PeerGalaxy Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring over 82,000 monthly offerings of FREE telephone- and online-accessible peer support, recovery support + wellness activities!

Over 30+ warmlines plus webinars, workshops, job postings, special events, consumer input opportunities and more.

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

Click the Accessibility Button on the right side, halfway down in the middle, for enhanced viewing and/or access options!  Click the Translate Button in the lower left corner for language options. 

Your use of this site is subject to the Privacy Policy, Terms and Conditions of Use.  Reminder: Fees or charges may be charged by your carrier for sending or receiving SMS text messaging, phone, or data.

If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

Training Opportunities in July 2020
List Provided Courtesy of State of Oregon, Oregon Health Authority
Click here to download PDF Format, 16 pages

How Events are Sorted:

First, at the top of the list: Disaster Hotline & Oregon Safe + Strong Helpline.

Next in the list: Bundled “All Day” Events for organizations with events happening at multiple times throughout the day and/or in many formats or locations; these are bundled into a single listing to prevent endless scrolling.  Usually these offer a lookup by zip code or other criteria. 

Lastly, Time-Specific Events listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  Warmlines and places east of Oregon’s time zone tend to start earlier (e.g. 4am in Oregon is 7am in New York).

May
27
Fri
04 – Resources – ADRCOR – Aging and Disability Resource Connection of Oregon @ phone
May 27 all-day

 

ADRC – OR

Aging and Disability Resource Connection of Oregon

Explore your options

It can be overwhelming to try to understand your options for Long-term Services and Supports. The ADRC of Oregon is here to help.

The information on this website will help you understand the long-term services and supports available in Oregon. You will also find steps you can take now to prepare for your future needs.

You can contact your Local ADRC of Oregon through this website or our toll-free number, Tel: (1-855-673-2372). You will be connected with an information and assistance specialist in your area. That person can help you find resources and refer you to services.

You may need more help planning for a safe and healthy future. A skilled professional options counselor will help you assess your strengths, needs and challenges. The counselor will also help you choose options to improve the quality of your life. The option’s counselor can connect you with local resources. The counselor can also help you resolve problems and help with short- and long-term planning.

ADRC of Oregon’s services are free and available to anyone.

SEARCH RESOURCES BY TOPIC

Click on these links to find resources

Community Support and Recreation

Employment and Education

Family Caregivers and In – Home Services

Financial Assistance

Food

Health and Wellness

Housing

Crisis Support, Legal Services and Safety

Medicare, Medicaid, and Other Insurance

Disability Services and Supports

Transportation

Veterans

Connect with your Local ADRC Of Oregon

Use this link to find ADRC information by your county in Oregon

Plan and Prevent

It can seem overwhelming to plan for possibly needing Long-term services and supports in the future. But it doesn’t have to be. You can make a great start right here with information, tools and guidance from the Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) of Oregon.

The ADRC of Oregon also has offices throughout the state. Staff are trained to talk with you about your situation. An information and referral specialist can help you find resources to meet your current needs. An option’s counselor can talk with you about your long-term care needs and local options. Call Tel: 1-855-673-2372 to get connected with your local ADRC. Then ask to talk with an information and referral specialist or an options counselor.

AM – All Month – VA – VisionAware – 2022 Tax Filing Resources and Rps For Visually Impaired @ Online
May 27 all-day

 

 Fax Filing Resources and Tips for Visually Impaired 2022

 

Tax time is stressful for everyone. It involves organizing receipts and tax documents, filling out confusing forms, working with accountants, and meeting that fast-approaching April deadline. For people with age-related vision problems, there is often added anxiety around tax time since most receipts and paperwork come in small print that is difficult, if not impossible, for people with eye conditions such as glaucoma and macular degeneration to read. To help seniors experiencing vision loss get organized and find helpful resources and tips, here is a Tax Guide dedicated to getting yourself organized for this annual event and making the filing process easier. Getting Ready to File? Help With Filing? Working with an Accountant? Ready to file?

Getting Ready to File? It’s Time to Get Organized!

Need Help With Filing? Follow These Tips.

  • Visit the IRS website to download tax forms and instructions in the format that’s easiest for you to read—whether its large print, braille, or ASCII text and HTML versions for assistive technology users.
  • Use a magnification device to help you read your W-2 and other preprinted tax forms.
  • If you need help preparing basic tax forms, the AARP Tax-Aide program offers free tax preparation help from February 1 through April 15th. Find a Tax-Aide location near you .
  • You can also get free help with your tax return at a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) or Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) site near you. For more information, call 1-800-906-9887 (VITA) or 1-888-227-7669 (TCE).
  • If you are legally blind, indicate that on your tax form since you may qualify for a higher deduction. Find information about itemized deductions for medical expenses.
  • Social Security is offering resources that may help you as you prepare and file your taxes, including where you can find free help and advice.
  • Check out the American Council of the Blind information page on filing taxes.
  • Though online tax preparation and e-filing has become extremely popular, many are not accessible to people who use screen readers or screen magnifiers. Before you start using an online tax program, make sure you can easily navigate it using your assistive technology. More information about accessible tax programs can be found through the AccessWorld review of IRS Free File.

Working With an Accountant? Follow These Tips.

  • It is important to use a reputable accountant because you are ultimately responsible for the return filed under your name. Word-of-mouth is a great way to find a good, credible accountant in your area. The IRS website also offers good tips on finding a credible tax preparer.
  • Once you’re working with an accountant you trust, ask him or her to prepare your taxes using large print forms, or another accessible format, so that you can review your return before you sign it.
  • Make sure to tell your accountant if you are legally blind since you may qualify for a higher deduction.
  • Once your accountant has completed your return, ask him or her to read through the form with you to allow you to ask questions on figures you do not understand.

Ready to File? Follow These Tips.

  • When it’s time to sign your return, use a signature guide to help you ensure you’ve signed in the appropriate place.
  • If you owe money in taxes, and need to write a check, ask your bank to order bold-line large-print checks available from Deluxe (1-800-328-0304).
  • If you are expecting a federal refund, you can check its status through the “Where’s My Refund?” tool on the IRS website. According to the IRS, this online tool is accessible to taxpayers who use the JAWS screen reader alone or when used with a Braille display which is compatible with different JAWS modes.
  • If you do not have internet access, you can check the status of your refund by calling the IRS TeleTax System at 800-829-4477 or the IRS Refund Hotline at 800-829-1954. When calling, you must provide a social security number for you or your spouse, your filing status, and the exact refund amount shown on your return.

To sign up for more useful information, visit the VisionAware’s registration page.

Related Information

A variety of federal and state government financial incentives can help employers capitalize on the skills and talents people with disabilities have to offer. EARN recently developed a new website guide containing detailed descriptions of federal and state tax incentives, including those specific to veterans and return-to-work/stay-at-work initiatives. Visit the Employer Financial Incentives webpage. Find out about the the Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (Able Act). This Act gives people with disabilities a way to save money for qualifying expenses such as a car, college or career training, healthcare, prevention and wellness, and other expenses without being taxed or impacting eligibility for benefit programs. The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) is a Federal benefit for employers hiring individuals from specific target groups, including certain people with disabilities. WOTC helps targeted workers move into self-sufficiency as they earn a steady income, while participating employers are able to reduce their income tax liability.

 

Warmline – IOA – Institute on Aging – The Friendship Line – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
May 27 all-day

THE FRIENDSHIP LINE

24 Hour Telephone Hotline/Warmline

800-971-0016

We support individuals who find connecting within the community challenging

The Institute on Aging’s 24-hour toll-free Friendship Line is the only accredited crisis line in the country for people aged 60 years and older, and adults living with disabilities. We also make on-going outreach calls to lonely older adults. While there are other organizations that respond to the needs of people who may be contemplating suicide, none provides the type of services that IOA’s Friendship Line offers to respond to the public health problem of suicide among the elderly. Knowing that older people do not contact traditional suicide prevention centers on a regular basis even if they are considering suicide, we created the only program nationwide that reaches out to lonely, depressed, isolated, frail and/or suicidal older adults. Our trained volunteers specialize in offering a caring ear and having a friendly conversation with depressed older adults.

The Friendship Line is both a crisis intervention hotline and a warmline for non-emergency emotional support calls. Founded in 1973 by Dr. Patrick Arbore, Director of IOA’s Center for Elderly Suicide Prevention, and accredited by the American Association of Suicidology, Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including:

  • Providing emotional support
  • Elder abuse reporting
  • Well-being checks
  • Grief support through assistance and reassurance
  • Active suicide intervention
  • Information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities

In addition to receiving incoming calls, Friendship Line also offers outreach to eligible callers. We connect with people on a regular basis, and help monitor their physical and mental health concerns. The call-out services act as an intervention to prevent suicide in the long term by improving the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Any aging adult or person living with disabilities, who suffers from depression, loneliness, isolation, anxiousness, or may be thinking about death or suicide, can benefit from completely confidential phone calls with Friendship Line volunteers. Sometimes the road to happiness begins by simply saying hello to someone who cares.

