner

 

Pride Month

Online Events, Resources, and Support Groups

We celebrate Pride Month in June to honor the 1969 Stonewall Uprising and to commemorate the positive impact the LGBTQ+ community has had on our world.

Online Support Groups

Family Equality Council

Family Equality Council connects and supports LGBTQ parents and their kids. The organization works to ensure equality for these families by influencing change in other people’s minds and building a community of acceptance for all families.

The LGBTQ National Help Center

The LGBTQ National Help Center is a non-profit organization dedicated to addressing the needs of LGBTQ people as well as those still questioning their sexuality and struggling with gender identity. This organization has more than 15,000 local resources in different cities and towns all over the country.

Mens group

Men’s Group is an online support group specifically for LGBTQ men. It is tailored to offering emotional support to create a positive community and start conversations and forums where gay men can share their life stresses in a safe space. As one of the most active online forums for men, it is the perfect place to interact with other community members who have gone through similar LGBTQ issues and have managed to find their way through.

 

 

Organizations Offering Resources for the LGBTQ+ Community

 

Resources for Providers

Articles of Interest

 

Mental Health Technology Transfer Center Products

Transgender Mental Health: Co-Conspiratorship – Hosted by the Northwest MHTTC, this recorded webinar provides a community-defined and evidence-based foundation for mental health providers serving queer and transgender communities. Centering anti-racism, community lived experience, and an interdisciplinary framework, this webinar explores strengths, weaknesses, and best practices of mental health care for queer and transgender communities.

Working with Transgender Patients in Integrated Care – Hosted by the Mountain Plains MHTTC, this two-part recorded webinar series focuses on how to effectively implement trans-affirmative care for transgender and nonbinary patients.

The Latinx LGBT+ Community: The Consequences of Intersectionality and the Use of the Affirmative Model for Latinx Populations – Hosted by the National Hispanic and Latino MHTTC, this recorded webinar discusses the Minority Stress Model, the excessive stress to which individuals of stigmatized social categories are exposed as a result of their social position, and its impact on mental health. The presenter also discusses the LGBTQ+ Affirmative Model as a recommended approach to work with Latinx LGBTQ+ communities with mental health challenges.

Desk Guide: Building Your Toolkit to Serve the LGBTQ Community  – Created by the Great Lakes MHTTC, this guide is based on material presented by Dr. Amney Harper on April 9, 2021, and outlines tools for providers to help LGBTQ+ patients navigate disparities and achieve a fulfilling, emotionally healthy life.

Warmline – ODOJ – Oregon Department of Justice – Non-Emergency Bias Response Hotline – 1-844-924-BIAS (1-844-924-2427) 9am to 5pm PST Monday – Friday
Jun 29 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Non-Emergency Bias Response Hotline

9am to 5pm Pacific time, Monday – Friday

Were you targeted with bias due to your race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, or religion?

Make a report, receive support, learn about your options

1-844-924-BIAS (1-844-924-2427) 9am to 5pm Pacific time, Monday – Friday.

Trauma-informed operators are standing by. Interpreters in over 240 languages.

After hours? Leave a message and we’ll return your call.

Hearing Impaired? Dial 711 for Oregon Relay.

You can also submit a report online.

What happens when I call the Bias Response Hotline or make a report online?

The Bias Response Hotline is here to help you understand your options, make choices about next steps, and receive support in the aftermath of experiencing or witnessing bias. 

If you call the Bias Response Hotline, you are connecting with trauma-informed hotline advocates who are trained in crisis intervention and can provide bias response advocacy, including assistance in reporting a bias crime to law enforcement. For more information, see What Happens on the Hotline? and Reporting Bias Crime to Law Enforcement.

Read more about how Oregon is tracking bias crimes and incidents.

Download Bias Hotline infographic

Jun
30
Thu
01 – Support Line – L4L Racial Equity Support Line – BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free – Lines for Life – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Jun 30 all-day
01 - Support Line - L4L Racial Equity Support Line - BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free - Lines for Life - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis / Support Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 8:30am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Toll-Free Access

If you need toll-free access, call any line at Lines for Life and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line during its operating hours.

For example, you can call the Suicide Prevention Crisis Line @ 1-877-273-8255 or the Safe+Strong Helpline @ 1-800-923-4457 and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line between 8:30am and 5pm PST.

04 – Resources – AM – All Month – Pride Month – Online Events, Resources, Hotlines and Support Groups
Jun 30 all-day

Gay Pride Banner

 

Pride Month

Online Events, Resources, and Support Groups

We celebrate Pride Month in June to honor the 1969 Stonewall Uprising and to commemorate the positive impact the LGBTQ+ community has had on our world.

Online Support Groups

Family Equality Council

Family Equality Council connects and supports LGBTQ parents and their kids. The organization works to ensure equality for these families by influencing change in other people’s minds and building a community of acceptance for all families.

