PeerGalaxy Original Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring over 187,600+ monthly offerings of FREE telephone- and online-accessible peer support, recovery support, and wellness activities!  Plus 50+ warmlines, helplines, chatlines, and hotlines.  Plus workshops, webinars, job postings, resources, observances, special events, consumer input opportunities and more.

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

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If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

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Calendar Event Sorting

At the top, the 24/7/365 SAMHSA Disaster Helpline and similar links.

Next, Bundled “All Day” Events

Some organizations (like 12 step recovery programs, AA, NA, AlAnon, etc.) have so many events happening throughout the day that they need to be in a bundled listing to spare endless scrolling.  Often there is a link to look up events by zip code and other criteria.

Lastly, Time-Specific Events

So you can see what’s happening in the next hours, time specific events are tagged and listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  There can be events and warmlines operating in different time zones, though we try to list all in Oregon’s Pacific Time Zone.

Page Advancement

The calendar displays ~50 listings per page.  To advance to next page with ~50 more listings, click the right arrow in the lower left corner of the calendar


Screenshot image of the page advancing arrows at the bottom of the calendar, lower left corner.
May
23
Thu
2024
00 – Hotline – DWIHN – Detroit Wayne Integrated Health Network – Mental Heath Crisis Help – 1-800-241-4949 – 24/7
May 23 all-day

Mental Health Crisis Help

The Detroit Wayne Integrated Health Network is Here to Talk. Here to Help. Our trained clinicians are standing by 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to help you.

Crisis Helpline

Helpline:(800) 241-4949 (24/7)
TTY:(800) 630-1044 (24/7)
DWIHN:(313) 833-2500 (8:00 am – 4:30 pm M-F)

DWIHN Customer Service

Monday-Friday 8:00 am – 4:30 pm
Toll-Free: 888-490-9698 or 313-833-3232
TDD/TTY: 800-630-1044
Fax: 313-833-2217 or 313-833-4280

Recipient Rights Office

Toll-Free: 888-339-5595
TDD/TTY: 888-339-5588

00 – Hotline – NCMEC – National Center for Missing & Exploited Children – 24 Hour Hotline – 1-800-843-5678 @ phone
May 23 all-day
00 - Hotline - NCMEC - National Center for Missing & Exploited Children - 24 Hour Hotline  - 1-800-843-5678 @ phone

 

24-Hour Call Center 1-800-843-5678

Act immediately if you believe your child is missing.

Download this checklist of actions to be taken by families in the initial stages of a missing child case.

If you have any questions call the NCMEC at 1-800-THE-LOST® (1-800-843-5678). If you are not located in the United States, call your country’s hotline.

NCMEC is the nation’s largest and most influential child protection organization.

We lead the fight to protect children, creating vital resources for them and the people who keep them safe.

HOW NCMEC can help

When you call NCMEC, a Call Center specialist will record information about your child. A NCMEC case management team will next work directly with your family and the law enforcement agency investigating your case. They will offer technical assistance tailored to your case to help ensure all available search and recovery methods are used. As appropriate NCMEC case management teams:

  • Rapidly create and disseminate posters to help generate leads.
  • Rapidly review, analyze and disseminate leads received on 1-800-THE-LOST® (1-800-843-5678) to the investigating law enforcement agency.
  • Communicate with federal agencies to provide services to assist in the location and recovery of missing children.
  • Provide peer support, resources and empowerment from trained volunteers who have experienced a missing child incident in their own family.
  • Provide families with access to referrals they may use to help process any emotional or counseling needs.
00 – Hotline – NHTH – National Human Trafficking Hotline – 1-888-373-7888 – Confidential – 24/7 @ phone
May 23 all-day
01 – Helpline – Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline – 1-800-422-4453 – Confidential – 24/7 @ text/chat
May 23 all-day
01 – Helpline – PHP – Parents Helping Parents – Parent Stress Line – 1-800-632-8188 – 24/7 – Weekdays & Weekends @ phone
May 23 all-day

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parent Stress Line

1-800 – 632 – 8188

Call our Parent Stress Line any time and any day of the week

if you need to vent about the stress from taking care of a child or children. 18006328188

 

 

02 – Urgent Info – Services and Resources for Families and Children in Response to the Recent Tragic Events Across the Country
May 23 all-day

 

Some Resources for Families and Communities:

Due to recent tragic events across the country

 

Agency Logo

Racial Stress and Self-care:

Parent Tip Tool

How race-related stress affects you and your relationship with your child

What effect does racism have on your health and well-being?

Not only does racism impact you as a parent, it can also impact how you interact with your children. Experiences of racism build on each other and can chip away at your emotional, physical and spiritual resources as a parent, contributing to race-related stress. Race-related stress can make it hard to have the space needed to take care of yourself as a parent, which reduces the emotional space you need to adequately take care of your children.

Racism can impact parents emotionally, physically and spiritually

Physical effects

Physical Effects

Physical Effects can include increased hypertension, illness and risky behaviors such as substance use.

Emotional effects

Emotional Effects

Emotional effects can include depression, anxiety, anger, irritability and aggression.

Spiritual effects

Spiritual Effects

Spiritual effects can include a decreased sense of purpose, lack of connection with the larger community, isolation from larger social groups and reduced involvement in communal activities that you enjoy.

Potential reactions to racial stress or trauma

Insecure feelings

Insecure Feelings

Feelings of shame and lack of confidence due to feeling that a situation cannot be changed.

Lack of trust

Lack of Trust

Feeling detached or a lack of trust for others due to experiencing multiple losses or letdowns. This can make it very difficult to seek out help and to identify potential safe sources of support.

Triggers

Triggers

Reminders of the event, such as particular people or situations, can also trigger strong emotional or physical responses (e.g., crying or rapid heartbeat).

Emotions

Difficulty Controlling Emotions

Difficulty controlling emotional responses (going from “zero to one hundred”) can occur as the body helps you adapt to potentially unsafe situations, making you feel constantly on “alert.”

The body’s response to the experience of racism can make accessing resources to cope with the situation difficult. Race-related stress is unique in that it threatens psychological resources that are needed to cope and fulfill basic needs such as financial support, housing, access to jobs, etc.

When your body is in stress mode, it is geared up to help you and your child survive, which sometimes leads to impulsive decisions. If you live in a chronic state of stress related to racism, you can start to engage in survival coping. Survival coping can help you to deal with very hard or potentially life-threatening situations. However, if you continue to exist in this mode long-term, it can make it difficult to enjoy being in the moment with your child and can reduce your ability to feel safe and in control.

What impact can racial stress have on your parenting?

Experiencing race-related stress can also impact the quality of parenting relationships in the following ways:

Impostor syndrome

When you are exposed to racism repeatedly, you often start doubting yourself and can feel like you are an imposter in dominant culture settings or in settings where you feel as though you do not belong. Your inner thoughts might sound something like: “Am I being judged?” “Am I worthy?” “I got lucky.” “I only got this because I am Black.”

Being overly alert (hypervigilance)

Experiencing racial stress can make you more aware of potential dangers and negative experiences that can occur. This, in turn, can make the experience of parenting even more stressful. When you interact with your children, you can sometimes be reminded of negative race-related experiences that you had when you were a child. This reminder can amp up emotional responses, or hyperarousal, making it hard for you to “keep your cool” and be open to flexible problem solving.

“Helicopter parenting” (monitoring in fear)

These experiences of racism and unwarranted blame or lack of acceptance can make you want to protect your children so much, that you don’t allow them to explore in the way that they need to. You may shelter them from failures, which everyone needs to experience in order to learn how to manage everyday life. You may tend to be overly cautious or suspicious. Examples can include not allowing your children to have sleepovers or go to the park, even with your supervision.

Difficulty regulating emotions

  • When your past influences your emotional state, it can affect your emotional responses to both big and minor stressors with children, such as when they misbehave. This, in turn, can lead to being overprotective or overuse of physical discipline, as a means of survival.
  • For children, having parents who can keep perspective (stay cool) when children are upset, or misbehaving is very important. Likewise, it is important to stay calm when disciplining a child, otherwise discipline may go overboard. Both of these things can be hard if you are having difficulty controlling your emotions.

Avoidance

  • Avoiding situations that are related to racism can be a needed strategy to survive; such as instances that may involve violence or threat to yourself or your family. Sometimes you may avoid reminders of past experiences due to the pain or discomfort they cause.
  • If you find yourself avoiding strong feelings or situations with your child that bring up painful memories, it may make it hard to show affection and support for your child. It may even make it difficult to know how to provide emotional support for your child during times of stress. For instance, if your child brings up their own experience of oppression or an event in their life reminds you of something from your own childhood.

Mistrusting others

  • Racism can lead to distrust or mistrust of other communities. Internalized racism is when you begin to accept negative messages about your own abilities and inherent worth by the dominant group in society.
  • When you use society’s norms to judge yourself, you can feel depressed, unworthy and just not good enough. You are taught in many ways to take these feelings and paint them onto another group.
  • Intra and interracial violence, contention among disenfranchised communities or color, and the way the media conveys information about people of color, contribute to this.
  • This kind of coping can make you more vulnerable to racism, because on some level you may believe in racial hierarchy and difference when you belittle other groups. And when you show your children that it is right to discriminate against certain other groups, you make them more vulnerable to discrimination that they face.

Minimizing racism

  • Racism is overwhelming, as is the history of violence. You are sometimes taught that accepting this and minimizing racism is the only thing you can do. But when you ignore racism, and accept powerlessness, you encourage your kids to internalize racism. This can lead to increased levels of depression, anxiety and externalizing behaviors (e.g., engaging in risky behaviors, such as alcohol or substance use).
  • When you believe that you should be able to handle and manage it all without a break or without asking for help, you are at increased risk for health problems and can miss important cues about your well-being and safety.

Self-blame

Experiencing chronically unfair and dangerous discriminatory practices due to race can lead to feelings of low worth. For parents, this can also lead to a questioning of your parenting choices and abilities.

Unbalanced Racial and Ethnic Socialization (RES)

Unbalanced messaging or communication about race and ethnicity occurs when you only promote messages of mistrust, preparation for bias, or only give racial pride messages to your children.

So, what can you do to mitigate racial stress?

As parents, it is important to develop positive identities and share your cultural identities with your children. Positive cultural identity and advocacy are protective factors against racism, which can help to reduce and prevent racial stress.

There are many other ways to cope with stress and everyone has different preferences. Reducing stress can also allow you to model healthy coping strategies for your child. Here are some suggestions with links you can try.

Agency Logo
Talking with Children About Tragic Events

What do we tell our children? How do we reassure them of their own safety?

At The Dougy Center in Portland, Oregon, we’ve provided grief support groups for children, teens, young adults and their parents or adult caregivers since 1982.

Based on our experience, here are some things for adults to keep in mind as you struggle with how to talk with children following tragic events, such as natural disasters, plane crashes, or school shootings.

1. Don’t project your fears onto your children. They take their cues from the adults around them.
You can’t hear the news about children being murdered or communities devastated by natural disasters without thinking about how you’d feel if it happened to your family, friends, or hometown. The outpouring of care and empathy for the families who lost loved ones will be powerful, and…we all know it could have been our friends, our child, our family and community members who died or were injured.

Identifying with the senselessness and randomness makes us all feel more vulnerable. But we should remember that children don’t always see things the same way that adults do, and it won’t be helpful to them for us to fall apart. They need to see that we care, that we feel terrible about this tragedy, and that we will do everything we can to keep them safe. They will take their cues from our behavior.

It’s okay to show emotion. We can model for children that feeling sad, scared, and upset is normal after tragedies. But we don’t want to overwhelm them with our emotions, or put them in the position of having to ‘parent,’ or take care of, the adults around them. Make sure you also model taking care of yourself, by sharing with trusted and supportive adult friends, eating (and drinking) healthfully.

2. Try to limit their access to the recurring news and exposure to the tragedy over and over.
Over-exposure to the graphic and emotional news can be overwhelming for children and can cause unnecessary anxiety and fear. Some children who repeatedly watched the footage of planes crashing into the towers on 9/11 thought it was happening again and again. Some children (and some adults) may have difficulty getting graphic scenes and images out of their minds. Too much exposure can fuel their fear, so don’t let them sit and watch the news over and over. Better yet, set the example of not doing so yourself as well.

3. Understand that you can’t completely shield them from what happened.
It would be next to impossible to hide these events from children, as much as we wish we could. You might be able to shield your own child in your home, for example, by not turning on (or owning) a television, but you can’t protect your children from hearing about it from other kids. The fact is, they will hear about it, so although they don’t “need” to know about it, pretending we can shield them is magical thinking.

That said, you don’t need to give them more information than they can handle, or more than they’re asking for. A simple, “Did they talk about what happened in _____ today at school?” would be a good starter. They need to know that you’re not trying to hide the truth from them, that you’re open to talking about it, but that you’re also not forcing them to do so.

4. Model truth-telling and build trust with your children by letting them hear things, even hard things, from you directly.
Eight days after the 9/11 attacks, I was meeting in small groups with pre-school workers in New York City, talking about how to respond to the young children in their care about the events. A man asked to speak to me privately after one of the trainings, and asked for my advice around his 7-year-old daughter. For the last week, since September 12th, she had been having stomach aches and difficulty sleeping. He said it was not tied to the events of 9/11 because, “We don’t have a television.” As his story unfolded it was evident that he did not want to have to explain to his child why people would do such horrible things, a normal dilemma that we face as parents and adults. This child was experiencing physical reactions, as it turned out, not primarily because of her reaction to the events of 9/11, but because she was unable to share her fears and concerns and questions in her own home, faced with her parents’ denial.

Here are some principles to keep in mind as you talk with children:

1. There is no one typical reaction one can or should expect from children.
Their responses will vary all over the ‘emotional’ map, from seeming disinterest to nightmares, eating issues, and anxiety. How any specific child will respond will depend on their age, previous experience with death and loss, and their personality style. Fearful children will tend to worry; quiet children may keep their feelings to themselves; those who want to appear unfazed may exhibit a sense of bravado or lack of caring. Of course, children directly affected – those who had a family member die; those who witnessed the tragedy; those who had friends die – will tend to have longer-term reactions and needs. Watch for changes in behavior, or concerning trends. While it would be normal to have heightened anxiety and sleeplessness, any concerning behavior or troubling symptoms should be taken seriously, and if warranted, professional help sought.

2. Many children will have an increased sense of fear about their safety.
Understandably. So will many adults. After a shooting at an Oregon mall in December 2012, the news outlets were filled with people who said they’d never take their children there again. Others said they’d return as soon as it opened in order to support the stores and employees who had experienced the traumatic events, and whose livelihoods were going to suffer as a result of the several day closure. Some runners in the Boston Marathon vowed to return; others said they would never do so again.

While we can’t guarantee to our children that nothing bad will ever happen to them, we can provide assurance that these events are relatively rare, and that we will do everything we can to keep them safe. Children may have many questions about the events, particularly about natural disasters. Answer their questions with language that fits their developmental stage. It’s okay if you don’t know the answer to a question. If it’s a question that might have an answer, offer to look up more information. You can also ask children what they think the answer is as they often have thoughts and ideas they want to share with you. In the case of natural disasters, if your child is fearful of something like that happening in your community, talk with them about the safety plan that you have in place for your family and home. You can also look into what community safety measures are in place and whatever elements are relevant with your children. Many children will be reassured knowing that there are specific, tangible things they and your family can do if something occurs. Some examples include, picking a meeting place, keeping flashlights in every bedroom, talking about where you will keep emergency water and food.

3. Children want, need, and deserve the truth.
In over 30 years of providing grief support to thousands of children and teens at The Dougy Center for Grieving Children & Families, we have never heard a child say, “I’m glad I was lied to.” Many, however, struggle with anger and lack of trust toward parents or other adults who lied to them. When we don’t tell the truth, they learn that we cannot be trusted. As difficult as it can be at times, and as horrendous as the truth may be, children want, need, and deserve the truth. Being able to talk openly and honestly with your children about tragic events and other losses, creates a foundation of trust, enabling them to come to you in the future with their questions, fears, and concerns.

 

 

Daniel Tiger

Helping Children with Tragic Events in the News

In times of community or world-wide crisis, it’s easy to assume that young children don’t know what’s going on. But one thing’s for sure — children are very sensitive to how their parents feel. They’re keenly aware of the expressions on their parents’ faces and the tone of their voices. Children can sense when their parents are really worried, whether they’re watching the news or talking about it with others. No matter what children know about a “crisis,” it’s especially scary for children to realize that their parents are scared.

Some Scary, Confusing Images

The way that news is presented on television can be quite confusing for a young child. The same video segment may be shown over and over again through the day, as if each showing was a different event. Someone who has died turns up alive and then dies again and again. Children often become very anxious since they don’t understand much about videotape replays, closeups, and camera angles. Any televised danger seems close to home to them because the tragic scenes are taking place on the TV set in their own living room. Children can’t tell the difference between what’s close and what’s far away, what’s real and what’s pretend, or what’s new and what’s re-run.

The younger the children are, the more likely they are to be interested in scenes of close-up faces, particularly if the people are expressing some strong feelings. When there’s tragic news, the images on TV are most often much too graphic and disturbing for young children.

“Who will take care of me?”

In times of crisis, children want to know, “Who will take care of me?” They’re dependent on adults for their survival and security. They’re naturally self-centered. They need to hear very clearly that their parents are doing all they can to take care of them and to keep them safe. They also need to hear that people in the government and other grown-ups they don’t even know are working hard to keep them safe, too.

