PeerGalaxy Original Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring over 99,000+ monthly offerings of FREE telephone- and online-accessible peer support, recovery support + wellness activities!

Over 30+ warmlines plus webinars, workshops, job postings, special events, consumer input opportunities and more.

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

Click the Accessibility Button on the right side, halfway down in the middle, for enhanced viewing and/or access options!  Click the Translate Button in the lower left corner for language options. 

Your use of this site is subject to the Privacy Policy, Terms and Conditions of Use.  Reminder: Fees or charges may be charged by your carrier for sending or receiving SMS text messaging, phone, or data.

If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

How Events are Sorted:

First, at the top of the list: SAMHSA Disaster Helpline and similar links.

Next in the list: Bundled “All Day” Events for organizations with events happening at multiple times throughout the day and/or in many formats or locations; these are bundled into a single listing to prevent endless scrolling.  Usually these offer a lookup by zip code or other criteria. 

Lastly, Time-Specific Events listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  Warmlines and places east of Oregon’s time zone tend to start earlier (e.g. 4am in Oregon is 7am in New York).

Apr
21
Sun
2024
00 – Hotline – Boys Town National Hot Line – A 24/7 crisis, resource and referral number for kids and parents – 1-800-448-3000 – Text VOICE to 20121 @ Phone
Apr 21 all-day

 

 

 

 

 

Increasing Outreach to Teens

Teens are more connected than ever ​before and the Boys Town National Hotline® at 800-448-3000 is right there with them.

In addition to calling, teens can now text VOICE to 20121 or email hotline@boystown.org any day, any time to speak with a trained counselor.

Online resources are also available at yourlifeyourvoice.org.

 

04 – Resources – APH – American Printing House for the Blind – VisionAware – Visual Impairment Information Service
Apr 21 all-day

 

 

 

 

VisionAware

Are you or a family member having difficulty seeing? Or perhaps been diagnosed with an eye condition such as macular degeneration, cataracts, glaucoma, or diabetic retinopathy? If the answer is yes, you’re not alone: vision problems affect 25 million Americans, and they are on the rise.

VisionAware is a free, easy-to-use informational service for adults who are blind or have low vision, their families, caregivers, healthcare providers, and social service professionals. Visitors will find tips and resources on living with blindness or low vision; information on eye diseases and disorders; and a searchable, free Directory of Services.

man getting an eye exam

Eye Conditions

Some changes in vision are normal as we grow older. This section of our website can help you understand these vision changes, alert you to abnormal changes in vision, and […]

READ MORE

Man sitting on park bench with white cane holding his phone

Recreation and Leisure

From crafts, woodworking, traveling, and reading to sports and exercise, this section is full of information on the variety of activities people who are blind or low vision can engage […]

READ MORE

Person using a refreshable braille display.

Products and Technology

Discover low and high-tech solutions enabling independence at home and work, connection with friends and family, and enjoyment of hobbies and leisure activities.

READ MORE

Professionals in scrubs talking

Professionals

Find resources and techniques you can use to serve people who are blind or low vision effectively and safely, and learn key information about the impact of aging and vision […]

READ MORE

Older man wearing eyeglasses surrounded by family of various ages

Families and Friends

Do you know someone (parent or family member, neighbor, or friend) having trouble seeing? You may be wondering about blindness/ low vision and how to talk with them about it. […]

READ MORE

Woman sitting in kitchen reading braille.

Living with Blindness or Low Vision

If you are new to blindness or low vision, take the journey one day and one step at a time. Utilize our tips for adjusting to vision changes, living independently, […]

Read More

04 – Resources – Autism Resources, Articles, Support
Apr 21 all-day
04 - Resources - Autism Resources, Articles, Support

 

 

 

 

What is Autism?

What you should know

Autism is a severe developmental disorder that affects the way a child sees and interacts with the rest of the world. It limits their ability to interact with others socially, in fact many autism suffers avoid human contact.

Autism is part of a larger group of disorders called pervasive developmental disorders (PDD). More information about autism: Click on each of these links

 

Autism-Definition

Autism is a developmental disability that comes from a neurological disorder that affects the normal functioning of the brain. It is characterized by the abnormal development of communication skills, social skills, and reasoning. Males are affected four times as often as females. Children may appear normal until around the age of 30 months.

 

Click each of these following titles learn more….

Autism Symptoms

Autism Symptoms vary widely in severity, include impairment in social interaction, fixation on inanimate objects, inability to communicate normally, and resistance to changes in daily routine. Characteristic traits include lack of eye contact, repetition of words or phrases, unmotivated tantrums, inability to express needs verbally, and insensitivity to pain.

Behaviors may change over time. Autistic children often have other disorders of brain function; about two thirds are mentally retarded; over one quarter develop seizures.

What Autism is Not

Autism can be confused with several other disorders which may have similar behaviors. Here is a list of autism like disorders that you should look at.

What Causes Autism

It remains unclear, but a psychological one has been ruled out. Neurological studies seem to indicate a primary brain dysfunction, and a genetic component is suggested by a pattern of autism in some families. It is largely believed that autism is a genetic disorder that involves several genes related to gene function. However it is unclear to researchers what causes these genes to turn on. Learn more about other causes of autism.

Autism Research

There are many exciting developments in autism research going on at the top universities. They are focusing on inherited autism and autism gene research.

Other Autism Spectrum Disorders

Asperger’s Syndrome – A child with asperger’s disorder has the same common problems as children with autism however they don’t have language development problems of a autistic child.

Pervasive Developmental Disorder and not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) – This child has autism but doesn’t meet the criteria for high functioning autism.

High-Functioning Autism – This child has autism but has normal learning and cognitive and learning skills. Language development is difficult initially but they become proficient eventually.

 

FAQ about Autism Special Education and IEP

This is an important list of questions and answers to help you deal with special education issues at your school.

 

Autism Tips for working with Teachers

This is a great check list of items to be aware of when you work with your child’s teacher and your child’s Individual Education Plan.

Tip: Go to our Autism education discussion boards and post a question with other parents.

Early Origins of Autism

 

ADDITIONAL LINKS TO RESOURCES AND EXPERTISE

Ask an Expert on Autism

Health Finder

Talk to Autism Expert

National Institutes of Mental Health

Combined Health Information Database

Abstracts on Autism

 

 

Searchable Directory of Autism Resources

CLICK HERE TO VISIT THE DIRECTORY PAGE 

Or Click on the Topic area directly below

Adult Resources

Attorneys & Advocates

Behavior/Family Training

Community Living

Education

Medical Providers/Diagnosis

Non-English Resources

Respite Care Providers

Safety

Sports & Camps

Therapy Providers

 

Autism NOW Center’s fact sheets on topics of importance to people with autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disabilities are a resource you and your family members, as well as educators, employers, physicians and others, can use to get information in an easy-to-read and understand format.  The fact sheets are available in several languages in PDF form which can be printed out for your convenience. See the full list of topics and language choices below.

English:

Spanish:

Find the resources you need 1-885-828-847

 

Article Links

Follow this page link for listings of over 800 articles and resources

https://autismnow.org/resources/

Interagency Autism Coordination Committee

 

About Autism

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disability that is estimated to affect about 1 in 36 children and approximately 2.21% of adults. Autism affects the way a person experiences the world and can result in significant challenges in social communication and interaction, as well as repetitive behaviors and unusual or intense interests.

People on the autism spectrum often have a strong preference for routines and predictability, and some are challenged in adapting to change. Many people on the autism spectrum experience sensory differences, including high or low sensitivity to sounds, light, textures, tastes, and physical touch. Some have accompanying language and/or intellectual disabilities, and some may be intellectually gifted or possess other unique abilities, talents, or strengths.

ASD can be diagnosed at any age, but differences generally appear in the first two years of life. ASD is known as a “spectrum” condition because it encompasses a wide variation in the type, combination, and severity of disabilities, as a well as a range of unique abilities and strengths, many of which can change over the course of a person’s lifespan. The type and intensity of supports and services that a child or adult on the autism spectrum may require, ranging from minimal to intensive, will vary depending on their unique needs.

With appropriate supports and an environment that promotes inclusion, acceptance, and empowerment, people on the autism spectrum can fully participate in community life and achieve their full potential.

This page includes resources that provide general information about autism.

 

Websites and Programs

The Autistic Self Advocacy Network was created by autistic people and for autistic people. This page provides an overview of typical characteristics of autism.

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

This tool kit provides families of children ages four and under with guidance on how to access services the first 100 days after an autism diagnosis.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

March 2020

This report from provides an overview of 2016 data collected by the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network and Early ADDM. ADDM provides estimates of the prevalence of ASD among 8-year-old children. Early ADDM estimates ASD prevalence and monitors early identification of 4-year-old children. Full findings of the data on 8-year-old and 4-year-old children are available.

March 2020

The CDC released their first estimate of the prevalence of autism in adults based on 2017 data. They estimated that 2.21 percent of adults in the United States have ASD.

More Reports

Videos

April 24, 2019

NIMH Director Joshua Gordon, M.D., Ph.D. interviews Ann Wagner, Ph.D., National Autism Coordinator, and Lisa Gilotty, Ph.D., program chief of NIMH’s chief of NIMH’s Research Program on Autism Spectrum Disorders, to discuss advances on the study of autism in adulthood.

 

Federal Departments and Agencies

This list includes federal departments and agencies that provide funding, programs, and support for issues related to autism and other developmental disabilities.

Independent Agencies

  • National Council on Disability (NCD)
    • Meetings and Events The NCD is an independent federal agency that advises the President, Congress, and other federal agencies on policies, programs, practices, and procedures that affect people with disabilities. Their meetings are open to the public.
    • Resources This page includes information on disability rights and links to resources and services on education, employment, financial assistance and incentives, health care, housing, and more.
  • National Science Foundation (NSF)
    • About NSF The NSF is an independent federal agency that supports fundamental research and education in all non-medical fields of science and engineering.
  • Social Security Administration (SSA)
    • Disability Benefits The Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability programs provide assistance to people with disabilities. This page explains these benefits and the application process.
    • Spotlight on Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Accounts Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (ABLE) allows individuals with disabilities to make tax-free saving accounts to cover qualified disability expenses. Individuals can save up to $100,000 without counting against their Supplemental Security Income (SSI) eligibility.

Transition from youth to adulthood

Websites and Programs

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

ASAN partnered with the Family Network on Disabilities to produce this guide, which prepares transition age youth for adulthood. The first half provides information on preparing for transition and the second half gives in-depth information on post-secondary education, employment, housing and independent living, and healthcare.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

March 22, 2018

This report examines guardianship and makes recommendations for its use. Recommendations are based on disability law and policy, how people with disabilities are treated in the legal system, alternatives to guardianship, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

March 13, 2019

This report describes the demographics, disability, education, and health characteristics of teens and young adults ages 12-23 on the autism spectrum.

More Reports

Research Articles

More Research Articles

Videos

March 23, 2020

This webinar provided information about supports and resources to improve access to competitive, integrated employment for youth and young adults on the autism spectrum and enhance their career pathways.