The LGBTQ National Help Center

The LGBTQ National Help Center is a non-profit organization dedicated to addressing the needs of LGBTQ people as well as those still questioning their sexuality and struggling with gender identity. This organization has more than 15,000 local resources in different cities and towns all over the country.

Mens group

Men’s Group is an online support group specifically for LGBTQ men. It is tailored to offering emotional support to create a positive community and start conversations and forums where gay men can share their life stresses in a safe space. As one of the most active online forums for men, it is the perfect place to interact with other community members who have gone through similar LGBTQ issues and have managed to find their way through.

 

 

Organizations Offering Resources for the LGBTQ+ Community

 

Resources for Providers

Articles of Interest

 

Mental Health Technology Transfer Center Products

Transgender Mental Health: Co-Conspiratorship – Hosted by the Northwest MHTTC, this recorded webinar provides a community-defined and evidence-based foundation for mental health providers serving queer and transgender communities. Centering anti-racism, community lived experience, and an interdisciplinary framework, this webinar explores strengths, weaknesses, and best practices of mental health care for queer and transgender communities.

Working with Transgender Patients in Integrated Care – Hosted by the Mountain Plains MHTTC, this two-part recorded webinar series focuses on how to effectively implement trans-affirmative care for transgender and nonbinary patients.

The Latinx LGBT+ Community: The Consequences of Intersectionality and the Use of the Affirmative Model for Latinx Populations – Hosted by the National Hispanic and Latino MHTTC, this recorded webinar discusses the Minority Stress Model, the excessive stress to which individuals of stigmatized social categories are exposed as a result of their social position, and its impact on mental health. The presenter also discusses the LGBTQ+ Affirmative Model as a recommended approach to work with Latinx LGBTQ+ communities with mental health challenges.

Desk Guide: Building Your Toolkit to Serve the LGBTQ Community  – Created by the Great Lakes MHTTC, this guide is based on material presented by Dr. Amney Harper on April 9, 2021, and outlines tools for providers to help LGBTQ+ patients navigate disparities and achieve a fulfilling, emotionally healthy life.

Warmline – ODOJ – Oregon Department of Justice – Non-Emergency Bias Response Hotline – 1-844-924-BIAS (1-844-924-2427) 9am to 5pm PST Monday – Friday
Jun 30 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Non-Emergency Bias Response Hotline

9am to 5pm Pacific time, Monday – Friday

Were you targeted with bias due to your race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, or religion?

Make a report, receive support, learn about your options

1-844-924-BIAS (1-844-924-2427) 9am to 5pm Pacific time, Monday – Friday.

Trauma-informed operators are standing by. Interpreters in over 240 languages.

After hours? Leave a message and we’ll return your call.

Hearing Impaired? Dial 711 for Oregon Relay.

You can also submit a report online.

What happens when I call the Bias Response Hotline or make a report online?

The Bias Response Hotline is here to help you understand your options, make choices about next steps, and receive support in the aftermath of experiencing or witnessing bias. 

If you call the Bias Response Hotline, you are connecting with trauma-informed hotline advocates who are trained in crisis intervention and can provide bias response advocacy, including assistance in reporting a bias crime to law enforcement. For more information, see What Happens on the Hotline? and Reporting Bias Crime to Law Enforcement.

Read more about how Oregon is tracking bias crimes and incidents.

Download Bias Hotline infographic

Jul
1
Fri
01 – Support Line – L4L Racial Equity Support Line – BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free – Lines for Life – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Jul 1 all-day
01 - Support Line - L4L Racial Equity Support Line - BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free - Lines for Life - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis / Support Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 8:30am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Toll-Free Access

If you need toll-free access, call any line at Lines for Life and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line during its operating hours.

For example, you can call the Suicide Prevention Crisis Line @ 1-877-273-8255 or the Safe+Strong Helpline @ 1-800-923-4457 and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line between 8:30am and 5pm PST.

Warmline – ODOJ – Oregon Department of Justice – Non-Emergency Bias Response Hotline – 1-844-924-BIAS (1-844-924-2427) 9am to 5pm PST Monday – Friday
Jul 1 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Non-Emergency Bias Response Hotline

9am to 5pm Pacific time, Monday – Friday

Were you targeted with bias due to your race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, or religion?

Make a report, receive support, learn about your options

1-844-924-BIAS (1-844-924-2427) 9am to 5pm Pacific time, Monday – Friday.

Trauma-informed operators are standing by. Interpreters in over 240 languages.

After hours? Leave a message and we’ll return your call.

Hearing Impaired? Dial 711 for Oregon Relay.

You can also submit a report online.

What happens when I call the Bias Response Hotline or make a report online?