Helping Children Feel More Secure

Play is one of the important ways young children have of dealing with their concerns. Of course, playing about violent news can be scary and sometimes unsafe, so adults need to be nearby to help redirect that kind of play into nurturing themes, such as a hospital for the wounded or a pretend meal for emergency workers.

When children are scared and anxious, they might become more dependent, clingy, and afraid to go to bed at night. Whining, aggressive behavior, or toilet “accidents” may be their way of asking for more comfort from the important adults in their lives. Little by little, as the adults around them become more confident, hopeful and secure, our children probably will, too.

Turn Off the TV

When there’s something tragic in the news, many parents get concerned about what and how to tell their children. It’s even harder than usual if we’re struggling with our own powerful feelings about what has happened. Adults are sometimes surprised that their own reactions to a televised crisis are so strong, but great loss and devastation in the news often reawaken our own earlier losses and fears – even some we think we might have “forgotten”

It’s easy to allow ourselves to get drawn into watching televised news of a crisis for hours and hours; however, exposing ourselves to so many tragedies can make us feel hopeless, insecure, and even depressed. We help our children and ourselves if we’re able to limit our own television viewing. Our children need us to spend time with them – away from the frightening images on the screen.

Talking and Listening

Even if we wanted to, it would be impossible to give our children all the reasons for such things as war, terrorists, abuse, murders, major fires, hurricanes, and earthquakes. If they ask questions, our best answer may be to ask them, “What do you think happened?” If the answer is “I don’t know,” then the simplest reply might be something like, “I’m sad about the news, and I’m worried. But I love you, and I’m here to care for you.”

If we don’t let children know it’s okay to feel sad and scared, they may think something is wrong with them when they do feel that way. They certainly don’t need to hear all the details of what’s making us sad or scared, but if we can help them accept their own feelings as natural and normal, their feelings will be much more manageable for them.

Angry feelings are part of being human, especially when we feel powerless. One of the most important messages we can give our children is, “It’s okay to be angry, but it’s not okay to hurt ourselves or others.” Besides giving children the right to their anger, we can help them find constructive things to do with their feelings. This way, we’ll be giving them useful tools that will serve them all their life, and help them to become the worlds’ future peacemakers — the world’s future “helpers.”

Helpful Hints

  • Do your best to keep the television off, or at least limit how much your child sees of any news event.
  • Try to keep yourself calm. Your presence can help your child feel more secure.
  • Give your child extra comfort and physical affection, like hugs or snuggling up together with a favorite book. Physical comfort goes a long way towards providing inner security. That closeness can nourish you, too.
  • Try to keep regular routines as normal as possible. Children and adults count on their familiar pattern of everyday life.
  • Plan something that you and your child enjoy doing together, like taking a walk, going on a picnic, having some quiet time, or doing something silly. It can help to know there are simple things in life that can help us feel better, in good times and in bad.
  • Even if children don’t mention what they’ve seen or heard in the news, it can help to ask what they think has happened. If parents don’t bring up the subject, children can be left with their misinterpretations. You may be really surprised at how much your child has heard from others.
  • Focus attention on the helpers, like the police, firemen, doctors, nurses, paramedics, and volunteers. It’s reassuring to know there are many caring people who are doing all they can to help others in this world.
  • Let your child know if you’re making a donation, going to a town meeting, writing a letter or e-mail of support, or taking some other action. It can help children to know that adults take many different active roles and that we don’t give in to helplessness in times of worldwide crisis.

 

04 – Resources – AKIDSCO – A Kids Book About School Shootings – Free
May 23 all-day

A Kids Book About School Shootings

Crystal Woodman Miller

Many of us are going to need to find the words to talk to the kids in our lives about tragic events like the school shooting in Uvalde, Texas. Here’s a free resource from A Kids Company About to help you do that was written by Crystal Woodman-Miller, one of the survivors of the Columbine school shooting.

I hate that we need tools like this. I can’t wait for us to have to write the book “A Kids Book About Why It’s So Hard To Buy A Gun”

Link: www.akidsco.com

There aren’t enough words to explain all the thoughts, emotions, and heartbreak that comes with yesterday’s tragedy in Uvalde. We hope this book helps everyone start somewhere.

We’re making #AKidsBookAboutSchoolShootings free for kids, grownups, and educators everywhere, so that this conversation can get started when it matters most.

FREE DOWNLOAD

A Kids Book About School Shootings by Crystal Woodman Miller:

Link: akidsco.com

 

04 – Resources – APH – American Printing House for the Blind – VisionAware – Visual Impairment Information Service
May 23 all-day

 

 

 

 

VisionAware

Are you or a family member having difficulty seeing? Or perhaps been diagnosed with an eye condition such as macular degeneration, cataracts, glaucoma, or diabetic retinopathy? If the answer is yes, you’re not alone: vision problems affect 25 million Americans, and they are on the rise.

VisionAware is a free, easy-to-use informational service for adults who are blind or have low vision, their families, caregivers, healthcare providers, and social service professionals. Visitors will find tips and resources on living with blindness or low vision; information on eye diseases and disorders; and a searchable, free Directory of Services.

man getting an eye exam

Eye Conditions

Some changes in vision are normal as we grow older. This section of our website can help you understand these vision changes, alert you to abnormal changes in vision, and […]

READ MORE

Man sitting on park bench with white cane holding his phone

Recreation and Leisure

From crafts, woodworking, traveling, and reading to sports and exercise, this section is full of information on the variety of activities people who are blind or low vision can engage […]

READ MORE

Person using a refreshable braille display.

Products and Technology

Discover low and high-tech solutions enabling independence at home and work, connection with friends and family, and enjoyment of hobbies and leisure activities.

READ MORE

Professionals in scrubs talking

Professionals

Find resources and techniques you can use to serve people who are blind or low vision effectively and safely, and learn key information about the impact of aging and vision […]

READ MORE

Older man wearing eyeglasses surrounded by family of various ages

Families and Friends

Do you know someone (parent or family member, neighbor, or friend) having trouble seeing? You may be wondering about blindness/ low vision and how to talk with them about it. […]

READ MORE

Woman sitting in kitchen reading braille.

Living with Blindness or Low Vision

If you are new to blindness or low vision, take the journey one day and one step at a time. Utilize our tips for adjusting to vision changes, living independently, […]

Read More

04 – Resources – Autism Resources, Articles, Support
May 23 all-day
04 - Resources - Autism Resources, Articles, Support

 

 

 

 

What is Autism?

What you should know

Autism is a severe developmental disorder that affects the way a child sees and interacts with the rest of the world. It limits their ability to interact with others socially, in fact many autism suffers avoid human contact.

Autism is part of a larger group of disorders called pervasive developmental disorders (PDD). More information about autism: Click on each of these links

 

Autism-Definition

Autism is a developmental disability that comes from a neurological disorder that affects the normal functioning of the brain. It is characterized by the abnormal development of communication skills, social skills, and reasoning. Males are affected four times as often as females. Children may appear normal until around the age of 30 months.

 

Click each of these following titles learn more….

Autism Symptoms

Autism Symptoms vary widely in severity, include impairment in social interaction, fixation on inanimate objects, inability to communicate normally, and resistance to changes in daily routine. Characteristic traits include lack of eye contact, repetition of words or phrases, unmotivated tantrums, inability to express needs verbally, and insensitivity to pain.

Behaviors may change over time. Autistic children often have other disorders of brain function; about two thirds are mentally retarded; over one quarter develop seizures.

What Autism is Not

Autism can be confused with several other disorders which may have similar behaviors. Here is a list of autism like disorders that you should look at.

What Causes Autism

It remains unclear, but a psychological one has been ruled out. Neurological studies seem to indicate a primary brain dysfunction, and a genetic component is suggested by a pattern of autism in some families. It is largely believed that autism is a genetic disorder that involves several genes related to gene function. However it is unclear to researchers what causes these genes to turn on. Learn more about other causes of autism.

Autism Research

There are many exciting developments in autism research going on at the top universities. They are focusing on inherited autism and autism gene research.

Other Autism Spectrum Disorders

Asperger’s Syndrome – A child with asperger’s disorder has the same common problems as children with autism however they don’t have language development problems of a autistic child.

Pervasive Developmental Disorder and not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) – This child has autism but doesn’t meet the criteria for high functioning autism.

High-Functioning Autism – This child has autism but has normal learning and cognitive and learning skills. Language development is difficult initially but they become proficient eventually.

 

FAQ about Autism Special Education and IEP

This is an important list of questions and answers to help you deal with special education issues at your school.

 

Autism Tips for working with Teachers

This is a great check list of items to be aware of when you work with your child’s teacher and your child’s Individual Education Plan.

Tip: Go to our Autism education discussion boards and post a question with other parents.

Early Origins of Autism

 

ADDITIONAL LINKS TO RESOURCES AND EXPERTISE

Ask an Expert on Autism

Health Finder

Talk to Autism Expert

National Institutes of Mental Health

Combined Health Information Database

Abstracts on Autism

 

 

Searchable Directory of Autism Resources

CLICK HERE TO VISIT THE DIRECTORY PAGE 

Or Click on the Topic area directly below

Adult Resources

Attorneys & Advocates

Behavior/Family Training

Community Living

Education

Medical Providers/Diagnosis

Non-English Resources

Respite Care Providers

Safety

Sports & Camps

Therapy Providers

 

Autism NOW Center’s fact sheets on topics of importance to people with autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disabilities are a resource you and your family members, as well as educators, employers, physicians and others, can use to get information in an easy-to-read and understand format.  The fact sheets are available in several languages in PDF form which can be printed out for your convenience. See the full list of topics and language choices below.

English:

Spanish:

Find the resources you need 1-885-828-847

 

Article Links

Follow this page link for listings of over 800 articles and resources

https://autismnow.org/resources/

Interagency Autism Coordination Committee

 

About Autism

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disability that is estimated to affect about 1 in 36 children and approximately 2.21% of adults. Autism affects the way a person experiences the world and can result in significant challenges in social communication and interaction, as well as repetitive behaviors and unusual or intense interests.

People on the autism spectrum often have a strong preference for routines and predictability, and some are challenged in adapting to change. Many people on the autism spectrum experience sensory differences, including high or low sensitivity to sounds, light, textures, tastes, and physical touch. Some have accompanying language and/or intellectual disabilities, and some may be intellectually gifted or possess other unique abilities, talents, or strengths.

ASD can be diagnosed at any age, but differences generally appear in the first two years of life. ASD is known as a “spectrum” condition because it encompasses a wide variation in the type, combination, and severity of disabilities, as a well as a range of unique abilities and strengths, many of which can change over the course of a person’s lifespan. The type and intensity of supports and services that a child or adult on the autism spectrum may require, ranging from minimal to intensive, will vary depending on their unique needs.

With appropriate supports and an environment that promotes inclusion, acceptance, and empowerment, people on the autism spectrum can fully participate in community life and achieve their full potential.

This page includes resources that provide general information about autism.

 

Websites and Programs

The Autistic Self Advocacy Network was created by autistic people and for autistic people. This page provides an overview of typical characteristics of autism.

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

This tool kit provides families of children ages four and under with guidance on how to access services the first 100 days after an autism diagnosis.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

March 2020

This report from provides an overview of 2016 data collected by the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network and Early ADDM. ADDM provides estimates of the prevalence of ASD among 8-year-old children. Early ADDM estimates ASD prevalence and monitors early identification of 4-year-old children. Full findings of the data on 8-year-old and 4-year-old children are available.

March 2020

The CDC released their first estimate of the prevalence of autism in adults based on 2017 data. They estimated that 2.21 percent of adults in the United States have ASD.

More Reports

Videos

April 24, 2019

NIMH Director Joshua Gordon, M.D., Ph.D. interviews Ann Wagner, Ph.D., National Autism Coordinator, and Lisa Gilotty, Ph.D., program chief of NIMH’s chief of NIMH’s Research Program on Autism Spectrum Disorders, to discuss advances on the study of autism in adulthood.

 

Federal Departments and Agencies

This list includes federal departments and agencies that provide funding, programs, and support for issues related to autism and other developmental disabilities.

Independent Agencies

  • National Council on Disability (NCD)
    • Meetings and Events The NCD is an independent federal agency that advises the President, Congress, and other federal agencies on policies, programs, practices, and procedures that affect people with disabilities. Their meetings are open to the public.
    • Resources This page includes information on disability rights and links to resources and services on education, employment, financial assistance and incentives, health care, housing, and more.
  • National Science Foundation (NSF)
    • About NSF The NSF is an independent federal agency that supports fundamental research and education in all non-medical fields of science and engineering.
  • Social Security Administration (SSA)
    • Disability Benefits The Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability programs provide assistance to people with disabilities. This page explains these benefits and the application process.
    • Spotlight on Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Accounts Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (ABLE) allows individuals with disabilities to make tax-free saving accounts to cover qualified disability expenses. Individuals can save up to $100,000 without counting against their Supplemental Security Income (SSI) eligibility.

Transition from youth to adulthood

Websites and Programs

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

ASAN partnered with the Family Network on Disabilities to produce this guide, which prepares transition age youth for adulthood. The first half provides information on preparing for transition and the second half gives in-depth information on post-secondary education, employment, housing and independent living, and healthcare.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

March 22, 2018

This report examines guardianship and makes recommendations for its use. Recommendations are based on disability law and policy, how people with disabilities are treated in the legal system, alternatives to guardianship, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

March 13, 2019

This report describes the demographics, disability, education, and health characteristics of teens and young adults ages 12-23 on the autism spectrum.

More Reports

Research Articles

More Research Articles

Videos

March 23, 2020

This webinar provided information about supports and resources to improve access to competitive, integrated employment for youth and young adults on the autism spectrum and enhance their career pathways.

 

 

Employment

National data has shown that many autistic adults are unemployed or underemployed, even when compared to people with other disabilities and in spite of having needed skills and abilities for the workplace. Researchers and policy makers have worked to develop programs that can increase opportunities for employment and improve employment outcomes. This includes job training and recruitment programs, as well as supports for employees and employers to increase retention and success in the workplace. This page provides information related to employment for people with autism and other disabilities.

Websites and Programs

This program helps public and private sectors recruit, hire, train, and retain job seekers with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

This plain language toolkit explains the existing policies that help people with disabilities people find and keep good jobs, and solve employment problems.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

October 9, 2018

Of the 74 state vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies that responded to GAO’s survey, most reported expanding services to help students with disabilities transition from school to work as required under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), enacted in July 2014. Most state agencies reported serving more students and providing work-based learning experiences and other activities.

May 12, 2020

Researchers analyzed Rehabilitation Services Administration data to determine the association of vocational rehabilitation services with employment outcomes for students ages 16-21. Students with autism were less likely to receive job-related services less than comparison groups.

More Reports

Research Articles

More Research Articles

Videos

March 23, 2020

In this webinar, Scott Michael Robertson Ph.D. provides information about government supports and resources that help youth and young adults with autism access competitive, integrated employment and enhance their careers. Full Transition Aged Youth Webinar Series.

Housing

Housing plays an important role in ensuring the well being of people on the autism spectrum and helping them integrate into the community. Some people can live independently with minimal or no supports, while others require high levels of support. There is a variety of federal and private resources that can enable people to live in settings that best fit their needs. This page provides information about models of housing for people with disabilities and resources and programs related to disability housing.

Websites and Programs

  • Medicaid.Gov
    • Home & Community Based Services This page provides information on Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) regulations. The page includes a training series for stakeholders, transition plans for individual states, technical assistance, and more. The Final Regulation page provides an overview of rules and regulations states must follow when providing HCBS under Medicaid.
  • The Arc
    • Housing Overview This page provides an overview of housing issues that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) encounter as well the Arc’s advocacy efforts. The page also describes key federal housing initiatives that enable people with I/DD to live in the community and links to additional resources.

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

This handbook is designed to help people with disabilities find and use resources that promote independent living. It includes information on support services and waivers, housing, employment, and community resources. This handbook was created in partnership with Autism NOW Center.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

May 24, 2019

This report that examines occurrences of institutionalization of people with disabilities, as well as thwarted threats of institutionalization, during hurricanes and the California wildfires in 2017 and 2018. The NCD found that people with disabilities are frequently institutionalized during and after disasters due to conflicting federal guidance; a lack of equal access to emergency and disaster-related programs and services; and a lack of compliance with federal law.

June 2018

The Residential Information Systems Project (RISP) studies trends in residential service settings, funding, and expenditures for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the United States. The most recent report uses data through Fiscal Year 2016.

More Reports

Research Articles

More Research Articles

Videos

July 23, 2019

This workshop focused on the housing needs of people on the autism spectrum and included examples of various housing models. Meeting details.

July 26, 2017

JaLynn Prince, Adrienne McBride, and Desiree Kameka present Madison House Autism Foundation’s Autism After 21 initiative. Madison House aims to raise awareness of the abilities of and issues facing adults with autism. They also promote housing options for adults with autism and other I/DD through the Autism Housing Network. Meeting details.

 

For Service Providers and Public Services

Unlocking Potential: Innovative Library Programs Enhancing the Lives of Autistic Individuals

http://librarysciencedegreesonline.org/libraries-and-autism/

 

Making Entertainment and Public Spaces More Autistim-Friendly

https://happiful.com/making-entertainment-and-public-spaces-more-autistic-friendly

 

 

04 – Resources – TIO – Trauma Informed Oregon – Resources, Training and Education.
May 23 all-day
04 - Resources - TIO - Trauma Informed Oregon - Resources, Training and Education.