 

 

Employment

National data has shown that many autistic adults are unemployed or underemployed, even when compared to people with other disabilities and in spite of having needed skills and abilities for the workplace. Researchers and policy makers have worked to develop programs that can increase opportunities for employment and improve employment outcomes. This includes job training and recruitment programs, as well as supports for employees and employers to increase retention and success in the workplace. This page provides information related to employment for people with autism and other disabilities.

Websites and Programs

This program helps public and private sectors recruit, hire, train, and retain job seekers with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

This plain language toolkit explains the existing policies that help people with disabilities people find and keep good jobs, and solve employment problems.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

October 9, 2018

Of the 74 state vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies that responded to GAO’s survey, most reported expanding services to help students with disabilities transition from school to work as required under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), enacted in July 2014. Most state agencies reported serving more students and providing work-based learning experiences and other activities.

May 12, 2020

Researchers analyzed Rehabilitation Services Administration data to determine the association of vocational rehabilitation services with employment outcomes for students ages 16-21. Students with autism were less likely to receive job-related services less than comparison groups.

More Reports

Research Articles

More Research Articles

Videos

March 23, 2020

In this webinar, Scott Michael Robertson Ph.D. provides information about government supports and resources that help youth and young adults with autism access competitive, integrated employment and enhance their careers. Full Transition Aged Youth Webinar Series.

Housing

Housing plays an important role in ensuring the well being of people on the autism spectrum and helping them integrate into the community. Some people can live independently with minimal or no supports, while others require high levels of support. There is a variety of federal and private resources that can enable people to live in settings that best fit their needs. This page provides information about models of housing for people with disabilities and resources and programs related to disability housing.

Websites and Programs

  • Medicaid.Gov
    • Home & Community Based Services This page provides information on Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) regulations. The page includes a training series for stakeholders, transition plans for individual states, technical assistance, and more. The Final Regulation page provides an overview of rules and regulations states must follow when providing HCBS under Medicaid.
  • The Arc
    • Housing Overview This page provides an overview of housing issues that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) encounter as well the Arc’s advocacy efforts. The page also describes key federal housing initiatives that enable people with I/DD to live in the community and links to additional resources.

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

This handbook is designed to help people with disabilities find and use resources that promote independent living. It includes information on support services and waivers, housing, employment, and community resources. This handbook was created in partnership with Autism NOW Center.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

May 24, 2019

This report that examines occurrences of institutionalization of people with disabilities, as well as thwarted threats of institutionalization, during hurricanes and the California wildfires in 2017 and 2018. The NCD found that people with disabilities are frequently institutionalized during and after disasters due to conflicting federal guidance; a lack of equal access to emergency and disaster-related programs and services; and a lack of compliance with federal law.

June 2018

The Residential Information Systems Project (RISP) studies trends in residential service settings, funding, and expenditures for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the United States. The most recent report uses data through Fiscal Year 2016.

More Reports

Research Articles

More Research Articles

Videos

July 23, 2019

This workshop focused on the housing needs of people on the autism spectrum and included examples of various housing models. Meeting details.

July 26, 2017

JaLynn Prince, Adrienne McBride, and Desiree Kameka present Madison House Autism Foundation’s Autism After 21 initiative. Madison House aims to raise awareness of the abilities of and issues facing adults with autism. They also promote housing options for adults with autism and other I/DD through the Autism Housing Network. Meeting details.

 

For Service Providers and Public Services

Unlocking Potential: Innovative Library Programs Enhancing the Lives of Autistic Individuals

http://librarysciencedegreesonline.org/libraries-and-autism/

 

Making Entertainment and Public Spaces More Autistim-Friendly

https://happiful.com/making-entertainment-and-public-spaces-more-autistic-friendly

 

 

ARCH National Respite Network – National Respite Locator Service
Apr 21 all-day

 

National Respite Locator Service

ARCH does not provide respite care, but we may be able to help you find it in your local community through your State Respite Coalition or Lifespan Respite Program or through resources listed below, including State Provider Registries or the Eldercare Locator.

If you cannot find respite through the resources listed above, we also maintain the National Respite Locator Service (NRLS), which helps parents, family caregivers, and professionals find respite services in their state and local area to match their specific needs. The NRLS lists primarily home care agencies, assisted living, or state or community-based agencies that provide respite care. If you find that a listing is out of date or no longer providing respite care, please contact ARCH.

If you have a respite program or service you would like to list on the NRLS, please visit the respite provider portal.

State Respite Coalition or Lifespan Respite Program

If your state has a State Respite Coalition or Lifespan Respite Care Program, be sure to contact them first for information about respite providers or ways to pay for respite.

CONTACT Information

Search for Respite on the National Respite Locator

DBSA – Depression Bipolar Support Alliance – Online Support Group – Sundays – 1-2PM PST @ Online Via HeyPeers
Apr 21 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

 

 

 

 

DBSA Online Support Group

Sundays 1-2PM PST

Online Support Group Information

All DBSA online support groups are free of charge. Online support groups are led by peers, which means that the person guiding the meeting knows firsthand what it’s like to live with a mood disorder.

Our national online support groups are hosted by HeyPeers, a DBSA vendor.

Upon registration, you will receive an email from them to assist you with managing your account.

Register Through HeyPeers

 

CA/OSA – Cocaine Anonymous Online Service Area – Online 12 Step Meeting – DAILY REPRIEVE – 7 Days A Week @ Online Via ZOOM
Apr 21 @ 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

DAILY REPRIEVE

Join Via ZOOM

ID: 852 6648 1221

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85266481221

 

MEETING/GROUP TYPES:

OPEN: Attended by C.A. members, their families, friends and other interested people.
CLOSED: Attendance is limited to C.A. members only.

Cocaine Anonymous Around the World Clock

Pacific Standard Time (PDT) Eastern Standard Time (EDT) Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) British Standard Time (BST) Central European Summer Time (CEST)
July 26, 2023 9:08:36 AM July 26, 2023 12:08:36 PM July 26, 2023 4:08:36 PM July 26, 2023 5:08:36 PM July 26, 2023 6:08:36 PM
Sweden, Stockholm South Africa, Johannesburg Thailand, Bangkok Asia, Hong Kong Australia, Melbourne
6:08:36 PM 6:08:36 PM 11:08:36 PM 12:08:36 AM 2:08:36 AM

Please check the time above for the time zone you are in.  U.S. Daylight Savings and U.K. Daylight Savings happen about two weeks apart. U.K. falls back at 2am Sunday October 25th/U.S. falls back at 2am Sunday November 1st. The schedule can vary and be 1 hour different during that period.

Online Service Area

Cocaine Anonymous is a Fellowship of, by, and for addicts seeking recovery. Friends and Family of addicts should contact Co-Anon Family Groups, a Fellowship dedicated to their much different needs. Some items contained in these pages are published with permission of C.A. World Services, Inc., but this does not imply endorsement of this website by the C.A. World Service Conference or the C.A. World Service Office. The information provided within this website is intended to be a convenience for those who visit our website. Such inclusion does not constitute or imply endorsement by, or affiliation with, the Area or the Districts within. “Cocaine Anonymous World Service Conference Approved Literature. Copyright © 2022 Cocaine Anonymous World Services, Inc. “C.A.”, “Cocaine Anonymous” and the C.A. logo are registered trademarks of Cocaine Anonymous World Services, Inc. All rights reserved.” “In the spirit of Tradition Six, C.A. is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization, or institution. As such, in the Area, District, Service Committees of Cocaine Anonymous and Cocaine Anonymous as a whole does not endorse and is not affiliated with or any of the companies and/or services offered on the site. Any links to external websites or services are only provided as a convenience to our members.”

webmaster@ca-online.org

DBSA – Depression Bipolar Support Alliance – DBSA California Support Groups – Sundays, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays @ Online Via ZOOM
Apr 21 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
DBSA - Depression Bipolar Support Alliance - DBSA California Support Groups - Sundays, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays @ Online Via ZOOM

 

 

 

 

 

DBSA California Support Groups

Sundays, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays 5:30-7:30PM PST

DBSA-California Support Groups are offered for free and provide a safe, confidential space where people from all walks of life connect with peers to share their stories, experiences, and lives in a way that helps redce isolation and loneliness.
The groups are held online every Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday
When we’re struggling or in a crisis, we often feel that we’re alone. Support groups can connect us with peers who understand us, have similar lived experiences, and can help us get through. Our support groups are led by peers we highly train as facilitators, so they have an intimate comprehension of the challenges firsthand and serve as a beacon of hope to others.
Who Should Join Groups?
Battling mental health alone is difficult for most individuals who suffer from Depression and Bipolar. It can seem impossible to cope, heal, or think about recovery. We understand the struggle, we’ve been there, we can help! By attending weekly discussion groups, you will be empowered with education, resources, emotional support, and guidance to set you up on the path to recovery. There is no shame in admitting that sometimes we need help, it’s tough enough carrying the weight of the world on your shoulders, let DBSA CA Support Groups lighten the load for you.
Topics of Discussion
Self-esteem/self-talk (positive/negative)
Planning for the future
Obligations (financial/relationships-family/work)
Medications
Initial steps (after an episode)
Hospitalization (in-patient/outpatient)
Insurance (medical/disability)
Sleep patterns
Triggers
Dual diagnosis & Addiction (drugs & alcohol)
Finding a doctor/therapist
Self-discipline, daily maintenance/routine
Proper self-care, motivation/lack of motivation
Spending money
Exercise/fitness (physical activity)
Setting goals and meeting deadlines
Setting boundaries
Weight loss/gain/appetite
Test of faith (spiritual life)
Self Education
Socializing
REGISTER AND GET A LINK TO OUR ZOOM MEETINGS
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/607974938407

 

 

 

 

 

 

Apr
22
Mon
2024
00 – Hotline – Boys Town National Hot Line – A 24/7 crisis, resource and referral number for kids and parents – 1-800-448-3000 – Text VOICE to 20121 @ Phone
Apr 22 all-day

 

 

 

 

 

Increasing Outreach to Teens

Teens are more connected than ever ​before and the Boys Town National Hotline® at 800-448-3000 is right there with them.

In addition to calling, teens can now text VOICE to 20121 or email hotline@boystown.org any day, any time to speak with a trained counselor.

Online resources are also available at yourlifeyourvoice.org.

 

04 – Resources – APH – American Printing House for the Blind – VisionAware – Visual Impairment Information Service
Apr 22 all-day

 

 

 

 

VisionAware

Are you or a family member having difficulty seeing? Or perhaps been diagnosed with an eye condition such as macular degeneration, cataracts, glaucoma, or diabetic retinopathy? If the answer is yes, you’re not alone: vision problems affect 25 million Americans, and they are on the rise.

VisionAware is a free, easy-to-use informational service for adults who are blind or have low vision, their families, caregivers, healthcare providers, and social service professionals. Visitors will find tips and resources on living with blindness or low vision; information on eye diseases and disorders; and a searchable, free Directory of Services.

man getting an eye exam

Eye Conditions

Some changes in vision are normal as we grow older. This section of our website can help you understand these vision changes, alert you to abnormal changes in vision, and […]

READ MORE

Man sitting on park bench with white cane holding his phone

Recreation and Leisure

From crafts, woodworking, traveling, and reading to sports and exercise, this section is full of information on the variety of activities people who are blind or low vision can engage […]

READ MORE

Person using a refreshable braille display.