The Bias Response Hotline is here to help you understand your options, make choices about next steps, and receive support in the aftermath of experiencing or witnessing bias. 

If you call the Bias Response Hotline, you are connecting with trauma-informed hotline advocates who are trained in crisis intervention and can provide bias response advocacy, including assistance in reporting a bias crime to law enforcement. For more information, see What Happens on the Hotline? and Reporting Bias Crime to Law Enforcement.

Read more about how Oregon is tracking bias crimes and incidents.

Download Bias Hotline infographic

Jul
4
Mon
01 – Support Line – L4L Racial Equity Support Line – BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free – Lines for Life – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Jul 4 all-day
01 - Support Line - L4L Racial Equity Support Line - BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free - Lines for Life - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis / Support Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 8:30am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Toll-Free Access

If you need toll-free access, call any line at Lines for Life and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line during its operating hours.

For example, you can call the Suicide Prevention Crisis Line @ 1-877-273-8255 or the Safe+Strong Helpline @ 1-800-923-4457 and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line between 8:30am and 5pm PST.

Warmline – ODOJ – Oregon Department of Justice – Non-Emergency Bias Response Hotline – 1-844-924-BIAS (1-844-924-2427) 9am to 5pm PST Monday – Friday
Jul 4 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Non-Emergency Bias Response Hotline

9am to 5pm Pacific time, Monday – Friday

Were you targeted with bias due to your race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, or religion?

Make a report, receive support, learn about your options

1-844-924-BIAS (1-844-924-2427) 9am to 5pm Pacific time, Monday – Friday.

Trauma-informed operators are standing by. Interpreters in over 240 languages.

After hours? Leave a message and we’ll return your call.

Hearing Impaired? Dial 711 for Oregon Relay.

You can also submit a report online.

What happens when I call the Bias Response Hotline or make a report online?

The Bias Response Hotline is here to help you understand your options, make choices about next steps, and receive support in the aftermath of experiencing or witnessing bias. 

If you call the Bias Response Hotline, you are connecting with trauma-informed hotline advocates who are trained in crisis intervention and can provide bias response advocacy, including assistance in reporting a bias crime to law enforcement. For more information, see What Happens on the Hotline? and Reporting Bias Crime to Law Enforcement.

Read more about how Oregon is tracking bias crimes and incidents.

Download Bias Hotline infographic

Jul
5
Tue
01 – Support Line – L4L Racial Equity Support Line – BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free – Lines for Life – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Jul 5 all-day
01 - Support Line - L4L Racial Equity Support Line - BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free - Lines for Life - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis / Support Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 8:30am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Toll-Free Access

If you need toll-free access, call any line at Lines for Life and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line during its operating hours.

For example, you can call the Suicide Prevention Crisis Line @ 1-877-273-8255 or the Safe+Strong Helpline @ 1-800-923-4457 and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line between 8:30am and 5pm PST.

Warmline – ODOJ – Oregon Department of Justice – Non-Emergency Bias Response Hotline – 1-844-924-BIAS (1-844-924-2427) 9am to 5pm PST Monday – Friday
Jul 5 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Non-Emergency Bias Response Hotline

9am to 5pm Pacific time, Monday – Friday

Were you targeted with bias due to your race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, or religion?

Make a report, receive support, learn about your options

1-844-924-BIAS (1-844-924-2427) 9am to 5pm Pacific time, Monday – Friday.

Trauma-informed operators are standing by. Interpreters in over 240 languages.

After hours? Leave a message and we’ll return your call.

Hearing Impaired? Dial 711 for Oregon Relay.

You can also submit a report online.

What happens when I call the Bias Response Hotline or make a report online?

The Bias Response Hotline is here to help you understand your options, make choices about next steps, and receive support in the aftermath of experiencing or witnessing bias. 

If you call the Bias Response Hotline, you are connecting with trauma-informed hotline advocates who are trained in crisis intervention and can provide bias response advocacy, including assistance in reporting a bias crime to law enforcement. For more information, see What Happens on the Hotline? and Reporting Bias Crime to Law Enforcement.

Read more about how Oregon is tracking bias crimes and incidents.

Download Bias Hotline infographic

Jul
6
Wed
01 – Support Line – L4L Racial Equity Support Line – BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free – Lines for Life – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Jul 6 all-day
01 - Support Line - L4L Racial Equity Support Line - BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free - Lines for Life - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis / Support Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 8:30am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Toll-Free Access

If you need toll-free access, call any line at Lines for Life and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line during its operating hours.

For example, you can call the Suicide Prevention Crisis Line @ 1-877-273-8255 or the Safe+Strong Helpline @ 1-800-923-4457 and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line between 8:30am and 5pm PST.