Trauma Informed Oregon – Resources, Training and Education

 

A Guide for Youth: Understanding Trauma

This guide is designed to help youth make a connection between stressful events and the potential lasting impacts. Understanding trauma and having a framework to talk about past experiences can help in processing and asking for help. This understanding supports healing. Source: Brianne Masselli and Johanna Bergan, Youth M.O.V.E. National A Guide for Youth: Understanding Trauma

A Trauma Informed Workforce: An Introduction to Workforce Wellness

This document developed by TIO provides foundational information about workforce wellness. It provides background and definitions to assist partners that are beginning to address workforce wellness in their programs and organizations. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

A Treatment Improvement Protocol: Trauma-Informed Care in Behavioral Health Services

A SAMHSA Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) with best practice guidelines for trauma informed care. TIPs are developed by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Each TIP involves the development of topic-specific best practice guidelines for the prevention A Treatment Improvement Protocol: Trauma-Informed Care in Behavioral Health Services

ACE Score Calculator

Learn about the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) measure and its use, and calculate your ACE and resilience scores. An ACE score is a tally of different types of abuse, neglect, and other hallmarks of a rough childhood. According to the Adverse Childhood Experiences study, the rougher your childhood, the higher your ACE Score Calculator

Addressing Secondary Stress: Strong in the Broken Places

This PowerPoint presentation, with accompanying video, addresses secondary stress and the impact and solutions to vicarious traumatization in the workforce. Source: Wayne Scott, MA, LCSW Download PDF View Video

Agency Components for Trauma Informed Care

This checklist can help assess the physical environment and selected intake and service procedures in an agency setting. Source: Region 3 Behavioral Health Services, Kearney, Nebraska Download PDF

AMH Approved Evidence-Based Practices

This list is an informational tool for providers to select and implement Evidence-Based Practices (EPBs). The list represents EBPs meeting the Addictions and Mental Health Services (AMH) definition and standards for EPBs. Source: Oregon Health Authority View Resources

Applying Trauma Informed Care Principles in Home Visiting

This full-day TIO training covers the definition of trauma and trauma informed care (TIC), the neurobiology of trauma, principles of TIC, and workforce stress. Originally created for home visiting and early childhood professionals some content has been tailored for these fields. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

Attunement and Self-Assessment in Supervision

Resource developed by TIO with strategies for “tuning” in as a supervisor as well as questions you can use to assess how trauma informed the supervision is. It is not an exhaustive list but it can be helpful in doing a personal assessment. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Behaviors and Actions of Trauma Informed Leaders

This TIO TIP sheet includes a summary of data on what trauma informed care looks like in leadership, among staff, and in an organization. Characteristics of a trauma informed leader are mapped out. The qualitative data included in the TIP sheet was collected formally and informally at several TIO community Behaviors and Actions of Trauma Informed Leaders

Books for Kids

A list of books that were written for children who may be coping with adversity or trauma in their lives. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Brief Trauma Questionnaire (Adults)

The BTQ is a 10-item self-report questionnaire designed to assess traumatic exposure according to DSM-IV but specifically including only life threat/serious injury) because of the difficulty of accurately assessing subjective response. Source: National Center for PTSD, US Department of Veterans Affairs View Resource

Child and Family Law Courts Meet Brain Science

This 5-minute video depicts a call to action for the legal community to learn as much as possible about brain science to make sure our law and policy are aligned with the focus on the latest information for building the capabilities of caregivers and strengthening the communities that together form Child and Family Law Courts Meet Brain Science

Child Welfare Trauma Training Toolkit 2nd Ed.

This curriculum is designed to teach basic knowledge, skills, and values about working with children who are in the child welfare system and who have experienced traumatic events. Source: National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2013 View Resource

Clackamas Behavioral Health Care Trauma-Informed Services Policy

An agency-wide trauma informed services policy developed by the Clackamas County Behavioral Health Division (CCBHD). Source: Clackamas County Behavioral Health Division (CCBHD) Download PDF

Clackamas County Behavioral Health Clinics Adult Consumer Services Survey

Consumer feedback survey that includes elements of trauma informed care, developed by Clackamas County Behavioral Health Clinics to help improve services and monitor progress in implementing trauma informed care. Source: Clackamas County Behavioral Health Division (CCBHD) Download PDF

Co-Regulation

Co-regulation follows attachment and precedes self-regulation in human emotional development. This presentation discusses the role of co-regulation in child-caregiver relationships, and how co-regulation can be strengthened. Source: Jean Barbre, EdD, LMFT Download PDF

Common Acronyms

A set of common acronyms related to trauma and trauma and trauma informed care, along with definitions of key terms. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Considerations for Responding to Crisis

Crisis response resource developed by TIO for agencies providing housing and shelter services to youth. Feel free to use this document in the development of your own agency trauma informed crisis response plan. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Considerations When Hiring a Trainer

Document developed by TIO that you can use to find the best trauma informed care trainer for your specific needs. It includes both reflective questions and interview questions. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

 

COVID-19 Considerations for a Trauma Informed Response for Work Settings

This TIO TIP sheet provides trauma informed considerations for work settings as we all navigate the uncharted territory and response to novel Coronavirus (COVID-19). The considerations included in the document are grounded in the principles of trauma informed care. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF Vietnamese PDF

Creating Cultures of Trauma-Informed Care (CCTIC): A Self-Assessment and Planning Protocol

This assessment tool provides guidelines for agencies or programs interested in facilitating trauma-informed modifications in their service systems. For use by administrators, providers, and survivor-consumers in the development, implementation, evaluation, and ongoing monitoring of trauma-informed programs. Source: Community Connections; Washington, D.C. Roger D. Fallot, Ph.D. and Maxine Harris, Ph.D. Download Creating Cultures of Trauma-Informed Care (CCTIC): A Self-Assessment and Planning Protocol

Crosswalk Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

Crosswalk between the TIO Standards of Practice and the OHA Trauma Informed Services Policy for organizations that are required to demonstrate compliance with the 2015 Trauma Informed Services Policy of the Oregon Health Authority (OHA). Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Dealing with Resistance to Trauma Informed Care

In any community that attempts Trauma Informed Care, some people resist the science and they resist the spending of tax dollars to help people who have been damaged by childhood trauma, also known as Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). Laura Porter from Ace Interface talks about how to respond. Source: Laura Dealing with Resistance to Trauma Informed Care

Dealing with the Effects of Trauma: A Self-Help Guide

Learn the symptoms of trauma and get ideas and strategies that can help you better cope. The information in this federally sponsored booklet can be used safely along with your other health care treatment. Source: Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Download PDF

Definitions and Additional Resources for the Standards of Practice

This document provides definitions and suggested resources to support use of the Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care. It is a downloadable and printable version (PDF) of information that appears in pop-up windows for the online version of the Standards. Each item in the Definitions and Additional Resources is Definitions and Additional Resources for the Standards of Practice

Disaster Resilience Learning Collaborative Evaluation Report

Disaster Resilience Learning Collaborative Evaluation Report: Creating Culturally-Grounded Healing Spaces by Leaders of Color for Leaders of Color is an evaluation of the Disaster Resilience Learning Collaborative (DRLC), a collaborative dedicated to creating culturally-grounded healing spaces by leaders of color and for leaders of color in disaster work. The DRLC Disaster Resilience Learning Collaborative Evaluation Report

Education Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

These guidelines have been adapted for educational settings from the Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care developed by Trauma Informed Oregon and with information from educational communities across the state provided by the Defending Childhood Initiative. These guidelines are intended to provide benchmarks for planning and monitoring progress and Education Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

Evidence Based Practices Resource Center

SAMHSA’s National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices promotes the adoption of scientifically established behavioral health interventions. Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) View Resource

For Youth by Youth: Foundations of Trauma Informed Care

This training revamps the Foundations of Trauma Informed Care training by making it more youth friendly, strengths based, and interactive. This is done by providing opportunities for young adults to engage in discussions on trauma and resilience with scenarios that relate to youth. The training also provides skills and tools For Youth by Youth: Foundations of Trauma Informed Care

Foundations of Trauma Informed Care (formerly TIC 101)

This (typically) 4 hr TIO training provides foundational knowledge appropriate for individuals across sectors and job titles. After defining key terms, including stress, trauma and systemic oppression, we explore how trauma and adversity affect individual’s access to services. Participants begin to identify how service systems, often unknowingly, retraumatize survivors of Foundations of Trauma Informed Care (formerly TIC 101)

General Parenting Resources

Check here to find books by experts in the field that may be helpful to parents and other caregivers dealing with children and youth affected by trauma. There are additional books for adult survivors of trauma who are parenting. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Gift From Within

This website for survivors of trauma has educational materials about PTSD and links to international support groups. In addition to educational material, the website has a roster of survivors who are willing to participate in an international network of peer support. Source: Gift from Within, Camden, Maine View Resource

Guide to Reviewing Existing Policies

Guide developed by TIO to help organizations review a specific policy about service exclusion through a trauma informed lens. Some of the questions in the guide may be helpful as you are developing or reviewing policies. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Healthcare Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

These Standards of Practice for healthcare settings provide a set of benchmarks for planning and monitoring progress implementation of TIC in clinic settings. The tool is an adaptation of the Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care developed for general use across health, behavioral health and related systems serving trauma Healthcare Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

Helping Teens with Traumatic Grief: Tips for Caregivers

This tip sheet from NCTSN offers ways to recognize and help your teen who may have difficulty coping after a sudden or violent death. Each teen grieves in a unique way so it’s important to understand your teen’s point of view. Source: National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) Download PDF

Historical Highlights of Trauma Informed Care

Timeline compiled by TIO of important National and Oregon-specific efforts to initiate trauma informed care. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Homeless Youth Continuum Tragedy Response Plan

The Homeless Youth Continuum created this Tragedy Response Plan as a way to support organizations in the continuum when a tragedy has occurred. This plan can be adapted to fit your organization or specific community. Source: Homeless Youth Continuum, Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Hosting a Meeting Using Principles of Trauma Informed Care

Bulleted list developed by TIO of things to do to take to prepare for and run a meeting that is trauma informed. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

Hosting a Virtual Meeting Using Trauma Informed Principles

This TIP sheet developed by TIO offers strategies for hosting virtual meetings that promote safety, power, and value. Hosting virtual meetings and trainings using SAMHSA’s six principles of trauma informed care can foster a space where participants are present & accessible, and their exposure to activation and re-traumatization is mitigated. Hosting a Virtual Meeting Using Trauma Informed Principles

 

How stress affects your brain – Madhumita Murgia

This accessible video describes how stress affects the brain and offers suggestions about how to reduce the impact. Madhumita Murgia shows how chronic stress can affect brain size, its structure, and how it functions, right down to the level of your genes. Source: TED Ed View Video

Human Resources Practices to Support TIC

List of strategies from TIO to promote trauma informed care through human resource policies and practices, including hiring, onboarding, supervision and performance reviews. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Identifying Hotspots Worksheet

A hands-on activity to walk through a critical thinking process about where and how organizations may activate a trauma response in staff or the population served. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Implementation of Trauma Informed Care

This TIO workshop is typically conducted as a working meeting, providing an opportunity for supervisors, managers and other champions of TIC a chance to identify how TIC applies to their work cross-system partnerships. A roadmap for the implementation of trauma informed care, along with TIO resources to guide the process Implementation of Trauma Informed Care

In the Gray Area of Being Suicidal

This short film shares the personal experience of a young adult experiencing suicidal thoughts along with their suggestions for wellness. Source: The Mighty View Video

International Transformational Resilience Coalition (ITRC) Climate Community of Practice Resource List

International Transformational Resilience Coalition (ITRC) Climate Community of Practice (CoP) Resource List 2022 Source: International Resilience Coalition’s 2022 Community of Practice Participants Download PDF

Intersections of Trauma Informed Care (TIC) and Diversity, Equity, Inclusion (DEI) Model

This infographic offers a model for thinking about the intersections of TIC and DEI. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Key Terms Related to Realizing the Widespread Impact of Trauma

This is a comprehensive list of terms related to realizing the widespread impact of trauma. The intention of the list is to be valuable, inclusive, and honor the array of potentially toxic experiences that exist. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon, and Trauma Informed Oregon Volunteer, Rebecca Saunders English PDF Spanish PDF

La Crianza de Los Hijos Durante COVID-19

Trauma Informed Oregon cree en el poder curativo de contar historias propias, y creemos que este poder es aún más crítico para los padres y las familias que crían a sus hijos durante la pandemia de COVID-19. Estamos muy agradecidos por la oportunidad de tener estas conversaciones con padres, cuidadores La Crianza de Los Hijos Durante COVID-19

Life Events Checklist for DSM-5 (Adults)

The LEC-5 is a self-report measure designed to screen for potentially traumatic events in a respondent’s lifetime. The LEC-5 assesses exposure to 16 events known to potentially result in PTSD or distress and includes one additional item assessing any other extraordinarily stressful event not captured in the first 16 items. Life Events Checklist for DSM-5 (Adults)

Literature on ACEs and Trauma

A list of key research articles about trauma, including studies related to prevalence, impact, and treatment, as well as information on the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Literature on Trauma Informed Care

A list of TIO’s favorite articles on trauma informed care, including early delineation of the principles of trauma informed care, the voices and perspective of trauma survivors, and seminal work in the housing field. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Looking for Trauma Specific Services?

This document developed by TIO is intended to serve as a resource to those seeking trauma specific services (TSS) and those who may be making referrals for TSS. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Making Your Voice Heard: Suggestions for Youth by Youth for use in Emergency Rooms

This tip sheet for youth by youth gives tips and resources for collaborating and engaging with providers so that youth and young adults can better get their needs met. The resource was developed by TIO’s Oregon Trauma Advocates Coalition (OTAC). OTAC is comprised of youth from around Oregon who are Making Your Voice Heard: Suggestions for Youth by Youth for use in Emergency Rooms

Mindfulness and Neural Integration: Daniel Siegel, MD

In this video, Dr. Daniel Siegel explores how relationships and reflection support the development of resilience in children and serve as the basic ‘3 R’s” of a new internal education of the mind. Source: TEDxStudioCityED View Video

Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support

A 12-item self-report measure of social support, using a 7-point scale from ‘very strongly agree’ to ‘very strongly disagree.’ Source: Zimet, Dahlem, Zimet & Farley, 1988 Download PDF

Nadine Burke Harris: How childhood trauma affects health across a lifetime

Childhood trauma isn’t something you just get over as you grow up. Pediatrician Nadine Burke Harris explains that the repeated stress of abuse, neglect and parents struggling with mental health or substance abuse issues has real, tangible effects on the development of the brain. Source: TED Talk View Video

National Child Traumatic Stress Network Empirically Supported Treatments and Promising Practices

The fact sheets linked from this page offer descriptive summaries of some of the clinical treatments, mental health interventions, and other trauma-informed service approaches that the NCTSN and its various centers have developed and/or implemented as a means of promoting the Network’s mission of raising the standard of care for National Child Traumatic Stress Network Empirically Supported Treatments and Promising Practices

National Child Traumatic Stress Network Standardized Measures to Assess Complex Trauma

The NCTSN’s database of tools that measure children’s experiences of trauma, their reactions to it, and other mental health and trauma-related issues. Source: National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) View Resource

Neighborhood Emergency Teams (NETs)

This City of Portland run program trains residents to provide emergency disaster assistance within their own neighborhoods. Their website also offers many resources and tools for getting organized and being prepared in an emergency. Source: Planning for Resilience & Emergency Preparedness (PREP) View Website PDF

Road Map to Trauma Informed Care

Check out the TIO Road Map to TIC, which offers phases to the implementation process. Each phase contains a marker(s) along the road that is integral to implementing that phase. When clicking on the road or phase sign, a hover box provides a description of that phase and leads you Road Map to Trauma Informed Care

SAMHSA’s Concept of Trauma and Guidance for a Trauma-Informed Approach

This document provides a working concept of trauma and a trauma-informed approach applicable across an array of service systems and stakeholder groups. In this paper, SAMHSA puts forth a framework for the behavioral health specialty sectors that can be adapted to other sectors such as child welfare, education, criminal and SAMHSA’s Concept of Trauma and Guidance for a Trauma-Informed Approach

Social Emotional Learning Resources

This list of resources in English and Spanish contains culturally-responsive, anti-racist information on Social Emotional Learning for educators, parents/guardians, and students. Editable Document Download PDF

Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

These Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care developed by TIO provide benchmarks for planning and monitoring progress and a means to highlight accomplishments as organizations work towards implementing trauma informed care. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon View Resource Spanish PDF

State of Connecticut Department of Children and Families – Trauma-Informed Care

This site provides a list of effective interventions for children and youth who experience symptoms related to trauma. Source: Department of Children and Families, Connecticut View Resource

Staying Connected while Physically Distancing

This TIO TIP sheet includes resources to support social connection while physical distancing during COVID-19. Physical distancing does not have to equate to social isolation. With a variety of technologies, virtual socializing is easier than ever before. Use video calling to socialize with family and friends, host a happy hour Staying Connected while Physically Distancing

Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (children and youth)

The SDQ is a brief behavioral screening questionnaire about 3-16 year olds. It exists in several versions to meet the needs of researchers, clinicians and educationalists. Source: YouthinMind View Resource

