PeerGalaxy Original Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring over 187,600+ monthly offerings of FREE telephone- and online-accessible peer support, recovery support, and wellness activities!  Plus 50+ warmlines, helplines, chatlines, and hotlines.  Plus workshops, webinars, job postings, resources, observances, special events, consumer input opportunities and more.

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

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If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

7

Training Opportunities in July 2020
List Provided Courtesy of State of Oregon, Oregon Health Authority
Click here to download PDF Format, 16 pages

Calendar Event Sorting

At the top, the 24/7/365 SAMHSA Disaster Helpline and similar links.

Next, Bundled “All Day” Events

Some organizations (like 12 step recovery programs, AA, NA, AlAnon, etc.) have so many events happening throughout the day that they need to be in a bundled listing to spare endless scrolling.  Often there is a link to look up events by zip code and other criteria.

Lastly, Time-Specific Events

So you can see what’s happening in the next hours, time specific events are tagged and listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  There can be events and warmlines operating in different time zones, though we try to list all in Oregon’s Pacific Time Zone.

Page Advancement

The calendar displays ~50 listings per page.  To advance to next page with ~50 more listings, click the right arrow in the lower left corner of the calendar


Screenshot image of the page advancing arrows at the bottom of the calendar, lower left corner.
Jul
24
Wed
2024
02 – Urgent Info – MC – Multnomah County – Help for When Its Hot – Updated Wednesday July 10, 2024
Jul 24 all-day

 

Help for When It’s Hot

Updated: 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, July 10, 2024

Multnomah County and its partners urge people to visit cool spaces even for a few hours including library branches, community centers and parks with misting stations, interactive fountains and splash pads listed on this interactive map(link is external) are available.

Central Library will extend hours and remain open until 8 p.m. Belmont, Gresham and Hollywood libraries are open until 8 p.m. All other open libraries are open until 6 p.m. Remember, because some libraries are closed for construction, always confirm hours and locations before you go.

The County is advising people to take care when working or playing outside in the midday heat. Remember to drink more water and take cooling breaks. Even a few minutes of cooling can help prevent heat illness.

Learn: The symptoms of heat illness and How to take care of yourself and others during hot weather

Multnomah County has closed recruitment for community volunteers interested in supporting this emergency activation. We welcome the support of community members when needs arise. Visit the Volunteer at a County Emergency Shelter page for information about the roles and future info sessions and trainings.

Get ready for summer weather

Now’s a good time to prepare yourself and your home for summer. Stock up on fans/air conditioners and sun-blocking curtains, sunscreen, and other summer essentials. Now is also a time to make a plan for pets, older adults, kids and those with medical conditions, all of whom are more vulnerable to heat illness.

Watch: How to prepare for the heat before temperatures soar(link is external) and Cómo preparase para el calor(link is external)

If you need financial assistance to obtain an air conditioning unit or to pay an electric bill, call 211 or visit this webpage(link is external).

Stay safe while swimming

Hot temperatures combined with cold, early-season snowmelt will be dangerous for those seeking relief in lakes, rivers and creeks. Be aware of swift currents, cool water temperatures, hidden hazards and uneven bottom surfaces. Watch kids in the water to make sure they aren’t feeling adverse effects. Learn more about staying safe while swimming here.

Bookmark these links

02 – Urgent Info – OHA – Oregon Health Authority – Extreme Heat, Preparation, Fact Sheets
Jul 24 all-day
02 - Urgent Info - OHA - Oregon Health Authority - Extreme Heat, Preparation, Fact Sheets

Oregon Health Authority

Get Prepared

Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable, yet annually many people succumb to extreme heat. This website provides easily accessible resources for members of the public, local health departments and other organizations to assist ongoing outreach efforts to those most vulnerable to extreme heat events.

Heat-related Illness:

Warning Signs and Symptoms

  • Muscle cramping might be the first sign of heat-related illness, and may lead to heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Here is how you can recognize heat exhaustion and heat stroke and what to do:
    Heat Exhaustion    What you should do
    Faint or dizzy

    Move to a cooler location.

    Sip water.

    Apply cool, wet cloths to as much of your body as possible.

    Lie down and loosen your clothing.

If the person has vomited and it continues, seek medical attention immediately.

Heavy sweating
Fast, weak pulse
Nausea or vomiting
Cold, pale, clammy skin
Muscle cramps
Heat Stroke    What you should do
High body temperature (above 103°F)

Call 911 immediately – heat stroke is a medical emergency.

Move the person to a cooler environment.

Reduce the person’s body temperature with cool cloths or even a bath.

Do NOT give fluids.

Health Threats from Extreme Heat

Infants and young children

Infants and young children are sensitive to the effects of extreme heat, and must rely on other people to keep them cool and hydrated.

  • Never leave infants or children in a parked car. (Nor should pets be left in parked cars—they can suffer heat-related illness too.)
  • Dress infants and children in loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Seek medical care immediately if your child has symptoms of heat-related illness.

People with chronic medical conditions

People of any age with a chronic medical condition are less likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature. Also, they may be taking medications that can worsen the impact of extreme heat. People in this category need the following information:

  • Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
  • Learn about how any medications you take affects your body’s ability to regulate temperature.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Check the local news for health and safety updates regularly.
  • Avoid use the stove or oven to cook — it will make you and your house hotter.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Take cool showers or baths to cool down.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or someone you know experiences symptoms of heat-related illness.

Athletes and outdoor sports enthusiasts

People who exercise in extreme heat are more likely to become dehydrated and get heat-related illness. STOP all activity and get to a cool environment if you feel faint or weak.

  • Drink more water than usual and take a drink before you are thirsty. Muscle cramping may be an early sign of heat-related illness.
  • Limit outdoor activity, especially midday when the sun is hottest.
  • Schedule workouts, practices, and activities earlier or later in the day when the temperature is cooler.
  • Pace activity. Start activities slow and pick up the pace gradually. Remember it may take 1-2 weeks of exposure to high temperatures before your body fully adjusts.
  • Monitor a teammate’s condition, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Wear and reapply sunscreen as indicated on the package.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or a teammate has symptoms of heat-related illness.
  • Learn about Oregon School Activities Association (OSAA) heat policies and guidance if you are an athlete, parent of an athlete, coach, trainer or athletics director. This guidance applies to members of OSAA, so if you engage in club sports, you may want to ask if they have similar policies.

Outdoor workers

People who work outdoors, whether as a source of income or for DIY home projects and landscaping, are more likely to become dehydrated. This makes them more likely to get heat-related illness. STOP all activity and get to a cool environment if you feel faint or weak.

  • Drink from two to four cups of water every hour while working. Take a drink BEFORE you are thirsty.
  • Avoid alcohol or liquids containing large amounts of sugar.
  • Ask your employer if tasks can be scheduled for earlier or later in the day to avoid midday heat. If you have DIY projects at home, consider moving work to the coolest parts of the day.
  • Wear a brimmed hat and loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Spend time in air-conditioned buildings during breaks and after work.
  • Encourage co-workers or those helping you with home projects to take breaks to cool off and drink water.
  • Wear and reapply sunscreen as indicated on the package.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or a co-worker has symptoms of heat-related illness.
  • For more information, please visit the CDC’s page on Heat Stress and visit OR-OSHA’s heat stress page.

Heat and low income

  • Drink more water than usual and take a drink BEFORE you are thirsty.
  • If you have air conditioning, use it to keep your home cool.
  • If you can’t afford to use your air conditioning:
  • If you live outdoors, identify public spaces with air conditioning and check to see if cooling centers are available in your community. 211 INFO’s Severe Weather Extreme Heat Cooling Center List, local service agencies and emergency management often have this information in locations where it is available.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you have, or someone you know has, symptoms of heat-related illness.

 Fact Sheets

FAQ: Extreme Heat and Public Health

OR-OSHA Resources

02 – Urgent Info – OPB – Oregon Public Broadcasting – Cooling Centers List Across Oregon and Southwest Washington – Heat Related Illness Infromation02 – Urgent Info – MC – Multnomah County – Help for When Its Hot – Updated Wednesday July 10, 2024
Jul 24 all-day

 

 

 

Cooling Centers List Across Oregon and Southwest Washington

Those centers include:

  • Cook Plaza, 19421 Southeast Stark Street, Gresham
  • Portland Covenant Church, 4046 Northeast Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Portland
  • The Hugo, 6221 Northeast 82nd Avenue, Portland

The county also announced it will be extending hours at the Central Library in Portland and the library in Gresham until 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Other locations will continue handing out bottled water and providing spaces for people seeking relief from the heat.

A fourth cooling center will open Saturday, from noon to 10 p.m. at Congregation Beth Israel at 1972 Northwest Flanders Street, Portland.

TriMet also announced Friday it will offer free rides to people traveling to or from a cooling center daily between 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Anyone needing additional transportation help should call 211.

Below is a list of cooling centers and shelters open across Oregon and Southwest Washington.

Clackamas County

  • Canby Denny’s Restaurant, 1369 Southeast 1st Avenue, Canby, Oregon
  • Canby Public Library, 220 Northeast 2nd Avenue, Canby, Oregon
  • Estacada AntFarm Office, 350 Southwest Zobrist Street, Estacada, Oregon
  • Estacada Public Library, 825 Northwest Wade Street, Estacada, Oregon
  • Father’s Heart Street Ministry, 603 12th Street, Oregon City, Oregon
  • Gladstone Public Library, 135 East Dartmouth Street, Gladstone, Oregon
  • Gladstone Community Center, 1050 Portland Avenue, Gladstone, Oregon
  • Happy Valley Public Library, 13793 Southeast Sieben Park Way, Happy Valley, Oregon
  • Hoodland Public Library, 24525 East Welches Road, Welches, Oregon
  • Lake Oswego Adult Community Center, 505 G Avenue, Lake Oswego, Oregon
  • Lake Oswego Public Library, 706 4th Street, Lake Oswego, Oregon
  • Ledding Public Library, 10660 Southeast 21st Avenue, Milwaukie, Oregon
  • Molalla AntFarm Office, 213 North Molalla Avenue, Molalla, Oregon
  • Molalla Public Library, 201 East 5th Street, Molalla, Oregon
  • Oak Lodge Public Library, 16201 Southeast McLoughlin Boulevard, Oak Grove, Oregon
  • Oregon City Public Library, 606 John Adams Street, Oregon City, Oregon
  • Sandy Public Library, 38980 Proctor Boulevard, Sandy, Oregon
  • West Linn Public Library, 1595 Burns Street, West Linn, Oregon
  • Wilsonville Community Center, 7965 Southwest Wilsonville Road, Wilsonville, Oregon
  • Wilsonville Public Library, 8200 Southwest Wilsonville Road, Wilsonville, Oregon

Washington County

  • Beaverton Community Center, 12350 Southwest 5th Street, Beaverton, Oregon
  • Beaverton City Library, 12375 Southwest 5th Street, Beaverton, Oregon
  • Washington Street Conference Center, 102 Southwest Washington Street, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Shute Park Library, 775 Southeast 10th Avenue, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Brookwood Library, 2850 Northeast Brookwood Parkway, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Shute Park Aquatic & Recreation Center, 953 Southeast Maple Street, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Hidden Creek Community Center, 5100 Northeast Hidden Creek Drive, Hillsboro, Oregon

Marion County

  • ARCHES Day Center, 615 Commercial Street Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • NWHS HOAP, 694 Church Street Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Salem Public Library, 585 Liberty Street Southeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Kroc Center, 1865 Bill Frey Drive Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Salem-ROCC, 1190 Broadway Street Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Kindness Closet Salem, 4105 Lancaster Drive Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Oak Park Church of God, 2990 Lancaster Drive Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Aumsville Bethel Baptist Church, 645 Cleveland Street, Aumsville, Oregon
  • Stayton Library, 515 North 1st Avenue, Stayton, Oregon
  • Santiam Outreach Center (SOCC), 280 Northeast Santiam Boulevard, Mill City, Oregon
  • Turner Christian Church, 7871 Marion Road Southeast, Turner, Oregon

Jackson County

  • ACCESS Medford Shelter, 324 West 6th Street, Medford, Oregon
  • Ashland Cooling Center, 2200 Ashland Street, Ashland, Oregon

Deschutes County

  • Downtown Bend Library, 601 Northwest Wall Street, Bend, Oregon
  • Blue Dog RV Shepherd’s House, 181 Northwest Franklin Avenue, Bend, Oregon
  • Council on Aging of Central Oregon, 1036 Northeast 5th Street, Bend, Oregon
  • The Lighthouse Navigation Center, 275 Northeast 2nd Street, Bend, Oregon
  • Redmond Library, 2127 South Highway 97, Redmond, Oregon
  • Shepherd’s House Redmond, 1350 South Highway 97, Redmond, Oregon
  • La Pine Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way, La Pine, Oregon
  • La Pine Library, 16425 1st Street, La Pine, Oregon
  • Sisters Library, 110 North Cedar Street, Sisters, Oregon

Clark County

  • Fort Vancouver Regional Library, 901 C Street, Vancouver, Washington
  • St. Paul Lutheran Church, 1309 Franklin Street, Vancouver, Washington
  • Marshall Community Center, 1009 East McLoughlin Boulevard, Vancouver, Washington
  • Living Hope Church, 2711 NE Andersen Road, Vancouver, Washington
  • Three Creeks Community Library, 800 NE Tenney Road, Vancouver, Washington
  • Cascade Park Community Library, 600 Northeast 136th Avenue, Vancouver, Washington
  • Firstenburg Community Center, 700 Northeast 136th Avenue, Vancouver, Washington
  • Mill Plain United Methodist Church, 15804 Southeast Mill Plain Boulevard, Vancouver, Washington
  • Ridgefield Community Library, 210 North Main Avenue, Ridgefield, Washington
  • Battle Ground Community Library, 1207 Southeast 8th Way, Battle Ground, Washington
  • Camas Public Library, 625 Northeast 4th Avenue, Camas, Washington
  • Washougal Community Library, 1661 C Street, Washougal, Washington

Heat advisories prompt OHA warning about heat-related illness

Tips for staying cool include limiting sun exposure, wearing light clothing, knowing signs of heat stroke

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon Health Authority is encouraging people to take steps to avoid heat-related illnesses such as heat stroke and heat exhaustion as advisories predicting triple-digit temperatures go into effect this week.

Older adults, infants and children, those who live or work outdoors, have low incomes, or who have a chronic medical condition are particularly vulnerable to the effects of extremely high temperatures. Heat-related illnesses among these groups are likely to increase as heat waves occur more often than usual – and at higher temperatures – around the state.

OHA offers these tips to stay safe and healthy during extreme heat:

1. Stay cool.

  • Stay in air-conditioned places, if possible.
  • Limit exposure to the sun from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. when temperatures are hottest, and avoid direct sunlight. Schedule outdoor activities in the early morning and late evening.
  • Open windows to allow fresh air to circulate if it cools off in the morning and evening hours. Close shades on south and west-facing windows during afternoon hours.
  • Use portable electric fans to push hot air out of rooms or draw in cooler air, but don’t rely on a fan as a primary cooling device.
  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight and light-colored clothing to keep cool and protect skin from the sun. Dress infants and children similarly.
  • Use cool compresses, misting and cool showers or baths to lower your body temperature.
  • Avoid hot foods and heavy meals, which increase body heat.
  • Never leave infants, children or pets in a parked car
  • Check on at-risk friends, family and neighbors several times a day. Heat-related illnesses can make it hard to think clearly. This means people may be in danger without realizing it. Make sure loved ones have what they need to stay cool.

2. Stay hydrated.

  • Regardless of your level of activity, drink plenty of fluids, even if you are not thirsty, and especially when working outside.
  • Avoid alcohol or liquids containing large amounts of sugar, which can increase dehydration. Alcohol can be especially dangerous when used as a substitute for water hydration, and increases risks of alcohol-related injuries.
  • Make sure your family, friends and neighbors drink enough water.

3. Stay informed.

  • Keep up to date on the heat risk and heat indexwhen planning activities so you can find ways to stay cool and hydrated.
  • Learn how to prevent, recognize and treat heat-related illnesses.
  • Heat-related illness can develop in as little as 10-15 minutes. It can happen indoors and outdoors.
  • Some heat-related illnesses can be managed at home or at urgent care. However, if you or someone you see is experiencing confusion or unconsciousness due to heat exposure, call 911. It is a medical emergency.

Ways to stay cool without an air conditioner:

  • Air conditioners can help you stay cool, but not everyone has one. Visiting friends with an air conditioner or going to cooling centers in your community can help you stay cool.
  • Local houses of worship and libraries may be open to the public during times of extreme heat. Splash pads and shopping centers can also be places to cool off.
  • Water is also great for cooling you off when it’s hot. Drape yourself with a damp towel, take a cool bath or shower or take a dip in a fountain. These actions can help cool you off in a hurry and work better when it’s not humid.
  • If you have a cooler part of the house, such as a basement, spend time there during the hottest parts of the day.

For more information, visit OHA’s website: www.oregon.gov/heat.

Air conditioners for eligible OHP members

Oregon launched new climate-related benefits as part of the state’s federally funded expansion of Oregon Health Plan (OHP) coverage, which includes health-related social needs (HRSN) services that help maintain health and well-being but are not traditionally thought of as medical services. New services include providing climate-control devices such as air conditioners, air filters, mini refrigeration units and portable power supplies to eligible OHP members.

OHP members interested in receiving climate devices should contact their coordinated care organization (CCO) to learn more. OHP Open Card members can call 1-888-834-4304 or email ORHRSN@acentra.com. If an OHP member is not sure which plan or CCO they are in, they can call the OHA Client Services Unit at 1-800-273-0557.

OHP members who don’t qualify for HRSN climate devices can still contact their CCO to see if climate supports are available through “flexible services” (also called “health-related services”). OHP Open Card members who don’t qualify for HRSN climate devices can still contact 1-888-834-4304 or their county to learn about local programs providing climate supports this summer. For non-OHP members in Oregon, some cities and counties have similar programs with a limited supply of devices.

Contact 211

During periods of extreme heat, counties often open cooling spaces for local communities to seek relief from high temperatures; these will be listed here, by county, based on the information shared with 211 by the shelter providers. Opening hours are based on specific counties’ and individual agencies’ criteria.

Methods to contact 211:

  • CALL 211 or 1-866-698-6155 or TTY: dial 711 and call 1-866-698-6155, 24 hours per day, 7 days per week.
  • TEXT your ZIP code to 898211 (TXT211), Monday to Friday, 9a.m. to 5p.m.
  • EMAIL help@211info.org, Monday to Friday, 9a.m. to5p.m. (Language interpreters available by phone; text and email in Spanish and English)

If there is a shelter that is not listed online, or information that needs to be edited, please email 211’s resource team: support@211info.org.

During times of emergency incident response, 211’s answer rate may vary

You are subscribed to Oregon Health Authority News Releases. View all OHA news releases.