May
28
Sat
AM – All Month – VA – VisionAware – 2022 Tax Filing Resources and Rps For Visually Impaired @ Online
May 28 all-day

 

 Fax Filing Resources and Tips for Visually Impaired 2022

 

Tax time is stressful for everyone. It involves organizing receipts and tax documents, filling out confusing forms, working with accountants, and meeting that fast-approaching April deadline. For people with age-related vision problems, there is often added anxiety around tax time since most receipts and paperwork come in small print that is difficult, if not impossible, for people with eye conditions such as glaucoma and macular degeneration to read. To help seniors experiencing vision loss get organized and find helpful resources and tips, here is a Tax Guide dedicated to getting yourself organized for this annual event and making the filing process easier. Getting Ready to File? Help With Filing? Working with an Accountant? Ready to file?

Getting Ready to File? It’s Time to Get Organized!

Need Help With Filing? Follow These Tips.

  • Visit the IRS website to download tax forms and instructions in the format that’s easiest for you to read—whether its large print, braille, or ASCII text and HTML versions for assistive technology users.
  • Use a magnification device to help you read your W-2 and other preprinted tax forms.
  • If you need help preparing basic tax forms, the AARP Tax-Aide program offers free tax preparation help from February 1 through April 15th. Find a Tax-Aide location near you .
  • You can also get free help with your tax return at a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) or Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) site near you. For more information, call 1-800-906-9887 (VITA) or 1-888-227-7669 (TCE).
  • If you are legally blind, indicate that on your tax form since you may qualify for a higher deduction. Find information about itemized deductions for medical expenses.
  • Social Security is offering resources that may help you as you prepare and file your taxes, including where you can find free help and advice.
  • Check out the American Council of the Blind information page on filing taxes.
  • Though online tax preparation and e-filing has become extremely popular, many are not accessible to people who use screen readers or screen magnifiers. Before you start using an online tax program, make sure you can easily navigate it using your assistive technology. More information about accessible tax programs can be found through the AccessWorld review of IRS Free File.

Working With an Accountant? Follow These Tips.

  • It is important to use a reputable accountant because you are ultimately responsible for the return filed under your name. Word-of-mouth is a great way to find a good, credible accountant in your area. The IRS website also offers good tips on finding a credible tax preparer.
  • Once you’re working with an accountant you trust, ask him or her to prepare your taxes using large print forms, or another accessible format, so that you can review your return before you sign it.
  • Make sure to tell your accountant if you are legally blind since you may qualify for a higher deduction.
  • Once your accountant has completed your return, ask him or her to read through the form with you to allow you to ask questions on figures you do not understand.

Ready to File? Follow These Tips.

  • When it’s time to sign your return, use a signature guide to help you ensure you’ve signed in the appropriate place.
  • If you owe money in taxes, and need to write a check, ask your bank to order bold-line large-print checks available from Deluxe (1-800-328-0304).
  • If you are expecting a federal refund, you can check its status through the “Where’s My Refund?” tool on the IRS website. According to the IRS, this online tool is accessible to taxpayers who use the JAWS screen reader alone or when used with a Braille display which is compatible with different JAWS modes.
  • If you do not have internet access, you can check the status of your refund by calling the IRS TeleTax System at 800-829-4477 or the IRS Refund Hotline at 800-829-1954. When calling, you must provide a social security number for you or your spouse, your filing status, and the exact refund amount shown on your return.

To sign up for more useful information, visit the VisionAware’s registration page.

Related Information

A variety of federal and state government financial incentives can help employers capitalize on the skills and talents people with disabilities have to offer. EARN recently developed a new website guide containing detailed descriptions of federal and state tax incentives, including those specific to veterans and return-to-work/stay-at-work initiatives. Visit the Employer Financial Incentives webpage. Find out about the the Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (Able Act). This Act gives people with disabilities a way to save money for qualifying expenses such as a car, college or career training, healthcare, prevention and wellness, and other expenses without being taxed or impacting eligibility for benefit programs. The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) is a Federal benefit for employers hiring individuals from specific target groups, including certain people with disabilities. WOTC helps targeted workers move into self-sufficiency as they earn a steady income, while participating employers are able to reduce their income tax liability.

 

Warmline – IOA – Institute on Aging – The Friendship Line – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
May 28 all-day

THE FRIENDSHIP LINE

24 Hour Telephone Hotline/Warmline

800-971-0016

We support individuals who find connecting within the community challenging

The Institute on Aging’s 24-hour toll-free Friendship Line is the only accredited crisis line in the country for people aged 60 years and older, and adults living with disabilities. We also make on-going outreach calls to lonely older adults. While there are other organizations that respond to the needs of people who may be contemplating suicide, none provides the type of services that IOA’s Friendship Line offers to respond to the public health problem of suicide among the elderly. Knowing that older people do not contact traditional suicide prevention centers on a regular basis even if they are considering suicide, we created the only program nationwide that reaches out to lonely, depressed, isolated, frail and/or suicidal older adults. Our trained volunteers specialize in offering a caring ear and having a friendly conversation with depressed older adults.

The Friendship Line is both a crisis intervention hotline and a warmline for non-emergency emotional support calls. Founded in 1973 by Dr. Patrick Arbore, Director of IOA’s Center for Elderly Suicide Prevention, and accredited by the American Association of Suicidology, Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including:

  • Providing emotional support
  • Elder abuse reporting
  • Well-being checks
  • Grief support through assistance and reassurance
  • Active suicide intervention
  • Information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities

In addition to receiving incoming calls, Friendship Line also offers outreach to eligible callers. We connect with people on a regular basis, and help monitor their physical and mental health concerns. The call-out services act as an intervention to prevent suicide in the long term by improving the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Any aging adult or person living with disabilities, who suffers from depression, loneliness, isolation, anxiousness, or may be thinking about death or suicide, can benefit from completely confidential phone calls with Friendship Line volunteers. Sometimes the road to happiness begins by simply saying hello to someone who cares.

ASO – AUTISM SOCIETY of OREGON – Autism Family Support Group – Saturday @ Online Via Zoom
May 28 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am

 

AUTISM FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP

Meeting Sat, March 19 from 10-11:30am

Cozy up with a morning beverage and your computer for a special meeting on the 3rd Saturday of March at 10am.

Notes: We’ll be back on the 4th Saturday of each month in April.

This is FREE on-line group for parents of children on the autism spectrum of any age living in Oregon.
Facilitated by Barbara Avila, MS, of Synergy Autism Center.

To register and get the Zoom link, please use this Link

Don’t Forget to Register For:

 

Color the Coast for Autism on Sat., April 9 at the KOA in Astoria: LINK for information

20th Anniversary Autism Walk in Portland on Sunday, April 24 at Oaks Park in SE Portland: LINK for information

Join us at these community events to meet other Autism community members, learn about local resources, and have lots of fun while raising money to support ASO’s programs!
Donations are tax-deductible.

May
29
Sun
AM – All Month – VA – VisionAware – 2022 Tax Filing Resources and Rps For Visually Impaired @ Online
May 29 all-day

 

 Fax Filing Resources and Tips for Visually Impaired 2022

 

Tax time is stressful for everyone. It involves organizing receipts and tax documents, filling out confusing forms, working with accountants, and meeting that fast-approaching April deadline. For people with age-related vision problems, there is often added anxiety around tax time since most receipts and paperwork come in small print that is difficult, if not impossible, for people with eye conditions such as glaucoma and macular degeneration to read. To help seniors experiencing vision loss get organized and find helpful resources and tips, here is a Tax Guide dedicated to getting yourself organized for this annual event and making the filing process easier. Getting Ready to File? Help With Filing? Working with an Accountant? Ready to file?

Getting Ready to File? It’s Time to Get Organized!

Need Help With Filing? Follow These Tips.

  • Visit the IRS website to download tax forms and instructions in the format that’s easiest for you to read—whether its large print, braille, or ASCII text and HTML versions for assistive technology users.
  • Use a magnification device to help you read your W-2 and other preprinted tax forms.
  • If you need help preparing basic tax forms, the AARP Tax-Aide program offers free tax preparation help from February 1 through April 15th. Find a Tax-Aide location near you .
  • You can also get free help with your tax return at a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) or Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) site near you. For more information, call 1-800-906-9887 (VITA) or 1-888-227-7669 (TCE).
  • If you are legally blind, indicate that on your tax form since you may qualify for a higher deduction. Find information about itemized deductions for medical expenses.
  • Social Security is offering resources that may help you as you prepare and file your taxes, including where you can find free help and advice.
  • Check out the American Council of the Blind information page on filing taxes.
  • Though online tax preparation and e-filing has become extremely popular, many are not accessible to people who use screen readers or screen magnifiers. Before you start using an online tax program, make sure you can easily navigate it using your assistive technology. More information about accessible tax programs can be found through the AccessWorld review of IRS Free File.

Working With an Accountant? Follow These Tips.

  • It is important to use a reputable accountant because you are ultimately responsible for the return filed under your name. Word-of-mouth is a great way to find a good, credible accountant in your area. The IRS website also offers good tips on finding a credible tax preparer.
  • Once you’re working with an accountant you trust, ask him or her to prepare your taxes using large print forms, or another accessible format, so that you can review your return before you sign it.
  • Make sure to tell your accountant if you are legally blind since you may qualify for a higher deduction.
  • Once your accountant has completed your return, ask him or her to read through the form with you to allow you to ask questions on figures you do not understand.