Products and Technology

Discover low and high-tech solutions enabling independence at home and work, connection with friends and family, and enjoyment of hobbies and leisure activities.

READ MORE

Professionals in scrubs talking

Professionals

Find resources and techniques you can use to serve people who are blind or low vision effectively and safely, and learn key information about the impact of aging and vision […]

READ MORE

Older man wearing eyeglasses surrounded by family of various ages

Families and Friends

Do you know someone (parent or family member, neighbor, or friend) having trouble seeing? You may be wondering about blindness/ low vision and how to talk with them about it. […]

READ MORE

Woman sitting in kitchen reading braille.

Living with Blindness or Low Vision

If you are new to blindness or low vision, take the journey one day and one step at a time. Utilize our tips for adjusting to vision changes, living independently, […]

Read More

04 – Resources – Autism Resources, Articles, Support
Apr 22 all-day
04 - Resources - Autism Resources, Articles, Support

 

 

 

 

What is Autism?

What you should know

Autism is a severe developmental disorder that affects the way a child sees and interacts with the rest of the world. It limits their ability to interact with others socially, in fact many autism suffers avoid human contact.

Autism is part of a larger group of disorders called pervasive developmental disorders (PDD). More information about autism: Click on each of these links

 

Autism-Definition

Autism is a developmental disability that comes from a neurological disorder that affects the normal functioning of the brain. It is characterized by the abnormal development of communication skills, social skills, and reasoning. Males are affected four times as often as females. Children may appear normal until around the age of 30 months.

 

Click each of these following titles learn more….

Autism Symptoms

Autism Symptoms vary widely in severity, include impairment in social interaction, fixation on inanimate objects, inability to communicate normally, and resistance to changes in daily routine. Characteristic traits include lack of eye contact, repetition of words or phrases, unmotivated tantrums, inability to express needs verbally, and insensitivity to pain.

Behaviors may change over time. Autistic children often have other disorders of brain function; about two thirds are mentally retarded; over one quarter develop seizures.

What Autism is Not

Autism can be confused with several other disorders which may have similar behaviors. Here is a list of autism like disorders that you should look at.

What Causes Autism

It remains unclear, but a psychological one has been ruled out. Neurological studies seem to indicate a primary brain dysfunction, and a genetic component is suggested by a pattern of autism in some families. It is largely believed that autism is a genetic disorder that involves several genes related to gene function. However it is unclear to researchers what causes these genes to turn on. Learn more about other causes of autism.

Autism Research

There are many exciting developments in autism research going on at the top universities. They are focusing on inherited autism and autism gene research.

Other Autism Spectrum Disorders

Asperger’s Syndrome – A child with asperger’s disorder has the same common problems as children with autism however they don’t have language development problems of a autistic child.

Pervasive Developmental Disorder and not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) – This child has autism but doesn’t meet the criteria for high functioning autism.

High-Functioning Autism – This child has autism but has normal learning and cognitive and learning skills. Language development is difficult initially but they become proficient eventually.

 

FAQ about Autism Special Education and IEP

This is an important list of questions and answers to help you deal with special education issues at your school.

 

Autism Tips for working with Teachers

This is a great check list of items to be aware of when you work with your child’s teacher and your child’s Individual Education Plan.

Tip: Go to our Autism education discussion boards and post a question with other parents.

Early Origins of Autism

 

ADDITIONAL LINKS TO RESOURCES AND EXPERTISE

Ask an Expert on Autism

Health Finder

Talk to Autism Expert

National Institutes of Mental Health

Combined Health Information Database

Abstracts on Autism

 

 

Searchable Directory of Autism Resources

CLICK HERE TO VISIT THE DIRECTORY PAGE 

Or Click on the Topic area directly below

Adult Resources

Attorneys & Advocates

Behavior/Family Training

Community Living

Education

Medical Providers/Diagnosis

Non-English Resources

Respite Care Providers

Safety

Sports & Camps

Therapy Providers

 

Autism NOW Center’s fact sheets on topics of importance to people with autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disabilities are a resource you and your family members, as well as educators, employers, physicians and others, can use to get information in an easy-to-read and understand format.  The fact sheets are available in several languages in PDF form which can be printed out for your convenience. See the full list of topics and language choices below.

English:

Spanish:

Find the resources you need 1-885-828-847

 

Article Links

Follow this page link for listings of over 800 articles and resources

https://autismnow.org/resources/

Interagency Autism Coordination Committee

 

About Autism

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disability that is estimated to affect about 1 in 36 children and approximately 2.21% of adults. Autism affects the way a person experiences the world and can result in significant challenges in social communication and interaction, as well as repetitive behaviors and unusual or intense interests.

People on the autism spectrum often have a strong preference for routines and predictability, and some are challenged in adapting to change. Many people on the autism spectrum experience sensory differences, including high or low sensitivity to sounds, light, textures, tastes, and physical touch. Some have accompanying language and/or intellectual disabilities, and some may be intellectually gifted or possess other unique abilities, talents, or strengths.

ASD can be diagnosed at any age, but differences generally appear in the first two years of life. ASD is known as a “spectrum” condition because it encompasses a wide variation in the type, combination, and severity of disabilities, as a well as a range of unique abilities and strengths, many of which can change over the course of a person’s lifespan. The type and intensity of supports and services that a child or adult on the autism spectrum may require, ranging from minimal to intensive, will vary depending on their unique needs.

With appropriate supports and an environment that promotes inclusion, acceptance, and empowerment, people on the autism spectrum can fully participate in community life and achieve their full potential.

This page includes resources that provide general information about autism.

 

Websites and Programs

The Autistic Self Advocacy Network was created by autistic people and for autistic people. This page provides an overview of typical characteristics of autism.

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

This tool kit provides families of children ages four and under with guidance on how to access services the first 100 days after an autism diagnosis.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

March 2020

This report from provides an overview of 2016 data collected by the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network and Early ADDM. ADDM provides estimates of the prevalence of ASD among 8-year-old children. Early ADDM estimates ASD prevalence and monitors early identification of 4-year-old children. Full findings of the data on 8-year-old and 4-year-old children are available.

March 2020

The CDC released their first estimate of the prevalence of autism in adults based on 2017 data. They estimated that 2.21 percent of adults in the United States have ASD.

More Reports

Videos

April 24, 2019

NIMH Director Joshua Gordon, M.D., Ph.D. interviews Ann Wagner, Ph.D., National Autism Coordinator, and Lisa Gilotty, Ph.D., program chief of NIMH’s chief of NIMH’s Research Program on Autism Spectrum Disorders, to discuss advances on the study of autism in adulthood.

 

Federal Departments and Agencies

This list includes federal departments and agencies that provide funding, programs, and support for issues related to autism and other developmental disabilities.

Independent Agencies

  • National Council on Disability (NCD)
    • Meetings and Events The NCD is an independent federal agency that advises the President, Congress, and other federal agencies on policies, programs, practices, and procedures that affect people with disabilities. Their meetings are open to the public.
    • Resources This page includes information on disability rights and links to resources and services on education, employment, financial assistance and incentives, health care, housing, and more.
  • National Science Foundation (NSF)
    • About NSF The NSF is an independent federal agency that supports fundamental research and education in all non-medical fields of science and engineering.
  • Social Security Administration (SSA)
    • Disability Benefits The Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability programs provide assistance to people with disabilities. This page explains these benefits and the application process.
    • Spotlight on Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Accounts Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (ABLE) allows individuals with disabilities to make tax-free saving accounts to cover qualified disability expenses. Individuals can save up to $100,000 without counting against their Supplemental Security Income (SSI) eligibility.

Transition from youth to adulthood

Websites and Programs

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

ASAN partnered with the Family Network on Disabilities to produce this guide, which prepares transition age youth for adulthood. The first half provides information on preparing for transition and the second half gives in-depth information on post-secondary education, employment, housing and independent living, and healthcare.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

March 22, 2018

This report examines guardianship and makes recommendations for its use. Recommendations are based on disability law and policy, how people with disabilities are treated in the legal system, alternatives to guardianship, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

March 13, 2019

This report describes the demographics, disability, education, and health characteristics of teens and young adults ages 12-23 on the autism spectrum.

More Reports

Research Articles

More Research Articles

Videos

March 23, 2020

This webinar provided information about supports and resources to improve access to competitive, integrated employment for youth and young adults on the autism spectrum and enhance their career pathways.

 

 

Employment

National data has shown that many autistic adults are unemployed or underemployed, even when compared to people with other disabilities and in spite of having needed skills and abilities for the workplace. Researchers and policy makers have worked to develop programs that can increase opportunities for employment and improve employment outcomes. This includes job training and recruitment programs, as well as supports for employees and employers to increase retention and success in the workplace. This page provides information related to employment for people with autism and other disabilities.

Websites and Programs

This program helps public and private sectors recruit, hire, train, and retain job seekers with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

This plain language toolkit explains the existing policies that help people with disabilities people find and keep good jobs, and solve employment problems.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

October 9, 2018

Of the 74 state vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies that responded to GAO’s survey, most reported expanding services to help students with disabilities transition from school to work as required under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), enacted in July 2014. Most state agencies reported serving more students and providing work-based learning experiences and other activities.

May 12, 2020

Researchers analyzed Rehabilitation Services Administration data to determine the association of vocational rehabilitation services with employment outcomes for students ages 16-21. Students with autism were less likely to receive job-related services less than comparison groups.

More Reports

Research Articles

More Research Articles

Videos

March 23, 2020

In this webinar, Scott Michael Robertson Ph.D. provides information about government supports and resources that help youth and young adults with autism access competitive, integrated employment and enhance their careers. Full Transition Aged Youth Webinar Series.

Housing

Housing plays an important role in ensuring the well being of people on the autism spectrum and helping them integrate into the community. Some people can live independently with minimal or no supports, while others require high levels of support. There is a variety of federal and private resources that can enable people to live in settings that best fit their needs. This page provides information about models of housing for people with disabilities and resources and programs related to disability housing.

Websites and Programs

  • Medicaid.Gov
    • Home & Community Based Services This page provides information on Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) regulations. The page includes a training series for stakeholders, transition plans for individual states, technical assistance, and more. The Final Regulation page provides an overview of rules and regulations states must follow when providing HCBS under Medicaid.
  • The Arc
    • Housing Overview This page provides an overview of housing issues that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) encounter as well the Arc’s advocacy efforts. The page also describes key federal housing initiatives that enable people with I/DD to live in the community and links to additional resources.

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

This handbook is designed to help people with disabilities find and use resources that promote independent living. It includes information on support services and waivers, housing, employment, and community resources. This handbook was created in partnership with Autism NOW Center.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

May 24, 2019

This report that examines occurrences of institutionalization of people with disabilities, as well as thwarted threats of institutionalization, during hurricanes and the California wildfires in 2017 and 2018. The NCD found that people with disabilities are frequently institutionalized during and after disasters due to conflicting federal guidance; a lack of equal access to emergency and disaster-related programs and services; and a lack of compliance with federal law.

June 2018

The Residential Information Systems Project (RISP) studies trends in residential service settings, funding, and expenditures for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the United States. The most recent report uses data through Fiscal Year 2016.