Summary of the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study

This handout briefly summarizes the ACE study, conducted by researchers from Kaiser Permanente and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) to study how adversity in childhood predicts adult physical, mental, and social well-being. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF Spanish PDF Russian PDF

Supporting Each Other and Ourselves: Trauma Informed Peer Support

This training is designed for people who provide peer recovery and support services and peer wellness services. Building on Foundations of Trauma Informed Care, the focus of this training is to help those who access services gain a better understanding of how their body responds to trauma and chronic stress Supporting Each Other and Ourselves: Trauma Informed Peer Support

Talking About Trauma and Suicide in Public Meetings

Recommendations from TIO to assist in preparing, facilitating and responding in a meeting when sharing personal experiences that may cause distress and trauma, to reflect a trauma informed approach. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Download PDF

The Anatomy of a Trauma Informed Script

This TIP sheet developed by TIO provides tools for making communication trauma informed. The resource maps out the key components that make a script (or set of words) trauma informed. A trauma informed script will help you stay regulated when you are delivering difficult news or getting hard questions. Source: The Anatomy of a Trauma Informed Script

The Child PTSD Symptom Scale (8 – 18yo)

The CPSS is a 26-item self-report measure that assesses PTSD diagnostic criteria and symptom severity in children ages 8 to 18. It includes 2 event items, 17 symptom items, and 7 functional impairment items. Source: National Center for PTSD, US Department of Veterans Affairs View Resource

The Impact of Trauma on Regulation

This presentation discusses types and degrees of trauma and their effect on beliefs, behaviors, emotional health, and more. Various brain functions and how they are affected by trauma are also discussed. Source: Diane Wagenhals, Program Director for Lakeside Global Institute Download PDF

The Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (8 – 18yo)

The JVQ is designed to gather information on a broad range of victimizations that may occur in childhood. It can enhance the assessment of any child or adolescent by providing a quantified description of all of the major forms of offenses against youth. Either youth or parents can complete the The Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (8 – 18yo)

The Magnitude of the Solution

A PowerPoint presentation focusing on risk, co-occurring problems, public costs, and high leverage solutions to childhood adversity. Source: Laura Porter, ACE Interface Download PDF

Through Our Eyes: Children, Violence, and Trauma

This video series discusses how violence and trauma affect children, including the serious and long-lasting consequences for their physical and mental health; signs that a child may be exposed to violence or trauma; and the staggering cost of child maltreatment to families, communities, and the nation. Victims lend their voices Through Our Eyes: Children, Violence, and Trauma

TIO Introduction to Trauma Informed Care Training Modules

These free online training modules have been created to increase access to foundational training so that the key guiding principles of trauma informed care are accessible to everyone. These four modules are self-guided and self-administered. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon View Training

To Live to See the Great Day that Dawns: Preventing Suicide by American Indian and Alaska Native Youth

This suicide prevention manual assists tribes and communities in developing effective and culturally appropriate suicide prevention plans for American Indian and Alaska Native teens and young adults. Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Download PDF

Train the Trainer Presentation in Spanish Definiciones (Key Terms in Spanish)

This Powerpoint document was produced by Trauma Informed Oregon. It is part of Train the Trainer presentation in Spanish with Definiciones — Key terms in Spanish. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Transformational Resilience Program

Learn about climate disruption and trauma and how to develop preventative resilience skills. The Resource Innovation Group (TRIG) is a non-partisan non-profit organization affiliated with the Sustainability Institute at Willamette University. TRIG’s mission is to address the human causes, impacts, and solutions to complex socio-economic-ecological challenges, with a special emphasis on climate Transformational Resilience Program

Trauma Education Statement

A workshop activity to help participants begin to view challenging behavior through a ‘trauma lens’, i.e., with heightened awareness of the role and impact of trauma. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care – Framework for Action

A graphic that depicts the principles of trauma informed care along with the role and major activities of Trauma Informed Oregon. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

Trauma Informed Care for Autistic Survivors

Disabled individuals and individuals with disabilities experience high rates of interpersonal violence and other negative life experiences which can lead to trauma. Additionally, due to systemic ableism and other forms of oppression individuals experiencing disability can have difficulty getting access to supportive services. An important part of providing trauma informed Trauma Informed Care for Autistic Survivors

Trauma Informed Care for Survivors With Disabilities

Disabled individuals and individuals with disabilities experience high rates of interpersonal violence and other negative life experiences which can lead to trauma. Additionally, due to systemic ableism and other forms of oppression individuals experiencing disability can have difficulty getting access to supportive services. An important part of providing trauma informed Trauma Informed Care for Survivors With Disabilities

Trauma Informed Care in the Classroom: A Resource Guide for Educators in Higher Learning

TIP sheet from TIO on how to create academic environments that are trauma informed. The TIP sheet aims to provide educators with tools that acknowledge the diverse backgrounds of each student that enters their classroom in order to enhance learning opportunities for all. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care Supervision: Questions and Ideas Table

Table developed by TIO that includes ideas and questions to help supervisors implement trauma informed care in their supervision practices. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care Workgroup Meeting Guidelines

List of questions from TIO to help set guidelines for Workgroup meetings. As TIC Workgroups form and begin to gather information, identify opportunities, set priorities for change, and propose solutions, there are a number of considerations that can help keep the process on track. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Neuro Takeaways

A brief bulleted list of key facts about the neuroscience of trauma as it relates to trauma informed care. Source: Julie Rosenzweig, PhD, Regional Research Institute, Portland State University Download PDF

Trauma Informed Oregon Survey Tools

This PDF lists and describes different survey tools TIO regularly offers organizations interested in TIC. Feel free to reach out to info@traumainformedoregon.org if you would like a copy or guidance for how to use these surveys Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Parenting During COVID-19

Trauma Informed Oregon believes in the healing power of telling one’s story, and we think that this power is even more critical for parents and families raising children during the COVID-19 pandemic. We were so grateful for the opportunity to hold discussions with parents, caregivers and providers to learn more Trauma Informed Parenting During COVID-19

Trauma Informed System Change Instrument Scoring Guide and Psychometrics: Organizational Trauma Informed Change

This tool provides psychometric information and the scoring protocol for child welfare agencies using the Trauma Informed System Change Instrument: Organizational change Self-Evaluation. Source: Southwest Michigan Children’s Trauma Assessment Center Download PDF

Trauma Informed System Change Instrument: Organizational Change Self-Evaluation – The Current System

This organizational assessment was created for child welfare agencies to track system change at a service provider level, at an agency level, and at the county system level. Source: Southwest Michigan Children’s Trauma Assessment Center Download PDF

Trauma Lens Exercise

This table developed by TIO provides examples of how you can reframe challenging behaviors through a trauma lens. The examples in the table are some of the most frequently reported in Trauma Informed Oregon (TIO) trainings and include challenging behaviors from service recipients and staff. It also includes challenging environmental Trauma Lens Exercise

Trauma Specific Services: A Resource for Implementation and Use

Learn about trauma specific services (TSS) and their role in treating individuals affected by trauma, as well as how to implement, seek out, and evaluate these services. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma-Informed Organizational Toolkit for Homeless Services

This organizational assessment was created to provide programs with a roadmap for becoming trauma-informed. The Toolkit offers homeless service providers with concrete guidelines for how to modify their practices and policies to ensure that they are responding appropriately to the needs of families who have experienced traumatic stress. Source: The Trauma-Informed Organizational Toolkit for Homeless Services

Traumatic Events Screening Inventory for Children

The TESI-C assesses a child’s experience of a variety of potential traumatic events including current and previous injuries, hospitalizations, domestic violence, community violence, disasters, accidents, physical abuse, and sexual abuse. The revised 24-item version (also known as the TESI-CRF-R; Ippen et al., 2002) is more developmentally sensitive to the traumatic Traumatic Events Screening Inventory for Children

Wellness Relapse Prevention Plan

This workshop exercise helps training participants to identify warning signs of excess stress or secondary trauma in their work and to create a plan to address it effectively. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

What is Trauma Informed Care?

This document developed by TIO provides general information about trauma informed care (TIC) especially for individuals new to this topic. Included are guiding considerations, principles and definitions offered by experts in the field. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

What One Thing Can You Do Feedback Questionnaire

Workshop activity to help participants consider concrete action steps to implement trauma informed care in their organizations. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

What You Really Need to Know About Being a Trauma-Informed Organization

A PowerPoint presentation from the National Council for organizations seeking to implement the principles of trauma informed care. The recording of the webinar is no longer available, but you can download the slide by clicking on “View the Slides.” Source: National Council for Behavioral Health webinar, Kristi McClure and Cheryl What You Really Need to Know About Being a Trauma-Informed Organization

 

Trauma Education Statement

A workshop activity to help participants begin to view challenging behavior through a ‘trauma lens’, i.e., with heightened awareness of the role and impact of trauma. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care – Framework for Action

A graphic that depicts the principles of trauma informed care along with the role and major activities of Trauma Informed Oregon. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

Trauma Informed Care for Autistic Survivors

Disabled individuals and individuals with disabilities experience high rates of interpersonal violence and other negative life experiences which can lead to trauma. Additionally, due to systemic ableism and other forms of oppression individuals experiencing disability can have difficulty getting access to supportive services. An important part of providing trauma informed Trauma Informed Care for Autistic Survivors

Trauma Informed Care for Survivors With Disabilities

Disabled individuals and individuals with disabilities experience high rates of interpersonal violence and other negative life experiences which can lead to trauma. Additionally, due to systemic ableism and other forms of oppression individuals experiencing disability can have difficulty getting access to supportive services. An important part of providing trauma informed Trauma Informed Care for Survivors With Disabilities

Trauma Informed Care in the Classroom: A Resource Guide for Educators in Higher Learning

TIP sheet from TIO on how to create academic environments that are trauma informed. The TIP sheet aims to provide educators with tools that acknowledge the diverse backgrounds of each student that enters their classroom in order to enhance learning opportunities for all. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care Supervision: Questions and Ideas Table

Table developed by TIO that includes ideas and questions to help supervisors implement trauma informed care in their supervision practices. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care Workgroup Meeting Guidelines

List of questions from TIO to help set guidelines for Workgroup meetings. As TIC Workgroups form and begin to gather information, identify opportunities, set priorities for change, and propose solutions, there are a number of considerations that can help keep the process on track. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Neuro Takeaways

A brief bulleted list of key facts about the neuroscience of trauma as it relates to trauma informed care. Source: Julie Rosenzweig, PhD, Regional Research Institute, Portland State University Download PDF

Trauma Informed Oregon Survey Tools

This PDF lists and describes different survey tools TIO regularly offers organizations interested in TIC. Feel free to reach out to info@traumainformedoregon.org if you would like a copy or guidance for how to use these surveys Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Parenting During COVID-19

Trauma Informed Oregon believes in the healing power of telling one’s story, and we think that this power is even more critical for parents and families raising children during the COVID-19 pandemic. We were so grateful for the opportunity to hold discussions with parents, caregivers and providers to learn more Trauma Informed Parenting During COVID-19

Trauma Informed System Change Instrument Scoring Guide and Psychometrics: Organizational Trauma Informed Change

This tool provides psychometric information and the scoring protocol for child welfare agencies using the Trauma Informed System Change Instrument: Organizational change Self-Evaluation. Source: Southwest Michigan Children’s Trauma Assessment Center Download PDF

Trauma Informed System Change Instrument: Organizational Change Self-Evaluation – The Current System

This organizational assessment was created for child welfare agencies to track system change at a service provider level, at an agency level, and at the county system level. Source: Southwest Michigan Children’s Trauma Assessment Center Download PDF

Trauma Lens Exercise

This table developed by TIO provides examples of how you can reframe challenging behaviors through a trauma lens. The examples in the table are some of the most frequently reported in Trauma Informed Oregon (TIO) trainings and include challenging behaviors from service recipients and staff. It also includes challenging environmental Trauma Lens Exercise

Trauma Specific Services: A Resource for Implementation and Use

Learn about trauma specific services (TSS) and their role in treating individuals affected by trauma, as well as how to implement, seek out, and evaluate these services. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma-Informed Organizational Toolkit for Homeless Services

This organizational assessment was created to provide programs with a roadmap for becoming trauma-informed. The Toolkit offers homeless service providers with concrete guidelines for how to modify their practices and policies to ensure that they are responding appropriately to the needs of families who have experienced traumatic stress. Source: The Trauma-Informed Organizational Toolkit for Homeless Services

Traumatic Events Screening Inventory for Children

The TESI-C assesses a child’s experience of a variety of potential traumatic events including current and previous injuries, hospitalizations, domestic violence, community violence, disasters, accidents, physical abuse, and sexual abuse. The revised 24-item version (also known as the TESI-CRF-R; Ippen et al., 2002) is more developmentally sensitive to the traumatic Traumatic Events Screening Inventory for Children

Wellness Relapse Prevention Plan

This workshop exercise helps training participants to identify warning signs of excess stress or secondary trauma in their work and to create a plan to address it effectively. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

What is Trauma Informed Care?

This document developed by TIO provides general information about trauma informed care (TIC) especially for individuals new to this topic. Included are guiding considerations, principles and definitions offered by experts in the field. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

What One Thing Can You Do Feedback Questionnaire

Workshop activity to help participants consider concrete action steps to implement trauma informed care in their organizations. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

What You Really Need to Know About Being a Trauma-Informed Organization

A PowerPoint presentation from the National Council for organizations seeking to implement the principles of trauma informed care. The recording of the webinar is no longer available, but you can download the slide by clicking on “View the Slides.” Source: National Council for Behavioral Health webinar, Kristi McClure and Cheryl What You Really Need to Know About Being a Trauma-Informed Organization

 

 

05 -Warmline – FACT Oregon – FACT Oregon Support Line – Support for Families with Children Experience Disabilities – Call 503-786-6082 or Text 541-695-5416 – Support Team Responds in 48 -72 Hours – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Call or Text
May 23 all-day

Support Line

FACT Oregon’s Support Line is staffed by parents of youth experiencing disability, and we’re here to help!

Wherever you are on your journey, from birth through young adulthood, we are here to answer your questions and help find resources to support your child’s academic, emotional, and physical growth and well-being! Collectively, our team has the lived experience and professional training needed to support families through many different milestones. Let us help you carve a path forward to a whole full life! We welcome questions about early childhood, special education (we’re the designated statewide Parent Information and Training Center), intellectual and developmental disability services, behavior and communication, self-determination and supported decision making, and so much more! If we don’t know the answer, we’ll try our best to help you find it!

Get Support!

Call or text 503-786-6082 or 541-695-5416

Email us at support@factoregon.org or apoyo@factoregon.org

Someone from our support team will call you back, usually within 48-72 hours. Or, if you’d like, you can choose a time to talk from our calendar by clicking below.

 

To Schedule a Support Call Use The Link Below

Para programar una llamada de soporte, use el siguiente enlace
07 Consumer Input Opportunity – ODHS – Oregon Department of Human Services – Round 4 Child and Family Service Review – Provide Feedback on Child Welfare Services – For Guardians, Resource and Adoptive Parents, Community and Service Providers – Register for Details and Dates @ contact for details
May 23 all-day

 

Child and Family Service Review, 2024

Opportunity to Provide Feedback

Guardians, Resource and Adoptive Parents, Community and Service Providers

 

 

Oregon Child Welfare is currently going through Round 4 of the Child and Family Service Review (CFSR) process (see attachment for more information).

The CFSR is a partnership between federal and state staff to (1) determine the status of federal child welfare requirements; (2) learn about the experiences of children, young adults, and families receiving child welfare services; and (3) assist states in enhancing their capacity to help children and families achieve positive outcomes. These reviews help states identify strengths and areas needing improvement to support improved child welfare services and achieve specific outcomes for families and children who receive services.

Through this review process, the Children’s Bureau determines our performance in seven areas. The goal being to help states improve child welfare services in all areas.

The attached Fact Sheet provides more detail regarding the systemic factors and expected outcomes for families and children receiving child welfare services.  

 The 7 areas being reviewed:

Statewide Information System

Case Review System

Quality Assurance System

Staff and Provider Training

Service Array and Resource Development

Agency Responsiveness to the Community

Foster and Adoptive Parent Licensing, Recruitment, and Retention

We are seeking participation from a wide range of individuals during the review process – families, parents, children, young adults, Tribes, resource and adoptive parents, service providers, legal partners, and child welfare staff. As a foster or adoptive parent or community service provider who serves families involved with child welfare systems, your participation in the CFSR is very important. The CFSR provides an opportunity for you to be heard and provide valuable input on critical child welfare agency policies and programs and the availability, accessibility, and effectiveness of services that affect the lives of children and families involved in the child welfare system.

 If you’re interested in providing input during the CFSR Round 4 review process, please use this link or the QR code included below to share your contact information. We will reach out to you with more information about the following opportunities to provide your insight and experiences:

 May and June 2024: Focus Groups – 1.5-hour virtual sessions; timing will vary depending on topics.

 December 9-14, 2024: Interviews – Portland-area (in-person), Virtual, and after-hours TBD

 Spring 2025: Program improvement planning – TBD location and time

 Please feel free to reach out to Kathy Steiner (Kathy.Steiner@odhs.oregon.gov) if you have additional questions or need to discuss accommodations for participation.

 Thank you for your time and interest. Your input is essential to improving Oregon’s Child Welfare programs!