Ready to File? Follow These Tips.

  • When it’s time to sign your return, use a signature guide to help you ensure you’ve signed in the appropriate place.
  • If you owe money in taxes, and need to write a check, ask your bank to order bold-line large-print checks available from Deluxe (1-800-328-0304).
  • If you are expecting a federal refund, you can check its status through the “Where’s My Refund?” tool on the IRS website. According to the IRS, this online tool is accessible to taxpayers who use the JAWS screen reader alone or when used with a Braille display which is compatible with different JAWS modes.
  • If you do not have internet access, you can check the status of your refund by calling the IRS TeleTax System at 800-829-4477 or the IRS Refund Hotline at 800-829-1954. When calling, you must provide a social security number for you or your spouse, your filing status, and the exact refund amount shown on your return.

To sign up for more useful information, visit the VisionAware’s registration page.

Related Information

A variety of federal and state government financial incentives can help employers capitalize on the skills and talents people with disabilities have to offer. EARN recently developed a new website guide containing detailed descriptions of federal and state tax incentives, including those specific to veterans and return-to-work/stay-at-work initiatives. Visit the Employer Financial Incentives webpage. Find out about the the Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (Able Act). This Act gives people with disabilities a way to save money for qualifying expenses such as a car, college or career training, healthcare, prevention and wellness, and other expenses without being taxed or impacting eligibility for benefit programs. The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) is a Federal benefit for employers hiring individuals from specific target groups, including certain people with disabilities. WOTC helps targeted workers move into self-sufficiency as they earn a steady income, while participating employers are able to reduce their income tax liability.

 

Warmline – IOA – Institute on Aging – The Friendship Line – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
May 29 all-day

THE FRIENDSHIP LINE

24 Hour Telephone Hotline/Warmline

800-971-0016

We support individuals who find connecting within the community challenging

The Institute on Aging’s 24-hour toll-free Friendship Line is the only accredited crisis line in the country for people aged 60 years and older, and adults living with disabilities. We also make on-going outreach calls to lonely older adults. While there are other organizations that respond to the needs of people who may be contemplating suicide, none provides the type of services that IOA’s Friendship Line offers to respond to the public health problem of suicide among the elderly. Knowing that older people do not contact traditional suicide prevention centers on a regular basis even if they are considering suicide, we created the only program nationwide that reaches out to lonely, depressed, isolated, frail and/or suicidal older adults. Our trained volunteers specialize in offering a caring ear and having a friendly conversation with depressed older adults.

The Friendship Line is both a crisis intervention hotline and a warmline for non-emergency emotional support calls. Founded in 1973 by Dr. Patrick Arbore, Director of IOA’s Center for Elderly Suicide Prevention, and accredited by the American Association of Suicidology, Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including:

  • Providing emotional support
  • Elder abuse reporting
  • Well-being checks
  • Grief support through assistance and reassurance
  • Active suicide intervention
  • Information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities

In addition to receiving incoming calls, Friendship Line also offers outreach to eligible callers. We connect with people on a regular basis, and help monitor their physical and mental health concerns. The call-out services act as an intervention to prevent suicide in the long term by improving the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Any aging adult or person living with disabilities, who suffers from depression, loneliness, isolation, anxiousness, or may be thinking about death or suicide, can benefit from completely confidential phone calls with Friendship Line volunteers. Sometimes the road to happiness begins by simply saying hello to someone who cares.

May
30
Mon
AM – All Month – VA – VisionAware – 2022 Tax Filing Resources and Rps For Visually Impaired @ Online
May 30 all-day

 

 Fax Filing Resources and Tips for Visually Impaired 2022

 

Tax time is stressful for everyone. It involves organizing receipts and tax documents, filling out confusing forms, working with accountants, and meeting that fast-approaching April deadline. For people with age-related vision problems, there is often added anxiety around tax time since most receipts and paperwork come in small print that is difficult, if not impossible, for people with eye conditions such as glaucoma and macular degeneration to read. To help seniors experiencing vision loss get organized and find helpful resources and tips, here is a Tax Guide dedicated to getting yourself organized for this annual event and making the filing process easier. Getting Ready to File? Help With Filing? Working with an Accountant? Ready to file?

Getting Ready to File? It’s Time to Get Organized!

Need Help With Filing? Follow These Tips.

  • Visit the IRS website to download tax forms and instructions in the format that’s easiest for you to read—whether its large print, braille, or ASCII text and HTML versions for assistive technology users.
  • Use a magnification device to help you read your W-2 and other preprinted tax forms.
  • If you need help preparing basic tax forms, the AARP Tax-Aide program offers free tax preparation help from February 1 through April 15th. Find a Tax-Aide location near you .
  • You can also get free help with your tax return at a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) or Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) site near you. For more information, call 1-800-906-9887 (VITA) or 1-888-227-7669 (TCE).
  • If you are legally blind, indicate that on your tax form since you may qualify for a higher deduction. Find information about itemized deductions for medical expenses.
  • Social Security is offering resources that may help you as you prepare and file your taxes, including where you can find free help and advice.
  • Check out the American Council of the Blind information page on filing taxes.
  • Though online tax preparation and e-filing has become extremely popular, many are not accessible to people who use screen readers or screen magnifiers. Before you start using an online tax program, make sure you can easily navigate it using your assistive technology. More information about accessible tax programs can be found through the AccessWorld review of IRS Free File.

Working With an Accountant? Follow These Tips.

  • It is important to use a reputable accountant because you are ultimately responsible for the return filed under your name. Word-of-mouth is a great way to find a good, credible accountant in your area. The IRS website also offers good tips on finding a credible tax preparer.
  • Once you’re working with an accountant you trust, ask him or her to prepare your taxes using large print forms, or another accessible format, so that you can review your return before you sign it.
  • Make sure to tell your accountant if you are legally blind since you may qualify for a higher deduction.
  • Once your accountant has completed your return, ask him or her to read through the form with you to allow you to ask questions on figures you do not understand.

Ready to File? Follow These Tips.

  • When it’s time to sign your return, use a signature guide to help you ensure you’ve signed in the appropriate place.
  • If you owe money in taxes, and need to write a check, ask your bank to order bold-line large-print checks available from Deluxe (1-800-328-0304).
  • If you are expecting a federal refund, you can check its status through the “Where’s My Refund?” tool on the IRS website. According to the IRS, this online tool is accessible to taxpayers who use the JAWS screen reader alone or when used with a Braille display which is compatible with different JAWS modes.
  • If you do not have internet access, you can check the status of your refund by calling the IRS TeleTax System at 800-829-4477 or the IRS Refund Hotline at 800-829-1954. When calling, you must provide a social security number for you or your spouse, your filing status, and the exact refund amount shown on your return.

To sign up for more useful information, visit the VisionAware’s registration page.

Related Information

A variety of federal and state government financial incentives can help employers capitalize on the skills and talents people with disabilities have to offer. EARN recently developed a new website guide containing detailed descriptions of federal and state tax incentives, including those specific to veterans and return-to-work/stay-at-work initiatives. Visit the Employer Financial Incentives webpage. Find out about the the Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (Able Act). This Act gives people with disabilities a way to save money for qualifying expenses such as a car, college or career training, healthcare, prevention and wellness, and other expenses without being taxed or impacting eligibility for benefit programs. The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) is a Federal benefit for employers hiring individuals from specific target groups, including certain people with disabilities. WOTC helps targeted workers move into self-sufficiency as they earn a steady income, while participating employers are able to reduce their income tax liability.

 

Warmline – IOA – Institute on Aging – The Friendship Line – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
May 30 all-day

THE FRIENDSHIP LINE

24 Hour Telephone Hotline/Warmline

800-971-0016

We support individuals who find connecting within the community challenging

The Institute on Aging’s 24-hour toll-free Friendship Line is the only accredited crisis line in the country for people aged 60 years and older, and adults living with disabilities. We also make on-going outreach calls to lonely older adults. While there are other organizations that respond to the needs of people who may be contemplating suicide, none provides the type of services that IOA’s Friendship Line offers to respond to the public health problem of suicide among the elderly. Knowing that older people do not contact traditional suicide prevention centers on a regular basis even if they are considering suicide, we created the only program nationwide that reaches out to lonely, depressed, isolated, frail and/or suicidal older adults. Our trained volunteers specialize in offering a caring ear and having a friendly conversation with depressed older adults.

The Friendship Line is both a crisis intervention hotline and a warmline for non-emergency emotional support calls. Founded in 1973 by Dr. Patrick Arbore, Director of IOA’s Center for Elderly Suicide Prevention, and accredited by the American Association of Suicidology, Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including:

  • Providing emotional support
  • Elder abuse reporting
  • Well-being checks
  • Grief support through assistance and reassurance
  • Active suicide intervention
  • Information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities

In addition to receiving incoming calls, Friendship Line also offers outreach to eligible callers. We connect with people on a regular basis, and help monitor their physical and mental health concerns. The call-out services act as an intervention to prevent suicide in the long term by improving the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Any aging adult or person living with disabilities, who suffers from depression, loneliness, isolation, anxiousness, or may be thinking about death or suicide, can benefit from completely confidential phone calls with Friendship Line volunteers. Sometimes the road to happiness begins by simply saying hello to someone who cares.