 

Help for When It’s Hot

Updated: 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, July 10, 2024

Multnomah County and its partners urge people to visit cool spaces even for a few hours including library branches, community centers and parks with misting stations, interactive fountains and splash pads listed on this interactive map(link is external) are available.

Central Library will extend hours and remain open until 8 p.m. Belmont, Gresham and Hollywood libraries are open until 8 p.m. All other open libraries are open until 6 p.m. Remember, because some libraries are closed for construction, always confirm hours and locations before you go.

The County is advising people to take care when working or playing outside in the midday heat. Remember to drink more water and take cooling breaks. Even a few minutes of cooling can help prevent heat illness.

Learn: The symptoms of heat illness and How to take care of yourself and others during hot weather

Multnomah County has closed recruitment for community volunteers interested in supporting this emergency activation. We welcome the support of community members when needs arise. Visit the Volunteer at a County Emergency Shelter page for information about the roles and future info sessions and trainings.

Get ready for summer weather

Now’s a good time to prepare yourself and your home for summer. Stock up on fans/air conditioners and sun-blocking curtains, sunscreen, and other summer essentials. Now is also a time to make a plan for pets, older adults, kids and those with medical conditions, all of whom are more vulnerable to heat illness.

Watch: How to prepare for the heat before temperatures soar(link is external) and Cómo preparase para el calor(link is external)

If you need financial assistance to obtain an air conditioning unit or to pay an electric bill, call 211 or visit this webpage(link is external).

Stay safe while swimming

Hot temperatures combined with cold, early-season snowmelt will be dangerous for those seeking relief in lakes, rivers and creeks. Be aware of swift currents, cool water temperatures, hidden hazards and uneven bottom surfaces. Watch kids in the water to make sure they aren’t feeling adverse effects. Learn more about staying safe while swimming here.

Bookmark these links

02 – Urgent Info – OWRR – Oregon Wildfire Response & Recovery – Wildfire Information – Sign Up for Emergency Alerts, Prepare and Prevent, Fire Updates, Evacuation Notices and Maps
Jul 24 all-day

 

Oregon Wildfire
Response & Recovery

Stay safe, stay informed and stay connected. Access resources before, during and after wildfires.

EXPLORE THE STATE OF OREGON FIRES DASH BOARD FOR INFORMATION ON CURRENT FIRE INFORMATION

CLICK ON THIS LINK FOR THE MAP AND DASH BOARD

 

This application includes relevant information about fire activity in and around Oregon. Click on any of the tabs to see details for that topic. Information includes:

  • Fires Overview and Map

  • Evacuation Information

  • Fire-Related Weather Watches and Warnings

  • Latest GOES Satellite Image

  • Air Quality Monitoring

  • Smoke Forecast

  • AlertWildfire Cameras

  • Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Danger

  • Daily Significant Fire Potential Outlook

  • Monthly Significant Wildland Fire Potential Outlook

Disclaimer: Fire acreage will be updated as soon as reports are available from the on-scene fire teams/fire personnel. Fire teams typically update the fire acreage every 24 hours. You may find differences in reported fire acreage because some sites update fire information at different times.

 

Sign Up for Emergency Notifications

Get lifesaving alerts and instructions during emergencies to help you and others stay safe in Oregon.

 

 

USE THIS LINK FOR  LOCAL ALERT SYSTEM AND GET EMERGENCY NOTIFICATIONS

 

 

 YOU CAN VIEW CURRENT LIVE ALERT MESSAGES USING THE LINK BELOW

 

SEE LIVE ALERT MESSAGE HERE

 

 

Jul
25
Thu
2024
02 – Urgent Info – MC – Multnomah County – Help for When Its Hot – Updated Wednesday July 10, 2024
Jul 25 all-day

 

Help for When It’s Hot

Updated: 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, July 10, 2024

Multnomah County and its partners urge people to visit cool spaces even for a few hours including library branches, community centers and parks with misting stations, interactive fountains and splash pads listed on this interactive map(link is external) are available.

Central Library will extend hours and remain open until 8 p.m. Belmont, Gresham and Hollywood libraries are open until 8 p.m. All other open libraries are open until 6 p.m. Remember, because some libraries are closed for construction, always confirm hours and locations before you go.

The County is advising people to take care when working or playing outside in the midday heat. Remember to drink more water and take cooling breaks. Even a few minutes of cooling can help prevent heat illness.

Learn: The symptoms of heat illness and How to take care of yourself and others during hot weather

Multnomah County has closed recruitment for community volunteers interested in supporting this emergency activation. We welcome the support of community members when needs arise. Visit the Volunteer at a County Emergency Shelter page for information about the roles and future info sessions and trainings.

Get ready for summer weather

Now’s a good time to prepare yourself and your home for summer. Stock up on fans/air conditioners and sun-blocking curtains, sunscreen, and other summer essentials. Now is also a time to make a plan for pets, older adults, kids and those with medical conditions, all of whom are more vulnerable to heat illness.

Watch: How to prepare for the heat before temperatures soar(link is external) and Cómo preparase para el calor(link is external)

If you need financial assistance to obtain an air conditioning unit or to pay an electric bill, call 211 or visit this webpage(link is external).

Stay safe while swimming

Hot temperatures combined with cold, early-season snowmelt will be dangerous for those seeking relief in lakes, rivers and creeks. Be aware of swift currents, cool water temperatures, hidden hazards and uneven bottom surfaces. Watch kids in the water to make sure they aren’t feeling adverse effects. Learn more about staying safe while swimming here.

Bookmark these links

02 – Urgent Info – OHA – Oregon Health Authority – Extreme Heat, Preparation, Fact Sheets
Jul 25 all-day
02 - Urgent Info - OHA - Oregon Health Authority - Extreme Heat, Preparation, Fact Sheets

Oregon Health Authority

Get Prepared

Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable, yet annually many people succumb to extreme heat. This website provides easily accessible resources for members of the public, local health departments and other organizations to assist ongoing outreach efforts to those most vulnerable to extreme heat events.

Heat-related Illness:

Warning Signs and Symptoms

  • Muscle cramping might be the first sign of heat-related illness, and may lead to heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Here is how you can recognize heat exhaustion and heat stroke and what to do:
    Heat Exhaustion    What you should do
    Faint or dizzy

    Move to a cooler location.

    Sip water.

    Apply cool, wet cloths to as much of your body as possible.

    Lie down and loosen your clothing.

If the person has vomited and it continues, seek medical attention immediately.

Heavy sweating
Fast, weak pulse
Nausea or vomiting
Cold, pale, clammy skin
Muscle cramps
Heat Stroke    What you should do
High body temperature (above 103°F)

Call 911 immediately – heat stroke is a medical emergency.

Move the person to a cooler environment.

Reduce the person’s body temperature with cool cloths or even a bath.

Do NOT give fluids.

Health Threats from Extreme Heat

Infants and young children

Infants and young children are sensitive to the effects of extreme heat, and must rely on other people to keep them cool and hydrated.

  • Never leave infants or children in a parked car. (Nor should pets be left in parked cars—they can suffer heat-related illness too.)
  • Dress infants and children in loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Seek medical care immediately if your child has symptoms of heat-related illness.

People with chronic medical conditions

People of any age with a chronic medical condition are less likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature. Also, they may be taking medications that can worsen the impact of extreme heat. People in this category need the following information:

  • Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
  • Learn about how any medications you take affects your body’s ability to regulate temperature.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Check the local news for health and safety updates regularly.
  • Avoid use the stove or oven to cook — it will make you and your house hotter.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Take cool showers or baths to cool down.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or someone you know experiences symptoms of heat-related illness.

Athletes and outdoor sports enthusiasts

People who exercise in extreme heat are more likely to become dehydrated and get heat-related illness. STOP all activity and get to a cool environment if you feel faint or weak.

  • Drink more water than usual and take a drink before you are thirsty. Muscle cramping may be an early sign of heat-related illness.
  • Limit outdoor activity, especially midday when the sun is hottest.
  • Schedule workouts, practices, and activities earlier or later in the day when the temperature is cooler.
  • Pace activity. Start activities slow and pick up the pace gradually. Remember it may take 1-2 weeks of exposure to high temperatures before your body fully adjusts.
  • Monitor a teammate’s condition, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Wear and reapply sunscreen as indicated on the package.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or a teammate has symptoms of heat-related illness.
  • Learn about Oregon School Activities Association (OSAA) heat policies and guidance if you are an athlete, parent of an athlete, coach, trainer or athletics director. This guidance applies to members of OSAA, so if you engage in club sports, you may want to ask if they have similar policies.

Outdoor workers

People who work outdoors, whether as a source of income or for DIY home projects and landscaping, are more likely to become dehydrated. This makes them more likely to get heat-related illness. STOP all activity and get to a cool environment if you feel faint or weak.

  • Drink from two to four cups of water every hour while working. Take a drink BEFORE you are thirsty.
  • Avoid alcohol or liquids containing large amounts of sugar.
  • Ask your employer if tasks can be scheduled for earlier or later in the day to avoid midday heat. If you have DIY projects at home, consider moving work to the coolest parts of the day.
  • Wear a brimmed hat and loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Spend time in air-conditioned buildings during breaks and after work.
  • Encourage co-workers or those helping you with home projects to take breaks to cool off and drink water.
  • Wear and reapply sunscreen as indicated on the package.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or a co-worker has symptoms of heat-related illness.
  • For more information, please visit the CDC’s page on Heat Stress and visit OR-OSHA’s heat stress page.

Heat and low income

  • Drink more water than usual and take a drink BEFORE you are thirsty.
  • If you have air conditioning, use it to keep your home cool.
  • If you can’t afford to use your air conditioning:
  • If you live outdoors, identify public spaces with air conditioning and check to see if cooling centers are available in your community. 211 INFO’s Severe Weather Extreme Heat Cooling Center List, local service agencies and emergency management often have this information in locations where it is available.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you have, or someone you know has, symptoms of heat-related illness.

 Fact Sheets

FAQ: Extreme Heat and Public Health

OR-OSHA Resources

02 – Urgent Info – OPB – Oregon Public Broadcasting – Cooling Centers List Across Oregon and Southwest Washington – Heat Related Illness Infromation02 – Urgent Info – MC – Multnomah County – Help for When Its Hot – Updated Wednesday July 10, 2024
Jul 25 all-day

 

 

 

Cooling Centers List Across Oregon and Southwest Washington

Those centers include:

  • Cook Plaza, 19421 Southeast Stark Street, Gresham
  • Portland Covenant Church, 4046 Northeast Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Portland
  • The Hugo, 6221 Northeast 82nd Avenue, Portland

The county also announced it will be extending hours at the Central Library in Portland and the library in Gresham until 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Other locations will continue handing out bottled water and providing spaces for people seeking relief from the heat.

A fourth cooling center will open Saturday, from noon to 10 p.m. at Congregation Beth Israel at 1972 Northwest Flanders Street, Portland.

TriMet also announced Friday it will offer free rides to people traveling to or from a cooling center daily between 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Anyone needing additional transportation help should call 211.

Below is a list of cooling centers and shelters open across Oregon and Southwest Washington.

Clackamas County

  • Canby Denny’s Restaurant, 1369 Southeast 1st Avenue, Canby, Oregon
  • Canby Public Library, 220 Northeast 2nd Avenue, Canby, Oregon
  • Estacada AntFarm Office, 350 Southwest Zobrist Street, Estacada, Oregon
  • Estacada Public Library, 825 Northwest Wade Street, Estacada, Oregon
  • Father’s Heart Street Ministry, 603 12th Street, Oregon City, Oregon
  • Gladstone Public Library, 135 East Dartmouth Street, Gladstone, Oregon
  • Gladstone Community Center, 1050 Portland Avenue, Gladstone, Oregon
  • Happy Valley Public Library, 13793 Southeast Sieben Park Way, Happy Valley, Oregon
  • Hoodland Public Library, 24525 East Welches Road, Welches, Oregon
  • Lake Oswego Adult Community Center, 505 G Avenue, Lake Oswego, Oregon
  • Lake Oswego Public Library, 706 4th Street, Lake Oswego, Oregon
  • Ledding Public Library, 10660 Southeast 21st Avenue, Milwaukie, Oregon
  • Molalla AntFarm Office, 213 North Molalla Avenue, Molalla, Oregon
  • Molalla Public Library, 201 East 5th Street, Molalla, Oregon
  • Oak Lodge Public Library, 16201 Southeast McLoughlin Boulevard, Oak Grove, Oregon
  • Oregon City Public Library, 606 John Adams Street, Oregon City, Oregon
  • Sandy Public Library, 38980 Proctor Boulevard, Sandy, Oregon
  • West Linn Public Library, 1595 Burns Street, West Linn, Oregon
  • Wilsonville Community Center, 7965 Southwest Wilsonville Road, Wilsonville, Oregon
  • Wilsonville Public Library, 8200 Southwest Wilsonville Road, Wilsonville, Oregon

Washington County

  • Beaverton Community Center, 12350 Southwest 5th Street, Beaverton, Oregon
  • Beaverton City Library, 12375 Southwest 5th Street, Beaverton, Oregon
  • Washington Street Conference Center, 102 Southwest Washington Street, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Shute Park Library, 775 Southeast 10th Avenue, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Brookwood Library, 2850 Northeast Brookwood Parkway, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Shute Park Aquatic & Recreation Center, 953 Southeast Maple Street, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Hidden Creek Community Center, 5100 Northeast Hidden Creek Drive, Hillsboro, Oregon

Marion County

  • ARCHES Day Center, 615 Commercial Street Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • NWHS HOAP, 694 Church Street Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Salem Public Library, 585 Liberty Street Southeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Kroc Center, 1865 Bill Frey Drive Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Salem-ROCC, 1190 Broadway Street Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Kindness Closet Salem, 4105 Lancaster Drive Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Oak Park Church of God, 2990 Lancaster Drive Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Aumsville Bethel Baptist Church, 645 Cleveland Street, Aumsville, Oregon
  • Stayton Library, 515 North 1st Avenue, Stayton, Oregon
  • Santiam Outreach Center (SOCC), 280 Northeast Santiam Boulevard, Mill City, Oregon
  • Turner Christian Church, 7871 Marion Road Southeast, Turner, Oregon

Jackson County

  • ACCESS Medford Shelter, 324 West 6th Street, Medford, Oregon
  • Ashland Cooling Center, 2200 Ashland Street, Ashland, Oregon

Deschutes County

  • Downtown Bend Library, 601 Northwest Wall Street, Bend, Oregon
  • Blue Dog RV Shepherd’s House, 181 Northwest Franklin Avenue, Bend, Oregon
  • Council on Aging of Central Oregon, 1036 Northeast 5th Street, Bend, Oregon
  • The Lighthouse Navigation Center, 275 Northeast 2nd Street, Bend, Oregon
  • Redmond Library, 2127 South Highway 97, Redmond, Oregon
  • Shepherd’s House Redmond, 1350 South Highway 97, Redmond, Oregon
  • La Pine Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way, La Pine, Oregon
  • La Pine Library, 16425 1st Street, La Pine, Oregon
  • Sisters Library, 110 North Cedar Street, Sisters, Oregon

Clark County

  • Fort Vancouver Regional Library, 901 C Street, Vancouver, Washington
  • St. Paul Lutheran Church, 1309 Franklin Street, Vancouver, Washington
  • Marshall Community Center, 1009 East McLoughlin Boulevard, Vancouver, Washington
  • Living Hope Church, 2711 NE Andersen Road, Vancouver, Washington
  • Three Creeks Community Library, 800 NE Tenney Road, Vancouver, Washington
  • Cascade Park Community Library, 600 Northeast 136th Avenue, Vancouver, Washington
  • Firstenburg Community Center, 700 Northeast 136th Avenue, Vancouver, Washington
  • Mill Plain United Methodist Church, 15804 Southeast Mill Plain Boulevard, Vancouver, Washington
  • Ridgefield Community Library, 210 North Main Avenue, Ridgefield, Washington
  • Battle Ground Community Library, 1207 Southeast 8th Way, Battle Ground, Washington
  • Camas Public Library, 625 Northeast 4th Avenue, Camas, Washington
  • Washougal Community Library, 1661 C Street, Washougal, Washington

Heat advisories prompt OHA warning about heat-related illness

Tips for staying cool include limiting sun exposure, wearing light clothing, knowing signs of heat stroke

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon Health Authority is encouraging people to take steps to avoid heat-related illnesses such as heat stroke and heat exhaustion as advisories predicting triple-digit temperatures go into effect this week.

Older adults, infants and children, those who live or work outdoors, have low incomes, or who have a chronic medical condition are particularly vulnerable to the effects of extremely high temperatures. Heat-related illnesses among these groups are likely to increase as heat waves occur more often than usual – and at higher temperatures – around the state.

OHA offers these tips to stay safe and healthy during extreme heat:

1. Stay cool.

  • Stay in air-conditioned places, if possible.
  • Limit exposure to the sun from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. when temperatures are hottest, and avoid direct sunlight. Schedule outdoor activities in the early morning and late evening.
  • Open windows to allow fresh air to circulate if it cools off in the morning and evening hours. Close shades on south and west-facing windows during afternoon hours.
  • Use portable electric fans to push hot air out of rooms or draw in cooler air, but don’t rely on a fan as a primary cooling device.
  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight and light-colored clothing to keep cool and protect skin from the sun. Dress infants and children similarly.
  • Use cool compresses, misting and cool showers or baths to lower your body temperature.
  • Avoid hot foods and heavy meals, which increase body heat.
  • Never leave infants, children or pets in a parked car
  • Check on at-risk friends, family and neighbors several times a day. Heat-related illnesses can make it hard to think clearly. This means people may be in danger without realizing it. Make sure loved ones have what they need to stay cool.

2. Stay hydrated.

  • Regardless of your level of activity, drink plenty of fluids, even if you are not thirsty, and especially when working outside.
  • Avoid alcohol or liquids containing large amounts of sugar, which can increase dehydration. Alcohol can be especially dangerous when used as a substitute for water hydration, and increases risks of alcohol-related injuries.
  • Make sure your family, friends and neighbors drink enough water.

3. Stay informed.

  • Keep up to date on the heat risk and heat indexwhen planning activities so you can find ways to stay cool and hydrated.
  • Learn how to prevent, recognize and treat heat-related illnesses.
  • Heat-related illness can develop in as little as 10-15 minutes. It can happen indoors and outdoors.
  • Some heat-related illnesses can be managed at home or at urgent care. However, if you or someone you see is experiencing confusion or unconsciousness due to heat exposure, call 911. It is a medical emergency.

Ways to stay cool without an air conditioner:

  • Air conditioners can help you stay cool, but not everyone has one. Visiting friends with an air conditioner or going to cooling centers in your community can help you stay cool.
  • Local houses of worship and libraries may be open to the public during times of extreme heat. Splash pads and shopping centers can also be places to cool off.
  • Water is also great for cooling you off when it’s hot. Drape yourself with a damp towel, take a cool bath or shower or take a dip in a fountain. These actions can help cool you off in a hurry and work better when it’s not humid.
  • If you have a cooler part of the house, such as a basement, spend time there during the hottest parts of the day.