 

QR code

 

 

08 – Observance – AAPSG – Autism Awareness & Parents Support Group – 24/7 – Weekdays & Weekends @ online via Facebook Live
May 23 all-day
08 - Observance - AAPSG - Autism Awareness & Parents Support Group - 24/7 - Weekdays & Weekends @ online via Facebook Live

 

Welcome to our Autism Awareness Group!
Join a warm and supportive community that embraces and empowers individuals with autism and their families. Our group is a safe space for sharing experiences, seeking guidance, and connecting with like-minded individuals who understand the journey of autism.
Discover valuable resources, expert insights, and practical tips that promote understanding and inclusion for people on the autism spectrum. Together, we celebrate the unique strengths and talents of those with autism while providing a platform to address challenges and find solutions.
Whether you’re a parent, caregiver, educator, or someone on the spectrum, this group offers a non-judgmental environment to learn, grow, and build lasting connections. Share your triumphs, seek advice, or simply be part of a compassionate network that fosters a sense of belonging and acceptance.

 

May
24
Fri
2024
00 – Hotline – DWIHN – Detroit Wayne Integrated Health Network – Mental Heath Crisis Help – 1-800-241-4949 – 24/7
May 24 all-day

Mental Health Crisis Help

The Detroit Wayne Integrated Health Network is Here to Talk. Here to Help. Our trained clinicians are standing by 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to help you.

Crisis Helpline

Helpline:(800) 241-4949 (24/7)
TTY:(800) 630-1044 (24/7)
DWIHN:(313) 833-2500 (8:00 am – 4:30 pm M-F)

DWIHN Customer Service

Monday-Friday 8:00 am – 4:30 pm
Toll-Free: 888-490-9698 or 313-833-3232
TDD/TTY: 800-630-1044
Fax: 313-833-2217 or 313-833-4280

Recipient Rights Office

Toll-Free: 888-339-5595
TDD/TTY: 888-339-5588

00 – Hotline – NCMEC – National Center for Missing & Exploited Children – 24 Hour Hotline – 1-800-843-5678 @ phone
May 24 all-day
00 - Hotline - NCMEC - National Center for Missing & Exploited Children - 24 Hour Hotline  - 1-800-843-5678 @ phone

 

24-Hour Call Center 1-800-843-5678

Act immediately if you believe your child is missing.

Download this checklist of actions to be taken by families in the initial stages of a missing child case.

If you have any questions call the NCMEC at 1-800-THE-LOST® (1-800-843-5678). If you are not located in the United States, call your country’s hotline.

NCMEC is the nation’s largest and most influential child protection organization.

We lead the fight to protect children, creating vital resources for them and the people who keep them safe.

HOW NCMEC can help

When you call NCMEC, a Call Center specialist will record information about your child. A NCMEC case management team will next work directly with your family and the law enforcement agency investigating your case. They will offer technical assistance tailored to your case to help ensure all available search and recovery methods are used. As appropriate NCMEC case management teams:

  • Rapidly create and disseminate posters to help generate leads.
  • Rapidly review, analyze and disseminate leads received on 1-800-THE-LOST® (1-800-843-5678) to the investigating law enforcement agency.
  • Communicate with federal agencies to provide services to assist in the location and recovery of missing children.
  • Provide peer support, resources and empowerment from trained volunteers who have experienced a missing child incident in their own family.
  • Provide families with access to referrals they may use to help process any emotional or counseling needs.
00 – Hotline – NHTH – National Human Trafficking Hotline – 1-888-373-7888 – Confidential – 24/7 @ phone
May 24 all-day
01 – Helpline – Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline – 1-800-422-4453 – Confidential – 24/7 @ text/chat
May 24 all-day
01 – Helpline – PHP – Parents Helping Parents – Parent Stress Line – 1-800-632-8188 – 24/7 – Weekdays & Weekends @ phone
May 24 all-day

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parent Stress Line

1-800 – 632 – 8188

Call our Parent Stress Line any time and any day of the week

if you need to vent about the stress from taking care of a child or children. 18006328188

 

 

02 – Urgent Info – Services and Resources for Families and Children in Response to the Recent Tragic Events Across the Country
May 24 all-day

 

Some Resources for Families and Communities:

Due to recent tragic events across the country

 

Agency Logo

Racial Stress and Self-care:

Parent Tip Tool

How race-related stress affects you and your relationship with your child

What effect does racism have on your health and well-being?

Not only does racism impact you as a parent, it can also impact how you interact with your children. Experiences of racism build on each other and can chip away at your emotional, physical and spiritual resources as a parent, contributing to race-related stress. Race-related stress can make it hard to have the space needed to take care of yourself as a parent, which reduces the emotional space you need to adequately take care of your children.

Racism can impact parents emotionally, physically and spiritually

Physical effects

Physical Effects

Physical Effects can include increased hypertension, illness and risky behaviors such as substance use.

Emotional effects

Emotional Effects

Emotional effects can include depression, anxiety, anger, irritability and aggression.

Spiritual effects

Spiritual Effects

Spiritual effects can include a decreased sense of purpose, lack of connection with the larger community, isolation from larger social groups and reduced involvement in communal activities that you enjoy.

Potential reactions to racial stress or trauma

Insecure feelings

Insecure Feelings

Feelings of shame and lack of confidence due to feeling that a situation cannot be changed.

Lack of trust

Lack of Trust

Feeling detached or a lack of trust for others due to experiencing multiple losses or letdowns. This can make it very difficult to seek out help and to identify potential safe sources of support.

Triggers

Triggers

Reminders of the event, such as particular people or situations, can also trigger strong emotional or physical responses (e.g., crying or rapid heartbeat).

Emotions

Difficulty Controlling Emotions

Difficulty controlling emotional responses (going from “zero to one hundred”) can occur as the body helps you adapt to potentially unsafe situations, making you feel constantly on “alert.”

The body’s response to the experience of racism can make accessing resources to cope with the situation difficult. Race-related stress is unique in that it threatens psychological resources that are needed to cope and fulfill basic needs such as financial support, housing, access to jobs, etc.

When your body is in stress mode, it is geared up to help you and your child survive, which sometimes leads to impulsive decisions. If you live in a chronic state of stress related to racism, you can start to engage in survival coping. Survival coping can help you to deal with very hard or potentially life-threatening situations. However, if you continue to exist in this mode long-term, it can make it difficult to enjoy being in the moment with your child and can reduce your ability to feel safe and in control.

What impact can racial stress have on your parenting?

Experiencing race-related stress can also impact the quality of parenting relationships in the following ways:

Impostor syndrome

When you are exposed to racism repeatedly, you often start doubting yourself and can feel like you are an imposter in dominant culture settings or in settings where you feel as though you do not belong. Your inner thoughts might sound something like: “Am I being judged?” “Am I worthy?” “I got lucky.” “I only got this because I am Black.”

Being overly alert (hypervigilance)

Experiencing racial stress can make you more aware of potential dangers and negative experiences that can occur. This, in turn, can make the experience of parenting even more stressful. When you interact with your children, you can sometimes be reminded of negative race-related experiences that you had when you were a child. This reminder can amp up emotional responses, or hyperarousal, making it hard for you to “keep your cool” and be open to flexible problem solving.

“Helicopter parenting” (monitoring in fear)

These experiences of racism and unwarranted blame or lack of acceptance can make you want to protect your children so much, that you don’t allow them to explore in the way that they need to. You may shelter them from failures, which everyone needs to experience in order to learn how to manage everyday life. You may tend to be overly cautious or suspicious. Examples can include not allowing your children to have sleepovers or go to the park, even with your supervision.

Difficulty regulating emotions

  • When your past influences your emotional state, it can affect your emotional responses to both big and minor stressors with children, such as when they misbehave. This, in turn, can lead to being overprotective or overuse of physical discipline, as a means of survival.
  • For children, having parents who can keep perspective (stay cool) when children are upset, or misbehaving is very important. Likewise, it is important to stay calm when disciplining a child, otherwise discipline may go overboard. Both of these things can be hard if you are having difficulty controlling your emotions.

Avoidance

  • Avoiding situations that are related to racism can be a needed strategy to survive; such as instances that may involve violence or threat to yourself or your family. Sometimes you may avoid reminders of past experiences due to the pain or discomfort they cause.
  • If you find yourself avoiding strong feelings or situations with your child that bring up painful memories, it may make it hard to show affection and support for your child. It may even make it difficult to know how to provide emotional support for your child during times of stress. For instance, if your child brings up their own experience of oppression or an event in their life reminds you of something from your own childhood.

Mistrusting others

  • Racism can lead to distrust or mistrust of other communities. Internalized racism is when you begin to accept negative messages about your own abilities and inherent worth by the dominant group in society.
  • When you use society’s norms to judge yourself, you can feel depressed, unworthy and just not good enough. You are taught in many ways to take these feelings and paint them onto another group.
  • Intra and interracial violence, contention among disenfranchised communities or color, and the way the media conveys information about people of color, contribute to this.
  • This kind of coping can make you more vulnerable to racism, because on some level you may believe in racial hierarchy and difference when you belittle other groups. And when you show your children that it is right to discriminate against certain other groups, you make them more vulnerable to discrimination that they face.

Minimizing racism

  • Racism is overwhelming, as is the history of violence. You are sometimes taught that accepting this and minimizing racism is the only thing you can do. But when you ignore racism, and accept powerlessness, you encourage your kids to internalize racism. This can lead to increased levels of depression, anxiety and externalizing behaviors (e.g., engaging in risky behaviors, such as alcohol or substance use).
  • When you believe that you should be able to handle and manage it all without a break or without asking for help, you are at increased risk for health problems and can miss important cues about your well-being and safety.

Self-blame

Experiencing chronically unfair and dangerous discriminatory practices due to race can lead to feelings of low worth. For parents, this can also lead to a questioning of your parenting choices and abilities.

Unbalanced Racial and Ethnic Socialization (RES)

Unbalanced messaging or communication about race and ethnicity occurs when you only promote messages of mistrust, preparation for bias, or only give racial pride messages to your children.

So, what can you do to mitigate racial stress?

As parents, it is important to develop positive identities and share your cultural identities with your children. Positive cultural identity and advocacy are protective factors against racism, which can help to reduce and prevent racial stress.

There are many other ways to cope with stress and everyone has different preferences. Reducing stress can also allow you to model healthy coping strategies for your child. Here are some suggestions with links you can try.

Agency Logo
Talking with Children About Tragic Events

What do we tell our children? How do we reassure them of their own safety?

At The Dougy Center in Portland, Oregon, we’ve provided grief support groups for children, teens, young adults and their parents or adult caregivers since 1982.

Based on our experience, here are some things for adults to keep in mind as you struggle with how to talk with children following tragic events, such as natural disasters, plane crashes, or school shootings.

1. Don’t project your fears onto your children. They take their cues from the adults around them.
You can’t hear the news about children being murdered or communities devastated by natural disasters without thinking about how you’d feel if it happened to your family, friends, or hometown. The outpouring of care and empathy for the families who lost loved ones will be powerful, and…we all know it could have been our friends, our child, our family and community members who died or were injured.

Identifying with the senselessness and randomness makes us all feel more vulnerable. But we should remember that children don’t always see things the same way that adults do, and it won’t be helpful to them for us to fall apart. They need to see that we care, that we feel terrible about this tragedy, and that we will do everything we can to keep them safe. They will take their cues from our behavior.

It’s okay to show emotion. We can model for children that feeling sad, scared, and upset is normal after tragedies. But we don’t want to overwhelm them with our emotions, or put them in the position of having to ‘parent,’ or take care of, the adults around them. Make sure you also model taking care of yourself, by sharing with trusted and supportive adult friends, eating (and drinking) healthfully.

2. Try to limit their access to the recurring news and exposure to the tragedy over and over.
Over-exposure to the graphic and emotional news can be overwhelming for children and can cause unnecessary anxiety and fear. Some children who repeatedly watched the footage of planes crashing into the towers on 9/11 thought it was happening again and again. Some children (and some adults) may have difficulty getting graphic scenes and images out of their minds. Too much exposure can fuel their fear, so don’t let them sit and watch the news over and over. Better yet, set the example of not doing so yourself as well.

3. Understand that you can’t completely shield them from what happened.
It would be next to impossible to hide these events from children, as much as we wish we could. You might be able to shield your own child in your home, for example, by not turning on (or owning) a television, but you can’t protect your children from hearing about it from other kids. The fact is, they will hear about it, so although they don’t “need” to know about it, pretending we can shield them is magical thinking.

That said, you don’t need to give them more information than they can handle, or more than they’re asking for. A simple, “Did they talk about what happened in _____ today at school?” would be a good starter. They need to know that you’re not trying to hide the truth from them, that you’re open to talking about it, but that you’re also not forcing them to do so.

4. Model truth-telling and build trust with your children by letting them hear things, even hard things, from you directly.
Eight days after the 9/11 attacks, I was meeting in small groups with pre-school workers in New York City, talking about how to respond to the young children in their care about the events. A man asked to speak to me privately after one of the trainings, and asked for my advice around his 7-year-old daughter. For the last week, since September 12th, she had been having stomach aches and difficulty sleeping. He said it was not tied to the events of 9/11 because, “We don’t have a television.” As his story unfolded it was evident that he did not want to have to explain to his child why people would do such horrible things, a normal dilemma that we face as parents and adults. This child was experiencing physical reactions, as it turned out, not primarily because of her reaction to the events of 9/11, but because she was unable to share her fears and concerns and questions in her own home, faced with her parents’ denial.

Here are some principles to keep in mind as you talk with children:

1. There is no one typical reaction one can or should expect from children.
Their responses will vary all over the ‘emotional’ map, from seeming disinterest to nightmares, eating issues, and anxiety. How any specific child will respond will depend on their age, previous experience with death and loss, and their personality style. Fearful children will tend to worry; quiet children may keep their feelings to themselves; those who want to appear unfazed may exhibit a sense of bravado or lack of caring. Of course, children directly affected – those who had a family member die; those who witnessed the tragedy; those who had friends die – will tend to have longer-term reactions and needs. Watch for changes in behavior, or concerning trends. While it would be normal to have heightened anxiety and sleeplessness, any concerning behavior or troubling symptoms should be taken seriously, and if warranted, professional help sought.

2. Many children will have an increased sense of fear about their safety.
Understandably. So will many adults. After a shooting at an Oregon mall in December 2012, the news outlets were filled with people who said they’d never take their children there again. Others said they’d return as soon as it opened in order to support the stores and employees who had experienced the traumatic events, and whose livelihoods were going to suffer as a result of the several day closure. Some runners in the Boston Marathon vowed to return; others said they would never do so again.

While we can’t guarantee to our children that nothing bad will ever happen to them, we can provide assurance that these events are relatively rare, and that we will do everything we can to keep them safe. Children may have many questions about the events, particularly about natural disasters. Answer their questions with language that fits their developmental stage. It’s okay if you don’t know the answer to a question. If it’s a question that might have an answer, offer to look up more information. You can also ask children what they think the answer is as they often have thoughts and ideas they want to share with you. In the case of natural disasters, if your child is fearful of something like that happening in your community, talk with them about the safety plan that you have in place for your family and home. You can also look into what community safety measures are in place and whatever elements are relevant with your children. Many children will be reassured knowing that there are specific, tangible things they and your family can do if something occurs. Some examples include, picking a meeting place, keeping flashlights in every bedroom, talking about where you will keep emergency water and food.

3. Children want, need, and deserve the truth.
In over 30 years of providing grief support to thousands of children and teens at The Dougy Center for Grieving Children & Families, we have never heard a child say, “I’m glad I was lied to.” Many, however, struggle with anger and lack of trust toward parents or other adults who lied to them. When we don’t tell the truth, they learn that we cannot be trusted. As difficult as it can be at times, and as horrendous as the truth may be, children want, need, and deserve the truth. Being able to talk openly and honestly with your children about tragic events and other losses, creates a foundation of trust, enabling them to come to you in the future with their questions, fears, and concerns.

 

 

Daniel Tiger

Helping Children with Tragic Events in the News

In times of community or world-wide crisis, it’s easy to assume that young children don’t know what’s going on. But one thing’s for sure — children are very sensitive to how their parents feel. They’re keenly aware of the expressions on their parents’ faces and the tone of their voices. Children can sense when their parents are really worried, whether they’re watching the news or talking about it with others. No matter what children know about a “crisis,” it’s especially scary for children to realize that their parents are scared.

Some Scary, Confusing Images

The way that news is presented on television can be quite confusing for a young child. The same video segment may be shown over and over again through the day, as if each showing was a different event. Someone who has died turns up alive and then dies again and again. Children often become very anxious since they don’t understand much about videotape replays, closeups, and camera angles. Any televised danger seems close to home to them because the tragic scenes are taking place on the TV set in their own living room. Children can’t tell the difference between what’s close and what’s far away, what’s real and what’s pretend, or what’s new and what’s re-run.

The younger the children are, the more likely they are to be interested in scenes of close-up faces, particularly if the people are expressing some strong feelings. When there’s tragic news, the images on TV are most often much too graphic and disturbing for young children.

“Who will take care of me?”

In times of crisis, children want to know, “Who will take care of me?” They’re dependent on adults for their survival and security. They’re naturally self-centered. They need to hear very clearly that their parents are doing all they can to take care of them and to keep them safe. They also need to hear that people in the government and other grown-ups they don’t even know are working hard to keep them safe, too.