May
31
Tue
AM – All Month – VA – VisionAware – 2022 Tax Filing Resources and Rps For Visually Impaired @ Online
May 31 all-day

 

 Fax Filing Resources and Tips for Visually Impaired 2022

 

Tax time is stressful for everyone. It involves organizing receipts and tax documents, filling out confusing forms, working with accountants, and meeting that fast-approaching April deadline. For people with age-related vision problems, there is often added anxiety around tax time since most receipts and paperwork come in small print that is difficult, if not impossible, for people with eye conditions such as glaucoma and macular degeneration to read. To help seniors experiencing vision loss get organized and find helpful resources and tips, here is a Tax Guide dedicated to getting yourself organized for this annual event and making the filing process easier. Getting Ready to File? Help With Filing? Working with an Accountant? Ready to file?

Getting Ready to File? It’s Time to Get Organized!

Need Help With Filing? Follow These Tips.

  • Visit the IRS website to download tax forms and instructions in the format that’s easiest for you to read—whether its large print, braille, or ASCII text and HTML versions for assistive technology users.
  • Use a magnification device to help you read your W-2 and other preprinted tax forms.
  • If you need help preparing basic tax forms, the AARP Tax-Aide program offers free tax preparation help from February 1 through April 15th. Find a Tax-Aide location near you .
  • You can also get free help with your tax return at a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) or Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) site near you. For more information, call 1-800-906-9887 (VITA) or 1-888-227-7669 (TCE).
  • If you are legally blind, indicate that on your tax form since you may qualify for a higher deduction. Find information about itemized deductions for medical expenses.
  • Social Security is offering resources that may help you as you prepare and file your taxes, including where you can find free help and advice.
  • Check out the American Council of the Blind information page on filing taxes.
  • Though online tax preparation and e-filing has become extremely popular, many are not accessible to people who use screen readers or screen magnifiers. Before you start using an online tax program, make sure you can easily navigate it using your assistive technology. More information about accessible tax programs can be found through the AccessWorld review of IRS Free File.

Working With an Accountant? Follow These Tips.

  • It is important to use a reputable accountant because you are ultimately responsible for the return filed under your name. Word-of-mouth is a great way to find a good, credible accountant in your area. The IRS website also offers good tips on finding a credible tax preparer.
  • Once you’re working with an accountant you trust, ask him or her to prepare your taxes using large print forms, or another accessible format, so that you can review your return before you sign it.
  • Make sure to tell your accountant if you are legally blind since you may qualify for a higher deduction.
  • Once your accountant has completed your return, ask him or her to read through the form with you to allow you to ask questions on figures you do not understand.

Ready to File? Follow These Tips.

  • When it’s time to sign your return, use a signature guide to help you ensure you’ve signed in the appropriate place.
  • If you owe money in taxes, and need to write a check, ask your bank to order bold-line large-print checks available from Deluxe (1-800-328-0304).
  • If you are expecting a federal refund, you can check its status through the “Where’s My Refund?” tool on the IRS website. According to the IRS, this online tool is accessible to taxpayers who use the JAWS screen reader alone or when used with a Braille display which is compatible with different JAWS modes.
  • If you do not have internet access, you can check the status of your refund by calling the IRS TeleTax System at 800-829-4477 or the IRS Refund Hotline at 800-829-1954. When calling, you must provide a social security number for you or your spouse, your filing status, and the exact refund amount shown on your return.

To sign up for more useful information, visit the VisionAware’s registration page.

Related Information

A variety of federal and state government financial incentives can help employers capitalize on the skills and talents people with disabilities have to offer. EARN recently developed a new website guide containing detailed descriptions of federal and state tax incentives, including those specific to veterans and return-to-work/stay-at-work initiatives. Visit the Employer Financial Incentives webpage. Find out about the the Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (Able Act). This Act gives people with disabilities a way to save money for qualifying expenses such as a car, college or career training, healthcare, prevention and wellness, and other expenses without being taxed or impacting eligibility for benefit programs. The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) is a Federal benefit for employers hiring individuals from specific target groups, including certain people with disabilities. WOTC helps targeted workers move into self-sufficiency as they earn a steady income, while participating employers are able to reduce their income tax liability.

 

Warmline – IOA – Institute on Aging – The Friendship Line – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
May 31 all-day

THE FRIENDSHIP LINE

24 Hour Telephone Hotline/Warmline

800-971-0016

We support individuals who find connecting within the community challenging

The Institute on Aging’s 24-hour toll-free Friendship Line is the only accredited crisis line in the country for people aged 60 years and older, and adults living with disabilities. We also make on-going outreach calls to lonely older adults. While there are other organizations that respond to the needs of people who may be contemplating suicide, none provides the type of services that IOA’s Friendship Line offers to respond to the public health problem of suicide among the elderly. Knowing that older people do not contact traditional suicide prevention centers on a regular basis even if they are considering suicide, we created the only program nationwide that reaches out to lonely, depressed, isolated, frail and/or suicidal older adults. Our trained volunteers specialize in offering a caring ear and having a friendly conversation with depressed older adults.

The Friendship Line is both a crisis intervention hotline and a warmline for non-emergency emotional support calls. Founded in 1973 by Dr. Patrick Arbore, Director of IOA’s Center for Elderly Suicide Prevention, and accredited by the American Association of Suicidology, Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including:

  • Providing emotional support
  • Elder abuse reporting
  • Well-being checks
  • Grief support through assistance and reassurance
  • Active suicide intervention
  • Information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities

In addition to receiving incoming calls, Friendship Line also offers outreach to eligible callers. We connect with people on a regular basis, and help monitor their physical and mental health concerns. The call-out services act as an intervention to prevent suicide in the long term by improving the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Any aging adult or person living with disabilities, who suffers from depression, loneliness, isolation, anxiousness, or may be thinking about death or suicide, can benefit from completely confidential phone calls with Friendship Line volunteers. Sometimes the road to happiness begins by simply saying hello to someone who cares.

Jun
1
Wed
AM – All Month – VA – VisionAware – 2022 Tax Filing Resources and Rps For Visually Impaired @ Online
Jun 1 all-day

 

 Fax Filing Resources and Tips for Visually Impaired 2022

 

Tax time is stressful for everyone. It involves organizing receipts and tax documents, filling out confusing forms, working with accountants, and meeting that fast-approaching April deadline. For people with age-related vision problems, there is often added anxiety around tax time since most receipts and paperwork come in small print that is difficult, if not impossible, for people with eye conditions such as glaucoma and macular degeneration to read. To help seniors experiencing vision loss get organized and find helpful resources and tips, here is a Tax Guide dedicated to getting yourself organized for this annual event and making the filing process easier. Getting Ready to File? Help With Filing? Working with an Accountant? Ready to file?

Getting Ready to File? It’s Time to Get Organized!

Need Help With Filing? Follow These Tips.

  • Visit the IRS website to download tax forms and instructions in the format that’s easiest for you to read—whether its large print, braille, or ASCII text and HTML versions for assistive technology users.
  • Use a magnification device to help you read your W-2 and other preprinted tax forms.
  • If you need help preparing basic tax forms, the AARP Tax-Aide program offers free tax preparation help from February 1 through April 15th. Find a Tax-Aide location near you .
  • You can also get free help with your tax return at a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) or Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) site near you. For more information, call 1-800-906-9887 (VITA) or 1-888-227-7669 (TCE).
  • If you are legally blind, indicate that on your tax form since you may qualify for a higher deduction. Find information about itemized deductions for medical expenses.
  • Social Security is offering resources that may help you as you prepare and file your taxes, including where you can find free help and advice.
  • Check out the American Council of the Blind information page on filing taxes.
  • Though online tax preparation and e-filing has become extremely popular, many are not accessible to people who use screen readers or screen magnifiers. Before you start using an online tax program, make sure you can easily navigate it using your assistive technology. More information about accessible tax programs can be found through the AccessWorld review of IRS Free File.

Working With an Accountant? Follow These Tips.

  • It is important to use a reputable accountant because you are ultimately responsible for the return filed under your name. Word-of-mouth is a great way to find a good, credible accountant in your area. The IRS website also offers good tips on finding a credible tax preparer.
  • Once you’re working with an accountant you trust, ask him or her to prepare your taxes using large print forms, or another accessible format, so that you can review your return before you sign it.
  • Make sure to tell your accountant if you are legally blind since you may qualify for a higher deduction.
  • Once your accountant has completed your return, ask him or her to read through the form with you to allow you to ask questions on figures you do not understand.

Ready to File? Follow These Tips.

  • When it’s time to sign your return, use a signature guide to help you ensure you’ve signed in the appropriate place.
  • If you owe money in taxes, and need to write a check, ask your bank to order bold-line large-print checks available from Deluxe (1-800-328-0304).
  • If you are expecting a federal refund, you can check its status through the “Where’s My Refund?” tool on the IRS website. According to the IRS, this online tool is accessible to taxpayers who use the JAWS screen reader alone or when used with a Braille display which is compatible with different JAWS modes.
  • If you do not have internet access, you can check the status of your refund by calling the IRS TeleTax System at 800-829-4477 or the IRS Refund Hotline at 800-829-1954. When calling, you must provide a social security number for you or your spouse, your filing status, and the exact refund amount shown on your return.