More Reports

Research Articles

More Research Articles

Videos

July 23, 2019

This workshop focused on the housing needs of people on the autism spectrum and included examples of various housing models. Meeting details.

July 26, 2017

JaLynn Prince, Adrienne McBride, and Desiree Kameka present Madison House Autism Foundation’s Autism After 21 initiative. Madison House aims to raise awareness of the abilities of and issues facing adults with autism. They also promote housing options for adults with autism and other I/DD through the Autism Housing Network. Meeting details.

 

For Service Providers and Public Services

Unlocking Potential: Innovative Library Programs Enhancing the Lives of Autistic Individuals

http://librarysciencedegreesonline.org/libraries-and-autism/

 

Making Entertainment and Public Spaces More Autistim-Friendly

https://happiful.com/making-entertainment-and-public-spaces-more-autistic-friendly

 

 

ARCH National Respite Network – National Respite Locator Service
Apr 22 all-day

 

National Respite Locator Service

ARCH does not provide respite care, but we may be able to help you find it in your local community through your State Respite Coalition or Lifespan Respite Program or through resources listed below, including State Provider Registries or the Eldercare Locator.

If you cannot find respite through the resources listed above, we also maintain the National Respite Locator Service (NRLS), which helps parents, family caregivers, and professionals find respite services in their state and local area to match their specific needs. The NRLS lists primarily home care agencies, assisted living, or state or community-based agencies that provide respite care. If you find that a listing is out of date or no longer providing respite care, please contact ARCH.

If you have a respite program or service you would like to list on the NRLS, please visit the respite provider portal.

State Respite Coalition or Lifespan Respite Program

If your state has a State Respite Coalition or Lifespan Respite Care Program, be sure to contact them first for information about respite providers or ways to pay for respite.

CONTACT Information

Search for Respite on the National Respite Locator

CA/OSA – Cocaine Anonymous Online Service Area – Online 12 Step Meeting – DAILY REPRIEVE – 7 Days A Week @ Online Via ZOOM
Apr 22 @ 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

DAILY REPRIEVE

Join Via ZOOM

ID: 852 6648 1221

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85266481221

 

MEETING/GROUP TYPES:

OPEN: Attended by C.A. members, their families, friends and other interested people.
CLOSED: Attendance is limited to C.A. members only.

Cocaine Anonymous Around the World Clock

Pacific Standard Time (PDT) Eastern Standard Time (EDT) Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) British Standard Time (BST) Central European Summer Time (CEST)
July 26, 2023 9:08:36 AM July 26, 2023 12:08:36 PM July 26, 2023 4:08:36 PM July 26, 2023 5:08:36 PM July 26, 2023 6:08:36 PM
Sweden, Stockholm South Africa, Johannesburg Thailand, Bangkok Asia, Hong Kong Australia, Melbourne
6:08:36 PM 6:08:36 PM 11:08:36 PM 12:08:36 AM 2:08:36 AM

Please check the time above for the time zone you are in.  U.S. Daylight Savings and U.K. Daylight Savings happen about two weeks apart. U.K. falls back at 2am Sunday October 25th/U.S. falls back at 2am Sunday November 1st. The schedule can vary and be 1 hour different during that period.

Online Service Area

Cocaine Anonymous is a Fellowship of, by, and for addicts seeking recovery. Friends and Family of addicts should contact Co-Anon Family Groups, a Fellowship dedicated to their much different needs. Some items contained in these pages are published with permission of C.A. World Services, Inc., but this does not imply endorsement of this website by the C.A. World Service Conference or the C.A. World Service Office. The information provided within this website is intended to be a convenience for those who visit our website. Such inclusion does not constitute or imply endorsement by, or affiliation with, the Area or the Districts within. “Cocaine Anonymous World Service Conference Approved Literature. Copyright © 2022 Cocaine Anonymous World Services, Inc. “C.A.”, “Cocaine Anonymous” and the C.A. logo are registered trademarks of Cocaine Anonymous World Services, Inc. All rights reserved.” “In the spirit of Tradition Six, C.A. is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization, or institution. As such, in the Area, District, Service Committees of Cocaine Anonymous and Cocaine Anonymous as a whole does not endorse and is not affiliated with or any of the companies and/or services offered on the site. Any links to external websites or services are only provided as a convenience to our members.”

webmaster@ca-online.org

DBSA – Depression Bipolar Support Alliance – DBSA California Support Groups – Sundays, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays @ Online Via ZOOM
Apr 22 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
DBSA - Depression Bipolar Support Alliance - DBSA California Support Groups - Sundays, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays @ Online Via ZOOM

 

 

 

 

 

DBSA California Support Groups

Sundays, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays 5:30-7:30PM PST

DBSA-California Support Groups are offered for free and provide a safe, confidential space where people from all walks of life connect with peers to share their stories, experiences, and lives in a way that helps redce isolation and loneliness.
The groups are held online every Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday
When we’re struggling or in a crisis, we often feel that we’re alone. Support groups can connect us with peers who understand us, have similar lived experiences, and can help us get through. Our support groups are led by peers we highly train as facilitators, so they have an intimate comprehension of the challenges firsthand and serve as a beacon of hope to others.
Who Should Join Groups?
Battling mental health alone is difficult for most individuals who suffer from Depression and Bipolar. It can seem impossible to cope, heal, or think about recovery. We understand the struggle, we’ve been there, we can help! By attending weekly discussion groups, you will be empowered with education, resources, emotional support, and guidance to set you up on the path to recovery. There is no shame in admitting that sometimes we need help, it’s tough enough carrying the weight of the world on your shoulders, let DBSA CA Support Groups lighten the load for you.
Topics of Discussion
Self-esteem/self-talk (positive/negative)
Planning for the future
Obligations (financial/relationships-family/work)
Medications
Initial steps (after an episode)
Hospitalization (in-patient/outpatient)
Insurance (medical/disability)
Sleep patterns
Triggers
Dual diagnosis & Addiction (drugs & alcohol)
Finding a doctor/therapist
Self-discipline, daily maintenance/routine
Proper self-care, motivation/lack of motivation
Spending money
Exercise/fitness (physical activity)
Setting goals and meeting deadlines
Setting boundaries
Weight loss/gain/appetite
Test of faith (spiritual life)
Self Education
Socializing
REGISTER AND GET A LINK TO OUR ZOOM MEETINGS
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/607974938407

 

 

 

 

 

 

CA/OSA – Cocaine Anonymous Online Service Area – Online 12 Step Meetings – Monday Newcomers Meeting – Mondays @ Online Via ZOOM
Apr 22 @ 9:30 pm – 10:30 pm

 

Monday Newcomers Meeting

Monday 9:30am PST

Join Monday Newcomers Meeting from your computer, tablet, or smartphone at:

https://us02web.zoom.us

/j/2758035650?pwd=S01SZUFOMEFyRktKU1JzR2ZUUHBidz09

Meeting ID: 275 803 5650
Passcode: JhA6BV

MEETING/GROUP TYPES:

OPEN: Attended by C.A. members, their families, friends, and other interested people.

CLOSED: Attendance is limited to C.A. members only.

Cocaine Anonymous Around the World Clock

Pacific Standard Time (PDT) Eastern Standard Time (EDT) Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) British Standard Time (BST) Central European Summer Time (CEST)
July 26, 2023 9:08:36 AM July 26, 2023 12:08:36 PM July 26, 2023 4:08:36 PM July 26, 2023 5:08:36 PM July 26, 2023 6:08:36 PM
Sweden, Stockholm South Africa, Johannesburg Thailand, Bangkok Asia, Hong Kong Australia, Melbourne
6:08:36 PM 6:08:36 PM 11:08:36 PM 12:08:36 AM 2:08:36 AM

Please check the time above for the time zone you are in.  U.S. Daylight Savings and U.K. Daylight Savings happen about two weeks apart. U.K. falls back at 2am Sunday October 25th/U.S. falls back at 2am Sunday November 1st. The schedule can vary and be 1 hour different during that period.

Online Service Area

Cocaine Anonymous is a Fellowship of, by, and for addicts seeking recovery. Friends and Family of addicts should contact Co-Anon Family Groups, a Fellowship dedicated to their much different needs. Some items contained in these pages are published with permission of C.A. World Services, Inc., but this does not imply endorsement of this website by the C.A. World Service Conference or the C.A. World Service Office. The information provided within this website is intended to be a convenience for those who visit our website. Such inclusion does not constitute or imply endorsement by, or affiliation with, the Area or the Districts within. “Cocaine Anonymous World Service Conference Approved Literature. Copyright © 2022 Cocaine Anonymous World Services, Inc. “C.A.”, “Cocaine Anonymous” and the C.A. logo are registered trademarks of Cocaine Anonymous World Services, Inc. All rights reserved.” “In the spirit of Tradition Six, C.A. is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization, or institution. As such, in the Area, District, Service Committees of Cocaine Anonymous and Cocaine Anonymous as a whole does not endorse and is not affiliated with or any of the companies and/or services offered on the site. Any links to external websites or services are only provided as a convenience to our members.”

webmaster@ca-online.org

 

Apr
23
Tue
2024
00 – Hotline – Boys Town National Hot Line – A 24/7 crisis, resource and referral number for kids and parents – 1-800-448-3000 – Text VOICE to 20121 @ Phone
Apr 23 all-day

 

 

 

 

 

Increasing Outreach to Teens

Teens are more connected than ever ​before and the Boys Town National Hotline® at 800-448-3000 is right there with them.

In addition to calling, teens can now text VOICE to 20121 or email hotline@boystown.org any day, any time to speak with a trained counselor.

Online resources are also available at yourlifeyourvoice.org.

 

04 – Resources – APH – American Printing House for the Blind – VisionAware – Visual Impairment Information Service
Apr 23 all-day

 

 

 

 

VisionAware

Are you or a family member having difficulty seeing? Or perhaps been diagnosed with an eye condition such as macular degeneration, cataracts, glaucoma, or diabetic retinopathy? If the answer is yes, you’re not alone: vision problems affect 25 million Americans, and they are on the rise.

VisionAware is a free, easy-to-use informational service for adults who are blind or have low vision, their families, caregivers, healthcare providers, and social service professionals. Visitors will find tips and resources on living with blindness or low vision; information on eye diseases and disorders; and a searchable, free Directory of Services.

man getting an eye exam

Eye Conditions

Some changes in vision are normal as we grow older. This section of our website can help you understand these vision changes, alert you to abnormal changes in vision, and […]

READ MORE

Man sitting on park bench with white cane holding his phone

Recreation and Leisure

From crafts, woodworking, traveling, and reading to sports and exercise, this section is full of information on the variety of activities people who are blind or low vision can engage […]

READ MORE

Person using a refreshable braille display.

Products and Technology

Discover low and high-tech solutions enabling independence at home and work, connection with friends and family, and enjoyment of hobbies and leisure activities.

READ MORE

Professionals in scrubs talking

Professionals

Find resources and techniques you can use to serve people who are blind or low vision effectively and safely, and learn key information about the impact of aging and vision […]

READ MORE

Older man wearing eyeglasses surrounded by family of various ages

Families and Friends

Do you know someone (parent or family member, neighbor, or friend) having trouble seeing? You may be wondering about blindness/ low vision and how to talk with them about it. […]

READ MORE

Woman sitting in kitchen reading braille.