Helping Children Feel More Secure

Play is one of the important ways young children have of dealing with their concerns. Of course, playing about violent news can be scary and sometimes unsafe, so adults need to be nearby to help redirect that kind of play into nurturing themes, such as a hospital for the wounded or a pretend meal for emergency workers.

When children are scared and anxious, they might become more dependent, clingy, and afraid to go to bed at night. Whining, aggressive behavior, or toilet “accidents” may be their way of asking for more comfort from the important adults in their lives. Little by little, as the adults around them become more confident, hopeful and secure, our children probably will, too.

Turn Off the TV

When there’s something tragic in the news, many parents get concerned about what and how to tell their children. It’s even harder than usual if we’re struggling with our own powerful feelings about what has happened. Adults are sometimes surprised that their own reactions to a televised crisis are so strong, but great loss and devastation in the news often reawaken our own earlier losses and fears – even some we think we might have “forgotten”

It’s easy to allow ourselves to get drawn into watching televised news of a crisis for hours and hours; however, exposing ourselves to so many tragedies can make us feel hopeless, insecure, and even depressed. We help our children and ourselves if we’re able to limit our own television viewing. Our children need us to spend time with them – away from the frightening images on the screen.

Talking and Listening

Even if we wanted to, it would be impossible to give our children all the reasons for such things as war, terrorists, abuse, murders, major fires, hurricanes, and earthquakes. If they ask questions, our best answer may be to ask them, “What do you think happened?” If the answer is “I don’t know,” then the simplest reply might be something like, “I’m sad about the news, and I’m worried. But I love you, and I’m here to care for you.”

If we don’t let children know it’s okay to feel sad and scared, they may think something is wrong with them when they do feel that way. They certainly don’t need to hear all the details of what’s making us sad or scared, but if we can help them accept their own feelings as natural and normal, their feelings will be much more manageable for them.

Angry feelings are part of being human, especially when we feel powerless. One of the most important messages we can give our children is, “It’s okay to be angry, but it’s not okay to hurt ourselves or others.” Besides giving children the right to their anger, we can help them find constructive things to do with their feelings. This way, we’ll be giving them useful tools that will serve them all their life, and help them to become the worlds’ future peacemakers — the world’s future “helpers.”

Helpful Hints

  • Do your best to keep the television off, or at least limit how much your child sees of any news event.
  • Try to keep yourself calm. Your presence can help your child feel more secure.
  • Give your child extra comfort and physical affection, like hugs or snuggling up together with a favorite book. Physical comfort goes a long way towards providing inner security. That closeness can nourish you, too.
  • Try to keep regular routines as normal as possible. Children and adults count on their familiar pattern of everyday life.
  • Plan something that you and your child enjoy doing together, like taking a walk, going on a picnic, having some quiet time, or doing something silly. It can help to know there are simple things in life that can help us feel better, in good times and in bad.
  • Even if children don’t mention what they’ve seen or heard in the news, it can help to ask what they think has happened. If parents don’t bring up the subject, children can be left with their misinterpretations. You may be really surprised at how much your child has heard from others.
  • Focus attention on the helpers, like the police, firemen, doctors, nurses, paramedics, and volunteers. It’s reassuring to know there are many caring people who are doing all they can to help others in this world.
  • Let your child know if you’re making a donation, going to a town meeting, writing a letter or e-mail of support, or taking some other action. It can help children to know that adults take many different active roles and that we don’t give in to helplessness in times of worldwide crisis.

 

04 – Resources – AKIDSCO – A Kids Book About School Shootings – Free
May 24 all-day

A Kids Book About School Shootings

Crystal Woodman Miller

Many of us are going to need to find the words to talk to the kids in our lives about tragic events like the school shooting in Uvalde, Texas. Here’s a free resource from A Kids Company About to help you do that was written by Crystal Woodman-Miller, one of the survivors of the Columbine school shooting.

I hate that we need tools like this. I can’t wait for us to have to write the book “A Kids Book About Why It’s So Hard To Buy A Gun”

Link: www.akidsco.com

There aren’t enough words to explain all the thoughts, emotions, and heartbreak that comes with yesterday’s tragedy in Uvalde. We hope this book helps everyone start somewhere.

We’re making #AKidsBookAboutSchoolShootings free for kids, grownups, and educators everywhere, so that this conversation can get started when it matters most.

FREE DOWNLOAD

A Kids Book About School Shootings by Crystal Woodman Miller:

Link: akidsco.com

 

04 – Resources – APH – American Printing House for the Blind – VisionAware – Visual Impairment Information Service
May 24 all-day

 

 

 

 

VisionAware

Are you or a family member having difficulty seeing? Or perhaps been diagnosed with an eye condition such as macular degeneration, cataracts, glaucoma, or diabetic retinopathy? If the answer is yes, you’re not alone: vision problems affect 25 million Americans, and they are on the rise.

VisionAware is a free, easy-to-use informational service for adults who are blind or have low vision, their families, caregivers, healthcare providers, and social service professionals. Visitors will find tips and resources on living with blindness or low vision; information on eye diseases and disorders; and a searchable, free Directory of Services.

man getting an eye exam

Eye Conditions

Some changes in vision are normal as we grow older. This section of our website can help you understand these vision changes, alert you to abnormal changes in vision, and […]

READ MORE

Man sitting on park bench with white cane holding his phone

Recreation and Leisure

From crafts, woodworking, traveling, and reading to sports and exercise, this section is full of information on the variety of activities people who are blind or low vision can engage […]

READ MORE

Person using a refreshable braille display.

Products and Technology

Discover low and high-tech solutions enabling independence at home and work, connection with friends and family, and enjoyment of hobbies and leisure activities.

READ MORE

Professionals in scrubs talking

Professionals

Find resources and techniques you can use to serve people who are blind or low vision effectively and safely, and learn key information about the impact of aging and vision […]

READ MORE

Older man wearing eyeglasses surrounded by family of various ages

Families and Friends

Do you know someone (parent or family member, neighbor, or friend) having trouble seeing? You may be wondering about blindness/ low vision and how to talk with them about it. […]

READ MORE

Woman sitting in kitchen reading braille.

Living with Blindness or Low Vision

If you are new to blindness or low vision, take the journey one day and one step at a time. Utilize our tips for adjusting to vision changes, living independently, […]

Read More

04 – Resources – Autism Resources, Articles, Support
May 24 all-day
04 - Resources - Autism Resources, Articles, Support

 

 

 

 

What is Autism?

What you should know

Autism is a severe developmental disorder that affects the way a child sees and interacts with the rest of the world. It limits their ability to interact with others socially, in fact many autism suffers avoid human contact.

Autism is part of a larger group of disorders called pervasive developmental disorders (PDD). More information about autism: Click on each of these links

 

Autism-Definition

Autism is a developmental disability that comes from a neurological disorder that affects the normal functioning of the brain. It is characterized by the abnormal development of communication skills, social skills, and reasoning. Males are affected four times as often as females. Children may appear normal until around the age of 30 months.

 

Click each of these following titles learn more….

Autism Symptoms

Autism Symptoms vary widely in severity, include impairment in social interaction, fixation on inanimate objects, inability to communicate normally, and resistance to changes in daily routine. Characteristic traits include lack of eye contact, repetition of words or phrases, unmotivated tantrums, inability to express needs verbally, and insensitivity to pain.

Behaviors may change over time. Autistic children often have other disorders of brain function; about two thirds are mentally retarded; over one quarter develop seizures.

What Autism is Not

Autism can be confused with several other disorders which may have similar behaviors. Here is a list of autism like disorders that you should look at.

What Causes Autism

It remains unclear, but a psychological one has been ruled out. Neurological studies seem to indicate a primary brain dysfunction, and a genetic component is suggested by a pattern of autism in some families. It is largely believed that autism is a genetic disorder that involves several genes related to gene function. However it is unclear to researchers what causes these genes to turn on. Learn more about other causes of autism.

Autism Research

There are many exciting developments in autism research going on at the top universities. They are focusing on inherited autism and autism gene research.

Other Autism Spectrum Disorders

Asperger’s Syndrome – A child with asperger’s disorder has the same common problems as children with autism however they don’t have language development problems of a autistic child.

Pervasive Developmental Disorder and not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) – This child has autism but doesn’t meet the criteria for high functioning autism.

High-Functioning Autism – This child has autism but has normal learning and cognitive and learning skills. Language development is difficult initially but they become proficient eventually.

 

FAQ about Autism Special Education and IEP

This is an important list of questions and answers to help you deal with special education issues at your school.

 

Autism Tips for working with Teachers

This is a great check list of items to be aware of when you work with your child’s teacher and your child’s Individual Education Plan.

Tip: Go to our Autism education discussion boards and post a question with other parents.

Early Origins of Autism

 

ADDITIONAL LINKS TO RESOURCES AND EXPERTISE

Ask an Expert on Autism

Health Finder

Talk to Autism Expert

National Institutes of Mental Health

Combined Health Information Database

Abstracts on Autism

 

 

Searchable Directory of Autism Resources

CLICK HERE TO VISIT THE DIRECTORY PAGE 

Or Click on the Topic area directly below

Adult Resources

Attorneys & Advocates

Behavior/Family Training

Community Living

Education

Medical Providers/Diagnosis

Non-English Resources

Respite Care Providers

Safety

Sports & Camps

Therapy Providers

 

Autism NOW Center’s fact sheets on topics of importance to people with autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disabilities are a resource you and your family members, as well as educators, employers, physicians and others, can use to get information in an easy-to-read and understand format.  The fact sheets are available in several languages in PDF form which can be printed out for your convenience. See the full list of topics and language choices below.

English:

Spanish:

Find the resources you need 1-885-828-847

 

Article Links

Follow this page link for listings of over 800 articles and resources

https://autismnow.org/resources/

Interagency Autism Coordination Committee

 

About Autism

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disability that is estimated to affect about 1 in 36 children and approximately 2.21% of adults. Autism affects the way a person experiences the world and can result in significant challenges in social communication and interaction, as well as repetitive behaviors and unusual or intense interests.

People on the autism spectrum often have a strong preference for routines and predictability, and some are challenged in adapting to change. Many people on the autism spectrum experience sensory differences, including high or low sensitivity to sounds, light, textures, tastes, and physical touch. Some have accompanying language and/or intellectual disabilities, and some may be intellectually gifted or possess other unique abilities, talents, or strengths.

ASD can be diagnosed at any age, but differences generally appear in the first two years of life. ASD is known as a “spectrum” condition because it encompasses a wide variation in the type, combination, and severity of disabilities, as a well as a range of unique abilities and strengths, many of which can change over the course of a person’s lifespan. The type and intensity of supports and services that a child or adult on the autism spectrum may require, ranging from minimal to intensive, will vary depending on their unique needs.

With appropriate supports and an environment that promotes inclusion, acceptance, and empowerment, people on the autism spectrum can fully participate in community life and achieve their full potential.

This page includes resources that provide general information about autism.

 

Websites and Programs

The Autistic Self Advocacy Network was created by autistic people and for autistic people. This page provides an overview of typical characteristics of autism.

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

This tool kit provides families of children ages four and under with guidance on how to access services the first 100 days after an autism diagnosis.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

March 2020

This report from provides an overview of 2016 data collected by the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network and Early ADDM. ADDM provides estimates of the prevalence of ASD among 8-year-old children. Early ADDM estimates ASD prevalence and monitors early identification of 4-year-old children. Full findings of the data on 8-year-old and 4-year-old children are available.

March 2020

The CDC released their first estimate of the prevalence of autism in adults based on 2017 data. They estimated that 2.21 percent of adults in the United States have ASD.

More Reports

Videos

April 24, 2019

NIMH Director Joshua Gordon, M.D., Ph.D. interviews Ann Wagner, Ph.D., National Autism Coordinator, and Lisa Gilotty, Ph.D., program chief of NIMH’s chief of NIMH’s Research Program on Autism Spectrum Disorders, to discuss advances on the study of autism in adulthood.

 

Federal Departments and Agencies

This list includes federal departments and agencies that provide funding, programs, and support for issues related to autism and other developmental disabilities.

Independent Agencies

  • National Council on Disability (NCD)
    • Meetings and Events The NCD is an independent federal agency that advises the President, Congress, and other federal agencies on policies, programs, practices, and procedures that affect people with disabilities. Their meetings are open to the public.
    • Resources This page includes information on disability rights and links to resources and services on education, employment, financial assistance and incentives, health care, housing, and more.
  • National Science Foundation (NSF)
    • About NSF The NSF is an independent federal agency that supports fundamental research and education in all non-medical fields of science and engineering.
  • Social Security Administration (SSA)
    • Disability Benefits The Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability programs provide assistance to people with disabilities. This page explains these benefits and the application process.
    • Spotlight on Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Accounts Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (ABLE) allows individuals with disabilities to make tax-free saving accounts to cover qualified disability expenses. Individuals can save up to $100,000 without counting against their Supplemental Security Income (SSI) eligibility.

Transition from youth to adulthood

Websites and Programs

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

ASAN partnered with the Family Network on Disabilities to produce this guide, which prepares transition age youth for adulthood. The first half provides information on preparing for transition and the second half gives in-depth information on post-secondary education, employment, housing and independent living, and healthcare.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

March 22, 2018

This report examines guardianship and makes recommendations for its use. Recommendations are based on disability law and policy, how people with disabilities are treated in the legal system, alternatives to guardianship, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

March 13, 2019

This report describes the demographics, disability, education, and health characteristics of teens and young adults ages 12-23 on the autism spectrum.

More Reports

Research Articles

More Research Articles

Videos

March 23, 2020

This webinar provided information about supports and resources to improve access to competitive, integrated employment for youth and young adults on the autism spectrum and enhance their career pathways.

 

 

Employment

National data has shown that many autistic adults are unemployed or underemployed, even when compared to people with other disabilities and in spite of having needed skills and abilities for the workplace. Researchers and policy makers have worked to develop programs that can increase opportunities for employment and improve employment outcomes. This includes job training and recruitment programs, as well as supports for employees and employers to increase retention and success in the workplace. This page provides information related to employment for people with autism and other disabilities.

Websites and Programs

This program helps public and private sectors recruit, hire, train, and retain job seekers with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

This plain language toolkit explains the existing policies that help people with disabilities people find and keep good jobs, and solve employment problems.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

October 9, 2018

Of the 74 state vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies that responded to GAO’s survey, most reported expanding services to help students with disabilities transition from school to work as required under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), enacted in July 2014. Most state agencies reported serving more students and providing work-based learning experiences and other activities.

May 12, 2020

Researchers analyzed Rehabilitation Services Administration data to determine the association of vocational rehabilitation services with employment outcomes for students ages 16-21. Students with autism were less likely to receive job-related services less than comparison groups.

More Reports

Research Articles

More Research Articles

Videos

March 23, 2020

In this webinar, Scott Michael Robertson Ph.D. provides information about government supports and resources that help youth and young adults with autism access competitive, integrated employment and enhance their careers. Full Transition Aged Youth Webinar Series.

Housing

Housing plays an important role in ensuring the well being of people on the autism spectrum and helping them integrate into the community. Some people can live independently with minimal or no supports, while others require high levels of support. There is a variety of federal and private resources that can enable people to live in settings that best fit their needs. This page provides information about models of housing for people with disabilities and resources and programs related to disability housing.

Websites and Programs

  • Medicaid.Gov
    • Home & Community Based Services This page provides information on Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) regulations. The page includes a training series for stakeholders, transition plans for individual states, technical assistance, and more. The Final Regulation page provides an overview of rules and regulations states must follow when providing HCBS under Medicaid.
  • The Arc
    • Housing Overview This page provides an overview of housing issues that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) encounter as well the Arc’s advocacy efforts. The page also describes key federal housing initiatives that enable people with I/DD to live in the community and links to additional resources.

More Websites and Programs

Toolkits and Guides

This handbook is designed to help people with disabilities find and use resources that promote independent living. It includes information on support services and waivers, housing, employment, and community resources. This handbook was created in partnership with Autism NOW Center.

More Toolkits and Guides

Reports

May 24, 2019

This report that examines occurrences of institutionalization of people with disabilities, as well as thwarted threats of institutionalization, during hurricanes and the California wildfires in 2017 and 2018. The NCD found that people with disabilities are frequently institutionalized during and after disasters due to conflicting federal guidance; a lack of equal access to emergency and disaster-related programs and services; and a lack of compliance with federal law.

June 2018

The Residential Information Systems Project (RISP) studies trends in residential service settings, funding, and expenditures for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the United States. The most recent report uses data through Fiscal Year 2016.

More Reports

Research Articles

More Research Articles

Videos

July 23, 2019

This workshop focused on the housing needs of people on the autism spectrum and included examples of various housing models. Meeting details.

July 26, 2017

JaLynn Prince, Adrienne McBride, and Desiree Kameka present Madison House Autism Foundation’s Autism After 21 initiative. Madison House aims to raise awareness of the abilities of and issues facing adults with autism. They also promote housing options for adults with autism and other I/DD through the Autism Housing Network. Meeting details.

 

For Service Providers and Public Services

Unlocking Potential: Innovative Library Programs Enhancing the Lives of Autistic Individuals

http://librarysciencedegreesonline.org/libraries-and-autism/

 

Making Entertainment and Public Spaces More Autistim-Friendly

https://happiful.com/making-entertainment-and-public-spaces-more-autistic-friendly

 

 

04 – Resources – TIO – Trauma Informed Oregon – Resources, Training and Education.
May 24 all-day
04 - Resources - TIO - Trauma Informed Oregon - Resources, Training and Education.