To sign up for more useful information, visit the VisionAware’s registration page.

Related Information

A variety of federal and state government financial incentives can help employers capitalize on the skills and talents people with disabilities have to offer. EARN recently developed a new website guide containing detailed descriptions of federal and state tax incentives, including those specific to veterans and return-to-work/stay-at-work initiatives. Visit the Employer Financial Incentives webpage. Find out about the the Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (Able Act). This Act gives people with disabilities a way to save money for qualifying expenses such as a car, college or career training, healthcare, prevention and wellness, and other expenses without being taxed or impacting eligibility for benefit programs. The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) is a Federal benefit for employers hiring individuals from specific target groups, including certain people with disabilities. WOTC helps targeted workers move into self-sufficiency as they earn a steady income, while participating employers are able to reduce their income tax liability.

 

Warmline – IOA – Institute on Aging – The Friendship Line – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jun 1 all-day

THE FRIENDSHIP LINE

24 Hour Telephone Hotline/Warmline

800-971-0016

We support individuals who find connecting within the community challenging

The Institute on Aging’s 24-hour toll-free Friendship Line is the only accredited crisis line in the country for people aged 60 years and older, and adults living with disabilities. We also make on-going outreach calls to lonely older adults. While there are other organizations that respond to the needs of people who may be contemplating suicide, none provides the type of services that IOA’s Friendship Line offers to respond to the public health problem of suicide among the elderly. Knowing that older people do not contact traditional suicide prevention centers on a regular basis even if they are considering suicide, we created the only program nationwide that reaches out to lonely, depressed, isolated, frail and/or suicidal older adults. Our trained volunteers specialize in offering a caring ear and having a friendly conversation with depressed older adults.

The Friendship Line is both a crisis intervention hotline and a warmline for non-emergency emotional support calls. Founded in 1973 by Dr. Patrick Arbore, Director of IOA’s Center for Elderly Suicide Prevention, and accredited by the American Association of Suicidology, Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including:

  • Providing emotional support
  • Elder abuse reporting
  • Well-being checks
  • Grief support through assistance and reassurance
  • Active suicide intervention
  • Information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities

In addition to receiving incoming calls, Friendship Line also offers outreach to eligible callers. We connect with people on a regular basis, and help monitor their physical and mental health concerns. The call-out services act as an intervention to prevent suicide in the long term by improving the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Any aging adult or person living with disabilities, who suffers from depression, loneliness, isolation, anxiousness, or may be thinking about death or suicide, can benefit from completely confidential phone calls with Friendship Line volunteers. Sometimes the road to happiness begins by simply saying hello to someone who cares.

Jun
2
Thu
AM – All Month – VA – VisionAware – 2022 Tax Filing Resources and Rps For Visually Impaired @ Online
Jun 2 all-day

 

 Fax Filing Resources and Tips for Visually Impaired 2022

 

Tax time is stressful for everyone. It involves organizing receipts and tax documents, filling out confusing forms, working with accountants, and meeting that fast-approaching April deadline. For people with age-related vision problems, there is often added anxiety around tax time since most receipts and paperwork come in small print that is difficult, if not impossible, for people with eye conditions such as glaucoma and macular degeneration to read. To help seniors experiencing vision loss get organized and find helpful resources and tips, here is a Tax Guide dedicated to getting yourself organized for this annual event and making the filing process easier. Getting Ready to File? Help With Filing? Working with an Accountant? Ready to file?

Getting Ready to File? It’s Time to Get Organized!

Need Help With Filing? Follow These Tips.

  • Visit the IRS website to download tax forms and instructions in the format that’s easiest for you to read—whether its large print, braille, or ASCII text and HTML versions for assistive technology users.
  • Use a magnification device to help you read your W-2 and other preprinted tax forms.
  • If you need help preparing basic tax forms, the AARP Tax-Aide program offers free tax preparation help from February 1 through April 15th. Find a Tax-Aide location near you .
  • You can also get free help with your tax return at a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) or Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) site near you. For more information, call 1-800-906-9887 (VITA) or 1-888-227-7669 (TCE).
  • If you are legally blind, indicate that on your tax form since you may qualify for a higher deduction. Find information about itemized deductions for medical expenses.
  • Social Security is offering resources that may help you as you prepare and file your taxes, including where you can find free help and advice.
  • Check out the American Council of the Blind information page on filing taxes.
  • Though online tax preparation and e-filing has become extremely popular, many are not accessible to people who use screen readers or screen magnifiers. Before you start using an online tax program, make sure you can easily navigate it using your assistive technology. More information about accessible tax programs can be found through the AccessWorld review of IRS Free File.

Working With an Accountant? Follow These Tips.

  • It is important to use a reputable accountant because you are ultimately responsible for the return filed under your name. Word-of-mouth is a great way to find a good, credible accountant in your area. The IRS website also offers good tips on finding a credible tax preparer.
  • Once you’re working with an accountant you trust, ask him or her to prepare your taxes using large print forms, or another accessible format, so that you can review your return before you sign it.
  • Make sure to tell your accountant if you are legally blind since you may qualify for a higher deduction.
  • Once your accountant has completed your return, ask him or her to read through the form with you to allow you to ask questions on figures you do not understand.

Ready to File? Follow These Tips.

  • When it’s time to sign your return, use a signature guide to help you ensure you’ve signed in the appropriate place.
  • If you owe money in taxes, and need to write a check, ask your bank to order bold-line large-print checks available from Deluxe (1-800-328-0304).
  • If you are expecting a federal refund, you can check its status through the “Where’s My Refund?” tool on the IRS website. According to the IRS, this online tool is accessible to taxpayers who use the JAWS screen reader alone or when used with a Braille display which is compatible with different JAWS modes.
  • If you do not have internet access, you can check the status of your refund by calling the IRS TeleTax System at 800-829-4477 or the IRS Refund Hotline at 800-829-1954. When calling, you must provide a social security number for you or your spouse, your filing status, and the exact refund amount shown on your return.

To sign up for more useful information, visit the VisionAware’s registration page.

Related Information

A variety of federal and state government financial incentives can help employers capitalize on the skills and talents people with disabilities have to offer. EARN recently developed a new website guide containing detailed descriptions of federal and state tax incentives, including those specific to veterans and return-to-work/stay-at-work initiatives. Visit the Employer Financial Incentives webpage. Find out about the the Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (Able Act). This Act gives people with disabilities a way to save money for qualifying expenses such as a car, college or career training, healthcare, prevention and wellness, and other expenses without being taxed or impacting eligibility for benefit programs. The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) is a Federal benefit for employers hiring individuals from specific target groups, including certain people with disabilities. WOTC helps targeted workers move into self-sufficiency as they earn a steady income, while participating employers are able to reduce their income tax liability.

 

Warmline – IOA – Institute on Aging – The Friendship Line – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jun 2 all-day

THE FRIENDSHIP LINE

24 Hour Telephone Hotline/Warmline

800-971-0016

We support individuals who find connecting within the community challenging

The Institute on Aging’s 24-hour toll-free Friendship Line is the only accredited crisis line in the country for people aged 60 years and older, and adults living with disabilities. We also make on-going outreach calls to lonely older adults. While there are other organizations that respond to the needs of people who may be contemplating suicide, none provides the type of services that IOA’s Friendship Line offers to respond to the public health problem of suicide among the elderly. Knowing that older people do not contact traditional suicide prevention centers on a regular basis even if they are considering suicide, we created the only program nationwide that reaches out to lonely, depressed, isolated, frail and/or suicidal older adults. Our trained volunteers specialize in offering a caring ear and having a friendly conversation with depressed older adults.

The Friendship Line is both a crisis intervention hotline and a warmline for non-emergency emotional support calls. Founded in 1973 by Dr. Patrick Arbore, Director of IOA’s Center for Elderly Suicide Prevention, and accredited by the American Association of Suicidology, Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including:

  • Providing emotional support
  • Elder abuse reporting
  • Well-being checks
  • Grief support through assistance and reassurance
  • Active suicide intervention
  • Information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities

In addition to receiving incoming calls, Friendship Line also offers outreach to eligible callers. We connect with people on a regular basis, and help monitor their physical and mental health concerns. The call-out services act as an intervention to prevent suicide in the long term by improving the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Any aging adult or person living with disabilities, who suffers from depression, loneliness, isolation, anxiousness, or may be thinking about death or suicide, can benefit from completely confidential phone calls with Friendship Line volunteers. Sometimes the road to happiness begins by simply saying hello to someone who cares.