Living with Blindness or Low Vision

If you are new to blindness or low vision, take the journey one day and one step at a time. Utilize our tips for adjusting to vision changes, living independently, […]

Read More

04 – Resources – Autism Resources, Articles, Support
Apr 23 all-day
04 - Resources - Autism Resources, Articles, Support

 

 

 

 

What is Autism?

What you should know

Autism is a severe developmental disorder that affects the way a child sees and interacts with the rest of the world. It limits their ability to interact with others socially, in fact many autism suffers avoid human contact.

Autism is part of a larger group of disorders called pervasive developmental disorders (PDD). More information about autism: Click on each of these links

 

Autism-Definition

Autism is a developmental disability that comes from a neurological disorder that affects the normal functioning of the brain. It is characterized by the abnormal development of communication skills, social skills, and reasoning. Males are affected four times as often as females. Children may appear normal until around the age of 30 months.

 

Click each of these following titles learn more….

Autism Symptoms

Autism Symptoms vary widely in severity, include impairment in social interaction, fixation on inanimate objects, inability to communicate normally, and resistance to changes in daily routine. Characteristic traits include lack of eye contact, repetition of words or phrases, unmotivated tantrums, inability to express needs verbally, and insensitivity to pain.

Behaviors may change over time. Autistic children often have other disorders of brain function; about two thirds are mentally retarded; over one quarter develop seizures.

What Autism is Not

Autism can be confused with several other disorders which may have similar behaviors. Here is a list of autism like disorders that you should look at.

What Causes Autism

It remains unclear, but a psychological one has been ruled out. Neurological studies seem to indicate a primary brain dysfunction, and a genetic component is suggested by a pattern of autism in some families. It is largely believed that autism is a genetic disorder that involves several genes related to gene function. However it is unclear to researchers what causes these genes to turn on. Learn more about other causes of autism.

Autism Research

There are many exciting developments in autism research going on at the top universities. They are focusing on inherited autism and autism gene research.

Other Autism Spectrum Disorders

Asperger’s Syndrome – A child with asperger’s disorder has the same common problems as children with autism however they don’t have language development problems of a autistic child.

Pervasive Developmental Disorder and not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) – This child has autism but doesn’t meet the criteria for high functioning autism.

High-Functioning Autism – This child has autism but has normal learning and cognitive and learning skills. Language development is difficult initially but they become proficient eventually.

 

FAQ about Autism Special Education and IEP

This is an important list of questions and answers to help you deal with special education issues at your school.

 

Autism Tips for working with Teachers

This is a great check list of items to be aware of when you work with your child’s teacher and your child’s Individual Education Plan.

Tip: Go to our Autism education discussion boards and post a question with other parents.

Early Origins of Autism

 

ADDITIONAL LINKS TO RESOURCES AND EXPERTISE

Ask an Expert on Autism

Health Finder

Talk to Autism Expert

National Institutes of Mental Health

Combined Health Information Database

Abstracts on Autism

 

 

Searchable Directory of Autism Resources

CLICK HERE TO VISIT THE DIRECTORY PAGE 

Or Click on the Topic area directly below

Adult Resources

Attorneys & Advocates

Behavior/Family Training

Community Living

Education

Medical Providers/Diagnosis

Non-English Resources

Respite Care Providers

Safety

Sports & Camps

Therapy Providers

 

Autism NOW Center’s fact sheets on topics of importance to people with autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disabilities are a resource you and your family members, as well as educators, employers, physicians and others, can use to get information in an easy-to-read and understand format.  The fact sheets are available in several languages in PDF form which can be printed out for your convenience. See the full list of topics and language choices below.

English:

Spanish:

Find the resources you need 1-885-828-847

 

Article Links

Follow this page link for listings of over 800 articles and resources

https://autismnow.org/resources/

Interagency Autism Coordination Committee

 

About Autism

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disability that is estimated to affect about 1 in 36 children and approximately 2.21% of adults. Autism affects the way a person experiences the world and can result in significant challenges in social communication and interaction, as well as repetitive behaviors and unusual or intense interests.

People on the autism spectrum often have a strong preference for routines and predictability, and some are challenged in adapting to change. Many people on the autism spectrum experience sensory differences, including high or low sensitivity to sounds, light, textures, tastes, and physical touch. Some have accompanying language and/or intellectual disabilities, and some may be intellectually gifted or possess other unique abilities, talents, or strengths.

ASD can be diagnosed at any age, but differences generally appear in the first two years of life. ASD is known as a “spectrum” condition because it encompasses a wide variation in the type, combination, and severity of disabilities, as a well as a range of unique abilities and strengths, many of which can change over the course of a person’s lifespan. The type and intensity of supports and services that a child or adult on the autism spectrum may require, ranging from minimal to intensive, will vary depending on their unique needs.

With appropriate supports and an environment that promotes inclusion, acceptance, and empowerment, people on the autism spectrum can fully participate in community life and achieve their full potential.

This page includes resources that provide general information about autism.

 

Websites and Programs

The Autistic Self Advocacy Network was created by autistic people and for autistic people. This page provides an overview of typical characteristics of autism.

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

This tool kit provides families of children ages four and under with guidance on how to access services the first 100 days after an autism diagnosis.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

March 2020

This report from provides an overview of 2016 data collected by the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network and Early ADDM. ADDM provides estimates of the prevalence of ASD among 8-year-old children. Early ADDM estimates ASD prevalence and monitors early identification of 4-year-old children. Full findings of the data on 8-year-old and 4-year-old children are available.

March 2020

The CDC released their first estimate of the prevalence of autism in adults based on 2017 data. They estimated that 2.21 percent of adults in the United States have ASD.

More Reports

Videos

April 24, 2019

NIMH Director Joshua Gordon, M.D., Ph.D. interviews Ann Wagner, Ph.D., National Autism Coordinator, and Lisa Gilotty, Ph.D., program chief of NIMH’s chief of NIMH’s Research Program on Autism Spectrum Disorders, to discuss advances on the study of autism in adulthood.

 

Federal Departments and Agencies

This list includes federal departments and agencies that provide funding, programs, and support for issues related to autism and other developmental disabilities.

Independent Agencies

  • National Council on Disability (NCD)
    • Meetings and Events The NCD is an independent federal agency that advises the President, Congress, and other federal agencies on policies, programs, practices, and procedures that affect people with disabilities. Their meetings are open to the public.
    • Resources This page includes information on disability rights and links to resources and services on education, employment, financial assistance and incentives, health care, housing, and more.
  • National Science Foundation (NSF)
    • About NSF The NSF is an independent federal agency that supports fundamental research and education in all non-medical fields of science and engineering.
  • Social Security Administration (SSA)
    • Disability Benefits The Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability programs provide assistance to people with disabilities. This page explains these benefits and the application process.
    • Spotlight on Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Accounts Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (ABLE) allows individuals with disabilities to make tax-free saving accounts to cover qualified disability expenses. Individuals can save up to $100,000 without counting against their Supplemental Security Income (SSI) eligibility.

Transition from youth to adulthood

Websites and Programs

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

ASAN partnered with the Family Network on Disabilities to produce this guide, which prepares transition age youth for adulthood. The first half provides information on preparing for transition and the second half gives in-depth information on post-secondary education, employment, housing and independent living, and healthcare.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

March 22, 2018

This report examines guardianship and makes recommendations for its use. Recommendations are based on disability law and policy, how people with disabilities are treated in the legal system, alternatives to guardianship, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

March 13, 2019

This report describes the demographics, disability, education, and health characteristics of teens and young adults ages 12-23 on the autism spectrum.

More Reports

Research Articles

More Research Articles

Videos

March 23, 2020

This webinar provided information about supports and resources to improve access to competitive, integrated employment for youth and young adults on the autism spectrum and enhance their career pathways.

 

 

Employment

National data has shown that many autistic adults are unemployed or underemployed, even when compared to people with other disabilities and in spite of having needed skills and abilities for the workplace. Researchers and policy makers have worked to develop programs that can increase opportunities for employment and improve employment outcomes. This includes job training and recruitment programs, as well as supports for employees and employers to increase retention and success in the workplace. This page provides information related to employment for people with autism and other disabilities.

Websites and Programs

This program helps public and private sectors recruit, hire, train, and retain job seekers with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

This plain language toolkit explains the existing policies that help people with disabilities people find and keep good jobs, and solve employment problems.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

October 9, 2018

Of the 74 state vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies that responded to GAO’s survey, most reported expanding services to help students with disabilities transition from school to work as required under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), enacted in July 2014. Most state agencies reported serving more students and providing work-based learning experiences and other activities.

May 12, 2020

Researchers analyzed Rehabilitation Services Administration data to determine the association of vocational rehabilitation services with employment outcomes for students ages 16-21. Students with autism were less likely to receive job-related services less than comparison groups.

More Reports

Research Articles

More Research Articles

Videos

March 23, 2020

In this webinar, Scott Michael Robertson Ph.D. provides information about government supports and resources that help youth and young adults with autism access competitive, integrated employment and enhance their careers. Full Transition Aged Youth Webinar Series.

Housing

Housing plays an important role in ensuring the well being of people on the autism spectrum and helping them integrate into the community. Some people can live independently with minimal or no supports, while others require high levels of support. There is a variety of federal and private resources that can enable people to live in settings that best fit their needs. This page provides information about models of housing for people with disabilities and resources and programs related to disability housing.

Websites and Programs

  • Medicaid.Gov
    • Home & Community Based Services This page provides information on Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) regulations. The page includes a training series for stakeholders, transition plans for individual states, technical assistance, and more. The Final Regulation page provides an overview of rules and regulations states must follow when providing HCBS under Medicaid.
  • The Arc
    • Housing Overview This page provides an overview of housing issues that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) encounter as well the Arc’s advocacy efforts. The page also describes key federal housing initiatives that enable people with I/DD to live in the community and links to additional resources.

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

This handbook is designed to help people with disabilities find and use resources that promote independent living. It includes information on support services and waivers, housing, employment, and community resources. This handbook was created in partnership with Autism NOW Center.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

May 24, 2019

This report that examines occurrences of institutionalization of people with disabilities, as well as thwarted threats of institutionalization, during hurricanes and the California wildfires in 2017 and 2018. The NCD found that people with disabilities are frequently institutionalized during and after disasters due to conflicting federal guidance; a lack of equal access to emergency and disaster-related programs and services; and a lack of compliance with federal law.

June 2018

The Residential Information Systems Project (RISP) studies trends in residential service settings, funding, and expenditures for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the United States. The most recent report uses data through Fiscal Year 2016.

More Reports

Research Articles

More Research Articles

Videos

July 23, 2019

This workshop focused on the housing needs of people on the autism spectrum and included examples of various housing models. Meeting details.

July 26, 2017

JaLynn Prince, Adrienne McBride, and Desiree Kameka present Madison House Autism Foundation’s Autism After 21 initiative. Madison House aims to raise awareness of the abilities of and issues facing adults with autism. They also promote housing options for adults with autism and other I/DD through the Autism Housing Network. Meeting details.