Trauma Informed Oregon – Resources, Training and Education

 

A Guide for Youth: Understanding Trauma

This guide is designed to help youth make a connection between stressful events and the potential lasting impacts. Understanding trauma and having a framework to talk about past experiences can help in processing and asking for help. This understanding supports healing. Source: Brianne Masselli and Johanna Bergan, Youth M.O.V.E. National A Guide for Youth: Understanding Trauma

A Trauma Informed Workforce: An Introduction to Workforce Wellness

This document developed by TIO provides foundational information about workforce wellness. It provides background and definitions to assist partners that are beginning to address workforce wellness in their programs and organizations. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

A Treatment Improvement Protocol: Trauma-Informed Care in Behavioral Health Services

A SAMHSA Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) with best practice guidelines for trauma informed care. TIPs are developed by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Each TIP involves the development of topic-specific best practice guidelines for the prevention A Treatment Improvement Protocol: Trauma-Informed Care in Behavioral Health Services

ACE Score Calculator

Learn about the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) measure and its use, and calculate your ACE and resilience scores. An ACE score is a tally of different types of abuse, neglect, and other hallmarks of a rough childhood. According to the Adverse Childhood Experiences study, the rougher your childhood, the higher your ACE Score Calculator

Addressing Secondary Stress: Strong in the Broken Places

This PowerPoint presentation, with accompanying video, addresses secondary stress and the impact and solutions to vicarious traumatization in the workforce. Source: Wayne Scott, MA, LCSW Download PDF View Video

Agency Components for Trauma Informed Care

This checklist can help assess the physical environment and selected intake and service procedures in an agency setting. Source: Region 3 Behavioral Health Services, Kearney, Nebraska Download PDF

AMH Approved Evidence-Based Practices

This list is an informational tool for providers to select and implement Evidence-Based Practices (EPBs). The list represents EBPs meeting the Addictions and Mental Health Services (AMH) definition and standards for EPBs. Source: Oregon Health Authority View Resources

Applying Trauma Informed Care Principles in Home Visiting

This full-day TIO training covers the definition of trauma and trauma informed care (TIC), the neurobiology of trauma, principles of TIC, and workforce stress. Originally created for home visiting and early childhood professionals some content has been tailored for these fields. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

Attunement and Self-Assessment in Supervision

Resource developed by TIO with strategies for “tuning” in as a supervisor as well as questions you can use to assess how trauma informed the supervision is. It is not an exhaustive list but it can be helpful in doing a personal assessment. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Behaviors and Actions of Trauma Informed Leaders

This TIO TIP sheet includes a summary of data on what trauma informed care looks like in leadership, among staff, and in an organization. Characteristics of a trauma informed leader are mapped out. The qualitative data included in the TIP sheet was collected formally and informally at several TIO community Behaviors and Actions of Trauma Informed Leaders

Books for Kids

A list of books that were written for children who may be coping with adversity or trauma in their lives. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Brief Trauma Questionnaire (Adults)

The BTQ is a 10-item self-report questionnaire designed to assess traumatic exposure according to DSM-IV but specifically including only life threat/serious injury) because of the difficulty of accurately assessing subjective response. Source: National Center for PTSD, US Department of Veterans Affairs View Resource

Child and Family Law Courts Meet Brain Science

This 5-minute video depicts a call to action for the legal community to learn as much as possible about brain science to make sure our law and policy are aligned with the focus on the latest information for building the capabilities of caregivers and strengthening the communities that together form Child and Family Law Courts Meet Brain Science

Child Welfare Trauma Training Toolkit 2nd Ed.

This curriculum is designed to teach basic knowledge, skills, and values about working with children who are in the child welfare system and who have experienced traumatic events. Source: National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2013 View Resource

Clackamas Behavioral Health Care Trauma-Informed Services Policy

An agency-wide trauma informed services policy developed by the Clackamas County Behavioral Health Division (CCBHD). Source: Clackamas County Behavioral Health Division (CCBHD) Download PDF

Clackamas County Behavioral Health Clinics Adult Consumer Services Survey

Consumer feedback survey that includes elements of trauma informed care, developed by Clackamas County Behavioral Health Clinics to help improve services and monitor progress in implementing trauma informed care. Source: Clackamas County Behavioral Health Division (CCBHD) Download PDF

Co-Regulation

Co-regulation follows attachment and precedes self-regulation in human emotional development. This presentation discusses the role of co-regulation in child-caregiver relationships, and how co-regulation can be strengthened. Source: Jean Barbre, EdD, LMFT Download PDF

Common Acronyms

A set of common acronyms related to trauma and trauma and trauma informed care, along with definitions of key terms. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Considerations for Responding to Crisis

Crisis response resource developed by TIO for agencies providing housing and shelter services to youth. Feel free to use this document in the development of your own agency trauma informed crisis response plan. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Considerations When Hiring a Trainer

Document developed by TIO that you can use to find the best trauma informed care trainer for your specific needs. It includes both reflective questions and interview questions. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

 

COVID-19 Considerations for a Trauma Informed Response for Work Settings

This TIO TIP sheet provides trauma informed considerations for work settings as we all navigate the uncharted territory and response to novel Coronavirus (COVID-19). The considerations included in the document are grounded in the principles of trauma informed care. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF Vietnamese PDF

Creating Cultures of Trauma-Informed Care (CCTIC): A Self-Assessment and Planning Protocol

This assessment tool provides guidelines for agencies or programs interested in facilitating trauma-informed modifications in their service systems. For use by administrators, providers, and survivor-consumers in the development, implementation, evaluation, and ongoing monitoring of trauma-informed programs. Source: Community Connections; Washington, D.C. Roger D. Fallot, Ph.D. and Maxine Harris, Ph.D. Download Creating Cultures of Trauma-Informed Care (CCTIC): A Self-Assessment and Planning Protocol

Crosswalk Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

Crosswalk between the TIO Standards of Practice and the OHA Trauma Informed Services Policy for organizations that are required to demonstrate compliance with the 2015 Trauma Informed Services Policy of the Oregon Health Authority (OHA). Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Dealing with Resistance to Trauma Informed Care

In any community that attempts Trauma Informed Care, some people resist the science and they resist the spending of tax dollars to help people who have been damaged by childhood trauma, also known as Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). Laura Porter from Ace Interface talks about how to respond. Source: Laura Dealing with Resistance to Trauma Informed Care

Dealing with the Effects of Trauma: A Self-Help Guide

Learn the symptoms of trauma and get ideas and strategies that can help you better cope. The information in this federally sponsored booklet can be used safely along with your other health care treatment. Source: Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Download PDF

Definitions and Additional Resources for the Standards of Practice

This document provides definitions and suggested resources to support use of the Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care. It is a downloadable and printable version (PDF) of information that appears in pop-up windows for the online version of the Standards. Each item in the Definitions and Additional Resources is Definitions and Additional Resources for the Standards of Practice

Disaster Resilience Learning Collaborative Evaluation Report

Disaster Resilience Learning Collaborative Evaluation Report: Creating Culturally-Grounded Healing Spaces by Leaders of Color for Leaders of Color is an evaluation of the Disaster Resilience Learning Collaborative (DRLC), a collaborative dedicated to creating culturally-grounded healing spaces by leaders of color and for leaders of color in disaster work. The DRLC Disaster Resilience Learning Collaborative Evaluation Report

Education Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

These guidelines have been adapted for educational settings from the Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care developed by Trauma Informed Oregon and with information from educational communities across the state provided by the Defending Childhood Initiative. These guidelines are intended to provide benchmarks for planning and monitoring progress and Education Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

Evidence Based Practices Resource Center

SAMHSA’s National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices promotes the adoption of scientifically established behavioral health interventions. Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) View Resource

For Youth by Youth: Foundations of Trauma Informed Care

This training revamps the Foundations of Trauma Informed Care training by making it more youth friendly, strengths based, and interactive. This is done by providing opportunities for young adults to engage in discussions on trauma and resilience with scenarios that relate to youth. The training also provides skills and tools For Youth by Youth: Foundations of Trauma Informed Care

Foundations of Trauma Informed Care (formerly TIC 101)

This (typically) 4 hr TIO training provides foundational knowledge appropriate for individuals across sectors and job titles. After defining key terms, including stress, trauma and systemic oppression, we explore how trauma and adversity affect individual’s access to services. Participants begin to identify how service systems, often unknowingly, retraumatize survivors of Foundations of Trauma Informed Care (formerly TIC 101)

General Parenting Resources

Check here to find books by experts in the field that may be helpful to parents and other caregivers dealing with children and youth affected by trauma. There are additional books for adult survivors of trauma who are parenting. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Gift From Within

This website for survivors of trauma has educational materials about PTSD and links to international support groups. In addition to educational material, the website has a roster of survivors who are willing to participate in an international network of peer support. Source: Gift from Within, Camden, Maine View Resource

Guide to Reviewing Existing Policies

Guide developed by TIO to help organizations review a specific policy about service exclusion through a trauma informed lens. Some of the questions in the guide may be helpful as you are developing or reviewing policies. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Healthcare Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

These Standards of Practice for healthcare settings provide a set of benchmarks for planning and monitoring progress implementation of TIC in clinic settings. The tool is an adaptation of the Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care developed for general use across health, behavioral health and related systems serving trauma Healthcare Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

Helping Teens with Traumatic Grief: Tips for Caregivers

This tip sheet from NCTSN offers ways to recognize and help your teen who may have difficulty coping after a sudden or violent death. Each teen grieves in a unique way so it’s important to understand your teen’s point of view. Source: National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) Download PDF

Historical Highlights of Trauma Informed Care

Timeline compiled by TIO of important National and Oregon-specific efforts to initiate trauma informed care. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Homeless Youth Continuum Tragedy Response Plan

The Homeless Youth Continuum created this Tragedy Response Plan as a way to support organizations in the continuum when a tragedy has occurred. This plan can be adapted to fit your organization or specific community. Source: Homeless Youth Continuum, Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Hosting a Meeting Using Principles of Trauma Informed Care

Bulleted list developed by TIO of things to do to take to prepare for and run a meeting that is trauma informed. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

Hosting a Virtual Meeting Using Trauma Informed Principles

This TIP sheet developed by TIO offers strategies for hosting virtual meetings that promote safety, power, and value. Hosting virtual meetings and trainings using SAMHSA’s six principles of trauma informed care can foster a space where participants are present & accessible, and their exposure to activation and re-traumatization is mitigated. Hosting a Virtual Meeting Using Trauma Informed Principles

 

How stress affects your brain – Madhumita Murgia

This accessible video describes how stress affects the brain and offers suggestions about how to reduce the impact. Madhumita Murgia shows how chronic stress can affect brain size, its structure, and how it functions, right down to the level of your genes. Source: TED Ed View Video

Human Resources Practices to Support TIC

List of strategies from TIO to promote trauma informed care through human resource policies and practices, including hiring, onboarding, supervision and performance reviews. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Identifying Hotspots Worksheet

A hands-on activity to walk through a critical thinking process about where and how organizations may activate a trauma response in staff or the population served. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Implementation of Trauma Informed Care

This TIO workshop is typically conducted as a working meeting, providing an opportunity for supervisors, managers and other champions of TIC a chance to identify how TIC applies to their work cross-system partnerships. A roadmap for the implementation of trauma informed care, along with TIO resources to guide the process Implementation of Trauma Informed Care

In the Gray Area of Being Suicidal

This short film shares the personal experience of a young adult experiencing suicidal thoughts along with their suggestions for wellness. Source: The Mighty View Video

International Transformational Resilience Coalition (ITRC) Climate Community of Practice Resource List

International Transformational Resilience Coalition (ITRC) Climate Community of Practice (CoP) Resource List 2022 Source: International Resilience Coalition’s 2022 Community of Practice Participants Download PDF

Intersections of Trauma Informed Care (TIC) and Diversity, Equity, Inclusion (DEI) Model

This infographic offers a model for thinking about the intersections of TIC and DEI. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Key Terms Related to Realizing the Widespread Impact of Trauma

This is a comprehensive list of terms related to realizing the widespread impact of trauma. The intention of the list is to be valuable, inclusive, and honor the array of potentially toxic experiences that exist. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon, and Trauma Informed Oregon Volunteer, Rebecca Saunders English PDF Spanish PDF

La Crianza de Los Hijos Durante COVID-19

Trauma Informed Oregon cree en el poder curativo de contar historias propias, y creemos que este poder es aún más crítico para los padres y las familias que crían a sus hijos durante la pandemia de COVID-19. Estamos muy agradecidos por la oportunidad de tener estas conversaciones con padres, cuidadores La Crianza de Los Hijos Durante COVID-19

Life Events Checklist for DSM-5 (Adults)

The LEC-5 is a self-report measure designed to screen for potentially traumatic events in a respondent’s lifetime. The LEC-5 assesses exposure to 16 events known to potentially result in PTSD or distress and includes one additional item assessing any other extraordinarily stressful event not captured in the first 16 items. Life Events Checklist for DSM-5 (Adults)

Literature on ACEs and Trauma

A list of key research articles about trauma, including studies related to prevalence, impact, and treatment, as well as information on the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Literature on Trauma Informed Care

A list of TIO’s favorite articles on trauma informed care, including early delineation of the principles of trauma informed care, the voices and perspective of trauma survivors, and seminal work in the housing field. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Looking for Trauma Specific Services?

This document developed by TIO is intended to serve as a resource to those seeking trauma specific services (TSS) and those who may be making referrals for TSS. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Making Your Voice Heard: Suggestions for Youth by Youth for use in Emergency Rooms

This tip sheet for youth by youth gives tips and resources for collaborating and engaging with providers so that youth and young adults can better get their needs met. The resource was developed by TIO’s Oregon Trauma Advocates Coalition (OTAC). OTAC is comprised of youth from around Oregon who are Making Your Voice Heard: Suggestions for Youth by Youth for use in Emergency Rooms

Mindfulness and Neural Integration: Daniel Siegel, MD

In this video, Dr. Daniel Siegel explores how relationships and reflection support the development of resilience in children and serve as the basic ‘3 R’s” of a new internal education of the mind. Source: TEDxStudioCityED View Video

Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support

A 12-item self-report measure of social support, using a 7-point scale from ‘very strongly agree’ to ‘very strongly disagree.’ Source: Zimet, Dahlem, Zimet & Farley, 1988 Download PDF

Nadine Burke Harris: How childhood trauma affects health across a lifetime

Childhood trauma isn’t something you just get over as you grow up. Pediatrician Nadine Burke Harris explains that the repeated stress of abuse, neglect and parents struggling with mental health or substance abuse issues has real, tangible effects on the development of the brain. Source: TED Talk View Video

National Child Traumatic Stress Network Empirically Supported Treatments and Promising Practices

The fact sheets linked from this page offer descriptive summaries of some of the clinical treatments, mental health interventions, and other trauma-informed service approaches that the NCTSN and its various centers have developed and/or implemented as a means of promoting the Network’s mission of raising the standard of care for National Child Traumatic Stress Network Empirically Supported Treatments and Promising Practices

National Child Traumatic Stress Network Standardized Measures to Assess Complex Trauma

The NCTSN’s database of tools that measure children’s experiences of trauma, their reactions to it, and other mental health and trauma-related issues. Source: National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) View Resource

Neighborhood Emergency Teams (NETs)

This City of Portland run program trains residents to provide emergency disaster assistance within their own neighborhoods. Their website also offers many resources and tools for getting organized and being prepared in an emergency. Source: Planning for Resilience & Emergency Preparedness (PREP) View Website PDF

Road Map to Trauma Informed Care

Check out the TIO Road Map to TIC, which offers phases to the implementation process. Each phase contains a marker(s) along the road that is integral to implementing that phase. When clicking on the road or phase sign, a hover box provides a description of that phase and leads you Road Map to Trauma Informed Care

SAMHSA’s Concept of Trauma and Guidance for a Trauma-Informed Approach

This document provides a working concept of trauma and a trauma-informed approach applicable across an array of service systems and stakeholder groups. In this paper, SAMHSA puts forth a framework for the behavioral health specialty sectors that can be adapted to other sectors such as child welfare, education, criminal and SAMHSA’s Concept of Trauma and Guidance for a Trauma-Informed Approach

Social Emotional Learning Resources

This list of resources in English and Spanish contains culturally-responsive, anti-racist information on Social Emotional Learning for educators, parents/guardians, and students. Editable Document Download PDF

Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care

These Standards of Practice for Trauma Informed Care developed by TIO provide benchmarks for planning and monitoring progress and a means to highlight accomplishments as organizations work towards implementing trauma informed care. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon View Resource Spanish PDF

State of Connecticut Department of Children and Families – Trauma-Informed Care

This site provides a list of effective interventions for children and youth who experience symptoms related to trauma. Source: Department of Children and Families, Connecticut View Resource

Staying Connected while Physically Distancing

This TIO TIP sheet includes resources to support social connection while physical distancing during COVID-19. Physical distancing does not have to equate to social isolation. With a variety of technologies, virtual socializing is easier than ever before. Use video calling to socialize with family and friends, host a happy hour Staying Connected while Physically Distancing

Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (children and youth)

The SDQ is a brief behavioral screening questionnaire about 3-16 year olds. It exists in several versions to meet the needs of researchers, clinicians and educationalists. Source: YouthinMind View Resource