Jun
3
Fri
AM – All Month – VA – VisionAware – 2022 Tax Filing Resources and Rps For Visually Impaired @ Online
Jun 3 all-day

 

 Fax Filing Resources and Tips for Visually Impaired 2022

 

Tax time is stressful for everyone. It involves organizing receipts and tax documents, filling out confusing forms, working with accountants, and meeting that fast-approaching April deadline. For people with age-related vision problems, there is often added anxiety around tax time since most receipts and paperwork come in small print that is difficult, if not impossible, for people with eye conditions such as glaucoma and macular degeneration to read. To help seniors experiencing vision loss get organized and find helpful resources and tips, here is a Tax Guide dedicated to getting yourself organized for this annual event and making the filing process easier. Getting Ready to File? Help With Filing? Working with an Accountant? Ready to file?

Getting Ready to File? It’s Time to Get Organized!

Need Help With Filing? Follow These Tips.

  • Visit the IRS website to download tax forms and instructions in the format that’s easiest for you to read—whether its large print, braille, or ASCII text and HTML versions for assistive technology users.
  • Use a magnification device to help you read your W-2 and other preprinted tax forms.
  • If you need help preparing basic tax forms, the AARP Tax-Aide program offers free tax preparation help from February 1 through April 15th. Find a Tax-Aide location near you .
  • You can also get free help with your tax return at a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) or Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) site near you. For more information, call 1-800-906-9887 (VITA) or 1-888-227-7669 (TCE).
  • If you are legally blind, indicate that on your tax form since you may qualify for a higher deduction. Find information about itemized deductions for medical expenses.
  • Social Security is offering resources that may help you as you prepare and file your taxes, including where you can find free help and advice.
  • Check out the American Council of the Blind information page on filing taxes.
  • Though online tax preparation and e-filing has become extremely popular, many are not accessible to people who use screen readers or screen magnifiers. Before you start using an online tax program, make sure you can easily navigate it using your assistive technology. More information about accessible tax programs can be found through the AccessWorld review of IRS Free File.

Working With an Accountant? Follow These Tips.

  • It is important to use a reputable accountant because you are ultimately responsible for the return filed under your name. Word-of-mouth is a great way to find a good, credible accountant in your area. The IRS website also offers good tips on finding a credible tax preparer.
  • Once you’re working with an accountant you trust, ask him or her to prepare your taxes using large print forms, or another accessible format, so that you can review your return before you sign it.
  • Make sure to tell your accountant if you are legally blind since you may qualify for a higher deduction.
  • Once your accountant has completed your return, ask him or her to read through the form with you to allow you to ask questions on figures you do not understand.

Ready to File? Follow These Tips.

  • When it’s time to sign your return, use a signature guide to help you ensure you’ve signed in the appropriate place.
  • If you owe money in taxes, and need to write a check, ask your bank to order bold-line large-print checks available from Deluxe (1-800-328-0304).
  • If you are expecting a federal refund, you can check its status through the “Where’s My Refund?” tool on the IRS website. According to the IRS, this online tool is accessible to taxpayers who use the JAWS screen reader alone or when used with a Braille display which is compatible with different JAWS modes.
  • If you do not have internet access, you can check the status of your refund by calling the IRS TeleTax System at 800-829-4477 or the IRS Refund Hotline at 800-829-1954. When calling, you must provide a social security number for you or your spouse, your filing status, and the exact refund amount shown on your return.

To sign up for more useful information, visit the VisionAware’s registration page.

Related Information

A variety of federal and state government financial incentives can help employers capitalize on the skills and talents people with disabilities have to offer. EARN recently developed a new website guide containing detailed descriptions of federal and state tax incentives, including those specific to veterans and return-to-work/stay-at-work initiatives. Visit the Employer Financial Incentives webpage. Find out about the the Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (Able Act). This Act gives people with disabilities a way to save money for qualifying expenses such as a car, college or career training, healthcare, prevention and wellness, and other expenses without being taxed or impacting eligibility for benefit programs. The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) is a Federal benefit for employers hiring individuals from specific target groups, including certain people with disabilities. WOTC helps targeted workers move into self-sufficiency as they earn a steady income, while participating employers are able to reduce their income tax liability.

 

Warmline – IOA – Institute on Aging – The Friendship Line – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jun 3 all-day

THE FRIENDSHIP LINE

24 Hour Telephone Hotline/Warmline

800-971-0016

We support individuals who find connecting within the community challenging

The Institute on Aging’s 24-hour toll-free Friendship Line is the only accredited crisis line in the country for people aged 60 years and older, and adults living with disabilities. We also make on-going outreach calls to lonely older adults. While there are other organizations that respond to the needs of people who may be contemplating suicide, none provides the type of services that IOA’s Friendship Line offers to respond to the public health problem of suicide among the elderly. Knowing that older people do not contact traditional suicide prevention centers on a regular basis even if they are considering suicide, we created the only program nationwide that reaches out to lonely, depressed, isolated, frail and/or suicidal older adults. Our trained volunteers specialize in offering a caring ear and having a friendly conversation with depressed older adults.

The Friendship Line is both a crisis intervention hotline and a warmline for non-emergency emotional support calls. Founded in 1973 by Dr. Patrick Arbore, Director of IOA’s Center for Elderly Suicide Prevention, and accredited by the American Association of Suicidology, Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including:

  • Providing emotional support
  • Elder abuse reporting
  • Well-being checks
  • Grief support through assistance and reassurance
  • Active suicide intervention
  • Information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities

In addition to receiving incoming calls, Friendship Line also offers outreach to eligible callers. We connect with people on a regular basis, and help monitor their physical and mental health concerns. The call-out services act as an intervention to prevent suicide in the long term by improving the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Any aging adult or person living with disabilities, who suffers from depression, loneliness, isolation, anxiousness, or may be thinking about death or suicide, can benefit from completely confidential phone calls with Friendship Line volunteers. Sometimes the road to happiness begins by simply saying hello to someone who cares.

Jun
4
Sat
AM – All Month – VA – VisionAware – 2022 Tax Filing Resources and Rps For Visually Impaired @ Online
Jun 4 all-day

 

 Fax Filing Resources and Tips for Visually Impaired 2022

 

Tax time is stressful for everyone. It involves organizing receipts and tax documents, filling out confusing forms, working with accountants, and meeting that fast-approaching April deadline. For people with age-related vision problems, there is often added anxiety around tax time since most receipts and paperwork come in small print that is difficult, if not impossible, for people with eye conditions such as glaucoma and macular degeneration to read. To help seniors experiencing vision loss get organized and find helpful resources and tips, here is a Tax Guide dedicated to getting yourself organized for this annual event and making the filing process easier. Getting Ready to File? Help With Filing? Working with an Accountant? Ready to file?

Getting Ready to File? It’s Time to Get Organized!

Need Help With Filing? Follow These Tips.

  • Visit the IRS website to download tax forms and instructions in the format that’s easiest for you to read—whether its large print, braille, or ASCII text and HTML versions for assistive technology users.
  • Use a magnification device to help you read your W-2 and other preprinted tax forms.
  • If you need help preparing basic tax forms, the AARP Tax-Aide program offers free tax preparation help from February 1 through April 15th. Find a Tax-Aide location near you .
  • You can also get free help with your tax return at a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) or Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) site near you. For more information, call 1-800-906-9887 (VITA) or 1-888-227-7669 (TCE).
  • If you are legally blind, indicate that on your tax form since you may qualify for a higher deduction. Find information about itemized deductions for medical expenses.
  • Social Security is offering resources that may help you as you prepare and file your taxes, including where you can find free help and advice.
  • Check out the American Council of the Blind information page on filing taxes.
  • Though online tax preparation and e-filing has become extremely popular, many are not accessible to people who use screen readers or screen magnifiers. Before you start using an online tax program, make sure you can easily navigate it using your assistive technology. More information about accessible tax programs can be found through the AccessWorld review of IRS Free File.

Working With an Accountant? Follow These Tips.

  • It is important to use a reputable accountant because you are ultimately responsible for the return filed under your name. Word-of-mouth is a great way to find a good, credible accountant in your area. The IRS website also offers good tips on finding a credible tax preparer.
  • Once you’re working with an accountant you trust, ask him or her to prepare your taxes using large print forms, or another accessible format, so that you can review your return before you sign it.
  • Make sure to tell your accountant if you are legally blind since you may qualify for a higher deduction.
  • Once your accountant has completed your return, ask him or her to read through the form with you to allow you to ask questions on figures you do not understand.

Ready to File? Follow These Tips.

  • When it’s time to sign your return, use a signature guide to help you ensure you’ve signed in the appropriate place.
  • If you owe money in taxes, and need to write a check, ask your bank to order bold-line large-print checks available from Deluxe (1-800-328-0304).
  • If you are expecting a federal refund, you can check its status through the “Where’s My Refund?” tool on the IRS website. According to the IRS, this online tool is accessible to taxpayers who use the JAWS screen reader alone or when used with a Braille display which is compatible with different JAWS modes.
  • If you do not have internet access, you can check the status of your refund by calling the IRS TeleTax System at 800-829-4477 or the IRS Refund Hotline at 800-829-1954. When calling, you must provide a social security number for you or your spouse, your filing status, and the exact refund amount shown on your return.

To sign up for more useful information, visit the VisionAware’s registration page.