For more information, visit OHA’s website: www.oregon.gov/heat.

Air conditioners for eligible OHP members

Oregon launched new climate-related benefits as part of the state’s federally funded expansion of Oregon Health Plan (OHP) coverage, which includes health-related social needs (HRSN) services that help maintain health and well-being but are not traditionally thought of as medical services. New services include providing climate-control devices such as air conditioners, air filters, mini refrigeration units and portable power supplies to eligible OHP members.

OHP members interested in receiving climate devices should contact their coordinated care organization (CCO) to learn more. OHP Open Card members can call 1-888-834-4304 or email ORHRSN@acentra.com. If an OHP member is not sure which plan or CCO they are in, they can call the OHA Client Services Unit at 1-800-273-0557.

OHP members who don’t qualify for HRSN climate devices can still contact their CCO to see if climate supports are available through “flexible services” (also called “health-related services”). OHP Open Card members who don’t qualify for HRSN climate devices can still contact 1-888-834-4304 or their county to learn about local programs providing climate supports this summer. For non-OHP members in Oregon, some cities and counties have similar programs with a limited supply of devices.

Contact 211

During periods of extreme heat, counties often open cooling spaces for local communities to seek relief from high temperatures; these will be listed here, by county, based on the information shared with 211 by the shelter providers. Opening hours are based on specific counties’ and individual agencies’ criteria.

Methods to contact 211:

  • CALL 211 or 1-866-698-6155 or TTY: dial 711 and call 1-866-698-6155, 24 hours per day, 7 days per week.
  • TEXT your ZIP code to 898211 (TXT211), Monday to Friday, 9a.m. to 5p.m.
  • EMAIL help@211info.org, Monday to Friday, 9a.m. to5p.m. (Language interpreters available by phone; text and email in Spanish and English)

If there is a shelter that is not listed online, or information that needs to be edited, please email 211’s resource team: support@211info.org.

During times of emergency incident response, 211’s answer rate may vary

You are subscribed to Oregon Health Authority News Releases. View all OHA news releases.

 

Help for When It’s Hot

Updated: 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, July 10, 2024

Multnomah County and its partners urge people to visit cool spaces even for a few hours including library branches, community centers and parks with misting stations, interactive fountains and splash pads listed on this interactive map(link is external) are available.

Central Library will extend hours and remain open until 8 p.m. Belmont, Gresham and Hollywood libraries are open until 8 p.m. All other open libraries are open until 6 p.m. Remember, because some libraries are closed for construction, always confirm hours and locations before you go.

The County is advising people to take care when working or playing outside in the midday heat. Remember to drink more water and take cooling breaks. Even a few minutes of cooling can help prevent heat illness.

Learn: The symptoms of heat illness and How to take care of yourself and others during hot weather

Multnomah County has closed recruitment for community volunteers interested in supporting this emergency activation. We welcome the support of community members when needs arise. Visit the Volunteer at a County Emergency Shelter page for information about the roles and future info sessions and trainings.

Get ready for summer weather

Now’s a good time to prepare yourself and your home for summer. Stock up on fans/air conditioners and sun-blocking curtains, sunscreen, and other summer essentials. Now is also a time to make a plan for pets, older adults, kids and those with medical conditions, all of whom are more vulnerable to heat illness.

Watch: How to prepare for the heat before temperatures soar(link is external) and Cómo preparase para el calor(link is external)

If you need financial assistance to obtain an air conditioning unit or to pay an electric bill, call 211 or visit this webpage(link is external).

Stay safe while swimming

Hot temperatures combined with cold, early-season snowmelt will be dangerous for those seeking relief in lakes, rivers and creeks. Be aware of swift currents, cool water temperatures, hidden hazards and uneven bottom surfaces. Watch kids in the water to make sure they aren’t feeling adverse effects. Learn more about staying safe while swimming here.

Bookmark these links

02 – Urgent Info – OWRR – Oregon Wildfire Response & Recovery – Wildfire Information – Sign Up for Emergency Alerts, Prepare and Prevent, Fire Updates, Evacuation Notices and Maps
Jul 25 all-day

 

Oregon Wildfire
Response & Recovery

Stay safe, stay informed and stay connected. Access resources before, during and after wildfires.

EXPLORE THE STATE OF OREGON FIRES DASH BOARD FOR INFORMATION ON CURRENT FIRE INFORMATION

CLICK ON THIS LINK FOR THE MAP AND DASH BOARD

 

This application includes relevant information about fire activity in and around Oregon. Click on any of the tabs to see details for that topic. Information includes:

  • Fires Overview and Map

  • Evacuation Information

  • Fire-Related Weather Watches and Warnings

  • Latest GOES Satellite Image

  • Air Quality Monitoring

  • Smoke Forecast

  • AlertWildfire Cameras

  • Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Danger

  • Daily Significant Fire Potential Outlook

  • Monthly Significant Wildland Fire Potential Outlook

Disclaimer: Fire acreage will be updated as soon as reports are available from the on-scene fire teams/fire personnel. Fire teams typically update the fire acreage every 24 hours. You may find differences in reported fire acreage because some sites update fire information at different times.

 

Sign Up for Emergency Notifications

Get lifesaving alerts and instructions during emergencies to help you and others stay safe in Oregon.

 

 

USE THIS LINK FOR  LOCAL ALERT SYSTEM AND GET EMERGENCY NOTIFICATIONS

 

 

 YOU CAN VIEW CURRENT LIVE ALERT MESSAGES USING THE LINK BELOW

 

SEE LIVE ALERT MESSAGE HERE

 

 

Jul
26
Fri
2024
02 – Urgent Info – MC – Multnomah County – Help for When Its Hot – Updated Wednesday July 10, 2024
Jul 26 all-day

 

Help for When It’s Hot

Updated: 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, July 10, 2024

Multnomah County and its partners urge people to visit cool spaces even for a few hours including library branches, community centers and parks with misting stations, interactive fountains and splash pads listed on this interactive map(link is external) are available.

Central Library will extend hours and remain open until 8 p.m. Belmont, Gresham and Hollywood libraries are open until 8 p.m. All other open libraries are open until 6 p.m. Remember, because some libraries are closed for construction, always confirm hours and locations before you go.

The County is advising people to take care when working or playing outside in the midday heat. Remember to drink more water and take cooling breaks. Even a few minutes of cooling can help prevent heat illness.

Learn: The symptoms of heat illness and How to take care of yourself and others during hot weather

Multnomah County has closed recruitment for community volunteers interested in supporting this emergency activation. We welcome the support of community members when needs arise. Visit the Volunteer at a County Emergency Shelter page for information about the roles and future info sessions and trainings.

Get ready for summer weather

Now’s a good time to prepare yourself and your home for summer. Stock up on fans/air conditioners and sun-blocking curtains, sunscreen, and other summer essentials. Now is also a time to make a plan for pets, older adults, kids and those with medical conditions, all of whom are more vulnerable to heat illness.

Watch: How to prepare for the heat before temperatures soar(link is external) and Cómo preparase para el calor(link is external)

If you need financial assistance to obtain an air conditioning unit or to pay an electric bill, call 211 or visit this webpage(link is external).

Stay safe while swimming

Hot temperatures combined with cold, early-season snowmelt will be dangerous for those seeking relief in lakes, rivers and creeks. Be aware of swift currents, cool water temperatures, hidden hazards and uneven bottom surfaces. Watch kids in the water to make sure they aren’t feeling adverse effects. Learn more about staying safe while swimming here.

Bookmark these links

02 – Urgent Info – OHA – Oregon Health Authority – Extreme Heat, Preparation, Fact Sheets
Jul 26 all-day
02 - Urgent Info - OHA - Oregon Health Authority - Extreme Heat, Preparation, Fact Sheets

Oregon Health Authority

Get Prepared

Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable, yet annually many people succumb to extreme heat. This website provides easily accessible resources for members of the public, local health departments and other organizations to assist ongoing outreach efforts to those most vulnerable to extreme heat events.

Heat-related Illness:

Warning Signs and Symptoms

  • Muscle cramping might be the first sign of heat-related illness, and may lead to heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Here is how you can recognize heat exhaustion and heat stroke and what to do:
    Heat Exhaustion    What you should do
    Faint or dizzy

    Move to a cooler location.

    Sip water.

    Apply cool, wet cloths to as much of your body as possible.

    Lie down and loosen your clothing.

If the person has vomited and it continues, seek medical attention immediately.

Heavy sweating
Fast, weak pulse
Nausea or vomiting
Cold, pale, clammy skin
Muscle cramps
Heat Stroke    What you should do
High body temperature (above 103°F)

Call 911 immediately – heat stroke is a medical emergency.

Move the person to a cooler environment.

Reduce the person’s body temperature with cool cloths or even a bath.

Do NOT give fluids.

Health Threats from Extreme Heat

Infants and young children

Infants and young children are sensitive to the effects of extreme heat, and must rely on other people to keep them cool and hydrated.

  • Never leave infants or children in a parked car. (Nor should pets be left in parked cars—they can suffer heat-related illness too.)
  • Dress infants and children in loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Seek medical care immediately if your child has symptoms of heat-related illness.

People with chronic medical conditions

People of any age with a chronic medical condition are less likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature. Also, they may be taking medications that can worsen the impact of extreme heat. People in this category need the following information:

  • Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
  • Learn about how any medications you take affects your body’s ability to regulate temperature.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Check the local news for health and safety updates regularly.
  • Avoid use the stove or oven to cook — it will make you and your house hotter.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Take cool showers or baths to cool down.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or someone you know experiences symptoms of heat-related illness.

Athletes and outdoor sports enthusiasts

People who exercise in extreme heat are more likely to become dehydrated and get heat-related illness. STOP all activity and get to a cool environment if you feel faint or weak.

  • Drink more water than usual and take a drink before you are thirsty. Muscle cramping may be an early sign of heat-related illness.
  • Limit outdoor activity, especially midday when the sun is hottest.
  • Schedule workouts, practices, and activities earlier or later in the day when the temperature is cooler.
  • Pace activity. Start activities slow and pick up the pace gradually. Remember it may take 1-2 weeks of exposure to high temperatures before your body fully adjusts.
  • Monitor a teammate’s condition, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Wear and reapply sunscreen as indicated on the package.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or a teammate has symptoms of heat-related illness.
  • Learn about Oregon School Activities Association (OSAA) heat policies and guidance if you are an athlete, parent of an athlete, coach, trainer or athletics director. This guidance applies to members of OSAA, so if you engage in club sports, you may want to ask if they have similar policies.

Outdoor workers

People who work outdoors, whether as a source of income or for DIY home projects and landscaping, are more likely to become dehydrated. This makes them more likely to get heat-related illness. STOP all activity and get to a cool environment if you feel faint or weak.

  • Drink from two to four cups of water every hour while working. Take a drink BEFORE you are thirsty.
  • Avoid alcohol or liquids containing large amounts of sugar.
  • Ask your employer if tasks can be scheduled for earlier or later in the day to avoid midday heat. If you have DIY projects at home, consider moving work to the coolest parts of the day.
  • Wear a brimmed hat and loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Spend time in air-conditioned buildings during breaks and after work.
  • Encourage co-workers or those helping you with home projects to take breaks to cool off and drink water.
  • Wear and reapply sunscreen as indicated on the package.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or a co-worker has symptoms of heat-related illness.
  • For more information, please visit the CDC’s page on Heat Stress and visit OR-OSHA’s heat stress page.

Heat and low income

  • Drink more water than usual and take a drink BEFORE you are thirsty.
  • If you have air conditioning, use it to keep your home cool.
  • If you can’t afford to use your air conditioning:
  • If you live outdoors, identify public spaces with air conditioning and check to see if cooling centers are available in your community. 211 INFO’s Severe Weather Extreme Heat Cooling Center List, local service agencies and emergency management often have this information in locations where it is available.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you have, or someone you know has, symptoms of heat-related illness.

 Fact Sheets

FAQ: Extreme Heat and Public Health

OR-OSHA Resources

02 – Urgent Info – OPB – Oregon Public Broadcasting – Cooling Centers List Across Oregon and Southwest Washington – Heat Related Illness Infromation02 – Urgent Info – MC – Multnomah County – Help for When Its Hot – Updated Wednesday July 10, 2024
Jul 26 all-day

 

 

 

Cooling Centers List Across Oregon and Southwest Washington

Those centers include:

  • Cook Plaza, 19421 Southeast Stark Street, Gresham
  • Portland Covenant Church, 4046 Northeast Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Portland
  • The Hugo, 6221 Northeast 82nd Avenue, Portland

The county also announced it will be extending hours at the Central Library in Portland and the library in Gresham until 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Other locations will continue handing out bottled water and providing spaces for people seeking relief from the heat.

A fourth cooling center will open Saturday, from noon to 10 p.m. at Congregation Beth Israel at 1972 Northwest Flanders Street, Portland.

TriMet also announced Friday it will offer free rides to people traveling to or from a cooling center daily between 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Anyone needing additional transportation help should call 211.

Below is a list of cooling centers and shelters open across Oregon and Southwest Washington.

Clackamas County

  • Canby Denny’s Restaurant, 1369 Southeast 1st Avenue, Canby, Oregon
  • Canby Public Library, 220 Northeast 2nd Avenue, Canby, Oregon
  • Estacada AntFarm Office, 350 Southwest Zobrist Street, Estacada, Oregon
  • Estacada Public Library, 825 Northwest Wade Street, Estacada, Oregon
  • Father’s Heart Street Ministry, 603 12th Street, Oregon City, Oregon
  • Gladstone Public Library, 135 East Dartmouth Street, Gladstone, Oregon
  • Gladstone Community Center, 1050 Portland Avenue, Gladstone, Oregon
  • Happy Valley Public Library, 13793 Southeast Sieben Park Way, Happy Valley, Oregon
  • Hoodland Public Library, 24525 East Welches Road, Welches, Oregon
  • Lake Oswego Adult Community Center, 505 G Avenue, Lake Oswego, Oregon
  • Lake Oswego Public Library, 706 4th Street, Lake Oswego, Oregon
  • Ledding Public Library, 10660 Southeast 21st Avenue, Milwaukie, Oregon
  • Molalla AntFarm Office, 213 North Molalla Avenue, Molalla, Oregon
  • Molalla Public Library, 201 East 5th Street, Molalla, Oregon
  • Oak Lodge Public Library, 16201 Southeast McLoughlin Boulevard, Oak Grove, Oregon
  • Oregon City Public Library, 606 John Adams Street, Oregon City, Oregon
  • Sandy Public Library, 38980 Proctor Boulevard, Sandy, Oregon
  • West Linn Public Library, 1595 Burns Street, West Linn, Oregon
  • Wilsonville Community Center, 7965 Southwest Wilsonville Road, Wilsonville, Oregon
  • Wilsonville Public Library, 8200 Southwest Wilsonville Road, Wilsonville, Oregon

Washington County

  • Beaverton Community Center, 12350 Southwest 5th Street, Beaverton, Oregon
  • Beaverton City Library, 12375 Southwest 5th Street, Beaverton, Oregon
  • Washington Street Conference Center, 102 Southwest Washington Street, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Shute Park Library, 775 Southeast 10th Avenue, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Brookwood Library, 2850 Northeast Brookwood Parkway, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Shute Park Aquatic & Recreation Center, 953 Southeast Maple Street, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Hidden Creek Community Center, 5100 Northeast Hidden Creek Drive, Hillsboro, Oregon

Marion County

  • ARCHES Day Center, 615 Commercial Street Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • NWHS HOAP, 694 Church Street Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Salem Public Library, 585 Liberty Street Southeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Kroc Center, 1865 Bill Frey Drive Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Salem-ROCC, 1190 Broadway Street Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Kindness Closet Salem, 4105 Lancaster Drive Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Oak Park Church of God, 2990 Lancaster Drive Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Aumsville Bethel Baptist Church, 645 Cleveland Street, Aumsville, Oregon
  • Stayton Library, 515 North 1st Avenue, Stayton, Oregon
  • Santiam Outreach Center (SOCC), 280 Northeast Santiam Boulevard, Mill City, Oregon
  • Turner Christian Church, 7871 Marion Road Southeast, Turner, Oregon

Jackson County

  • ACCESS Medford Shelter, 324 West 6th Street, Medford, Oregon
  • Ashland Cooling Center, 2200 Ashland Street, Ashland, Oregon

Deschutes County

  • Downtown Bend Library, 601 Northwest Wall Street, Bend, Oregon
  • Blue Dog RV Shepherd’s House, 181 Northwest Franklin Avenue, Bend, Oregon
  • Council on Aging of Central Oregon, 1036 Northeast 5th Street, Bend, Oregon
  • The Lighthouse Navigation Center, 275 Northeast 2nd Street, Bend, Oregon
  • Redmond Library, 2127 South Highway 97, Redmond, Oregon
  • Shepherd’s House Redmond, 1350 South Highway 97, Redmond, Oregon
  • La Pine Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way, La Pine, Oregon
  • La Pine Library, 16425 1st Street, La Pine, Oregon
  • Sisters Library, 110 North Cedar Street, Sisters, Oregon

Clark County

  • Fort Vancouver Regional Library, 901 C Street, Vancouver, Washington
  • St. Paul Lutheran Church, 1309 Franklin Street, Vancouver, Washington
  • Marshall Community Center, 1009 East McLoughlin Boulevard, Vancouver, Washington
  • Living Hope Church, 2711 NE Andersen Road, Vancouver, Washington
  • Three Creeks Community Library, 800 NE Tenney Road, Vancouver, Washington
  • Cascade Park Community Library, 600 Northeast 136th Avenue, Vancouver, Washington
  • Firstenburg Community Center, 700 Northeast 136th Avenue, Vancouver, Washington
  • Mill Plain United Methodist Church, 15804 Southeast Mill Plain Boulevard, Vancouver, Washington
  • Ridgefield Community Library, 210 North Main Avenue, Ridgefield, Washington
  • Battle Ground Community Library, 1207 Southeast 8th Way, Battle Ground, Washington
  • Camas Public Library, 625 Northeast 4th Avenue, Camas, Washington
  • Washougal Community Library, 1661 C Street, Washougal, Washington

Heat advisories prompt OHA warning about heat-related illness

Tips for staying cool include limiting sun exposure, wearing light clothing, knowing signs of heat stroke

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon Health Authority is encouraging people to take steps to avoid heat-related illnesses such as heat stroke and heat exhaustion as advisories predicting triple-digit temperatures go into effect this week.

Older adults, infants and children, those who live or work outdoors, have low incomes, or who have a chronic medical condition are particularly vulnerable to the effects of extremely high temperatures. Heat-related illnesses among these groups are likely to increase as heat waves occur more often than usual – and at higher temperatures – around the state.