Summary of the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study

This handout briefly summarizes the ACE study, conducted by researchers from Kaiser Permanente and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) to study how adversity in childhood predicts adult physical, mental, and social well-being. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF Spanish PDF Russian PDF

Supporting Each Other and Ourselves: Trauma Informed Peer Support

This training is designed for people who provide peer recovery and support services and peer wellness services. Building on Foundations of Trauma Informed Care, the focus of this training is to help those who access services gain a better understanding of how their body responds to trauma and chronic stress Supporting Each Other and Ourselves: Trauma Informed Peer Support

Talking About Trauma and Suicide in Public Meetings

Recommendations from TIO to assist in preparing, facilitating and responding in a meeting when sharing personal experiences that may cause distress and trauma, to reflect a trauma informed approach. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Download PDF

The Anatomy of a Trauma Informed Script

This TIP sheet developed by TIO provides tools for making communication trauma informed. The resource maps out the key components that make a script (or set of words) trauma informed. A trauma informed script will help you stay regulated when you are delivering difficult news or getting hard questions. Source: The Anatomy of a Trauma Informed Script

The Child PTSD Symptom Scale (8 – 18yo)

The CPSS is a 26-item self-report measure that assesses PTSD diagnostic criteria and symptom severity in children ages 8 to 18. It includes 2 event items, 17 symptom items, and 7 functional impairment items. Source: National Center for PTSD, US Department of Veterans Affairs View Resource

The Impact of Trauma on Regulation

This presentation discusses types and degrees of trauma and their effect on beliefs, behaviors, emotional health, and more. Various brain functions and how they are affected by trauma are also discussed. Source: Diane Wagenhals, Program Director for Lakeside Global Institute Download PDF

The Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (8 – 18yo)

The JVQ is designed to gather information on a broad range of victimizations that may occur in childhood. It can enhance the assessment of any child or adolescent by providing a quantified description of all of the major forms of offenses against youth. Either youth or parents can complete the The Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (8 – 18yo)

The Magnitude of the Solution

A PowerPoint presentation focusing on risk, co-occurring problems, public costs, and high leverage solutions to childhood adversity. Source: Laura Porter, ACE Interface Download PDF

Through Our Eyes: Children, Violence, and Trauma

This video series discusses how violence and trauma affect children, including the serious and long-lasting consequences for their physical and mental health; signs that a child may be exposed to violence or trauma; and the staggering cost of child maltreatment to families, communities, and the nation. Victims lend their voices Through Our Eyes: Children, Violence, and Trauma

TIO Introduction to Trauma Informed Care Training Modules

These free online training modules have been created to increase access to foundational training so that the key guiding principles of trauma informed care are accessible to everyone. These four modules are self-guided and self-administered. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon View Training

To Live to See the Great Day that Dawns: Preventing Suicide by American Indian and Alaska Native Youth

This suicide prevention manual assists tribes and communities in developing effective and culturally appropriate suicide prevention plans for American Indian and Alaska Native teens and young adults. Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Download PDF

Train the Trainer Presentation in Spanish Definiciones (Key Terms in Spanish)

This Powerpoint document was produced by Trauma Informed Oregon. It is part of Train the Trainer presentation in Spanish with Definiciones — Key terms in Spanish. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Transformational Resilience Program

Learn about climate disruption and trauma and how to develop preventative resilience skills. The Resource Innovation Group (TRIG) is a non-partisan non-profit organization affiliated with the Sustainability Institute at Willamette University. TRIG’s mission is to address the human causes, impacts, and solutions to complex socio-economic-ecological challenges, with a special emphasis on climate Transformational Resilience Program

Trauma Education Statement

A workshop activity to help participants begin to view challenging behavior through a ‘trauma lens’, i.e., with heightened awareness of the role and impact of trauma. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care – Framework for Action

A graphic that depicts the principles of trauma informed care along with the role and major activities of Trauma Informed Oregon. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

Trauma Informed Care for Autistic Survivors

Disabled individuals and individuals with disabilities experience high rates of interpersonal violence and other negative life experiences which can lead to trauma. Additionally, due to systemic ableism and other forms of oppression individuals experiencing disability can have difficulty getting access to supportive services. An important part of providing trauma informed Trauma Informed Care for Autistic Survivors

Trauma Informed Care for Survivors With Disabilities

Disabled individuals and individuals with disabilities experience high rates of interpersonal violence and other negative life experiences which can lead to trauma. Additionally, due to systemic ableism and other forms of oppression individuals experiencing disability can have difficulty getting access to supportive services. An important part of providing trauma informed Trauma Informed Care for Survivors With Disabilities

Trauma Informed Care in the Classroom: A Resource Guide for Educators in Higher Learning

TIP sheet from TIO on how to create academic environments that are trauma informed. The TIP sheet aims to provide educators with tools that acknowledge the diverse backgrounds of each student that enters their classroom in order to enhance learning opportunities for all. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care Supervision: Questions and Ideas Table

Table developed by TIO that includes ideas and questions to help supervisors implement trauma informed care in their supervision practices. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care Workgroup Meeting Guidelines

List of questions from TIO to help set guidelines for Workgroup meetings. As TIC Workgroups form and begin to gather information, identify opportunities, set priorities for change, and propose solutions, there are a number of considerations that can help keep the process on track. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Neuro Takeaways

A brief bulleted list of key facts about the neuroscience of trauma as it relates to trauma informed care. Source: Julie Rosenzweig, PhD, Regional Research Institute, Portland State University Download PDF

Trauma Informed Oregon Survey Tools

This PDF lists and describes different survey tools TIO regularly offers organizations interested in TIC. Feel free to reach out to info@traumainformedoregon.org if you would like a copy or guidance for how to use these surveys Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Parenting During COVID-19

Trauma Informed Oregon believes in the healing power of telling one’s story, and we think that this power is even more critical for parents and families raising children during the COVID-19 pandemic. We were so grateful for the opportunity to hold discussions with parents, caregivers and providers to learn more Trauma Informed Parenting During COVID-19

Trauma Informed System Change Instrument Scoring Guide and Psychometrics: Organizational Trauma Informed Change

This tool provides psychometric information and the scoring protocol for child welfare agencies using the Trauma Informed System Change Instrument: Organizational change Self-Evaluation. Source: Southwest Michigan Children’s Trauma Assessment Center Download PDF

Trauma Informed System Change Instrument: Organizational Change Self-Evaluation – The Current System

This organizational assessment was created for child welfare agencies to track system change at a service provider level, at an agency level, and at the county system level. Source: Southwest Michigan Children’s Trauma Assessment Center Download PDF

Trauma Lens Exercise

This table developed by TIO provides examples of how you can reframe challenging behaviors through a trauma lens. The examples in the table are some of the most frequently reported in Trauma Informed Oregon (TIO) trainings and include challenging behaviors from service recipients and staff. It also includes challenging environmental Trauma Lens Exercise

Trauma Specific Services: A Resource for Implementation and Use

Learn about trauma specific services (TSS) and their role in treating individuals affected by trauma, as well as how to implement, seek out, and evaluate these services. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma-Informed Organizational Toolkit for Homeless Services

This organizational assessment was created to provide programs with a roadmap for becoming trauma-informed. The Toolkit offers homeless service providers with concrete guidelines for how to modify their practices and policies to ensure that they are responding appropriately to the needs of families who have experienced traumatic stress. Source: The Trauma-Informed Organizational Toolkit for Homeless Services

Traumatic Events Screening Inventory for Children

The TESI-C assesses a child’s experience of a variety of potential traumatic events including current and previous injuries, hospitalizations, domestic violence, community violence, disasters, accidents, physical abuse, and sexual abuse. The revised 24-item version (also known as the TESI-CRF-R; Ippen et al., 2002) is more developmentally sensitive to the traumatic Traumatic Events Screening Inventory for Children

Wellness Relapse Prevention Plan

This workshop exercise helps training participants to identify warning signs of excess stress or secondary trauma in their work and to create a plan to address it effectively. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

What is Trauma Informed Care?

This document developed by TIO provides general information about trauma informed care (TIC) especially for individuals new to this topic. Included are guiding considerations, principles and definitions offered by experts in the field. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

What One Thing Can You Do Feedback Questionnaire

Workshop activity to help participants consider concrete action steps to implement trauma informed care in their organizations. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

What You Really Need to Know About Being a Trauma-Informed Organization

A PowerPoint presentation from the National Council for organizations seeking to implement the principles of trauma informed care. The recording of the webinar is no longer available, but you can download the slide by clicking on “View the Slides.” Source: National Council for Behavioral Health webinar, Kristi McClure and Cheryl What You Really Need to Know About Being a Trauma-Informed Organization

 

Trauma Education Statement

A workshop activity to help participants begin to view challenging behavior through a ‘trauma lens’, i.e., with heightened awareness of the role and impact of trauma. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care – Framework for Action

A graphic that depicts the principles of trauma informed care along with the role and major activities of Trauma Informed Oregon. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

Trauma Informed Care for Autistic Survivors

Disabled individuals and individuals with disabilities experience high rates of interpersonal violence and other negative life experiences which can lead to trauma. Additionally, due to systemic ableism and other forms of oppression individuals experiencing disability can have difficulty getting access to supportive services. An important part of providing trauma informed Trauma Informed Care for Autistic Survivors

Trauma Informed Care for Survivors With Disabilities

Disabled individuals and individuals with disabilities experience high rates of interpersonal violence and other negative life experiences which can lead to trauma. Additionally, due to systemic ableism and other forms of oppression individuals experiencing disability can have difficulty getting access to supportive services. An important part of providing trauma informed Trauma Informed Care for Survivors With Disabilities

Trauma Informed Care in the Classroom: A Resource Guide for Educators in Higher Learning

TIP sheet from TIO on how to create academic environments that are trauma informed. The TIP sheet aims to provide educators with tools that acknowledge the diverse backgrounds of each student that enters their classroom in order to enhance learning opportunities for all. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care Supervision: Questions and Ideas Table

Table developed by TIO that includes ideas and questions to help supervisors implement trauma informed care in their supervision practices. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Care Workgroup Meeting Guidelines

List of questions from TIO to help set guidelines for Workgroup meetings. As TIC Workgroups form and begin to gather information, identify opportunities, set priorities for change, and propose solutions, there are a number of considerations that can help keep the process on track. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Neuro Takeaways

A brief bulleted list of key facts about the neuroscience of trauma as it relates to trauma informed care. Source: Julie Rosenzweig, PhD, Regional Research Institute, Portland State University Download PDF

Trauma Informed Oregon Survey Tools

This PDF lists and describes different survey tools TIO regularly offers organizations interested in TIC. Feel free to reach out to info@traumainformedoregon.org if you would like a copy or guidance for how to use these surveys Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma Informed Parenting During COVID-19

Trauma Informed Oregon believes in the healing power of telling one’s story, and we think that this power is even more critical for parents and families raising children during the COVID-19 pandemic. We were so grateful for the opportunity to hold discussions with parents, caregivers and providers to learn more Trauma Informed Parenting During COVID-19

Trauma Informed System Change Instrument Scoring Guide and Psychometrics: Organizational Trauma Informed Change

This tool provides psychometric information and the scoring protocol for child welfare agencies using the Trauma Informed System Change Instrument: Organizational change Self-Evaluation. Source: Southwest Michigan Children’s Trauma Assessment Center Download PDF

Trauma Informed System Change Instrument: Organizational Change Self-Evaluation – The Current System

This organizational assessment was created for child welfare agencies to track system change at a service provider level, at an agency level, and at the county system level. Source: Southwest Michigan Children’s Trauma Assessment Center Download PDF

Trauma Lens Exercise

This table developed by TIO provides examples of how you can reframe challenging behaviors through a trauma lens. The examples in the table are some of the most frequently reported in Trauma Informed Oregon (TIO) trainings and include challenging behaviors from service recipients and staff. It also includes challenging environmental Trauma Lens Exercise

Trauma Specific Services: A Resource for Implementation and Use

Learn about trauma specific services (TSS) and their role in treating individuals affected by trauma, as well as how to implement, seek out, and evaluate these services. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

Trauma-Informed Organizational Toolkit for Homeless Services

This organizational assessment was created to provide programs with a roadmap for becoming trauma-informed. The Toolkit offers homeless service providers with concrete guidelines for how to modify their practices and policies to ensure that they are responding appropriately to the needs of families who have experienced traumatic stress. Source: The Trauma-Informed Organizational Toolkit for Homeless Services

Traumatic Events Screening Inventory for Children

The TESI-C assesses a child’s experience of a variety of potential traumatic events including current and previous injuries, hospitalizations, domestic violence, community violence, disasters, accidents, physical abuse, and sexual abuse. The revised 24-item version (also known as the TESI-CRF-R; Ippen et al., 2002) is more developmentally sensitive to the traumatic Traumatic Events Screening Inventory for Children

Wellness Relapse Prevention Plan

This workshop exercise helps training participants to identify warning signs of excess stress or secondary trauma in their work and to create a plan to address it effectively. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

What is Trauma Informed Care?

This document developed by TIO provides general information about trauma informed care (TIC) especially for individuals new to this topic. Included are guiding considerations, principles and definitions offered by experts in the field. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon English PDF Spanish PDF

What One Thing Can You Do Feedback Questionnaire

Workshop activity to help participants consider concrete action steps to implement trauma informed care in their organizations. Source: Trauma Informed Oregon Download PDF

What You Really Need to Know About Being a Trauma-Informed Organization

A PowerPoint presentation from the National Council for organizations seeking to implement the principles of trauma informed care. The recording of the webinar is no longer available, but you can download the slide by clicking on “View the Slides.” Source: National Council for Behavioral Health webinar, Kristi McClure and Cheryl What You Really Need to Know About Being a Trauma-Informed Organization

 

 

05 -Warmline – FACT Oregon – FACT Oregon Support Line – Support for Families with Children Experience Disabilities – Call 503-786-6082 or Text 541-695-5416 – Support Team Responds in 48 -72 Hours – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Call or Text
May 24 all-day

Support Line

FACT Oregon’s Support Line is staffed by parents of youth experiencing disability, and we’re here to help!

Wherever you are on your journey, from birth through young adulthood, we are here to answer your questions and help find resources to support your child’s academic, emotional, and physical growth and well-being! Collectively, our team has the lived experience and professional training needed to support families through many different milestones. Let us help you carve a path forward to a whole full life! We welcome questions about early childhood, special education (we’re the designated statewide Parent Information and Training Center), intellectual and developmental disability services, behavior and communication, self-determination and supported decision making, and so much more! If we don’t know the answer, we’ll try our best to help you find it!

Get Support!

Call or text 503-786-6082 or 541-695-5416

Email us at support@factoregon.org or apoyo@factoregon.org

Someone from our support team will call you back, usually within 48-72 hours. Or, if you’d like, you can choose a time to talk from our calendar by clicking below.

 

To Schedule a Support Call Use The Link Below

Para programar una llamada de soporte, use el siguiente enlace
07 Consumer Input Opportunity – ODHS – Oregon Department of Human Services – Round 4 Child and Family Service Review – Provide Feedback on Child Welfare Services – For Guardians, Resource and Adoptive Parents, Community and Service Providers – Register for Details and Dates @ contact for details
May 24 all-day

 

Child and Family Service Review, 2024

Opportunity to Provide Feedback

Guardians, Resource and Adoptive Parents, Community and Service Providers

 

 

Oregon Child Welfare is currently going through Round 4 of the Child and Family Service Review (CFSR) process (see attachment for more information).

The CFSR is a partnership between federal and state staff to (1) determine the status of federal child welfare requirements; (2) learn about the experiences of children, young adults, and families receiving child welfare services; and (3) assist states in enhancing their capacity to help children and families achieve positive outcomes. These reviews help states identify strengths and areas needing improvement to support improved child welfare services and achieve specific outcomes for families and children who receive services.

Through this review process, the Children’s Bureau determines our performance in seven areas. The goal being to help states improve child welfare services in all areas.

The attached Fact Sheet provides more detail regarding the systemic factors and expected outcomes for families and children receiving child welfare services.  

 The 7 areas being reviewed:

Statewide Information System

Case Review System

Quality Assurance System

Staff and Provider Training

Service Array and Resource Development

Agency Responsiveness to the Community

Foster and Adoptive Parent Licensing, Recruitment, and Retention

We are seeking participation from a wide range of individuals during the review process – families, parents, children, young adults, Tribes, resource and adoptive parents, service providers, legal partners, and child welfare staff. As a foster or adoptive parent or community service provider who serves families involved with child welfare systems, your participation in the CFSR is very important. The CFSR provides an opportunity for you to be heard and provide valuable input on critical child welfare agency policies and programs and the availability, accessibility, and effectiveness of services that affect the lives of children and families involved in the child welfare system.

 If you’re interested in providing input during the CFSR Round 4 review process, please use this link or the QR code included below to share your contact information. We will reach out to you with more information about the following opportunities to provide your insight and experiences:

 May and June 2024: Focus Groups – 1.5-hour virtual sessions; timing will vary depending on topics.

 December 9-14, 2024: Interviews – Portland-area (in-person), Virtual, and after-hours TBD

 Spring 2025: Program improvement planning – TBD location and time

 Please feel free to reach out to Kathy Steiner (Kathy.Steiner@odhs.oregon.gov) if you have additional questions or need to discuss accommodations for participation.

 Thank you for your time and interest. Your input is essential to improving Oregon’s Child Welfare programs!

 

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