 

For Service Providers and Public Services

Unlocking Potential: Innovative Library Programs Enhancing the Lives of Autistic Individuals

http://librarysciencedegreesonline.org/libraries-and-autism/

 

Making Entertainment and Public Spaces More Autistim-Friendly

https://happiful.com/making-entertainment-and-public-spaces-more-autistic-friendly

 

 

ARCH National Respite Network – National Respite Locator Service
Apr 23 all-day

 

National Respite Locator Service

ARCH does not provide respite care, but we may be able to help you find it in your local community through your State Respite Coalition or Lifespan Respite Program or through resources listed below, including State Provider Registries or the Eldercare Locator.

If you cannot find respite through the resources listed above, we also maintain the National Respite Locator Service (NRLS), which helps parents, family caregivers, and professionals find respite services in their state and local area to match their specific needs. The NRLS lists primarily home care agencies, assisted living, or state or community-based agencies that provide respite care. If you find that a listing is out of date or no longer providing respite care, please contact ARCH.

If you have a respite program or service you would like to list on the NRLS, please visit the respite provider portal.

State Respite Coalition or Lifespan Respite Program

If your state has a State Respite Coalition or Lifespan Respite Care Program, be sure to contact them first for information about respite providers or ways to pay for respite.

CONTACT Information

Search for Respite on the National Respite Locator

DBSA – Depression Bipolar Support Alliance – Online Support Group – Team Led – Wednesdays @ Online Via HeyPeers
Apr 23 @ 9:00 am – 10:00 am

 

 

 

 

 

DBSA Online Support Group

Wednesdays 9-10AM PST

Team Led

All DBSA online support groups are free of charge. Online support groups are led by peers, which means that the person guiding the meeting knows firsthand what it’s like to live with a mood disorder.

Our national online support groups are hosted by HeyPeers, a DBSA vendor.

Upon registration, you will receive an email from them to assist you with managing your account.

Register Through HeyPeers

 

 

 

 

CA/OSA – Cocaine Anonymous Online Service Area – Online 12 Step Meeting – Into Action Online – Big Book Discussion – Tuesdays & Fridays @ Online Via ZOOM
Apr 23 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Into Action Online

Big Book Discussion

Tuesdays & Fridays 1:00 pm PST

Skype Meeting Contact: Into Action Online

https://join.skype.com/IyvSmhPaRff9

MEETING/GROUP TYPES:

OPEN: Attended by C.A. members, their families, friends and other interested people.
CLOSED: Attendance is limited to C.A. members only.

Cocaine Anonymous Around the World Clock

Pacific Standard Time (PDT) Eastern Standard Time (EDT) Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) British Standard Time (BST) Central European Summer Time (CEST)
July 26, 2023 9:08:36 AM July 26, 2023 12:08:36 PM July 26, 2023 4:08:36 PM July 26, 2023 5:08:36 PM July 26, 2023 6:08:36 PM
Sweden, Stockholm South Africa, Johannesburg Thailand, Bangkok Asia, Hong Kong Australia, Melbourne
6:08:36 PM 6:08:36 PM 11:08:36 PM 12:08:36 AM 2:08:36 AM

Please check the time above for the time zone you are in.  U.S. Daylight Savings and U.K. Daylight Savings happen about two weeks apart. U.K. falls back at 2am Sunday October 25th/U.S. falls back at 2am Sunday November 1st. The schedule can vary and be 1 hour different during that period.

Online Service Area

Cocaine Anonymous is a Fellowship of, by, and for addicts seeking recovery. Friends and Family of addicts should contact Co-Anon Family Groups, a Fellowship dedicated to their much different needs. Some items contained in these pages are published with permission of C.A. World Services, Inc., but this does not imply endorsement of this website by the C.A. World Service Conference or the C.A. World Service Office. The information provided within this website is intended to be a convenience for those who visit our website. Such inclusion does not constitute or imply endorsement by, or affiliation with, the Area or the Districts within. “Cocaine Anonymous World Service Conference Approved Literature. Copyright © 2022 Cocaine Anonymous World Services, Inc. “C.A.”, “Cocaine Anonymous” and the C.A. logo are registered trademarks of Cocaine Anonymous World Services, Inc. All rights reserved.” “In the spirit of Tradition Six, C.A. is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization, or institution. As such, in the Area, District, Service Committees of Cocaine Anonymous and Cocaine Anonymous as a whole does not endorse and is not affiliated with or any of the companies and/or services offered on the site. Any links to external websites or services are only provided as a convenience to our members.”

webmaster@ca-online.org

CA/OSA – Cocaine Anonymous Online Service Area – Online 12 Step Meeting – DAILY REPRIEVE – 7 Days A Week @ Online Via ZOOM
Apr 23 @ 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

DAILY REPRIEVE

Join Via ZOOM

ID: 852 6648 1221

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85266481221

 

MEETING/GROUP TYPES:

OPEN: Attended by C.A. members, their families, friends and other interested people.
CLOSED: Attendance is limited to C.A. members only.

Cocaine Anonymous Around the World Clock

Pacific Standard Time (PDT) Eastern Standard Time (EDT) Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) British Standard Time (BST) Central European Summer Time (CEST)
July 26, 2023 9:08:36 AM July 26, 2023 12:08:36 PM July 26, 2023 4:08:36 PM July 26, 2023 5:08:36 PM July 26, 2023 6:08:36 PM
Sweden, Stockholm South Africa, Johannesburg Thailand, Bangkok Asia, Hong Kong Australia, Melbourne
6:08:36 PM 6:08:36 PM 11:08:36 PM 12:08:36 AM 2:08:36 AM

Please check the time above for the time zone you are in.  U.S. Daylight Savings and U.K. Daylight Savings happen about two weeks apart. U.K. falls back at 2am Sunday October 25th/U.S. falls back at 2am Sunday November 1st. The schedule can vary and be 1 hour different during that period.

Online Service Area

Cocaine Anonymous is a Fellowship of, by, and for addicts seeking recovery. Friends and Family of addicts should contact Co-Anon Family Groups, a Fellowship dedicated to their much different needs. Some items contained in these pages are published with permission of C.A. World Services, Inc., but this does not imply endorsement of this website by the C.A. World Service Conference or the C.A. World Service Office. The information provided within this website is intended to be a convenience for those who visit our website. Such inclusion does not constitute or imply endorsement by, or affiliation with, the Area or the Districts within. “Cocaine Anonymous World Service Conference Approved Literature. Copyright © 2022 Cocaine Anonymous World Services, Inc. “C.A.”, “Cocaine Anonymous” and the C.A. logo are registered trademarks of Cocaine Anonymous World Services, Inc. All rights reserved.” “In the spirit of Tradition Six, C.A. is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization, or institution. As such, in the Area, District, Service Committees of Cocaine Anonymous and Cocaine Anonymous as a whole does not endorse and is not affiliated with or any of the companies and/or services offered on the site. Any links to external websites or services are only provided as a convenience to our members.”

webmaster@ca-online.org

DBSA – Depression Bipolar Support Alliance – Parent and Caregiver Support Group (for ages 11-17) – Team Led – Tuesdays @ Online Via HeyPeers
Apr 23 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm

 

 

 

 

 

Parent and Caregiver Support Group (for ages 11-17)

Tuesdays 4:30-5:30PM PST

Team Led

All DBSA online support groups are free of charge. Online support groups are led by peers, which means that the person guiding the meeting knows firsthand what it’s like to live with a mood disorder.

Our national online support groups are hosted by HeyPeers, a DBSA vendor.

Upon registration, you will receive an email from them to assist you with managing your account.

Register Through HeyPeers

DBSA – Depression Bipolar Support Alliance – Parent and Caregiver Support Group (for ages 18+) – Team Led – Tuesdays @ Online Via HeyPeers
Apr 23 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm

 

 

 

 

 

Parent and Caregiver Support Group (for ages 18+)

Tuesdays 4:30-5:30PM PST

Team Led

All DBSA online support groups are free of charge. Online support groups are led by peers, which means that the person guiding the meeting knows firsthand what it’s like to live with a mood disorder.

Our national online support groups are hosted by HeyPeers, a DBSA vendor.

Upon registration, you will receive an email from them to assist you with managing your account.

Register Through HeyPeers

 

 

 

DBSA – Depression Bipolar Support Alliance – DBSA California Support Groups – Sundays, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays @ Online Via ZOOM
Apr 23 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
DBSA - Depression Bipolar Support Alliance - DBSA California Support Groups - Sundays, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays @ Online Via ZOOM

 

 

 

 

 

DBSA California Support Groups

Sundays, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays 5:30-7:30PM PST

DBSA-California Support Groups are offered for free and provide a safe, confidential space where people from all walks of life connect with peers to share their stories, experiences, and lives in a way that helps redce isolation and loneliness.
The groups are held online every Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday
When we’re struggling or in a crisis, we often feel that we’re alone. Support groups can connect us with peers who understand us, have similar lived experiences, and can help us get through. Our support groups are led by peers we highly train as facilitators, so they have an intimate comprehension of the challenges firsthand and serve as a beacon of hope to others.
Who Should Join Groups?
Battling mental health alone is difficult for most individuals who suffer from Depression and Bipolar. It can seem impossible to cope, heal, or think about recovery. We understand the struggle, we’ve been there, we can help! By attending weekly discussion groups, you will be empowered with education, resources, emotional support, and guidance to set you up on the path to recovery. There is no shame in admitting that sometimes we need help, it’s tough enough carrying the weight of the world on your shoulders, let DBSA CA Support Groups lighten the load for you.
Topics of Discussion
Self-esteem/self-talk (positive/negative)
Planning for the future
Obligations (financial/relationships-family/work)
Medications
Initial steps (after an episode)
Hospitalization (in-patient/outpatient)
Insurance (medical/disability)
Sleep patterns
Triggers
Dual diagnosis & Addiction (drugs & alcohol)
Finding a doctor/therapist
Self-discipline, daily maintenance/routine
Proper self-care, motivation/lack of motivation
Spending money
Exercise/fitness (physical activity)
Setting goals and meeting deadlines
Setting boundaries
Weight loss/gain/appetite
Test of faith (spiritual life)
Self Education
Socializing
REGISTER AND GET A LINK TO OUR ZOOM MEETINGS
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/607974938407

 

 

 

 

 

 

Apr
24
Wed
2024
00 – Hotline – Boys Town National Hot Line – A 24/7 crisis, resource and referral number for kids and parents – 1-800-448-3000 – Text VOICE to 20121 @ Phone
Apr 24 all-day

 

 

 

 

 

Increasing Outreach to Teens

Teens are more connected than ever ​before and the Boys Town National Hotline® at 800-448-3000 is right there with them.

In addition to calling, teens can now text VOICE to 20121 or email hotline@boystown.org any day, any time to speak with a trained counselor.

Online resources are also available at yourlifeyourvoice.org.

 

04 – Resources – APH – American Printing House for the Blind – VisionAware – Visual Impairment Information Service
Apr 24 all-day

 

 

 

 

VisionAware

Are you or a family member having difficulty seeing? Or perhaps been diagnosed with an eye condition such as macular degeneration, cataracts, glaucoma, or diabetic retinopathy? If the answer is yes, you’re not alone: vision problems affect 25 million Americans, and they are on the rise.