Warmline – ODOJ – Oregon Department of Justice – Non-Emergency Bias Response Hotline – 1-844-924-BIAS (1-844-924-2427) 9am to 5pm PST Monday – Friday
Jul 6 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Non-Emergency Bias Response Hotline

9am to 5pm Pacific time, Monday – Friday

Were you targeted with bias due to your race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, or religion?

Make a report, receive support, learn about your options

1-844-924-BIAS (1-844-924-2427) 9am to 5pm Pacific time, Monday – Friday.

Trauma-informed operators are standing by. Interpreters in over 240 languages.

After hours? Leave a message and we’ll return your call.

Hearing Impaired? Dial 711 for Oregon Relay.

You can also submit a report online.

What happens when I call the Bias Response Hotline or make a report online?

The Bias Response Hotline is here to help you understand your options, make choices about next steps, and receive support in the aftermath of experiencing or witnessing bias. 

If you call the Bias Response Hotline, you are connecting with trauma-informed hotline advocates who are trained in crisis intervention and can provide bias response advocacy, including assistance in reporting a bias crime to law enforcement. For more information, see What Happens on the Hotline? and Reporting Bias Crime to Law Enforcement.

Read more about how Oregon is tracking bias crimes and incidents.

Download Bias Hotline infographic

Jul
7
Thu
01 – Support Line – L4L Racial Equity Support Line – BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free – Lines for Life – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Jul 7 all-day
01 - Support Line - L4L Racial Equity Support Line - BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free - Lines for Life - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis / Support Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 8:30am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Toll-Free Access

If you need toll-free access, call any line at Lines for Life and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line during its operating hours.

For example, you can call the Suicide Prevention Crisis Line @ 1-877-273-8255 or the Safe+Strong Helpline @ 1-800-923-4457 and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line between 8:30am and 5pm PST.

Warmline – ODOJ – Oregon Department of Justice – Non-Emergency Bias Response Hotline – 1-844-924-BIAS (1-844-924-2427) 9am to 5pm PST Monday – Friday
Jul 7 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Non-Emergency Bias Response Hotline

9am to 5pm Pacific time, Monday – Friday

Were you targeted with bias due to your race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, or religion?

Make a report, receive support, learn about your options

1-844-924-BIAS (1-844-924-2427) 9am to 5pm Pacific time, Monday – Friday.

Trauma-informed operators are standing by. Interpreters in over 240 languages.

After hours? Leave a message and we’ll return your call.

Hearing Impaired? Dial 711 for Oregon Relay.

You can also submit a report online.

What happens when I call the Bias Response Hotline or make a report online?

The Bias Response Hotline is here to help you understand your options, make choices about next steps, and receive support in the aftermath of experiencing or witnessing bias. 

If you call the Bias Response Hotline, you are connecting with trauma-informed hotline advocates who are trained in crisis intervention and can provide bias response advocacy, including assistance in reporting a bias crime to law enforcement. For more information, see What Happens on the Hotline? and Reporting Bias Crime to Law Enforcement.

Read more about how Oregon is tracking bias crimes and incidents.

Download Bias Hotline infographic

Jul
8
Fri
01 – Support Line – L4L Racial Equity Support Line – BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free – Lines for Life – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Jul 8 all-day
01 - Support Line - L4L Racial Equity Support Line - BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free - Lines for Life - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis / Support Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 8:30am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Toll-Free Access

If you need toll-free access, call any line at Lines for Life and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line during its operating hours.

For example, you can call the Suicide Prevention Crisis Line @ 1-877-273-8255 or the Safe+Strong Helpline @ 1-800-923-4457 and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line between 8:30am and 5pm PST.

Warmline – ODOJ – Oregon Department of Justice – Non-Emergency Bias Response Hotline – 1-844-924-BIAS (1-844-924-2427) 9am to 5pm PST Monday – Friday
Jul 8 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Non-Emergency Bias Response Hotline

9am to 5pm Pacific time, Monday – Friday

Were you targeted with bias due to your race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, or religion?

Make a report, receive support, learn about your options

1-844-924-BIAS (1-844-924-2427) 9am to 5pm Pacific time, Monday – Friday.

Trauma-informed operators are standing by. Interpreters in over 240 languages.

After hours? Leave a message and we’ll return your call.

Hearing Impaired? Dial 711 for Oregon Relay.

You can also submit a report online.

What happens when I call the Bias Response Hotline or make a report online?

The Bias Response Hotline is here to help you understand your options, make choices about next steps, and receive support in the aftermath of experiencing or witnessing bias. 

If you call the Bias Response Hotline, you are connecting with trauma-informed hotline advocates who are trained in crisis intervention and can provide bias response advocacy, including assistance in reporting a bias crime to law enforcement. For more information, see What Happens on the Hotline? and Reporting Bias Crime to Law Enforcement.

Read more about how Oregon is tracking bias crimes and incidents.

Download Bias Hotline infographic