Related Information

A variety of federal and state government financial incentives can help employers capitalize on the skills and talents people with disabilities have to offer. EARN recently developed a new website guide containing detailed descriptions of federal and state tax incentives, including those specific to veterans and return-to-work/stay-at-work initiatives. Visit the Employer Financial Incentives webpage. Find out about the the Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (Able Act). This Act gives people with disabilities a way to save money for qualifying expenses such as a car, college or career training, healthcare, prevention and wellness, and other expenses without being taxed or impacting eligibility for benefit programs. The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) is a Federal benefit for employers hiring individuals from specific target groups, including certain people with disabilities. WOTC helps targeted workers move into self-sufficiency as they earn a steady income, while participating employers are able to reduce their income tax liability.

 

Warmline – IOA – Institute on Aging – The Friendship Line – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jun 4 all-day

THE FRIENDSHIP LINE

24 Hour Telephone Hotline/Warmline

800-971-0016

We support individuals who find connecting within the community challenging

The Institute on Aging’s 24-hour toll-free Friendship Line is the only accredited crisis line in the country for people aged 60 years and older, and adults living with disabilities. We also make on-going outreach calls to lonely older adults. While there are other organizations that respond to the needs of people who may be contemplating suicide, none provides the type of services that IOA’s Friendship Line offers to respond to the public health problem of suicide among the elderly. Knowing that older people do not contact traditional suicide prevention centers on a regular basis even if they are considering suicide, we created the only program nationwide that reaches out to lonely, depressed, isolated, frail and/or suicidal older adults. Our trained volunteers specialize in offering a caring ear and having a friendly conversation with depressed older adults.

The Friendship Line is both a crisis intervention hotline and a warmline for non-emergency emotional support calls. Founded in 1973 by Dr. Patrick Arbore, Director of IOA’s Center for Elderly Suicide Prevention, and accredited by the American Association of Suicidology, Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including:

  • Providing emotional support
  • Elder abuse reporting
  • Well-being checks
  • Grief support through assistance and reassurance
  • Active suicide intervention
  • Information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities

In addition to receiving incoming calls, Friendship Line also offers outreach to eligible callers. We connect with people on a regular basis, and help monitor their physical and mental health concerns. The call-out services act as an intervention to prevent suicide in the long term by improving the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Any aging adult or person living with disabilities, who suffers from depression, loneliness, isolation, anxiousness, or may be thinking about death or suicide, can benefit from completely confidential phone calls with Friendship Line volunteers. Sometimes the road to happiness begins by simply saying hello to someone who cares.

Jun
5
Sun
AM – All Month – VA – VisionAware – 2022 Tax Filing Resources and Rps For Visually Impaired @ Online
Jun 5 all-day

 

 Fax Filing Resources and Tips for Visually Impaired 2022

 

Tax time is stressful for everyone. It involves organizing receipts and tax documents, filling out confusing forms, working with accountants, and meeting that fast-approaching April deadline. For people with age-related vision problems, there is often added anxiety around tax time since most receipts and paperwork come in small print that is difficult, if not impossible, for people with eye conditions such as glaucoma and macular degeneration to read. To help seniors experiencing vision loss get organized and find helpful resources and tips, here is a Tax Guide dedicated to getting yourself organized for this annual event and making the filing process easier. Getting Ready to File? Help With Filing? Working with an Accountant? Ready to file?

Getting Ready to File? It’s Time to Get Organized!

Need Help With Filing? Follow These Tips.

  • Visit the IRS website to download tax forms and instructions in the format that’s easiest for you to read—whether its large print, braille, or ASCII text and HTML versions for assistive technology users.
  • Use a magnification device to help you read your W-2 and other preprinted tax forms.
  • If you need help preparing basic tax forms, the AARP Tax-Aide program offers free tax preparation help from February 1 through April 15th. Find a Tax-Aide location near you .
  • You can also get free help with your tax return at a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) or Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) site near you. For more information, call 1-800-906-9887 (VITA) or 1-888-227-7669 (TCE).
  • If you are legally blind, indicate that on your tax form since you may qualify for a higher deduction. Find information about itemized deductions for medical expenses.
  • Social Security is offering resources that may help you as you prepare and file your taxes, including where you can find free help and advice.
  • Check out the American Council of the Blind information page on filing taxes.
  • Though online tax preparation and e-filing has become extremely popular, many are not accessible to people who use screen readers or screen magnifiers. Before you start using an online tax program, make sure you can easily navigate it using your assistive technology. More information about accessible tax programs can be found through the AccessWorld review of IRS Free File.

Working With an Accountant? Follow These Tips.

  • It is important to use a reputable accountant because you are ultimately responsible for the return filed under your name. Word-of-mouth is a great way to find a good, credible accountant in your area. The IRS website also offers good tips on finding a credible tax preparer.
  • Once you’re working with an accountant you trust, ask him or her to prepare your taxes using large print forms, or another accessible format, so that you can review your return before you sign it.
  • Make sure to tell your accountant if you are legally blind since you may qualify for a higher deduction.
  • Once your accountant has completed your return, ask him or her to read through the form with you to allow you to ask questions on figures you do not understand.

Ready to File? Follow These Tips.

  • When it’s time to sign your return, use a signature guide to help you ensure you’ve signed in the appropriate place.
  • If you owe money in taxes, and need to write a check, ask your bank to order bold-line large-print checks available from Deluxe (1-800-328-0304).
  • If you are expecting a federal refund, you can check its status through the “Where’s My Refund?” tool on the IRS website. According to the IRS, this online tool is accessible to taxpayers who use the JAWS screen reader alone or when used with a Braille display which is compatible with different JAWS modes.
  • If you do not have internet access, you can check the status of your refund by calling the IRS TeleTax System at 800-829-4477 or the IRS Refund Hotline at 800-829-1954. When calling, you must provide a social security number for you or your spouse, your filing status, and the exact refund amount shown on your return.

To sign up for more useful information, visit the VisionAware’s registration page.

Related Information

A variety of federal and state government financial incentives can help employers capitalize on the skills and talents people with disabilities have to offer. EARN recently developed a new website guide containing detailed descriptions of federal and state tax incentives, including those specific to veterans and return-to-work/stay-at-work initiatives. Visit the Employer Financial Incentives webpage. Find out about the the Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (Able Act). This Act gives people with disabilities a way to save money for qualifying expenses such as a car, college or career training, healthcare, prevention and wellness, and other expenses without being taxed or impacting eligibility for benefit programs. The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) is a Federal benefit for employers hiring individuals from specific target groups, including certain people with disabilities. WOTC helps targeted workers move into self-sufficiency as they earn a steady income, while participating employers are able to reduce their income tax liability.

 

Warmline – IOA – Institute on Aging – The Friendship Line – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jun 5 all-day

THE FRIENDSHIP LINE

24 Hour Telephone Hotline/Warmline

800-971-0016

We support individuals who find connecting within the community challenging

The Institute on Aging’s 24-hour toll-free Friendship Line is the only accredited crisis line in the country for people aged 60 years and older, and adults living with disabilities. We also make on-going outreach calls to lonely older adults. While there are other organizations that respond to the needs of people who may be contemplating suicide, none provides the type of services that IOA’s Friendship Line offers to respond to the public health problem of suicide among the elderly. Knowing that older people do not contact traditional suicide prevention centers on a regular basis even if they are considering suicide, we created the only program nationwide that reaches out to lonely, depressed, isolated, frail and/or suicidal older adults. Our trained volunteers specialize in offering a caring ear and having a friendly conversation with depressed older adults.

The Friendship Line is both a crisis intervention hotline and a warmline for non-emergency emotional support calls. Founded in 1973 by Dr. Patrick Arbore, Director of IOA’s Center for Elderly Suicide Prevention, and accredited by the American Association of Suicidology, Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including:

  • Providing emotional support
  • Elder abuse reporting
  • Well-being checks
  • Grief support through assistance and reassurance
  • Active suicide intervention
  • Information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities

In addition to receiving incoming calls, Friendship Line also offers outreach to eligible callers. We connect with people on a regular basis, and help monitor their physical and mental health concerns. The call-out services act as an intervention to prevent suicide in the long term by improving the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Any aging adult or person living with disabilities, who suffers from depression, loneliness, isolation, anxiousness, or may be thinking about death or suicide, can benefit from completely confidential phone calls with Friendship Line volunteers. Sometimes the road to happiness begins by simply saying hello to someone who cares.

Jun
6
Mon
AM – All Month – VA – VisionAware – 2022 Tax Filing Resources and Rps For Visually Impaired @ Online
Jun 6 all-day

 

 Fax Filing Resources and Tips for Visually Impaired 2022

 

Tax time is stressful for everyone. It involves organizing receipts and tax documents, filling out confusing forms, working with accountants, and meeting that fast-approaching April deadline. For people with age-related vision problems, there is often added anxiety around tax time since most receipts and paperwork come in small print that is difficult, if not impossible, for people with eye conditions such as glaucoma and macular degeneration to read. To help seniors experiencing vision loss get organized and find helpful resources and tips, here is a Tax Guide dedicated to getting yourself organized for this annual event and making the filing process easier. Getting Ready to File? Help With Filing? Working with an Accountant? Ready to file?

Getting Ready to File? It’s Time to Get Organized!

Need Help With Filing? Follow These Tips.