VisionAware is a free, easy-to-use informational service for adults who are blind or have low vision, their families, caregivers, healthcare providers, and social service professionals. Visitors will find tips and resources on living with blindness or low vision; information on eye diseases and disorders; and a searchable, free Directory of Services.

man getting an eye exam

Eye Conditions

Some changes in vision are normal as we grow older. This section of our website can help you understand these vision changes, alert you to abnormal changes in vision, and […]

READ MORE

Man sitting on park bench with white cane holding his phone

Recreation and Leisure

From crafts, woodworking, traveling, and reading to sports and exercise, this section is full of information on the variety of activities people who are blind or low vision can engage […]

READ MORE

Person using a refreshable braille display.

Products and Technology

Discover low and high-tech solutions enabling independence at home and work, connection with friends and family, and enjoyment of hobbies and leisure activities.

READ MORE

Professionals in scrubs talking

Professionals

Find resources and techniques you can use to serve people who are blind or low vision effectively and safely, and learn key information about the impact of aging and vision […]

READ MORE

Older man wearing eyeglasses surrounded by family of various ages

Families and Friends

Do you know someone (parent or family member, neighbor, or friend) having trouble seeing? You may be wondering about blindness/ low vision and how to talk with them about it. […]

READ MORE

Woman sitting in kitchen reading braille.

Living with Blindness or Low Vision

If you are new to blindness or low vision, take the journey one day and one step at a time. Utilize our tips for adjusting to vision changes, living independently, […]

Read More

04 – Resources – Autism Resources, Articles, Support
Apr 24 all-day
04 - Resources - Autism Resources, Articles, Support

 

 

 

 

What is Autism?

What you should know

Autism is a severe developmental disorder that affects the way a child sees and interacts with the rest of the world. It limits their ability to interact with others socially, in fact many autism suffers avoid human contact.

Autism is part of a larger group of disorders called pervasive developmental disorders (PDD). More information about autism: Click on each of these links

 

Autism-Definition

Autism is a developmental disability that comes from a neurological disorder that affects the normal functioning of the brain. It is characterized by the abnormal development of communication skills, social skills, and reasoning. Males are affected four times as often as females. Children may appear normal until around the age of 30 months.

 

Click each of these following titles learn more….

Autism Symptoms

Autism Symptoms vary widely in severity, include impairment in social interaction, fixation on inanimate objects, inability to communicate normally, and resistance to changes in daily routine. Characteristic traits include lack of eye contact, repetition of words or phrases, unmotivated tantrums, inability to express needs verbally, and insensitivity to pain.

Behaviors may change over time. Autistic children often have other disorders of brain function; about two thirds are mentally retarded; over one quarter develop seizures.

What Autism is Not

Autism can be confused with several other disorders which may have similar behaviors. Here is a list of autism like disorders that you should look at.

What Causes Autism

It remains unclear, but a psychological one has been ruled out. Neurological studies seem to indicate a primary brain dysfunction, and a genetic component is suggested by a pattern of autism in some families. It is largely believed that autism is a genetic disorder that involves several genes related to gene function. However it is unclear to researchers what causes these genes to turn on. Learn more about other causes of autism.

Autism Research

There are many exciting developments in autism research going on at the top universities. They are focusing on inherited autism and autism gene research.

Other Autism Spectrum Disorders

Asperger’s Syndrome – A child with asperger’s disorder has the same common problems as children with autism however they don’t have language development problems of a autistic child.

Pervasive Developmental Disorder and not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) – This child has autism but doesn’t meet the criteria for high functioning autism.

High-Functioning Autism – This child has autism but has normal learning and cognitive and learning skills. Language development is difficult initially but they become proficient eventually.

 

FAQ about Autism Special Education and IEP

This is an important list of questions and answers to help you deal with special education issues at your school.

 

Autism Tips for working with Teachers

This is a great check list of items to be aware of when you work with your child’s teacher and your child’s Individual Education Plan.

Tip: Go to our Autism education discussion boards and post a question with other parents.

Early Origins of Autism

 

ADDITIONAL LINKS TO RESOURCES AND EXPERTISE

Ask an Expert on Autism

Health Finder

Talk to Autism Expert

National Institutes of Mental Health

Combined Health Information Database

Abstracts on Autism

 

 

Searchable Directory of Autism Resources

CLICK HERE TO VISIT THE DIRECTORY PAGE 

Or Click on the Topic area directly below

Adult Resources

Attorneys & Advocates

Behavior/Family Training

Community Living

Education

Medical Providers/Diagnosis

Non-English Resources

Respite Care Providers

Safety

Sports & Camps

Therapy Providers

 

Autism NOW Center’s fact sheets on topics of importance to people with autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disabilities are a resource you and your family members, as well as educators, employers, physicians and others, can use to get information in an easy-to-read and understand format.  The fact sheets are available in several languages in PDF form which can be printed out for your convenience. See the full list of topics and language choices below.

English:

Spanish:

Find the resources you need 1-885-828-847

 

Article Links

Follow this page link for listings of over 800 articles and resources

https://autismnow.org/resources/

Interagency Autism Coordination Committee

 

About Autism

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disability that is estimated to affect about 1 in 36 children and approximately 2.21% of adults. Autism affects the way a person experiences the world and can result in significant challenges in social communication and interaction, as well as repetitive behaviors and unusual or intense interests.

People on the autism spectrum often have a strong preference for routines and predictability, and some are challenged in adapting to change. Many people on the autism spectrum experience sensory differences, including high or low sensitivity to sounds, light, textures, tastes, and physical touch. Some have accompanying language and/or intellectual disabilities, and some may be intellectually gifted or possess other unique abilities, talents, or strengths.

ASD can be diagnosed at any age, but differences generally appear in the first two years of life. ASD is known as a “spectrum” condition because it encompasses a wide variation in the type, combination, and severity of disabilities, as a well as a range of unique abilities and strengths, many of which can change over the course of a person’s lifespan. The type and intensity of supports and services that a child or adult on the autism spectrum may require, ranging from minimal to intensive, will vary depending on their unique needs.

With appropriate supports and an environment that promotes inclusion, acceptance, and empowerment, people on the autism spectrum can fully participate in community life and achieve their full potential.

This page includes resources that provide general information about autism.

 

Websites and Programs

The Autistic Self Advocacy Network was created by autistic people and for autistic people. This page provides an overview of typical characteristics of autism.

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

This tool kit provides families of children ages four and under with guidance on how to access services the first 100 days after an autism diagnosis.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

March 2020

This report from provides an overview of 2016 data collected by the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network and Early ADDM. ADDM provides estimates of the prevalence of ASD among 8-year-old children. Early ADDM estimates ASD prevalence and monitors early identification of 4-year-old children. Full findings of the data on 8-year-old and 4-year-old children are available.

March 2020

The CDC released their first estimate of the prevalence of autism in adults based on 2017 data. They estimated that 2.21 percent of adults in the United States have ASD.

More Reports

Videos

April 24, 2019

NIMH Director Joshua Gordon, M.D., Ph.D. interviews Ann Wagner, Ph.D., National Autism Coordinator, and Lisa Gilotty, Ph.D., program chief of NIMH’s chief of NIMH’s Research Program on Autism Spectrum Disorders, to discuss advances on the study of autism in adulthood.

 

Federal Departments and Agencies

This list includes federal departments and agencies that provide funding, programs, and support for issues related to autism and other developmental disabilities.

Independent Agencies

  • National Council on Disability (NCD)
    • Meetings and Events The NCD is an independent federal agency that advises the President, Congress, and other federal agencies on policies, programs, practices, and procedures that affect people with disabilities. Their meetings are open to the public.
    • Resources This page includes information on disability rights and links to resources and services on education, employment, financial assistance and incentives, health care, housing, and more.
  • National Science Foundation (NSF)
    • About NSF The NSF is an independent federal agency that supports fundamental research and education in all non-medical fields of science and engineering.
  • Social Security Administration (SSA)
    • Disability Benefits The Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability programs provide assistance to people with disabilities. This page explains these benefits and the application process.
    • Spotlight on Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Accounts Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (ABLE) allows individuals with disabilities to make tax-free saving accounts to cover qualified disability expenses. Individuals can save up to $100,000 without counting against their Supplemental Security Income (SSI) eligibility.

Transition from youth to adulthood

Websites and Programs

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

ASAN partnered with the Family Network on Disabilities to produce this guide, which prepares transition age youth for adulthood. The first half provides information on preparing for transition and the second half gives in-depth information on post-secondary education, employment, housing and independent living, and healthcare.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

March 22, 2018

This report examines guardianship and makes recommendations for its use. Recommendations are based on disability law and policy, how people with disabilities are treated in the legal system, alternatives to guardianship, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

March 13, 2019

This report describes the demographics, disability, education, and health characteristics of teens and young adults ages 12-23 on the autism spectrum.

More Reports

Research Articles

More Research Articles

Videos

March 23, 2020

This webinar provided information about supports and resources to improve access to competitive, integrated employment for youth and young adults on the autism spectrum and enhance their career pathways.

 

 

Employment

National data has shown that many autistic adults are unemployed or underemployed, even when compared to people with other disabilities and in spite of having needed skills and abilities for the workplace. Researchers and policy makers have worked to develop programs that can increase opportunities for employment and improve employment outcomes. This includes job training and recruitment programs, as well as supports for employees and employers to increase retention and success in the workplace. This page provides information related to employment for people with autism and other disabilities.

Websites and Programs

This program helps public and private sectors recruit, hire, train, and retain job seekers with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

This plain language toolkit explains the existing policies that help people with disabilities people find and keep good jobs, and solve employment problems.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

October 9, 2018

Of the 74 state vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies that responded to GAO’s survey, most reported expanding services to help students with disabilities transition from school to work as required under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), enacted in July 2014. Most state agencies reported serving more students and providing work-based learning experiences and other activities.

May 12, 2020

Researchers analyzed Rehabilitation Services Administration data to determine the association of vocational rehabilitation services with employment outcomes for students ages 16-21. Students with autism were less likely to receive job-related services less than comparison groups.

More Reports

Research Articles

More Research Articles

Videos

March 23, 2020

In this webinar, Scott Michael Robertson Ph.D. provides information about government supports and resources that help youth and young adults with autism access competitive, integrated employment and enhance their careers. Full Transition Aged Youth Webinar Series.

Housing

Housing plays an important role in ensuring the well being of people on the autism spectrum and helping them integrate into the community. Some people can live independently with minimal or no supports, while others require high levels of support. There is a variety of federal and private resources that can enable people to live in settings that best fit their needs. This page provides information about models of housing for people with disabilities and resources and programs related to disability housing.

Websites and Programs

  • Medicaid.Gov
    • Home & Community Based Services This page provides information on Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) regulations. The page includes a training series for stakeholders, transition plans for individual states, technical assistance, and more. The Final Regulation page provides an overview of rules and regulations states must follow when providing HCBS under Medicaid.
  • The Arc
    • Housing Overview This page provides an overview of housing issues that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) encounter as well the Arc’s advocacy efforts. The page also describes key federal housing initiatives that enable people with I/DD to live in the community and links to additional resources.