OHA offers these tips to stay safe and healthy during extreme heat:

1. Stay cool.

  • Stay in air-conditioned places, if possible.
  • Limit exposure to the sun from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. when temperatures are hottest, and avoid direct sunlight. Schedule outdoor activities in the early morning and late evening.
  • Open windows to allow fresh air to circulate if it cools off in the morning and evening hours. Close shades on south and west-facing windows during afternoon hours.
  • Use portable electric fans to push hot air out of rooms or draw in cooler air, but don’t rely on a fan as a primary cooling device.
  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight and light-colored clothing to keep cool and protect skin from the sun. Dress infants and children similarly.
  • Use cool compresses, misting and cool showers or baths to lower your body temperature.
  • Avoid hot foods and heavy meals, which increase body heat.
  • Never leave infants, children or pets in a parked car
  • Check on at-risk friends, family and neighbors several times a day. Heat-related illnesses can make it hard to think clearly. This means people may be in danger without realizing it. Make sure loved ones have what they need to stay cool.

2. Stay hydrated.

  • Regardless of your level of activity, drink plenty of fluids, even if you are not thirsty, and especially when working outside.
  • Avoid alcohol or liquids containing large amounts of sugar, which can increase dehydration. Alcohol can be especially dangerous when used as a substitute for water hydration, and increases risks of alcohol-related injuries.
  • Make sure your family, friends and neighbors drink enough water.

3. Stay informed.

  • Keep up to date on the heat risk and heat indexwhen planning activities so you can find ways to stay cool and hydrated.
  • Learn how to prevent, recognize and treat heat-related illnesses.
  • Heat-related illness can develop in as little as 10-15 minutes. It can happen indoors and outdoors.
  • Some heat-related illnesses can be managed at home or at urgent care. However, if you or someone you see is experiencing confusion or unconsciousness due to heat exposure, call 911. It is a medical emergency.

Ways to stay cool without an air conditioner:

  • Air conditioners can help you stay cool, but not everyone has one. Visiting friends with an air conditioner or going to cooling centers in your community can help you stay cool.
  • Local houses of worship and libraries may be open to the public during times of extreme heat. Splash pads and shopping centers can also be places to cool off.
  • Water is also great for cooling you off when it’s hot. Drape yourself with a damp towel, take a cool bath or shower or take a dip in a fountain. These actions can help cool you off in a hurry and work better when it’s not humid.
  • If you have a cooler part of the house, such as a basement, spend time there during the hottest parts of the day.

For more information, visit OHA’s website: www.oregon.gov/heat.

Air conditioners for eligible OHP members

Oregon launched new climate-related benefits as part of the state’s federally funded expansion of Oregon Health Plan (OHP) coverage, which includes health-related social needs (HRSN) services that help maintain health and well-being but are not traditionally thought of as medical services. New services include providing climate-control devices such as air conditioners, air filters, mini refrigeration units and portable power supplies to eligible OHP members.

OHP members interested in receiving climate devices should contact their coordinated care organization (CCO) to learn more. OHP Open Card members can call 1-888-834-4304 or email ORHRSN@acentra.com. If an OHP member is not sure which plan or CCO they are in, they can call the OHA Client Services Unit at 1-800-273-0557.

OHP members who don’t qualify for HRSN climate devices can still contact their CCO to see if climate supports are available through “flexible services” (also called “health-related services”). OHP Open Card members who don’t qualify for HRSN climate devices can still contact 1-888-834-4304 or their county to learn about local programs providing climate supports this summer. For non-OHP members in Oregon, some cities and counties have similar programs with a limited supply of devices.

Contact 211

During periods of extreme heat, counties often open cooling spaces for local communities to seek relief from high temperatures; these will be listed here, by county, based on the information shared with 211 by the shelter providers. Opening hours are based on specific counties’ and individual agencies’ criteria.

Methods to contact 211:

  • CALL 211 or 1-866-698-6155 or TTY: dial 711 and call 1-866-698-6155, 24 hours per day, 7 days per week.
  • TEXT your ZIP code to 898211 (TXT211), Monday to Friday, 9a.m. to 5p.m.
  • EMAIL help@211info.org, Monday to Friday, 9a.m. to5p.m. (Language interpreters available by phone; text and email in Spanish and English)

If there is a shelter that is not listed online, or information that needs to be edited, please email 211’s resource team: support@211info.org.

During times of emergency incident response, 211’s answer rate may vary

You are subscribed to Oregon Health Authority News Releases. View all OHA news releases.

 

Help for When It’s Hot

Updated: 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, July 10, 2024

Multnomah County and its partners urge people to visit cool spaces even for a few hours including library branches, community centers and parks with misting stations, interactive fountains and splash pads listed on this interactive map(link is external) are available.

Central Library will extend hours and remain open until 8 p.m. Belmont, Gresham and Hollywood libraries are open until 8 p.m. All other open libraries are open until 6 p.m. Remember, because some libraries are closed for construction, always confirm hours and locations before you go.

The County is advising people to take care when working or playing outside in the midday heat. Remember to drink more water and take cooling breaks. Even a few minutes of cooling can help prevent heat illness.

Learn: The symptoms of heat illness and How to take care of yourself and others during hot weather

Multnomah County has closed recruitment for community volunteers interested in supporting this emergency activation. We welcome the support of community members when needs arise. Visit the Volunteer at a County Emergency Shelter page for information about the roles and future info sessions and trainings.

Get ready for summer weather

Now’s a good time to prepare yourself and your home for summer. Stock up on fans/air conditioners and sun-blocking curtains, sunscreen, and other summer essentials. Now is also a time to make a plan for pets, older adults, kids and those with medical conditions, all of whom are more vulnerable to heat illness.

Watch: How to prepare for the heat before temperatures soar(link is external) and Cómo preparase para el calor(link is external)

If you need financial assistance to obtain an air conditioning unit or to pay an electric bill, call 211 or visit this webpage(link is external).

Stay safe while swimming

Hot temperatures combined with cold, early-season snowmelt will be dangerous for those seeking relief in lakes, rivers and creeks. Be aware of swift currents, cool water temperatures, hidden hazards and uneven bottom surfaces. Watch kids in the water to make sure they aren’t feeling adverse effects. Learn more about staying safe while swimming here.

Bookmark these links

02 – Urgent Info – OWRR – Oregon Wildfire Response & Recovery – Wildfire Information – Sign Up for Emergency Alerts, Prepare and Prevent, Fire Updates, Evacuation Notices and Maps
Jul 26 all-day

 

Oregon Wildfire
Response & Recovery

Stay safe, stay informed and stay connected. Access resources before, during and after wildfires.

EXPLORE THE STATE OF OREGON FIRES DASH BOARD FOR INFORMATION ON CURRENT FIRE INFORMATION

CLICK ON THIS LINK FOR THE MAP AND DASH BOARD

 

This application includes relevant information about fire activity in and around Oregon. Click on any of the tabs to see details for that topic. Information includes:

  • Fires Overview and Map

  • Evacuation Information

  • Fire-Related Weather Watches and Warnings

  • Latest GOES Satellite Image

  • Air Quality Monitoring

  • Smoke Forecast

  • AlertWildfire Cameras

  • Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Danger

  • Daily Significant Fire Potential Outlook

  • Monthly Significant Wildland Fire Potential Outlook

Disclaimer: Fire acreage will be updated as soon as reports are available from the on-scene fire teams/fire personnel. Fire teams typically update the fire acreage every 24 hours. You may find differences in reported fire acreage because some sites update fire information at different times.

 

Sign Up for Emergency Notifications

Get lifesaving alerts and instructions during emergencies to help you and others stay safe in Oregon.

 

 

USE THIS LINK FOR  LOCAL ALERT SYSTEM AND GET EMERGENCY NOTIFICATIONS

 

 

 YOU CAN VIEW CURRENT LIVE ALERT MESSAGES USING THE LINK BELOW

 

SEE LIVE ALERT MESSAGE HERE

 

 

Jul
27
Sat
2024
02 – Urgent Info – MC – Multnomah County – Help for When Its Hot – Updated Wednesday July 10, 2024
Jul 27 all-day

 

Help for When It’s Hot

Updated: 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, July 10, 2024

Multnomah County and its partners urge people to visit cool spaces even for a few hours including library branches, community centers and parks with misting stations, interactive fountains and splash pads listed on this interactive map(link is external) are available.

Central Library will extend hours and remain open until 8 p.m. Belmont, Gresham and Hollywood libraries are open until 8 p.m. All other open libraries are open until 6 p.m. Remember, because some libraries are closed for construction, always confirm hours and locations before you go.

The County is advising people to take care when working or playing outside in the midday heat. Remember to drink more water and take cooling breaks. Even a few minutes of cooling can help prevent heat illness.

Learn: The symptoms of heat illness and How to take care of yourself and others during hot weather

Multnomah County has closed recruitment for community volunteers interested in supporting this emergency activation. We welcome the support of community members when needs arise. Visit the Volunteer at a County Emergency Shelter page for information about the roles and future info sessions and trainings.

Get ready for summer weather

Now’s a good time to prepare yourself and your home for summer. Stock up on fans/air conditioners and sun-blocking curtains, sunscreen, and other summer essentials. Now is also a time to make a plan for pets, older adults, kids and those with medical conditions, all of whom are more vulnerable to heat illness.

Watch: How to prepare for the heat before temperatures soar(link is external) and Cómo preparase para el calor(link is external)

If you need financial assistance to obtain an air conditioning unit or to pay an electric bill, call 211 or visit this webpage(link is external).

Stay safe while swimming

Hot temperatures combined with cold, early-season snowmelt will be dangerous for those seeking relief in lakes, rivers and creeks. Be aware of swift currents, cool water temperatures, hidden hazards and uneven bottom surfaces. Watch kids in the water to make sure they aren’t feeling adverse effects. Learn more about staying safe while swimming here.

Bookmark these links

02 – Urgent Info – OHA – Oregon Health Authority – Extreme Heat, Preparation, Fact Sheets
Jul 27 all-day
02 - Urgent Info - OHA - Oregon Health Authority - Extreme Heat, Preparation, Fact Sheets

Oregon Health Authority

Get Prepared

Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable, yet annually many people succumb to extreme heat. This website provides easily accessible resources for members of the public, local health departments and other organizations to assist ongoing outreach efforts to those most vulnerable to extreme heat events.

Heat-related Illness:

Warning Signs and Symptoms

  • Muscle cramping might be the first sign of heat-related illness, and may lead to heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Here is how you can recognize heat exhaustion and heat stroke and what to do:
    Heat Exhaustion    What you should do
    Faint or dizzy

    Move to a cooler location.

    Sip water.

    Apply cool, wet cloths to as much of your body as possible.

    Lie down and loosen your clothing.

If the person has vomited and it continues, seek medical attention immediately.

Heavy sweating
Fast, weak pulse
Nausea or vomiting
Cold, pale, clammy skin
Muscle cramps
Heat Stroke    What you should do
High body temperature (above 103°F)

Call 911 immediately – heat stroke is a medical emergency.

Move the person to a cooler environment.

Reduce the person’s body temperature with cool cloths or even a bath.

Do NOT give fluids.

Health Threats from Extreme Heat

Infants and young children

Infants and young children are sensitive to the effects of extreme heat, and must rely on other people to keep them cool and hydrated.

  • Never leave infants or children in a parked car. (Nor should pets be left in parked cars—they can suffer heat-related illness too.)
  • Dress infants and children in loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Seek medical care immediately if your child has symptoms of heat-related illness.

People with chronic medical conditions

People of any age with a chronic medical condition are less likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature. Also, they may be taking medications that can worsen the impact of extreme heat. People in this category need the following information:

  • Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
  • Learn about how any medications you take affects your body’s ability to regulate temperature.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Check the local news for health and safety updates regularly.
  • Avoid use the stove or oven to cook — it will make you and your house hotter.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Take cool showers or baths to cool down.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or someone you know experiences symptoms of heat-related illness.

Athletes and outdoor sports enthusiasts

People who exercise in extreme heat are more likely to become dehydrated and get heat-related illness. STOP all activity and get to a cool environment if you feel faint or weak.

  • Drink more water than usual and take a drink before you are thirsty. Muscle cramping may be an early sign of heat-related illness.
  • Limit outdoor activity, especially midday when the sun is hottest.
  • Schedule workouts, practices, and activities earlier or later in the day when the temperature is cooler.
  • Pace activity. Start activities slow and pick up the pace gradually. Remember it may take 1-2 weeks of exposure to high temperatures before your body fully adjusts.
  • Monitor a teammate’s condition, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Wear and reapply sunscreen as indicated on the package.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or a teammate has symptoms of heat-related illness.
  • Learn about Oregon School Activities Association (OSAA) heat policies and guidance if you are an athlete, parent of an athlete, coach, trainer or athletics director. This guidance applies to members of OSAA, so if you engage in club sports, you may want to ask if they have similar policies.

Outdoor workers

People who work outdoors, whether as a source of income or for DIY home projects and landscaping, are more likely to become dehydrated. This makes them more likely to get heat-related illness. STOP all activity and get to a cool environment if you feel faint or weak.

  • Drink from two to four cups of water every hour while working. Take a drink BEFORE you are thirsty.
  • Avoid alcohol or liquids containing large amounts of sugar.
  • Ask your employer if tasks can be scheduled for earlier or later in the day to avoid midday heat. If you have DIY projects at home, consider moving work to the coolest parts of the day.
  • Wear a brimmed hat and loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Spend time in air-conditioned buildings during breaks and after work.
  • Encourage co-workers or those helping you with home projects to take breaks to cool off and drink water.
  • Wear and reapply sunscreen as indicated on the package.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or a co-worker has symptoms of heat-related illness.
  • For more information, please visit the CDC’s page on Heat Stress and visit OR-OSHA’s heat stress page.

Heat and low income

  • Drink more water than usual and take a drink BEFORE you are thirsty.
  • If you have air conditioning, use it to keep your home cool.
  • If you can’t afford to use your air conditioning:
  • If you live outdoors, identify public spaces with air conditioning and check to see if cooling centers are available in your community. 211 INFO’s Severe Weather Extreme Heat Cooling Center List, local service agencies and emergency management often have this information in locations where it is available.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you have, or someone you know has, symptoms of heat-related illness.

 Fact Sheets

FAQ: Extreme Heat and Public Health

OR-OSHA Resources

02 – Urgent Info – OPB – Oregon Public Broadcasting – Cooling Centers List Across Oregon and Southwest Washington – Heat Related Illness Infromation02 – Urgent Info – MC – Multnomah County – Help for When Its Hot – Updated Wednesday July 10, 2024
Jul 27 all-day

 

 

 

Cooling Centers List Across Oregon and Southwest Washington

Those centers include:

  • Cook Plaza, 19421 Southeast Stark Street, Gresham
  • Portland Covenant Church, 4046 Northeast Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Portland
  • The Hugo, 6221 Northeast 82nd Avenue, Portland

The county also announced it will be extending hours at the Central Library in Portland and the library in Gresham until 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Other locations will continue handing out bottled water and providing spaces for people seeking relief from the heat.

A fourth cooling center will open Saturday, from noon to 10 p.m. at Congregation Beth Israel at 1972 Northwest Flanders Street, Portland.

TriMet also announced Friday it will offer free rides to people traveling to or from a cooling center daily between 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Anyone needing additional transportation help should call 211.

Below is a list of cooling centers and shelters open across Oregon and Southwest Washington.

Clackamas County

  • Canby Denny’s Restaurant, 1369 Southeast 1st Avenue, Canby, Oregon
  • Canby Public Library, 220 Northeast 2nd Avenue, Canby, Oregon
  • Estacada AntFarm Office, 350 Southwest Zobrist Street, Estacada, Oregon
  • Estacada Public Library, 825 Northwest Wade Street, Estacada, Oregon
  • Father’s Heart Street Ministry, 603 12th Street, Oregon City, Oregon
  • Gladstone Public Library, 135 East Dartmouth Street, Gladstone, Oregon
  • Gladstone Community Center, 1050 Portland Avenue, Gladstone, Oregon
  • Happy Valley Public Library, 13793 Southeast Sieben Park Way, Happy Valley, Oregon
  • Hoodland Public Library, 24525 East Welches Road, Welches, Oregon
  • Lake Oswego Adult Community Center, 505 G Avenue, Lake Oswego, Oregon
  • Lake Oswego Public Library, 706 4th Street, Lake Oswego, Oregon
  • Ledding Public Library, 10660 Southeast 21st Avenue, Milwaukie, Oregon
  • Molalla AntFarm Office, 213 North Molalla Avenue, Molalla, Oregon
  • Molalla Public Library, 201 East 5th Street, Molalla, Oregon
  • Oak Lodge Public Library, 16201 Southeast McLoughlin Boulevard, Oak Grove, Oregon
  • Oregon City Public Library, 606 John Adams Street, Oregon City, Oregon
  • Sandy Public Library, 38980 Proctor Boulevard, Sandy, Oregon
  • West Linn Public Library, 1595 Burns Street, West Linn, Oregon
  • Wilsonville Community Center, 7965 Southwest Wilsonville Road, Wilsonville, Oregon
  • Wilsonville Public Library, 8200 Southwest Wilsonville Road, Wilsonville, Oregon

Washington County

  • Beaverton Community Center, 12350 Southwest 5th Street, Beaverton, Oregon
  • Beaverton City Library, 12375 Southwest 5th Street, Beaverton, Oregon
  • Washington Street Conference Center, 102 Southwest Washington Street, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Shute Park Library, 775 Southeast 10th Avenue, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Brookwood Library, 2850 Northeast Brookwood Parkway, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Shute Park Aquatic & Recreation Center, 953 Southeast Maple Street, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Hidden Creek Community Center, 5100 Northeast Hidden Creek Drive, Hillsboro, Oregon

Marion County

  • ARCHES Day Center, 615 Commercial Street Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • NWHS HOAP, 694 Church Street Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Salem Public Library, 585 Liberty Street Southeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Kroc Center, 1865 Bill Frey Drive Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Salem-ROCC, 1190 Broadway Street Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Kindness Closet Salem, 4105 Lancaster Drive Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Oak Park Church of God, 2990 Lancaster Drive Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Aumsville Bethel Baptist Church, 645 Cleveland Street, Aumsville, Oregon
  • Stayton Library, 515 North 1st Avenue, Stayton, Oregon
  • Santiam Outreach Center (SOCC), 280 Northeast Santiam Boulevard, Mill City, Oregon
  • Turner Christian Church, 7871 Marion Road Southeast, Turner, Oregon

Jackson County

  • ACCESS Medford Shelter, 324 West 6th Street, Medford, Oregon
  • Ashland Cooling Center, 2200 Ashland Street, Ashland, Oregon

Deschutes County

  • Downtown Bend Library, 601 Northwest Wall Street, Bend, Oregon
  • Blue Dog RV Shepherd’s House, 181 Northwest Franklin Avenue, Bend, Oregon
  • Council on Aging of Central Oregon, 1036 Northeast 5th Street, Bend, Oregon
  • The Lighthouse Navigation Center, 275 Northeast 2nd Street, Bend, Oregon
  • Redmond Library, 2127 South Highway 97, Redmond, Oregon
  • Shepherd’s House Redmond, 1350 South Highway 97, Redmond, Oregon
  • La Pine Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way, La Pine, Oregon
  • La Pine Library, 16425 1st Street, La Pine, Oregon
  • Sisters Library, 110 North Cedar Street, Sisters, Oregon

Clark County

  • Fort Vancouver Regional Library, 901 C Street, Vancouver, Washington
  • St. Paul Lutheran Church, 1309 Franklin Street, Vancouver, Washington
  • Marshall Community Center, 1009 East McLoughlin Boulevard, Vancouver, Washington
  • Living Hope Church, 2711 NE Andersen Road, Vancouver, Washington
  • Three Creeks Community Library, 800 NE Tenney Road, Vancouver, Washington
  • Cascade Park Community Library, 600 Northeast 136th Avenue, Vancouver, Washington
  • Firstenburg Community Center, 700 Northeast 136th Avenue, Vancouver, Washington
  • Mill Plain United Methodist Church, 15804 Southeast Mill Plain Boulevard, Vancouver, Washington
  • Ridgefield Community Library, 210 North Main Avenue, Ridgefield, Washington
  • Battle Ground Community Library, 1207 Southeast 8th Way, Battle Ground, Washington
  • Camas Public Library, 625 Northeast 4th Avenue, Camas, Washington
  • Washougal Community Library, 1661 C Street, Washougal, Washington

Heat advisories prompt OHA warning about heat-related illness

Tips for staying cool include limiting sun exposure, wearing light clothing, knowing signs of heat stroke

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon Health Authority is encouraging people to take steps to avoid heat-related illnesses such as heat stroke and heat exhaustion as advisories predicting triple-digit temperatures go into effect this week.