  • Visit the IRS website to download tax forms and instructions in the format that’s easiest for you to read—whether its large print, braille, or ASCII text and HTML versions for assistive technology users.
  • Use a magnification device to help you read your W-2 and other preprinted tax forms.
  • If you need help preparing basic tax forms, the AARP Tax-Aide program offers free tax preparation help from February 1 through April 15th. Find a Tax-Aide location near you .
  • You can also get free help with your tax return at a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) or Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) site near you. For more information, call 1-800-906-9887 (VITA) or 1-888-227-7669 (TCE).
  • If you are legally blind, indicate that on your tax form since you may qualify for a higher deduction. Find information about itemized deductions for medical expenses.
  • Social Security is offering resources that may help you as you prepare and file your taxes, including where you can find free help and advice.
  • Check out the American Council of the Blind information page on filing taxes.
  • Though online tax preparation and e-filing has become extremely popular, many are not accessible to people who use screen readers or screen magnifiers. Before you start using an online tax program, make sure you can easily navigate it using your assistive technology. More information about accessible tax programs can be found through the AccessWorld review of IRS Free File.

Working With an Accountant? Follow These Tips.

  • It is important to use a reputable accountant because you are ultimately responsible for the return filed under your name. Word-of-mouth is a great way to find a good, credible accountant in your area. The IRS website also offers good tips on finding a credible tax preparer.
  • Once you’re working with an accountant you trust, ask him or her to prepare your taxes using large print forms, or another accessible format, so that you can review your return before you sign it.
  • Make sure to tell your accountant if you are legally blind since you may qualify for a higher deduction.
  • Once your accountant has completed your return, ask him or her to read through the form with you to allow you to ask questions on figures you do not understand.

Ready to File? Follow These Tips.

  • When it’s time to sign your return, use a signature guide to help you ensure you’ve signed in the appropriate place.
  • If you owe money in taxes, and need to write a check, ask your bank to order bold-line large-print checks available from Deluxe (1-800-328-0304).
  • If you are expecting a federal refund, you can check its status through the “Where’s My Refund?” tool on the IRS website. According to the IRS, this online tool is accessible to taxpayers who use the JAWS screen reader alone or when used with a Braille display which is compatible with different JAWS modes.
  • If you do not have internet access, you can check the status of your refund by calling the IRS TeleTax System at 800-829-4477 or the IRS Refund Hotline at 800-829-1954. When calling, you must provide a social security number for you or your spouse, your filing status, and the exact refund amount shown on your return.

To sign up for more useful information, visit the VisionAware’s registration page.

Related Information

A variety of federal and state government financial incentives can help employers capitalize on the skills and talents people with disabilities have to offer. EARN recently developed a new website guide containing detailed descriptions of federal and state tax incentives, including those specific to veterans and return-to-work/stay-at-work initiatives. Visit the Employer Financial Incentives webpage. Find out about the the Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (Able Act). This Act gives people with disabilities a way to save money for qualifying expenses such as a car, college or career training, healthcare, prevention and wellness, and other expenses without being taxed or impacting eligibility for benefit programs. The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) is a Federal benefit for employers hiring individuals from specific target groups, including certain people with disabilities. WOTC helps targeted workers move into self-sufficiency as they earn a steady income, while participating employers are able to reduce their income tax liability.

 

Warmline – IOA – Institute on Aging – The Friendship Line – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jun 6 all-day

THE FRIENDSHIP LINE

24 Hour Telephone Hotline/Warmline

800-971-0016

We support individuals who find connecting within the community challenging

The Institute on Aging’s 24-hour toll-free Friendship Line is the only accredited crisis line in the country for people aged 60 years and older, and adults living with disabilities. We also make on-going outreach calls to lonely older adults. While there are other organizations that respond to the needs of people who may be contemplating suicide, none provides the type of services that IOA’s Friendship Line offers to respond to the public health problem of suicide among the elderly. Knowing that older people do not contact traditional suicide prevention centers on a regular basis even if they are considering suicide, we created the only program nationwide that reaches out to lonely, depressed, isolated, frail and/or suicidal older adults. Our trained volunteers specialize in offering a caring ear and having a friendly conversation with depressed older adults.

The Friendship Line is both a crisis intervention hotline and a warmline for non-emergency emotional support calls. Founded in 1973 by Dr. Patrick Arbore, Director of IOA’s Center for Elderly Suicide Prevention, and accredited by the American Association of Suicidology, Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including:

  • Providing emotional support
  • Elder abuse reporting
  • Well-being checks
  • Grief support through assistance and reassurance
  • Active suicide intervention
  • Information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities

In addition to receiving incoming calls, Friendship Line also offers outreach to eligible callers. We connect with people on a regular basis, and help monitor their physical and mental health concerns. The call-out services act as an intervention to prevent suicide in the long term by improving the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Any aging adult or person living with disabilities, who suffers from depression, loneliness, isolation, anxiousness, or may be thinking about death or suicide, can benefit from completely confidential phone calls with Friendship Line volunteers. Sometimes the road to happiness begins by simply saying hello to someone who cares.

Jun
7
Tue
AM – All Month – VA – VisionAware – 2022 Tax Filing Resources and Rps For Visually Impaired @ Online
Jun 7 all-day

 

 Fax Filing Resources and Tips for Visually Impaired 2022

 

Tax time is stressful for everyone. It involves organizing receipts and tax documents, filling out confusing forms, working with accountants, and meeting that fast-approaching April deadline. For people with age-related vision problems, there is often added anxiety around tax time since most receipts and paperwork come in small print that is difficult, if not impossible, for people with eye conditions such as glaucoma and macular degeneration to read. To help seniors experiencing vision loss get organized and find helpful resources and tips, here is a Tax Guide dedicated to getting yourself organized for this annual event and making the filing process easier. Getting Ready to File? Help With Filing? Working with an Accountant? Ready to file?

Getting Ready to File? It’s Time to Get Organized!

Need Help With Filing? Follow These Tips.

  • Visit the IRS website to download tax forms and instructions in the format that’s easiest for you to read—whether its large print, braille, or ASCII text and HTML versions for assistive technology users.
  • Use a magnification device to help you read your W-2 and other preprinted tax forms.
  • If you need help preparing basic tax forms, the AARP Tax-Aide program offers free tax preparation help from February 1 through April 15th. Find a Tax-Aide location near you .
  • You can also get free help with your tax return at a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) or Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) site near you. For more information, call 1-800-906-9887 (VITA) or 1-888-227-7669 (TCE).
  • If you are legally blind, indicate that on your tax form since you may qualify for a higher deduction. Find information about itemized deductions for medical expenses.
  • Social Security is offering resources that may help you as you prepare and file your taxes, including where you can find free help and advice.
  • Check out the American Council of the Blind information page on filing taxes.
  • Though online tax preparation and e-filing has become extremely popular, many are not accessible to people who use screen readers or screen magnifiers. Before you start using an online tax program, make sure you can easily navigate it using your assistive technology. More information about accessible tax programs can be found through the AccessWorld review of IRS Free File.

Working With an Accountant? Follow These Tips.

  • It is important to use a reputable accountant because you are ultimately responsible for the return filed under your name. Word-of-mouth is a great way to find a good, credible accountant in your area. The IRS website also offers good tips on finding a credible tax preparer.
  • Once you’re working with an accountant you trust, ask him or her to prepare your taxes using large print forms, or another accessible format, so that you can review your return before you sign it.
  • Make sure to tell your accountant if you are legally blind since you may qualify for a higher deduction.
  • Once your accountant has completed your return, ask him or her to read through the form with you to allow you to ask questions on figures you do not understand.

Ready to File? Follow These Tips.

  • When it’s time to sign your return, use a signature guide to help you ensure you’ve signed in the appropriate place.
  • If you owe money in taxes, and need to write a check, ask your bank to order bold-line large-print checks available from Deluxe (1-800-328-0304).
  • If you are expecting a federal refund, you can check its status through the “Where’s My Refund?” tool on the IRS website. According to the IRS, this online tool is accessible to taxpayers who use the JAWS screen reader alone or when used with a Braille display which is compatible with different JAWS modes.
  • If you do not have internet access, you can check the status of your refund by calling the IRS TeleTax System at 800-829-4477 or the IRS Refund Hotline at 800-829-1954. When calling, you must provide a social security number for you or your spouse, your filing status, and the exact refund amount shown on your return.

To sign up for more useful information, visit the VisionAware’s registration page.

Related Information

A variety of federal and state government financial incentives can help employers capitalize on the skills and talents people with disabilities have to offer. EARN recently developed a new website guide containing detailed descriptions of federal and state tax incentives, including those specific to veterans and return-to-work/stay-at-work initiatives. Visit the Employer Financial Incentives webpage. Find out about the the Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (Able Act). This Act gives people with disabilities a way to save money for qualifying expenses such as a car, college or career training, healthcare, prevention and wellness, and other expenses without being taxed or impacting eligibility for benefit programs. The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) is a Federal benefit for employers hiring individuals from specific target groups, including certain people with disabilities. WOTC helps targeted workers move into self-sufficiency as they earn a steady income, while participating employers are able to reduce their income tax liability.