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

This handbook is designed to help people with disabilities find and use resources that promote independent living. It includes information on support services and waivers, housing, employment, and community resources. This handbook was created in partnership with Autism NOW Center.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

May 24, 2019

This report that examines occurrences of institutionalization of people with disabilities, as well as thwarted threats of institutionalization, during hurricanes and the California wildfires in 2017 and 2018. The NCD found that people with disabilities are frequently institutionalized during and after disasters due to conflicting federal guidance; a lack of equal access to emergency and disaster-related programs and services; and a lack of compliance with federal law.

June 2018

The Residential Information Systems Project (RISP) studies trends in residential service settings, funding, and expenditures for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the United States. The most recent report uses data through Fiscal Year 2016.

More Reports

Research Articles

More Research Articles

Videos

July 23, 2019

This workshop focused on the housing needs of people on the autism spectrum and included examples of various housing models. Meeting details.

July 26, 2017

JaLynn Prince, Adrienne McBride, and Desiree Kameka present Madison House Autism Foundation’s Autism After 21 initiative. Madison House aims to raise awareness of the abilities of and issues facing adults with autism. They also promote housing options for adults with autism and other I/DD through the Autism Housing Network. Meeting details.

 

For Service Providers and Public Services

Unlocking Potential: Innovative Library Programs Enhancing the Lives of Autistic Individuals

http://librarysciencedegreesonline.org/libraries-and-autism/

 

Making Entertainment and Public Spaces More Autistim-Friendly

https://happiful.com/making-entertainment-and-public-spaces-more-autistic-friendly

 

 

ARCH National Respite Network – National Respite Locator Service
Apr 24 all-day

 

National Respite Locator Service

ARCH does not provide respite care, but we may be able to help you find it in your local community through your State Respite Coalition or Lifespan Respite Program or through resources listed below, including State Provider Registries or the Eldercare Locator.

If you cannot find respite through the resources listed above, we also maintain the National Respite Locator Service (NRLS), which helps parents, family caregivers, and professionals find respite services in their state and local area to match their specific needs. The NRLS lists primarily home care agencies, assisted living, or state or community-based agencies that provide respite care. If you find that a listing is out of date or no longer providing respite care, please contact ARCH.

If you have a respite program or service you would like to list on the NRLS, please visit the respite provider portal.

State Respite Coalition or Lifespan Respite Program

If your state has a State Respite Coalition or Lifespan Respite Care Program, be sure to contact them first for information about respite providers or ways to pay for respite.

CONTACT Information

Search for Respite on the National Respite Locator

CA/OSA – Cocaine Anonymous Online Service Area – Online 12 Step Meeting – DAILY REPRIEVE – 7 Days A Week @ Online Via ZOOM
Apr 24 @ 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

DAILY REPRIEVE

Join Via ZOOM

ID: 852 6648 1221

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85266481221

 

MEETING/GROUP TYPES:

OPEN: Attended by C.A. members, their families, friends and other interested people.
CLOSED: Attendance is limited to C.A. members only.

Cocaine Anonymous Around the World Clock

Pacific Standard Time (PDT) Eastern Standard Time (EDT) Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) British Standard Time (BST) Central European Summer Time (CEST)
July 26, 2023 9:08:36 AM July 26, 2023 12:08:36 PM July 26, 2023 4:08:36 PM July 26, 2023 5:08:36 PM July 26, 2023 6:08:36 PM
Sweden, Stockholm South Africa, Johannesburg Thailand, Bangkok Asia, Hong Kong Australia, Melbourne
6:08:36 PM 6:08:36 PM 11:08:36 PM 12:08:36 AM 2:08:36 AM

Please check the time above for the time zone you are in.  U.S. Daylight Savings and U.K. Daylight Savings happen about two weeks apart. U.K. falls back at 2am Sunday October 25th/U.S. falls back at 2am Sunday November 1st. The schedule can vary and be 1 hour different during that period.

Online Service Area

Cocaine Anonymous is a Fellowship of, by, and for addicts seeking recovery. Friends and Family of addicts should contact Co-Anon Family Groups, a Fellowship dedicated to their much different needs. Some items contained in these pages are published with permission of C.A. World Services, Inc., but this does not imply endorsement of this website by the C.A. World Service Conference or the C.A. World Service Office. The information provided within this website is intended to be a convenience for those who visit our website. Such inclusion does not constitute or imply endorsement by, or affiliation with, the Area or the Districts within. “Cocaine Anonymous World Service Conference Approved Literature. Copyright © 2022 Cocaine Anonymous World Services, Inc. “C.A.”, “Cocaine Anonymous” and the C.A. logo are registered trademarks of Cocaine Anonymous World Services, Inc. All rights reserved.” “In the spirit of Tradition Six, C.A. is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization, or institution. As such, in the Area, District, Service Committees of Cocaine Anonymous and Cocaine Anonymous as a whole does not endorse and is not affiliated with or any of the companies and/or services offered on the site. Any links to external websites or services are only provided as a convenience to our members.”

webmaster@ca-online.org

NAR – Never Alone Recovery – Online Support Group – Wednesdays @ Online Via ZOOM
Apr 24 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
NAR - Never Alone Recovery - Online Support Group - Wednesdays @ Online Via ZOOM

NEVER ALONE RECOVERY

Online Support Group Via ZOOM

Wednesdays, 5:00PM to 6:00PM PST

What to Expect: Our meetings are a place for community members and their loved ones, as well as any other individuals, to seek information and support.

Who is Our Support Group For?

Addicts:

Individuals who suffer from addiction benefit from having a community of understanding cohorts and allies in recovery.

Spouses:

Our support groups are a great resource for addicts’ spouses to gain a better understanding and receive emotional support.

Parents:

Many of our support group attendees are parents of individuals who are either actively experiencing addiction or are at varying points in recovery.

Extended Family:

Anyone who has a loved one suffering from addiction will find invaluable support and deep understanding in those attending our meetings.

Friends:

If your friend is showing signs of addiction, our support groups are a great resource to better understand addiction and recovery.

Allies:

Know someone who’s struggling and you want to lend support? Our attendees can often provide poignant feedback and encouragement.

How to Join Our Online Support Group Meetings

Our meetings are hosted on Zoom. Here’s how to attend a meeting:

To enter the lobby, copy and paste the following URL into your web browser.

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/777316787?pwd=LzBDSzdSbXB2bnRmUEl5alRpNE03UT09

Meeting ID: 777 316 787

Password: 5397

Meeting ID and password will remain the same for every meeting

DBSA – Depression Bipolar Support Alliance – DBSA California Support Groups – Sundays, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays @ Online Via ZOOM
Apr 24 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
DBSA - Depression Bipolar Support Alliance - DBSA California Support Groups - Sundays, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays @ Online Via ZOOM

 

 

 

 

 

DBSA California Support Groups

Sundays, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays 5:30-7:30PM PST

DBSA-California Support Groups are offered for free and provide a safe, confidential space where people from all walks of life connect with peers to share their stories, experiences, and lives in a way that helps redce isolation and loneliness.
The groups are held online every Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday
When we’re struggling or in a crisis, we often feel that we’re alone. Support groups can connect us with peers who understand us, have similar lived experiences, and can help us get through. Our support groups are led by peers we highly train as facilitators, so they have an intimate comprehension of the challenges firsthand and serve as a beacon of hope to others.
Who Should Join Groups?
Battling mental health alone is difficult for most individuals who suffer from Depression and Bipolar. It can seem impossible to cope, heal, or think about recovery. We understand the struggle, we’ve been there, we can help! By attending weekly discussion groups, you will be empowered with education, resources, emotional support, and guidance to set you up on the path to recovery. There is no shame in admitting that sometimes we need help, it’s tough enough carrying the weight of the world on your shoulders, let DBSA CA Support Groups lighten the load for you.
Topics of Discussion
Self-esteem/self-talk (positive/negative)
Planning for the future
Obligations (financial/relationships-family/work)
Medications
Initial steps (after an episode)
Hospitalization (in-patient/outpatient)
Insurance (medical/disability)
Sleep patterns
Triggers
Dual diagnosis & Addiction (drugs & alcohol)
Finding a doctor/therapist
Self-discipline, daily maintenance/routine
Proper self-care, motivation/lack of motivation
Spending money
Exercise/fitness (physical activity)
Setting goals and meeting deadlines
Setting boundaries
Weight loss/gain/appetite
Test of faith (spiritual life)
Self Education
Socializing
REGISTER AND GET A LINK TO OUR ZOOM MEETINGS
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/607974938407

 

 

 

 

 

 

Apr
25
Thu
2024
00 – Hotline – Boys Town National Hot Line – A 24/7 crisis, resource and referral number for kids and parents – 1-800-448-3000 – Text VOICE to 20121 @ Phone
Apr 25 all-day

 

 

 

 

 

Increasing Outreach to Teens

Teens are more connected than ever ​before and the Boys Town National Hotline® at 800-448-3000 is right there with them.

In addition to calling, teens can now text VOICE to 20121 or email hotline@boystown.org any day, any time to speak with a trained counselor.

Online resources are also available at yourlifeyourvoice.org.

 

04 – Resources – APH – American Printing House for the Blind – VisionAware – Visual Impairment Information Service
Apr 25 all-day

 

 

 

 

VisionAware

Are you or a family member having difficulty seeing? Or perhaps been diagnosed with an eye condition such as macular degeneration, cataracts, glaucoma, or diabetic retinopathy? If the answer is yes, you’re not alone: vision problems affect 25 million Americans, and they are on the rise.

VisionAware is a free, easy-to-use informational service for adults who are blind or have low vision, their families, caregivers, healthcare providers, and social service professionals. Visitors will find tips and resources on living with blindness or low vision; information on eye diseases and disorders; and a searchable, free Directory of Services.

man getting an eye exam

Eye Conditions

Some changes in vision are normal as we grow older. This section of our website can help you understand these vision changes, alert you to abnormal changes in vision, and […]

READ MORE

Man sitting on park bench with white cane holding his phone

Recreation and Leisure

From crafts, woodworking, traveling, and reading to sports and exercise, this section is full of information on the variety of activities people who are blind or low vision can engage […]

READ MORE

Person using a refreshable braille display.

Products and Technology

Discover low and high-tech solutions enabling independence at home and work, connection with friends and family, and enjoyment of hobbies and leisure activities.

READ MORE

Professionals in scrubs talking

Professionals

Find resources and techniques you can use to serve people who are blind or low vision effectively and safely, and learn key information about the impact of aging and vision […]

READ MORE

Older man wearing eyeglasses surrounded by family of various ages

Families and Friends

Do you know someone (parent or family member, neighbor, or friend) having trouble seeing? You may be wondering about blindness/ low vision and how to talk with them about it. […]

READ MORE

Woman sitting in kitchen reading braille.

Living with Blindness or Low Vision

If you are new to blindness or low vision, take the journey one day and one step at a time. Utilize our tips for adjusting to vision changes, living independently, […]

Read More

04 – Resources – Autism Resources, Articles, Support
Apr 25 all-day
04 - Resources - Autism Resources, Articles, Support

 

 

 

 

What is Autism?

What you should know

Autism is a severe developmental disorder that affects the way a child sees and interacts with the rest of the world. It limits their ability to interact with others socially, in fact many autism suffers avoid human contact.

Autism is part of a larger group of disorders called pervasive developmental disorders (PDD). More information about autism: Click on each of these links