Older adults, infants and children, those who live or work outdoors, have low incomes, or who have a chronic medical condition are particularly vulnerable to the effects of extremely high temperatures. Heat-related illnesses among these groups are likely to increase as heat waves occur more often than usual – and at higher temperatures – around the state.

OHA offers these tips to stay safe and healthy during extreme heat:

1. Stay cool.

  • Stay in air-conditioned places, if possible.
  • Limit exposure to the sun from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. when temperatures are hottest, and avoid direct sunlight. Schedule outdoor activities in the early morning and late evening.
  • Open windows to allow fresh air to circulate if it cools off in the morning and evening hours. Close shades on south and west-facing windows during afternoon hours.
  • Use portable electric fans to push hot air out of rooms or draw in cooler air, but don’t rely on a fan as a primary cooling device.
  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight and light-colored clothing to keep cool and protect skin from the sun. Dress infants and children similarly.
  • Use cool compresses, misting and cool showers or baths to lower your body temperature.
  • Avoid hot foods and heavy meals, which increase body heat.
  • Never leave infants, children or pets in a parked car
  • Check on at-risk friends, family and neighbors several times a day. Heat-related illnesses can make it hard to think clearly. This means people may be in danger without realizing it. Make sure loved ones have what they need to stay cool.

2. Stay hydrated.

  • Regardless of your level of activity, drink plenty of fluids, even if you are not thirsty, and especially when working outside.
  • Avoid alcohol or liquids containing large amounts of sugar, which can increase dehydration. Alcohol can be especially dangerous when used as a substitute for water hydration, and increases risks of alcohol-related injuries.
  • Make sure your family, friends and neighbors drink enough water.

3. Stay informed.

  • Keep up to date on the heat risk and heat indexwhen planning activities so you can find ways to stay cool and hydrated.
  • Learn how to prevent, recognize and treat heat-related illnesses.
  • Heat-related illness can develop in as little as 10-15 minutes. It can happen indoors and outdoors.
  • Some heat-related illnesses can be managed at home or at urgent care. However, if you or someone you see is experiencing confusion or unconsciousness due to heat exposure, call 911. It is a medical emergency.

Ways to stay cool without an air conditioner:

  • Air conditioners can help you stay cool, but not everyone has one. Visiting friends with an air conditioner or going to cooling centers in your community can help you stay cool.
  • Local houses of worship and libraries may be open to the public during times of extreme heat. Splash pads and shopping centers can also be places to cool off.
  • Water is also great for cooling you off when it’s hot. Drape yourself with a damp towel, take a cool bath or shower or take a dip in a fountain. These actions can help cool you off in a hurry and work better when it’s not humid.
  • If you have a cooler part of the house, such as a basement, spend time there during the hottest parts of the day.

For more information, visit OHA’s website: www.oregon.gov/heat.

Air conditioners for eligible OHP members

Oregon launched new climate-related benefits as part of the state’s federally funded expansion of Oregon Health Plan (OHP) coverage, which includes health-related social needs (HRSN) services that help maintain health and well-being but are not traditionally thought of as medical services. New services include providing climate-control devices such as air conditioners, air filters, mini refrigeration units and portable power supplies to eligible OHP members.

OHP members interested in receiving climate devices should contact their coordinated care organization (CCO) to learn more. OHP Open Card members can call 1-888-834-4304 or email ORHRSN@acentra.com. If an OHP member is not sure which plan or CCO they are in, they can call the OHA Client Services Unit at 1-800-273-0557.

OHP members who don’t qualify for HRSN climate devices can still contact their CCO to see if climate supports are available through “flexible services” (also called “health-related services”). OHP Open Card members who don’t qualify for HRSN climate devices can still contact 1-888-834-4304 or their county to learn about local programs providing climate supports this summer. For non-OHP members in Oregon, some cities and counties have similar programs with a limited supply of devices.

Contact 211

During periods of extreme heat, counties often open cooling spaces for local communities to seek relief from high temperatures; these will be listed here, by county, based on the information shared with 211 by the shelter providers. Opening hours are based on specific counties’ and individual agencies’ criteria.

Methods to contact 211:

  • CALL 211 or 1-866-698-6155 or TTY: dial 711 and call 1-866-698-6155, 24 hours per day, 7 days per week.
  • TEXT your ZIP code to 898211 (TXT211), Monday to Friday, 9a.m. to 5p.m.
  • EMAIL help@211info.org, Monday to Friday, 9a.m. to5p.m. (Language interpreters available by phone; text and email in Spanish and English)

If there is a shelter that is not listed online, or information that needs to be edited, please email 211’s resource team: support@211info.org.

During times of emergency incident response, 211’s answer rate may vary

You are subscribed to Oregon Health Authority News Releases. View all OHA news releases.

 

Help for When It’s Hot

Updated: 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, July 10, 2024

Multnomah County and its partners urge people to visit cool spaces even for a few hours including library branches, community centers and parks with misting stations, interactive fountains and splash pads listed on this interactive map(link is external) are available.

Central Library will extend hours and remain open until 8 p.m. Belmont, Gresham and Hollywood libraries are open until 8 p.m. All other open libraries are open until 6 p.m. Remember, because some libraries are closed for construction, always confirm hours and locations before you go.

The County is advising people to take care when working or playing outside in the midday heat. Remember to drink more water and take cooling breaks. Even a few minutes of cooling can help prevent heat illness.

Learn: The symptoms of heat illness and How to take care of yourself and others during hot weather

Multnomah County has closed recruitment for community volunteers interested in supporting this emergency activation. We welcome the support of community members when needs arise. Visit the Volunteer at a County Emergency Shelter page for information about the roles and future info sessions and trainings.

Get ready for summer weather

Now’s a good time to prepare yourself and your home for summer. Stock up on fans/air conditioners and sun-blocking curtains, sunscreen, and other summer essentials. Now is also a time to make a plan for pets, older adults, kids and those with medical conditions, all of whom are more vulnerable to heat illness.

Watch: How to prepare for the heat before temperatures soar(link is external) and Cómo preparase para el calor(link is external)

If you need financial assistance to obtain an air conditioning unit or to pay an electric bill, call 211 or visit this webpage(link is external).

Stay safe while swimming

Hot temperatures combined with cold, early-season snowmelt will be dangerous for those seeking relief in lakes, rivers and creeks. Be aware of swift currents, cool water temperatures, hidden hazards and uneven bottom surfaces. Watch kids in the water to make sure they aren’t feeling adverse effects. Learn more about staying safe while swimming here.

Bookmark these links

02 – Urgent Info – OWRR – Oregon Wildfire Response & Recovery – Wildfire Information – Sign Up for Emergency Alerts, Prepare and Prevent, Fire Updates, Evacuation Notices and Maps
Jul 27 all-day

 

Oregon Wildfire
Response & Recovery

Stay safe, stay informed and stay connected. Access resources before, during and after wildfires.

EXPLORE THE STATE OF OREGON FIRES DASH BOARD FOR INFORMATION ON CURRENT FIRE INFORMATION

CLICK ON THIS LINK FOR THE MAP AND DASH BOARD

 

This application includes relevant information about fire activity in and around Oregon. Click on any of the tabs to see details for that topic. Information includes:

  • Fires Overview and Map

  • Evacuation Information

  • Fire-Related Weather Watches and Warnings

  • Latest GOES Satellite Image

  • Air Quality Monitoring

  • Smoke Forecast

  • AlertWildfire Cameras

  • Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Danger

  • Daily Significant Fire Potential Outlook

  • Monthly Significant Wildland Fire Potential Outlook

Disclaimer: Fire acreage will be updated as soon as reports are available from the on-scene fire teams/fire personnel. Fire teams typically update the fire acreage every 24 hours. You may find differences in reported fire acreage because some sites update fire information at different times.

 

Sign Up for Emergency Notifications

Get lifesaving alerts and instructions during emergencies to help you and others stay safe in Oregon.

 

 

USE THIS LINK FOR  LOCAL ALERT SYSTEM AND GET EMERGENCY NOTIFICATIONS

 

 

 YOU CAN VIEW CURRENT LIVE ALERT MESSAGES USING THE LINK BELOW

 

SEE LIVE ALERT MESSAGE HERE

 

 

Jul
28
Sun
2024
02 – Urgent Info – MC – Multnomah County – Help for When Its Hot – Updated Wednesday July 10, 2024
Jul 28 all-day

 

Help for When It’s Hot

Updated: 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, July 10, 2024

Multnomah County and its partners urge people to visit cool spaces even for a few hours including library branches, community centers and parks with misting stations, interactive fountains and splash pads listed on this interactive map(link is external) are available.

Central Library will extend hours and remain open until 8 p.m. Belmont, Gresham and Hollywood libraries are open until 8 p.m. All other open libraries are open until 6 p.m. Remember, because some libraries are closed for construction, always confirm hours and locations before you go.

The County is advising people to take care when working or playing outside in the midday heat. Remember to drink more water and take cooling breaks. Even a few minutes of cooling can help prevent heat illness.

Learn: The symptoms of heat illness and How to take care of yourself and others during hot weather

Multnomah County has closed recruitment for community volunteers interested in supporting this emergency activation. We welcome the support of community members when needs arise. Visit the Volunteer at a County Emergency Shelter page for information about the roles and future info sessions and trainings.

Get ready for summer weather

Now’s a good time to prepare yourself and your home for summer. Stock up on fans/air conditioners and sun-blocking curtains, sunscreen, and other summer essentials. Now is also a time to make a plan for pets, older adults, kids and those with medical conditions, all of whom are more vulnerable to heat illness.

Watch: How to prepare for the heat before temperatures soar(link is external) and Cómo preparase para el calor(link is external)

If you need financial assistance to obtain an air conditioning unit or to pay an electric bill, call 211 or visit this webpage(link is external).

Stay safe while swimming

Hot temperatures combined with cold, early-season snowmelt will be dangerous for those seeking relief in lakes, rivers and creeks. Be aware of swift currents, cool water temperatures, hidden hazards and uneven bottom surfaces. Watch kids in the water to make sure they aren’t feeling adverse effects. Learn more about staying safe while swimming here.

Bookmark these links

02 – Urgent Info – OHA – Oregon Health Authority – Extreme Heat, Preparation, Fact Sheets
Jul 28 all-day
02 - Urgent Info - OHA - Oregon Health Authority - Extreme Heat, Preparation, Fact Sheets

Oregon Health Authority

Get Prepared

Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable, yet annually many people succumb to extreme heat. This website provides easily accessible resources for members of the public, local health departments and other organizations to assist ongoing outreach efforts to those most vulnerable to extreme heat events.

Heat-related Illness:

Warning Signs and Symptoms

  • Muscle cramping might be the first sign of heat-related illness, and may lead to heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Here is how you can recognize heat exhaustion and heat stroke and what to do:
    Heat Exhaustion    What you should do
    Faint or dizzy

    Move to a cooler location.

    Sip water.

    Apply cool, wet cloths to as much of your body as possible.

    Lie down and loosen your clothing.

If the person has vomited and it continues, seek medical attention immediately.

Heavy sweating
Fast, weak pulse
Nausea or vomiting
Cold, pale, clammy skin
Muscle cramps
Heat Stroke    What you should do
High body temperature (above 103°F)

Call 911 immediately – heat stroke is a medical emergency.

Move the person to a cooler environment.

Reduce the person’s body temperature with cool cloths or even a bath.

Do NOT give fluids.

Health Threats from Extreme Heat

Infants and young children

Infants and young children are sensitive to the effects of extreme heat, and must rely on other people to keep them cool and hydrated.

  • Never leave infants or children in a parked car. (Nor should pets be left in parked cars—they can suffer heat-related illness too.)
  • Dress infants and children in loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Seek medical care immediately if your child has symptoms of heat-related illness.

People with chronic medical conditions

People of any age with a chronic medical condition are less likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature. Also, they may be taking medications that can worsen the impact of extreme heat. People in this category need the following information:

  • Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
  • Learn about how any medications you take affects your body’s ability to regulate temperature.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Check the local news for health and safety updates regularly.
  • Avoid use the stove or oven to cook — it will make you and your house hotter.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Take cool showers or baths to cool down.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or someone you know experiences symptoms of heat-related illness.

Athletes and outdoor sports enthusiasts

People who exercise in extreme heat are more likely to become dehydrated and get heat-related illness. STOP all activity and get to a cool environment if you feel faint or weak.

  • Drink more water than usual and take a drink before you are thirsty. Muscle cramping may be an early sign of heat-related illness.
  • Limit outdoor activity, especially midday when the sun is hottest.
  • Schedule workouts, practices, and activities earlier or later in the day when the temperature is cooler.
  • Pace activity. Start activities slow and pick up the pace gradually. Remember it may take 1-2 weeks of exposure to high temperatures before your body fully adjusts.
  • Monitor a teammate’s condition, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Wear and reapply sunscreen as indicated on the package.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or a teammate has symptoms of heat-related illness.
  • Learn about Oregon School Activities Association (OSAA) heat policies and guidance if you are an athlete, parent of an athlete, coach, trainer or athletics director. This guidance applies to members of OSAA, so if you engage in club sports, you may want to ask if they have similar policies.

Outdoor workers

People who work outdoors, whether as a source of income or for DIY home projects and landscaping, are more likely to become dehydrated. This makes them more likely to get heat-related illness. STOP all activity and get to a cool environment if you feel faint or weak.

  • Drink from two to four cups of water every hour while working. Take a drink BEFORE you are thirsty.
  • Avoid alcohol or liquids containing large amounts of sugar.
  • Ask your employer if tasks can be scheduled for earlier or later in the day to avoid midday heat. If you have DIY projects at home, consider moving work to the coolest parts of the day.
  • Wear a brimmed hat and loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Spend time in air-conditioned buildings during breaks and after work.
  • Encourage co-workers or those helping you with home projects to take breaks to cool off and drink water.
  • Wear and reapply sunscreen as indicated on the package.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or a co-worker has symptoms of heat-related illness.
  • For more information, please visit the CDC’s page on Heat Stress and visit OR-OSHA’s heat stress page.

Heat and low income

  • Drink more water than usual and take a drink BEFORE you are thirsty.
  • If you have air conditioning, use it to keep your home cool.
  • If you can’t afford to use your air conditioning:
  • If you live outdoors, identify public spaces with air conditioning and check to see if cooling centers are available in your community. 211 INFO’s Severe Weather Extreme Heat Cooling Center List, local service agencies and emergency management often have this information in locations where it is available.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you have, or someone you know has, symptoms of heat-related illness.

 Fact Sheets

FAQ: Extreme Heat and Public Health

OR-OSHA Resources

02 – Urgent Info – OPB – Oregon Public Broadcasting – Cooling Centers List Across Oregon and Southwest Washington – Heat Related Illness Infromation02 – Urgent Info – MC – Multnomah County – Help for When Its Hot – Updated Wednesday July 10, 2024
Jul 28 all-day

 

 

 

Cooling Centers List Across Oregon and Southwest Washington

Those centers include:

  • Cook Plaza, 19421 Southeast Stark Street, Gresham
  • Portland Covenant Church, 4046 Northeast Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Portland
  • The Hugo, 6221 Northeast 82nd Avenue, Portland

The county also announced it will be extending hours at the Central Library in Portland and the library in Gresham until 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Other locations will continue handing out bottled water and providing spaces for people seeking relief from the heat.

A fourth cooling center will open Saturday, from noon to 10 p.m. at Congregation Beth Israel at 1972 Northwest Flanders Street, Portland.

TriMet also announced Friday it will offer free rides to people traveling to or from a cooling center daily between 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Anyone needing additional transportation help should call 211.

Below is a list of cooling centers and shelters open across Oregon and Southwest Washington.

Clackamas County

  • Canby Denny’s Restaurant, 1369 Southeast 1st Avenue, Canby, Oregon
  • Canby Public Library, 220 Northeast 2nd Avenue, Canby, Oregon
  • Estacada AntFarm Office, 350 Southwest Zobrist Street, Estacada, Oregon
  • Estacada Public Library, 825 Northwest Wade Street, Estacada, Oregon
  • Father’s Heart Street Ministry, 603 12th Street, Oregon City, Oregon
  • Gladstone Public Library, 135 East Dartmouth Street, Gladstone, Oregon
  • Gladstone Community Center, 1050 Portland Avenue, Gladstone, Oregon
  • Happy Valley Public Library, 13793 Southeast Sieben Park Way, Happy Valley, Oregon
  • Hoodland Public Library, 24525 East Welches Road, Welches, Oregon
  • Lake Oswego Adult Community Center, 505 G Avenue, Lake Oswego, Oregon
  • Lake Oswego Public Library, 706 4th Street, Lake Oswego, Oregon
  • Ledding Public Library, 10660 Southeast 21st Avenue, Milwaukie, Oregon
  • Molalla AntFarm Office, 213 North Molalla Avenue, Molalla, Oregon
  • Molalla Public Library, 201 East 5th Street, Molalla, Oregon
  • Oak Lodge Public Library, 16201 Southeast McLoughlin Boulevard, Oak Grove, Oregon
  • Oregon City Public Library, 606 John Adams Street, Oregon City, Oregon
  • Sandy Public Library, 38980 Proctor Boulevard, Sandy, Oregon
  • West Linn Public Library, 1595 Burns Street, West Linn, Oregon
  • Wilsonville Community Center, 7965 Southwest Wilsonville Road, Wilsonville, Oregon
  • Wilsonville Public Library, 8200 Southwest Wilsonville Road, Wilsonville, Oregon

Washington County

  • Beaverton Community Center, 12350 Southwest 5th Street, Beaverton, Oregon
  • Beaverton City Library, 12375 Southwest 5th Street, Beaverton, Oregon
  • Washington Street Conference Center, 102 Southwest Washington Street, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Shute Park Library, 775 Southeast 10th Avenue, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Brookwood Library, 2850 Northeast Brookwood Parkway, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Shute Park Aquatic & Recreation Center, 953 Southeast Maple Street, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Hidden Creek Community Center, 5100 Northeast Hidden Creek Drive, Hillsboro, Oregon

Marion County

  • ARCHES Day Center, 615 Commercial Street Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • NWHS HOAP, 694 Church Street Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Salem Public Library, 585 Liberty Street Southeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Kroc Center, 1865 Bill Frey Drive Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Salem-ROCC, 1190 Broadway Street Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Kindness Closet Salem, 4105 Lancaster Drive Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Oak Park Church of God, 2990 Lancaster Drive Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Aumsville Bethel Baptist Church, 645 Cleveland Street, Aumsville, Oregon
  • Stayton Library, 515 North 1st Avenue, Stayton, Oregon
  • Santiam Outreach Center (SOCC), 280 Northeast Santiam Boulevard, Mill City, Oregon
  • Turner Christian Church, 7871 Marion Road Southeast, Turner, Oregon

Jackson County

  • ACCESS Medford Shelter, 324 West 6th Street, Medford, Oregon
  • Ashland Cooling Center, 2200 Ashland Street, Ashland, Oregon

Deschutes County

  • Downtown Bend Library, 601 Northwest Wall Street, Bend, Oregon
  • Blue Dog RV Shepherd’s House, 181 Northwest Franklin Avenue, Bend, Oregon
  • Council on Aging of Central Oregon, 1036 Northeast 5th Street, Bend, Oregon
  • The Lighthouse Navigation Center, 275 Northeast 2nd Street, Bend, Oregon
  • Redmond Library, 2127 South Highway 97, Redmond, Oregon
  • Shepherd’s House Redmond, 1350 South Highway 97, Redmond, Oregon
  • La Pine Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way, La Pine, Oregon
  • La Pine Library, 16425 1st Street, La Pine, Oregon
  • Sisters Library, 110 North Cedar Street, Sisters, Oregon

Clark County

  • Fort Vancouver Regional Library, 901 C Street, Vancouver, Washington
  • St. Paul Lutheran Church, 1309 Franklin Street, Vancouver, Washington
  • Marshall Community Center, 1009 East McLoughlin Boulevard, Vancouver, Washington
  • Living Hope Church, 2711 NE Andersen Road, Vancouver, Washington
  • Three Creeks Community Library, 800 NE Tenney Road, Vancouver, Washington
  • Cascade Park Community Library, 600 Northeast 136th Avenue, Vancouver, Washington
  • Firstenburg Community Center, 700 Northeast 136th Avenue, Vancouver, Washington
  • Mill Plain United Methodist Church, 15804 Southeast Mill Plain Boulevard, Vancouver, Washington
  • Ridgefield Community Library, 210 North Main Avenue, Ridgefield, Washington
  • Battle Ground Community Library, 1207 Southeast 8th Way, Battle Ground, Washington
  • Camas Public Library, 625 Northeast 4th Avenue, Camas, Washington
  • Washougal Community Library, 1661 C Street, Washougal, Washington

Heat advisories prompt OHA warning about heat-related illness

Tips for staying cool include limiting sun exposure, wearing light clothing, knowing signs of heat stroke

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon Health Authority is encouraging people to take steps to avoid heat-related illnesses such as heat stroke and heat exhaustion as advisories predicting triple-digit temperatures go into effect this week.

Older adults, infants and children, those who live or work outdoors, have low incomes, or who have a chronic medical condition are particularly vulnerable to the effects of extremely high temperatures. Heat-related illnesses among these groups are likely to increase as heat waves occur more often than usual – and at higher temperatures – around the state.

OHA offers these tips to stay safe and healthy during extreme heat:

1. Stay cool.

  • Stay in air-conditioned places, if possible.
  • Limit exposure to the sun from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. when temperatures are hottest, and avoid direct sunlight. Schedule outdoor activities in the early morning and late evening.
  • Open windows to allow fresh air to circulate if it cools off in the morning and evening hours. Close shades on south and west-facing windows during afternoon hours.
  • Use portable electric fans to push hot air out of rooms or draw in cooler air, but don’t rely on a fan as a primary cooling device.
  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight and light-colored clothing to keep cool and protect skin from the sun. Dress infants and children similarly.
  • Use cool compresses, misting and cool showers or baths to lower your body temperature.
  • Avoid hot foods and heavy meals, which increase body heat.
  • Never leave infants, children or pets in a parked car
  • Check on at-risk friends, family and neighbors several times a day. Heat-related illnesses can make it hard to think clearly. This means people may be in danger without realizing it. Make sure loved ones have what they need to stay cool.

2. Stay hydrated.

  • Regardless of your level of activity, drink plenty of fluids, even if you are not thirsty, and especially when working outside.
  • Avoid alcohol or liquids containing large amounts of sugar, which can increase dehydration. Alcohol can be especially dangerous when used as a substitute for water hydration, and increases risks of alcohol-related injuries.
  • Make sure your family, friends and neighbors drink enough water.

3. Stay informed.

  • Keep up to date on the heat risk and heat indexwhen planning activities so you can find ways to stay cool and hydrated.
  • Learn how to prevent, recognize and treat heat-related illnesses.
  • Heat-related illness can develop in as little as 10-15 minutes. It can happen indoors and outdoors.
  • Some heat-related illnesses can be managed at home or at urgent care. However, if you or someone you see is experiencing confusion or unconsciousness due to heat exposure, call 911. It is a medical emergency.

Ways to stay cool without an air conditioner:

  • Air conditioners can help you stay cool, but not everyone has one. Visiting friends with an air conditioner or going to cooling centers in your community can help you stay cool.
  • Local houses of worship and libraries may be open to the public during times of extreme heat. Splash pads and shopping centers can also be places to cool off.
  • Water is also great for cooling you off when it’s hot. Drape yourself with a damp towel, take a cool bath or shower or take a dip in a fountain. These actions can help cool you off in a hurry and work better when it’s not humid.
  • If you have a cooler part of the house, such as a basement, spend time there during the hottest parts of the day.

For more information, visit OHA’s website: www.oregon.gov/heat.

Air conditioners for eligible OHP members

Oregon launched new climate-related benefits as part of the state’s federally funded expansion of Oregon Health Plan (OHP) coverage, which includes health-related social needs (HRSN) services that help maintain health and well-being but are not traditionally thought of as medical services. New services include providing climate-control devices such as air conditioners, air filters, mini refrigeration units and portable power supplies to eligible OHP members.

OHP members interested in receiving climate devices should contact their coordinated care organization (CCO) to learn more. OHP Open Card members can call 1-888-834-4304 or email ORHRSN@acentra.com. If an OHP member is not sure which plan or CCO they are in, they can call the OHA Client Services Unit at 1-800-273-0557.

OHP members who don’t qualify for HRSN climate devices can still contact their CCO to see if climate supports are available through “flexible services” (also called “health-related services”). OHP Open Card members who don’t qualify for HRSN climate devices can still contact 1-888-834-4304 or their county to learn about local programs providing climate supports this summer. For non-OHP members in Oregon, some cities and counties have similar programs with a limited supply of devices.

Contact 211

During periods of extreme heat, counties often open cooling spaces for local communities to seek relief from high temperatures; these will be listed here, by county, based on the information shared with 211 by the shelter providers. Opening hours are based on specific counties’ and individual agencies’ criteria.

Methods to contact 211:

  • CALL 211 or 1-866-698-6155 or TTY: dial 711 and call 1-866-698-6155, 24 hours per day, 7 days per week.
  • TEXT your ZIP code to 898211 (TXT211), Monday to Friday, 9a.m. to 5p.m.
  • EMAIL help@211info.org, Monday to Friday, 9a.m. to5p.m. (Language interpreters available by phone; text and email in Spanish and English)

If there is a shelter that is not listed online, or information that needs to be edited, please email 211’s resource team: support@211info.org.

During times of emergency incident response, 211’s answer rate may vary

You are subscribed to Oregon Health Authority News Releases. View all OHA news releases.

 

Help for When It’s Hot

Updated: 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, July 10, 2024

Multnomah County and its partners urge people to visit cool spaces even for a few hours including library branches, community centers and parks with misting stations, interactive fountains and splash pads listed on this interactive map(link is external) are available.

Central Library will extend hours and remain open until 8 p.m. Belmont, Gresham and Hollywood libraries are open until 8 p.m. All other open libraries are open until 6 p.m. Remember, because some libraries are closed for construction, always confirm hours and locations before you go.

The County is advising people to take care when working or playing outside in the midday heat. Remember to drink more water and take cooling breaks. Even a few minutes of cooling can help prevent heat illness.

Learn: The symptoms of heat illness and How to take care of yourself and others during hot weather

Multnomah County has closed recruitment for community volunteers interested in supporting this emergency activation. We welcome the support of community members when needs arise. Visit the Volunteer at a County Emergency Shelter page for information about the roles and future info sessions and trainings.

Get ready for summer weather

Now’s a good time to prepare yourself and your home for summer. Stock up on fans/air conditioners and sun-blocking curtains, sunscreen, and other summer essentials. Now is also a time to make a plan for pets, older adults, kids and those with medical conditions, all of whom are more vulnerable to heat illness.

Watch: How to prepare for the heat before temperatures soar(link is external) and Cómo preparase para el calor(link is external)

If you need financial assistance to obtain an air conditioning unit or to pay an electric bill, call 211 or visit this webpage(link is external).

Stay safe while swimming

Hot temperatures combined with cold, early-season snowmelt will be dangerous for those seeking relief in lakes, rivers and creeks. Be aware of swift currents, cool water temperatures, hidden hazards and uneven bottom surfaces. Watch kids in the water to make sure they aren’t feeling adverse effects. Learn more about staying safe while swimming here.

Bookmark these links

02 – Urgent Info – OWRR – Oregon Wildfire Response & Recovery – Wildfire Information – Sign Up for Emergency Alerts, Prepare and Prevent, Fire Updates, Evacuation Notices and Maps
Jul 28 all-day

 

Oregon Wildfire
Response & Recovery

Stay safe, stay informed and stay connected. Access resources before, during and after wildfires.

EXPLORE THE STATE OF OREGON FIRES DASH BOARD FOR INFORMATION ON CURRENT FIRE INFORMATION

CLICK ON THIS LINK FOR THE MAP AND DASH BOARD

 

This application includes relevant information about fire activity in and around Oregon. Click on any of the tabs to see details for that topic. Information includes:

  • Fires Overview and Map

  • Evacuation Information

  • Fire-Related Weather Watches and Warnings

  • Latest GOES Satellite Image

  • Air Quality Monitoring

  • Smoke Forecast

  • AlertWildfire Cameras

  • Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Danger

  • Daily Significant Fire Potential Outlook

  • Monthly Significant Wildland Fire Potential Outlook

Disclaimer: Fire acreage will be updated as soon as reports are available from the on-scene fire teams/fire personnel. Fire teams typically update the fire acreage every 24 hours. You may find differences in reported fire acreage because some sites update fire information at different times.

 

Sign Up for Emergency Notifications

Get lifesaving alerts and instructions during emergencies to help you and others stay safe in Oregon.

 

 

USE THIS LINK FOR  LOCAL ALERT SYSTEM AND GET EMERGENCY NOTIFICATIONS

 

 

 YOU CAN VIEW CURRENT LIVE ALERT MESSAGES USING THE LINK BELOW

 

SEE LIVE ALERT MESSAGE HERE

 

 

Jul
29
Mon
2024
02 – Urgent Info – MC – Multnomah County – Help for When Its Hot – Updated Wednesday July 10, 2024
Jul 29 all-day

 

Help for When It’s Hot

Updated: 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, July 10, 2024

Multnomah County and its partners urge people to visit cool spaces even for a few hours including library branches, community centers and parks with misting stations, interactive fountains and splash pads listed on this interactive map(link is external) are available.

Central Library will extend hours and remain open until 8 p.m. Belmont, Gresham and Hollywood libraries are open until 8 p.m. All other open libraries are open until 6 p.m. Remember, because some libraries are closed for construction, always confirm hours and locations before you go.

The County is advising people to take care when working or playing outside in the midday heat. Remember to drink more water and take cooling breaks. Even a few minutes of cooling can help prevent heat illness.

Learn: The symptoms of heat illness and How to take care of yourself and others during hot weather

Multnomah County has closed recruitment for community volunteers interested in supporting this emergency activation. We welcome the support of community members when needs arise. Visit the Volunteer at a County Emergency Shelter page for information about the roles and future info sessions and trainings.

Get ready for summer weather

Now’s a good time to prepare yourself and your home for summer. Stock up on fans/air conditioners and sun-blocking curtains, sunscreen, and other summer essentials. Now is also a time to make a plan for pets, older adults, kids and those with medical conditions, all of whom are more vulnerable to heat illness.

Watch: How to prepare for the heat before temperatures soar(link is external) and Cómo preparase para el calor(link is external)

If you need financial assistance to obtain an air conditioning unit or to pay an electric bill, call 211 or visit this webpage(link is external).

Stay safe while swimming

Hot temperatures combined with cold, early-season snowmelt will be dangerous for those seeking relief in lakes, rivers and creeks. Be aware of swift currents, cool water temperatures, hidden hazards and uneven bottom surfaces. Watch kids in the water to make sure they aren’t feeling adverse effects. Learn more about staying safe while swimming here.

Bookmark these links

02 – Urgent Info – OHA – Oregon Health Authority – Extreme Heat, Preparation, Fact Sheets
Jul 29 all-day
02 - Urgent Info - OHA - Oregon Health Authority - Extreme Heat, Preparation, Fact Sheets

Oregon Health Authority

Get Prepared

Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable, yet annually many people succumb to extreme heat. This website provides easily accessible resources for members of the public, local health departments and other organizations to assist ongoing outreach efforts to those most vulnerable to extreme heat events.

Heat-related Illness:

Warning Signs and Symptoms

  • Muscle cramping might be the first sign of heat-related illness, and may lead to heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Here is how you can recognize heat exhaustion and heat stroke and what to do:
    Heat Exhaustion    What you should do
    Faint or dizzy

    Move to a cooler location.

    Sip water.

    Apply cool, wet cloths to as much of your body as possible.

    Lie down and loosen your clothing.

If the person has vomited and it continues, seek medical attention immediately.

Heavy sweating
Fast, weak pulse
Nausea or vomiting
Cold, pale, clammy skin
Muscle cramps
Heat Stroke    What you should do
High body temperature (above 103°F)

Call 911 immediately – heat stroke is a medical emergency.

Move the person to a cooler environment.

Reduce the person’s body temperature with cool cloths or even a bath.

Do NOT give fluids.

Health Threats from Extreme Heat

Infants and young children

Infants and young children are sensitive to the effects of extreme heat, and must rely on other people to keep them cool and hydrated.

  • Never leave infants or children in a parked car. (Nor should pets be left in parked cars—they can suffer heat-related illness too.)
  • Dress infants and children in loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Seek medical care immediately if your child has symptoms of heat-related illness.

People with chronic medical conditions

People of any age with a chronic medical condition are less likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature. Also, they may be taking medications that can worsen the impact of extreme heat. People in this category need the following information:

  • Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
  • Learn about how any medications you take affects your body’s ability to regulate temperature.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Check the local news for health and safety updates regularly.
  • Avoid use the stove or oven to cook — it will make you and your house hotter.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Take cool showers or baths to cool down.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or someone you know experiences symptoms of heat-related illness.

Athletes and outdoor sports enthusiasts

People who exercise in extreme heat are more likely to become dehydrated and get heat-related illness. STOP all activity and get to a cool environment if you feel faint or weak.

  • Drink more water than usual and take a drink before you are thirsty. Muscle cramping may be an early sign of heat-related illness.
  • Limit outdoor activity, especially midday when the sun is hottest.
  • Schedule workouts, practices, and activities earlier or later in the day when the temperature is cooler.
  • Pace activity. Start activities slow and pick up the pace gradually. Remember it may take 1-2 weeks of exposure to high temperatures before your body fully adjusts.
  • Monitor a teammate’s condition, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Wear and reapply sunscreen as indicated on the package.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or a teammate has symptoms of heat-related illness.
  • Learn about Oregon School Activities Association (OSAA) heat policies and guidance if you are an athlete, parent of an athlete, coach, trainer or athletics director. This guidance applies to members of OSAA, so if you engage in club sports, you may want to ask if they have similar policies.

Outdoor workers

People who work outdoors, whether as a source of income or for DIY home projects and landscaping, are more likely to become dehydrated. This makes them more likely to get heat-related illness. STOP all activity and get to a cool environment if you feel faint or weak.

  • Drink from two to four cups of water every hour while working. Take a drink BEFORE you are thirsty.
  • Avoid alcohol or liquids containing large amounts of sugar.
  • Ask your employer if tasks can be scheduled for earlier or later in the day to avoid midday heat. If you have DIY projects at home, consider moving work to the coolest parts of the day.
  • Wear a brimmed hat and loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Spend time in air-conditioned buildings during breaks and after work.
  • Encourage co-workers or those helping you with home projects to take breaks to cool off and drink water.
  • Wear and reapply sunscreen as indicated on the package.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or a co-worker has symptoms of heat-related illness.
  • For more information, please visit the CDC’s page on Heat Stress and visit OR-OSHA’s heat stress page.

Heat and low income

  • Drink more water than usual and take a drink BEFORE you are thirsty.
  • If you have air conditioning, use it to keep your home cool.
  • If you can’t afford to use your air conditioning:
  • If you live outdoors, identify public spaces with air conditioning and check to see if cooling centers are available in your community. 211 INFO’s Severe Weather Extreme Heat Cooling Center List, local service agencies and emergency management often have this information in locations where it is available.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you have, or someone you know has, symptoms of heat-related illness.

 Fact Sheets

FAQ: Extreme Heat and Public Health

OR-OSHA Resources

02 – Urgent Info – OPB – Oregon Public Broadcasting – Cooling Centers List Across Oregon and Southwest Washington – Heat Related Illness Infromation02 – Urgent Info – MC – Multnomah County – Help for When Its Hot – Updated Wednesday July 10, 2024
Jul 29 all-day

 

 

 

Cooling Centers List Across Oregon and Southwest Washington

Those centers include:

  • Cook Plaza, 19421 Southeast Stark Street, Gresham
  • Portland Covenant Church, 4046 Northeast Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Portland
  • The Hugo, 6221 Northeast 82nd Avenue, Portland

The county also announced it will be extending hours at the Central Library in Portland and the library in Gresham until 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Other locations will continue handing out bottled water and providing spaces for people seeking relief from the heat.

A fourth cooling center will open Saturday, from noon to 10 p.m. at Congregation Beth Israel at 1972 Northwest Flanders Street, Portland.

TriMet also announced Friday it will offer free rides to people traveling to or from a cooling center daily between 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Anyone needing additional transportation help should call 211.

Below is a list of cooling centers and shelters open across Oregon and Southwest Washington.

Clackamas County

  • Canby Denny’s Restaurant, 1369 Southeast 1st Avenue, Canby, Oregon
  • Canby Public Library, 220 Northeast 2nd Avenue, Canby, Oregon
  • Estacada AntFarm Office, 350 Southwest Zobrist Street, Estacada, Oregon
  • Estacada Public Library, 825 Northwest Wade Street, Estacada, Oregon
  • Father’s Heart Street Ministry, 603 12th Street, Oregon City, Oregon
  • Gladstone Public Library, 135 East Dartmouth Street, Gladstone, Oregon
  • Gladstone Community Center, 1050 Portland Avenue, Gladstone, Oregon
  • Happy Valley Public Library, 13793 Southeast Sieben Park Way, Happy Valley, Oregon
  • Hoodland Public Library, 24525 East Welches Road, Welches, Oregon
  • Lake Oswego Adult Community Center, 505 G Avenue, Lake Oswego, Oregon
  • Lake Oswego Public Library, 706 4th Street, Lake Oswego, Oregon
  • Ledding Public Library, 10660 Southeast 21st Avenue, Milwaukie, Oregon
  • Molalla AntFarm Office, 213 North Molalla Avenue, Molalla, Oregon
  • Molalla Public Library, 201 East 5th Street, Molalla, Oregon
  • Oak Lodge Public Library, 16201 Southeast McLoughlin Boulevard, Oak Grove, Oregon
  • Oregon City Public Library, 606 John Adams Street, Oregon City, Oregon
  • Sandy Public Library, 38980 Proctor Boulevard, Sandy, Oregon
  • West Linn Public Library, 1595 Burns Street, West Linn, Oregon
  • Wilsonville Community Center, 7965 Southwest Wilsonville Road, Wilsonville, Oregon
  • Wilsonville Public Library, 8200 Southwest Wilsonville Road, Wilsonville, Oregon

Washington County

  • Beaverton Community Center, 12350 Southwest 5th Street, Beaverton, Oregon
  • Beaverton City Library, 12375 Southwest 5th Street, Beaverton, Oregon
  • Washington Street Conference Center, 102 Southwest Washington Street, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Shute Park Library, 775 Southeast 10th Avenue, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Brookwood Library, 2850 Northeast Brookwood Parkway, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Shute Park Aquatic & Recreation Center, 953 Southeast Maple Street, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Hidden Creek Community Center, 5100 Northeast Hidden Creek Drive, Hillsboro, Oregon

Marion County

  • ARCHES Day Center, 615 Commercial Street Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • NWHS HOAP, 694 Church Street Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Salem Public Library, 585 Liberty Street Southeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Kroc Center, 1865 Bill Frey Drive Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Salem-ROCC, 1190 Broadway Street Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Kindness Closet Salem, 4105 Lancaster Drive Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Oak Park Church of God, 2990 Lancaster Drive Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Aumsville Bethel Baptist Church, 645 Cleveland Street, Aumsville, Oregon
  • Stayton Library, 515 North 1st Avenue, Stayton, Oregon
  • Santiam Outreach Center (SOCC), 280 Northeast Santiam Boulevard, Mill City, Oregon
  • Turner Christian Church, 7871 Marion Road Southeast, Turner, Oregon

Jackson County

  • ACCESS Medford Shelter, 324 West 6th Street, Medford, Oregon
  • Ashland Cooling Center, 2200 Ashland Street, Ashland, Oregon

Deschutes County

  • Downtown Bend Library, 601 Northwest Wall Street, Bend, Oregon
  • Blue Dog RV Shepherd’s House, 181 Northwest Franklin Avenue, Bend, Oregon
  • Council on Aging of Central Oregon, 1036 Northeast 5th Street, Bend, Oregon
  • The Lighthouse Navigation Center, 275 Northeast 2nd Street, Bend, Oregon
  • Redmond Library, 2127 South Highway 97, Redmond, Oregon
  • Shepherd’s House Redmond, 1350 South Highway 97, Redmond, Oregon
  • La Pine Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way, La Pine, Oregon
  • La Pine Library, 16425 1st Street, La Pine, Oregon
  • Sisters Library, 110 North Cedar Street, Sisters, Oregon

Clark County

  • Fort Vancouver Regional Library, 901 C Street, Vancouver, Washington
  • St. Paul Lutheran Church, 1309 Franklin Street, Vancouver, Washington
  • Marshall Community Center, 1009 East McLoughlin Boulevard, Vancouver, Washington
  • Living Hope Church, 2711 NE Andersen Road, Vancouver, Washington
  • Three Creeks Community Library, 800 NE Tenney Road, Vancouver, Washington
  • Cascade Park Community Library, 600 Northeast 136th Avenue, Vancouver, Washington
  • Firstenburg Community Center, 700 Northeast 136th Avenue, Vancouver, Washington
  • Mill Plain United Methodist Church, 15804 Southeast Mill Plain Boulevard, Vancouver, Washington
  • Ridgefield Community Library, 210 North Main Avenue, Ridgefield, Washington
  • Battle Ground Community Library, 1207 Southeast 8th Way, Battle Ground, Washington
  • Camas Public Library, 625 Northeast 4th Avenue, Camas, Washington
  • Washougal Community Library, 1661 C Street, Washougal, Washington

Heat advisories prompt OHA warning about heat-related illness

Tips for staying cool include limiting sun exposure, wearing light clothing, knowing signs of heat stroke

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon Health Authority is encouraging people to take steps to avoid heat-related illnesses such as heat stroke and heat exhaustion as advisories predicting triple-digit temperatures go into effect this week.

Older adults, infants and children, those who live or work outdoors, have low incomes, or who have a chronic medical condition are particularly vulnerable to the effects of extremely high temperatures. Heat-related illnesses among these groups are likely to increase as heat waves occur more often than usual – and at higher temperatures – around the state.

OHA offers these tips to stay safe and healthy during extreme heat:

1. Stay cool.

  • Stay in air-conditioned places, if possible.
  • Limit exposure to the sun from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. when temperatures are hottest, and avoid direct sunlight. Schedule outdoor activities in the early morning and late evening.
  • Open windows to allow fresh air to circulate if it cools off in the morning and evening hours. Close shades on south and west-facing windows during afternoon hours.
  • Use portable electric fans to push hot air out of rooms or draw in cooler air, but don’t rely on a fan as a primary cooling device.
  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight and light-colored clothing to keep cool and protect skin from the sun. Dress infants and children similarly.
  • Use cool compresses, misting and cool showers or baths to lower your body temperature.
  • Avoid hot foods and heavy meals, which increase body heat.
  • Never leave infants, children or pets in a parked car
  • Check on at-risk friends, family and neighbors several times a day. Heat-related illnesses can make it hard to think clearly. This means people may be in danger without realizing it. Make sure loved ones have what they need to stay cool.

2. Stay hydrated.

  • Regardless of your level of activity, drink plenty of fluids, even if you are not thirsty, and especially when working outside.
  • Avoid alcohol or liquids containing large amounts of sugar, which can increase dehydration. Alcohol can be especially dangerous when used as a substitute for water hydration, and increases risks of alcohol-related injuries.
  • Make sure your family, friends and neighbors drink enough water.

3. Stay informed.

  • Keep up to date on the heat risk and heat indexwhen planning activities so you can find ways to stay cool and hydrated.
  • Learn how to prevent, recognize and treat heat-related illnesses.
  • Heat-related illness can develop in as little as 10-15 minutes. It can happen indoors and outdoors.
  • Some heat-related illnesses can be managed at home or at urgent care. However, if you or someone you see is experiencing confusion or unconsciousness due to heat exposure, call 911. It is a medical emergency.

Ways to stay cool without an air conditioner:

  • Air conditioners can help you stay cool, but not everyone has one. Visiting friends with an air conditioner or going to cooling centers in your community can help you stay cool.
  • Local houses of worship and libraries may be open to the public during times of extreme heat. Splash pads and shopping centers can also be places to cool off.
  • Water is also great for cooling you off when it’s hot. Drape yourself with a damp towel, take a cool bath or shower or take a dip in a fountain. These actions can help cool you off in a hurry and work better when it’s not humid.
  • If you have a cooler part of the house, such as a basement, spend time there during the hottest parts of the day.

For more information, visit OHA’s website: www.oregon.gov/heat.

Air conditioners for eligible OHP members

Oregon launched new climate-related benefits as part of the state’s federally funded expansion of Oregon Health Plan (OHP) coverage, which includes health-related social needs (HRSN) services that help maintain health and well-being but are not traditionally thought of as medical services. New services include providing climate-control devices such as air conditioners, air filters, mini refrigeration units and portable power supplies to eligible OHP members.

OHP members interested in receiving climate devices should contact their coordinated care organization (CCO) to learn more. OHP Open Card members can call 1-888-834-4304 or email ORHRSN@acentra.com. If an OHP member is not sure which plan or CCO they are in, they can call the OHA Client Services Unit at 1-800-273-0557.

OHP members who don’t qualify for HRSN climate devices can still contact their CCO to see if climate supports are available through “flexible services” (also called “health-related services”). OHP Open Card members who don’t qualify for HRSN climate devices can still contact 1-888-834-4304 or their county to learn about local programs providing climate supports this summer. For non-OHP members in Oregon, some cities and counties have similar programs with a limited supply of devices.

Contact 211

During periods of extreme heat, counties often open cooling spaces for local communities to seek relief from high temperatures; these will be listed here, by county, based on the information shared with 211 by the shelter providers. Opening hours are based on specific counties’ and individual agencies’ criteria.

Methods to contact 211:

  • CALL 211 or 1-866-698-6155 or TTY: dial 711 and call 1-866-698-6155, 24 hours per day, 7 days per week.
  • TEXT your ZIP code to 898211 (TXT211), Monday to Friday, 9a.m. to 5p.m.
  • EMAIL help@211info.org, Monday to Friday, 9a.m. to5p.m. (Language interpreters available by phone; text and email in Spanish and English)

If there is a shelter that is not listed online, or information that needs to be edited, please email 211’s resource team: support@211info.org.

During times of emergency incident response, 211’s answer rate may vary

You are subscribed to Oregon Health Authority News Releases. View all OHA news releases.

 

Help for When It’s Hot

Updated: 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, July 10, 2024

Multnomah County and its partners urge people to visit cool spaces even for a few hours including library branches, community centers and parks with misting stations, interactive fountains and splash pads listed on this interactive map(link is external) are available.

Central Library will extend hours and remain open until 8 p.m. Belmont, Gresham and Hollywood libraries are open until 8 p.m. All other open libraries are open until 6 p.m. Remember, because some libraries are closed for construction, always confirm hours and locations before you go.

The County is advising people to take care when working or playing outside in the midday heat. Remember to drink more water and take cooling breaks. Even a few minutes of cooling can help prevent heat illness.

Learn: The symptoms of heat illness and How to take care of yourself and others during hot weather

Multnomah County has closed recruitment for community volunteers interested in supporting this emergency activation. We welcome the support of community members when needs arise. Visit the Volunteer at a County Emergency Shelter page for information about the roles and future info sessions and trainings.

Get ready for summer weather

Now’s a good time to prepare yourself and your home for summer. Stock up on fans/air conditioners and sun-blocking curtains, sunscreen, and other summer essentials. Now is also a time to make a plan for pets, older adults, kids and those with medical conditions, all of whom are more vulnerable to heat illness.

Watch: How to prepare for the heat before temperatures soar(link is external) and Cómo preparase para el calor(link is external)

If you need financial assistance to obtain an air conditioning unit or to pay an electric bill, call 211 or visit this webpage(link is external).

Stay safe while swimming

Hot temperatures combined with cold, early-season snowmelt will be dangerous for those seeking relief in lakes, rivers and creeks. Be aware of swift currents, cool water temperatures, hidden hazards and uneven bottom surfaces. Watch kids in the water to make sure they aren’t feeling adverse effects. Learn more about staying safe while swimming here.

Bookmark these links

02 – Urgent Info – OWRR – Oregon Wildfire Response & Recovery – Wildfire Information – Sign Up for Emergency Alerts, Prepare and Prevent, Fire Updates, Evacuation Notices and Maps
Jul 29 all-day

 

Oregon Wildfire
Response & Recovery

Stay safe, stay informed and stay connected. Access resources before, during and after wildfires.

EXPLORE THE STATE OF OREGON FIRES DASH BOARD FOR INFORMATION ON CURRENT FIRE INFORMATION

CLICK ON THIS LINK FOR THE MAP AND DASH BOARD

 

This application includes relevant information about fire activity in and around Oregon. Click on any of the tabs to see details for that topic. Information includes:

  • Fires Overview and Map

  • Evacuation Information

  • Fire-Related Weather Watches and Warnings

  • Latest GOES Satellite Image

  • Air Quality Monitoring

  • Smoke Forecast

  • AlertWildfire Cameras

  • Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Danger

  • Daily Significant Fire Potential Outlook

  • Monthly Significant Wildland Fire Potential Outlook

Disclaimer: Fire acreage will be updated as soon as reports are available from the on-scene fire teams/fire personnel. Fire teams typically update the fire acreage every 24 hours. You may find differences in reported fire acreage because some sites update fire information at different times.

 

Sign Up for Emergency Notifications

Get lifesaving alerts and instructions during emergencies to help you and others stay safe in Oregon.

 

 

USE THIS LINK FOR  LOCAL ALERT SYSTEM AND GET EMERGENCY NOTIFICATIONS

 

 

 YOU CAN VIEW CURRENT LIVE ALERT MESSAGES USING THE LINK BELOW

 

SEE LIVE ALERT MESSAGE HERE

 

 

Jul
30
Tue
2024
02 – Urgent Info – MC – Multnomah County – Help for When Its Hot – Updated Wednesday July 10, 2024
Jul 30 all-day

 

Help for When It’s Hot

Updated: 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, July 10, 2024

Multnomah County and its partners urge people to visit cool spaces even for a few hours including library branches, community centers and parks with misting stations, interactive fountains and splash pads listed on this interactive map(link is external) are available.

Central Library will extend hours and remain open until 8 p.m. Belmont, Gresham and Hollywood libraries are open until 8 p.m. All other open libraries are open until 6 p.m. Remember, because some libraries are closed for construction, always confirm hours and locations before you go.

The County is advising people to take care when working or playing outside in the midday heat. Remember to drink more water and take cooling breaks. Even a few minutes of cooling can help prevent heat illness.

Learn: The symptoms of heat illness and How to take care of yourself and others during hot weather

Multnomah County has closed recruitment for community volunteers interested in supporting this emergency activation. We welcome the support of community members when needs arise. Visit the Volunteer at a County Emergency Shelter page for information about the roles and future info sessions and trainings.

Get ready for summer weather

Now’s a good time to prepare yourself and your home for summer. Stock up on fans/air conditioners and sun-blocking curtains, sunscreen, and other summer essentials. Now is also a time to make a plan for pets, older adults, kids and those with medical conditions, all of whom are more vulnerable to heat illness.

Watch: How to prepare for the heat before temperatures soar(link is external) and Cómo preparase para el calor(link is external)

If you need financial assistance to obtain an air conditioning unit or to pay an electric bill, call 211 or visit this webpage(link is external).

Stay safe while swimming

Hot temperatures combined with cold, early-season snowmelt will be dangerous for those seeking relief in lakes, rivers and creeks. Be aware of swift currents, cool water temperatures, hidden hazards and uneven bottom surfaces. Watch kids in the water to make sure they aren’t feeling adverse effects. Learn more about staying safe while swimming here.

Bookmark these links

02 – Urgent Info – OHA – Oregon Health Authority – Extreme Heat, Preparation, Fact Sheets
Jul 30 all-day
02 - Urgent Info - OHA - Oregon Health Authority - Extreme Heat, Preparation, Fact Sheets

Oregon Health Authority

Get Prepared

Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable, yet annually many people succumb to extreme heat. This website provides easily accessible resources for members of the public, local health departments and other organizations to assist ongoing outreach efforts to those most vulnerable to extreme heat events.

Heat-related Illness:

Warning Signs and Symptoms

  • Muscle cramping might be the first sign of heat-related illness, and may lead to heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Here is how you can recognize heat exhaustion and heat stroke and what to do:
    Heat Exhaustion    What you should do
    Faint or dizzy

    Move to a cooler location.

    Sip water.

    Apply cool, wet cloths to as much of your body as possible.

    Lie down and loosen your clothing.

If the person has vomited and it continues, seek medical attention immediately.

Heavy sweating
Fast, weak pulse
Nausea or vomiting
Cold, pale, clammy skin
Muscle cramps
Heat Stroke    What you should do
High body temperature (above 103°F)

Call 911 immediately – heat stroke is a medical emergency.

Move the person to a cooler environment.

Reduce the person’s body temperature with cool cloths or even a bath.

Do NOT give fluids.

Health Threats from Extreme Heat

Infants and young children

Infants and young children are sensitive to the effects of extreme heat, and must rely on other people to keep them cool and hydrated.

  • Never leave infants or children in a parked car. (Nor should pets be left in parked cars—they can suffer heat-related illness too.)
  • Dress infants and children in loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Seek medical care immediately if your child has symptoms of heat-related illness.

People with chronic medical conditions

People of any age with a chronic medical condition are less likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature. Also, they may be taking medications that can worsen the impact of extreme heat. People in this category need the following information:

  • Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
  • Learn about how any medications you take affects your body’s ability to regulate temperature.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Check the local news for health and safety updates regularly.
  • Avoid use the stove or oven to cook — it will make you and your house hotter.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Take cool showers or baths to cool down.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or someone you know experiences symptoms of heat-related illness.

Athletes and outdoor sports enthusiasts

People who exercise in extreme heat are more likely to become dehydrated and get heat-related illness. STOP all activity and get to a cool environment if you feel faint or weak.

  • Drink more water than usual and take a drink before you are thirsty. Muscle cramping may be an early sign of heat-related illness.
  • Limit outdoor activity, especially midday when the sun is hottest.
  • Schedule workouts, practices, and activities earlier or later in the day when the temperature is cooler.
  • Pace activity. Start activities slow and pick up the pace gradually. Remember it may take 1-2 weeks of exposure to high temperatures before your body fully adjusts.
  • Monitor a teammate’s condition, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Wear and reapply sunscreen as indicated on the package.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or a teammate has symptoms of heat-related illness.
  • Learn about Oregon School Activities Association (OSAA) heat policies and guidance if you are an athlete, parent of an athlete, coach, trainer or athletics director. This guidance applies to members of OSAA, so if you engage in club sports, you may want to ask if they have similar policies.

Outdoor workers

People who work outdoors, whether as a source of income or for DIY home projects and landscaping, are more likely to become dehydrated. This makes them more likely to get heat-related illness. STOP all activity and get to a cool environment if you feel faint or weak.

  • Drink from two to four cups of water every hour while working. Take a drink BEFORE you are thirsty.
  • Avoid alcohol or liquids containing large amounts of sugar.
  • Ask your employer if tasks can be scheduled for earlier or later in the day to avoid midday heat. If you have DIY projects at home, consider moving work to the coolest parts of the day.
  • Wear a brimmed hat and loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Spend time in air-conditioned buildings during breaks and after work.
  • Encourage co-workers or those helping you with home projects to take breaks to cool off and drink water.
  • Wear and reapply sunscreen as indicated on the package.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or a co-worker has symptoms of heat-related illness.
  • For more information, please visit the CDC’s page on Heat Stress and visit OR-OSHA’s heat stress page.

Heat and low income

  • Drink more water than usual and take a drink BEFORE you are thirsty.
  • If you have air conditioning, use it to keep your home cool.
  • If you can’t afford to use your air conditioning:
  • If you live outdoors, identify public spaces with air conditioning and check to see if cooling centers are available in your community. 211 INFO’s Severe Weather Extreme Heat Cooling Center List, local service agencies and emergency management often have this information in locations where it is available.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you have, or someone you know has, symptoms of heat-related illness.

 Fact Sheets

FAQ: Extreme Heat and Public Health

OR-OSHA Resources

02 – Urgent Info – OPB – Oregon Public Broadcasting – Cooling Centers List Across Oregon and Southwest Washington – Heat Related Illness Infromation02 – Urgent Info – MC – Multnomah County – Help for When Its Hot – Updated Wednesday July 10, 2024
Jul 30 all-day

 

 

 

Cooling Centers List Across Oregon and Southwest Washington

Those centers include:

  • Cook Plaza, 19421 Southeast Stark Street, Gresham
  • Portland Covenant Church, 4046 Northeast Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Portland
  • The Hugo, 6221 Northeast 82nd Avenue, Portland

The county also announced it will be extending hours at the Central Library in Portland and the library in Gresham until 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Other locations will continue handing out bottled water and providing spaces for people seeking relief from the heat.

A fourth cooling center will open Saturday, from noon to 10 p.m. at Congregation Beth Israel at 1972 Northwest Flanders Street, Portland.

TriMet also announced Friday it will offer free rides to people traveling to or from a cooling center daily between 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Anyone needing additional transportation help should call 211.

Below is a list of cooling centers and shelters open across Oregon and Southwest Washington.

Clackamas County

  • Canby Denny’s Restaurant, 1369 Southeast 1st Avenue, Canby, Oregon
  • Canby Public Library, 220 Northeast 2nd Avenue, Canby, Oregon
  • Estacada AntFarm Office, 350 Southwest Zobrist Street, Estacada, Oregon
  • Estacada Public Library, 825 Northwest Wade Street, Estacada, Oregon
  • Father’s Heart Street Ministry, 603 12th Street, Oregon City, Oregon
  • Gladstone Public Library, 135 East Dartmouth Street, Gladstone, Oregon
  • Gladstone Community Center, 1050 Portland Avenue, Gladstone, Oregon
  • Happy Valley Public Library, 13793 Southeast Sieben Park Way, Happy Valley, Oregon
  • Hoodland Public Library, 24525 East Welches Road, Welches, Oregon
  • Lake Oswego Adult Community Center, 505 G Avenue, Lake Oswego, Oregon
  • Lake Oswego Public Library, 706 4th Street, Lake Oswego, Oregon
  • Ledding Public Library, 10660 Southeast 21st Avenue, Milwaukie, Oregon
  • Molalla AntFarm Office, 213 North Molalla Avenue, Molalla, Oregon
  • Molalla Public Library, 201 East 5th Street, Molalla, Oregon
  • Oak Lodge Public Library, 16201 Southeast McLoughlin Boulevard, Oak Grove, Oregon
  • Oregon City Public Library, 606 John Adams Street, Oregon City, Oregon
  • Sandy Public Library, 38980 Proctor Boulevard, Sandy, Oregon
  • West Linn Public Library, 1595 Burns Street, West Linn, Oregon
  • Wilsonville Community Center, 7965 Southwest Wilsonville Road, Wilsonville, Oregon
  • Wilsonville Public Library, 8200 Southwest Wilsonville Road, Wilsonville, Oregon

Washington County

  • Beaverton Community Center, 12350 Southwest 5th Street, Beaverton, Oregon
  • Beaverton City Library, 12375 Southwest 5th Street, Beaverton, Oregon
  • Washington Street Conference Center, 102 Southwest Washington Street, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Shute Park Library, 775 Southeast 10th Avenue, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Brookwood Library, 2850 Northeast Brookwood Parkway, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Shute Park Aquatic & Recreation Center, 953 Southeast Maple Street, Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Hidden Creek Community Center, 5100 Northeast Hidden Creek Drive, Hillsboro, Oregon

Marion County

  • ARCHES Day Center, 615 Commercial Street Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • NWHS HOAP, 694 Church Street Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Salem Public Library, 585 Liberty Street Southeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Kroc Center, 1865 Bill Frey Drive Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Salem-ROCC, 1190 Broadway Street Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Kindness Closet Salem, 4105 Lancaster Drive Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Oak Park Church of God, 2990 Lancaster Drive Northeast, Salem, Oregon
  • Aumsville Bethel Baptist Church, 645 Cleveland Street, Aumsville, Oregon
  • Stayton Library, 515 North 1st Avenue, Stayton, Oregon
  • Santiam Outreach Center (SOCC), 280 Northeast Santiam Boulevard, Mill City, Oregon
  • Turner Christian Church, 7871 Marion Road Southeast, Turner, Oregon

Jackson County

  • ACCESS Medford Shelter, 324 West 6th Street, Medford, Oregon
  • Ashland Cooling Center, 2200 Ashland Street, Ashland, Oregon

Deschutes County

  • Downtown Bend Library, 601 Northwest Wall Street, Bend, Oregon
  • Blue Dog RV Shepherd’s House, 181 Northwest Franklin Avenue, Bend, Oregon
  • Council on Aging of Central Oregon, 1036 Northeast 5th Street, Bend, Oregon
  • The Lighthouse Navigation Center, 275 Northeast 2nd Street, Bend, Oregon
  • Redmond Library, 2127 South Highway 97, Redmond, Oregon
  • Shepherd’s House Redmond, 1350 South Highway 97, Redmond, Oregon
  • La Pine Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way, La Pine, Oregon
  • La Pine Library, 16425 1st Street, La Pine, Oregon
  • Sisters Library, 110 North Cedar Street, Sisters, Oregon

Clark County

  • Fort Vancouver Regional Library, 901 C Street, Vancouver, Washington
  • St. Paul Lutheran Church, 1309 Franklin Street, Vancouver, Washington
  • Marshall Community Center, 1009 East McLoughlin Boulevard, Vancouver, Washington
  • Living Hope Church, 2711 NE Andersen Road, Vancouver, Washington
  • Three Creeks Community Library, 800 NE Tenney Road, Vancouver, Washington
  • Cascade Park Community Library, 600 Northeast 136th Avenue, Vancouver, Washington
  • Firstenburg Community Center, 700 Northeast 136th Avenue, Vancouver, Washington
  • Mill Plain United Methodist Church, 15804 Southeast Mill Plain Boulevard, Vancouver, Washington
  • Ridgefield Community Library, 210 North Main Avenue, Ridgefield, Washington
  • Battle Ground Community Library, 1207 Southeast 8th Way, Battle Ground, Washington
  • Camas Public Library, 625 Northeast 4th Avenue, Camas, Washington
  • Washougal Community Library, 1661 C Street, Washougal, Washington

Heat advisories prompt OHA warning about heat-related illness

Tips for staying cool include limiting sun exposure, wearing light clothing, knowing signs of heat stroke

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon Health Authority is encouraging people to take steps to avoid heat-related illnesses such as heat stroke and heat exhaustion as advisories predicting triple-digit temperatures go into effect this week.

Older adults, infants and children, those who live or work outdoors, have low incomes, or who have a chronic medical condition are particularly vulnerable to the effects of extremely high temperatures. Heat-related illnesses among these groups are likely to increase as heat waves occur more often than usual – and at higher temperatures – around the state.

OHA offers these tips to stay safe and healthy during extreme heat:

1. Stay cool.

  • Stay in air-conditioned places, if possible.
  • Limit exposure to the sun from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. when temperatures are hottest, and avoid direct sunlight. Schedule outdoor activities in the early morning and late evening.
  • Open windows to allow fresh air to circulate if it cools off in the morning and evening hours. Close shades on south and west-facing windows during afternoon hours.
  • Use portable electric fans to push hot air out of rooms or draw in cooler air, but don’t rely on a fan as a primary cooling device.
  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight and light-colored clothing to keep cool and protect skin from the sun. Dress infants and children similarly.
  • Use cool compresses, misting and cool showers or baths to lower your body temperature.
  • Avoid hot foods and heavy meals, which increase body heat.
  • Never leave infants, children or pets in a parked car
  • Check on at-risk friends, family and neighbors several times a day. Heat-related illnesses can make it hard to think clearly. This means people may be in danger without realizing it. Make sure loved ones have what they need to stay cool.

2. Stay hydrated.

  • Regardless of your level of activity, drink plenty of fluids, even if you are not thirsty, and especially when working outside.
  • Avoid alcohol or liquids containing large amounts of sugar, which can increase dehydration. Alcohol can be especially dangerous when used as a substitute for water hydration, and increases risks of alcohol-related injuries.
  • Make sure your family, friends and neighbors drink enough water.

3. Stay informed.

  • Keep up to date on the heat risk and heat indexwhen planning activities so you can find ways to stay cool and hydrated.
  • Learn how to prevent, recognize and treat heat-related illnesses.
  • Heat-related illness can develop in as little as 10-15 minutes. It can happen indoors and outdoors.
  • Some heat-related illnesses can be managed at home or at urgent care. However, if you or someone you see is experiencing confusion or unconsciousness due to heat exposure, call 911. It is a medical emergency.

Ways to stay cool without an air conditioner:

  • Air conditioners can help you stay cool, but not everyone has one. Visiting friends with an air conditioner or going to cooling centers in your community can help you stay cool.
  • Local houses of worship and libraries may be open to the public during times of extreme heat. Splash pads and shopping centers can also be places to cool off.
  • Water is also great for cooling you off when it’s hot. Drape yourself with a damp towel, take a cool bath or shower or take a dip in a fountain. These actions can help cool you off in a hurry and work better when it’s not humid.
  • If you have a cooler part of the house, such as a basement, spend time there during the hottest parts of the day.

For more information, visit OHA’s website: www.oregon.gov/heat.

Air conditioners for eligible OHP members

Oregon launched new climate-related benefits as part of the state’s federally funded expansion of Oregon Health Plan (OHP) coverage, which includes health-related social needs (HRSN) services that help maintain health and well-being but are not traditionally thought of as medical services. New services include providing climate-control devices such as air conditioners, air filters, mini refrigeration units and portable power supplies to eligible OHP members.

OHP members interested in receiving climate devices should contact their coordinated care organization (CCO) to learn more. OHP Open Card members can call 1-888-834-4304 or email ORHRSN@acentra.com. If an OHP member is not sure which plan or CCO they are in, they can call the OHA Client Services Unit at 1-800-273-0557.

OHP members who don’t qualify for HRSN climate devices can still contact their CCO to see if climate supports are available through “flexible services” (also called “health-related services”). OHP Open Card members who don’t qualify for HRSN climate devices can still contact 1-888-834-4304 or their county to learn about local programs providing climate supports this summer. For non-OHP members in Oregon, some cities and counties have similar programs with a limited supply of devices.

Contact 211

During periods of extreme heat, counties often open cooling spaces for local communities to seek relief from high temperatures; these will be listed here, by county, based on the information shared with 211 by the shelter providers. Opening hours are based on specific counties’ and individual agencies’ criteria.

Methods to contact 211:

  • CALL 211 or 1-866-698-6155 or TTY: dial 711 and call 1-866-698-6155, 24 hours per day, 7 days per week.
  • TEXT your ZIP code to 898211 (TXT211), Monday to Friday, 9a.m. to 5p.m.
  • EMAIL help@211info.org, Monday to Friday, 9a.m. to5p.m. (Language interpreters available by phone; text and email in Spanish and English)

If there is a shelter that is not listed online, or information that needs to be edited, please email 211’s resource team: support@211info.org.

During times of emergency incident response, 211’s answer rate may vary

You are subscribed to Oregon Health Authority News Releases. View all OHA news releases.

 

Help for When It’s Hot

Updated: 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, July 10, 2024

Multnomah County and its partners urge people to visit cool spaces even for a few hours including library branches, community centers and parks with misting stations, interactive fountains and splash pads listed on this interactive map(link is external) are available.

Central Library will extend hours and remain open until 8 p.m. Belmont, Gresham and Hollywood libraries are open until 8 p.m. All other open libraries are open until 6 p.m. Remember, because some libraries are closed for construction, always confirm hours and locations before you go.

The County is advising people to take care when working or playing outside in the midday heat. Remember to drink more water and take cooling breaks. Even a few minutes of cooling can help prevent heat illness.

Learn: The symptoms of heat illness and How to take care of yourself and others during hot weather

Multnomah County has closed recruitment for community volunteers interested in supporting this emergency activation. We welcome the support of community members when needs arise. Visit the Volunteer at a County Emergency Shelter page for information about the roles and future info sessions and trainings.

Get ready for summer weather

Now’s a good time to prepare yourself and your home for summer. Stock up on fans/air conditioners and sun-blocking curtains, sunscreen, and other summer essentials. Now is also a time to make a plan for pets, older adults, kids and those with medical conditions, all of whom are more vulnerable to heat illness.

Watch: How to prepare for the heat before temperatures soar(link is external) and Cómo preparase para el calor(link is external)

If you need financial assistance to obtain an air conditioning unit or to pay an electric bill, call 211 or visit this webpage(link is external).

Stay safe while swimming

Hot temperatures combined with cold, early-season snowmelt will be dangerous for those seeking relief in lakes, rivers and creeks. Be aware of swift currents, cool water temperatures, hidden hazards and uneven bottom surfaces. Watch kids in the water to make sure they aren’t feeling adverse effects. Learn more about staying safe while swimming here.

Bookmark these links

02 – Urgent Info – OWRR – Oregon Wildfire Response & Recovery – Wildfire Information – Sign Up for Emergency Alerts, Prepare and Prevent, Fire Updates, Evacuation Notices and Maps
Jul 30 all-day

 

Oregon Wildfire
Response & Recovery

Stay safe, stay informed and stay connected. Access resources before, during and after wildfires.

EXPLORE THE STATE OF OREGON FIRES DASH BOARD FOR INFORMATION ON CURRENT FIRE INFORMATION

CLICK ON THIS LINK FOR THE MAP AND DASH BOARD

 

This application includes relevant information about fire activity in and around Oregon. Click on any of the tabs to see details for that topic. Information includes:

  • Fires Overview and Map

  • Evacuation Information

  • Fire-Related Weather Watches and Warnings

  • Latest GOES Satellite Image

  • Air Quality Monitoring

  • Smoke Forecast

  • AlertWildfire Cameras

  • Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Danger

  • Daily Significant Fire Potential Outlook

  • Monthly Significant Wildland Fire Potential Outlook

Disclaimer: Fire acreage will be updated as soon as reports are available from the on-scene fire teams/fire personnel. Fire teams typically update the fire acreage every 24 hours. You may find differences in reported fire acreage because some sites update fire information at different times.

 

Sign Up for Emergency Notifications

Get lifesaving alerts and instructions during emergencies to help you and others stay safe in Oregon.

 

 

USE THIS LINK FOR  LOCAL ALERT SYSTEM AND GET EMERGENCY NOTIFICATIONS

 

 

 YOU CAN VIEW CURRENT LIVE ALERT MESSAGES USING THE LINK BELOW

 

SEE LIVE ALERT MESSAGE HERE

 

 

Jul
31
Wed
2024
02 – Urgent Info – MC – Multnomah County – Help for When Its Hot – Updated Wednesday July 10, 2024
Jul 31 all-day

 

Help for When It’s Hot

Updated: 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, July 10, 2024

Multnomah County and its partners urge people to visit cool spaces even for a few hours including library branches, community centers and parks with misting stations, interactive fountains and splash pads listed on this interactive map(link is external) are available.

Central Library will extend hours and remain open until 8 p.m. Belmont, Gresham and Hollywood libraries are open until 8 p.m. All other open libraries are open until 6 p.m. Remember, because some libraries are closed for construction, always confirm hours and locations before you go.

The County is advising people to take care when working or playing outside in the midday heat. Remember to drink more water and take cooling breaks. Even a few minutes of cooling can help prevent heat illness.

Learn: The symptoms of heat illness and How to take care of yourself and others during hot weather

Multnomah County has closed recruitment for community volunteers interested in supporting this emergency activation. We welcome the support of community members when needs arise. Visit the Volunteer at a County Emergency Shelter page for information about the roles and future info sessions and trainings.

Get ready for summer weather

Now’s a good time to prepare yourself and your home for summer. Stock up on fans/air conditioners and sun-blocking curtains, sunscreen, and other summer essentials. Now is also a time to make a plan for pets, older adults, kids and those with medical conditions, all of whom are more vulnerable to heat illness.

Watch: How to prepare for the heat before temperatures soar(link is external) and Cómo preparase para el calor(link is external)

If you need financial assistance to obtain an air conditioning unit or to pay an electric bill, call 211 or visit this webpage(link is external).

Stay safe while swimming

Hot temperatures combined with cold, early-season snowmelt will be dangerous for those seeking relief in lakes, rivers and creeks. Be aware of swift currents, cool water temperatures, hidden hazards and uneven bottom surfaces. Watch kids in the water to make sure they aren’t feeling adverse effects. Learn more about staying safe while swimming here.

Bookmark these links

02 – Urgent Info – OHA – Oregon Health Authority – Extreme Heat, Preparation, Fact Sheets
Jul 31 all-day
02 - Urgent Info - OHA - Oregon Health Authority - Extreme Heat, Preparation, Fact Sheets

Oregon Health Authority

Get Prepared

Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable, yet annually many people succumb to extreme heat. This website provides easily accessible resources for members of the public, local health departments and other organizations to assist ongoing outreach efforts to those most vulnerable to extreme heat events.

Heat-related Illness:

Warning Signs and Symptoms

  • Muscle cramping might be the first sign of heat-related illness, and may lead to heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Here is how you can recognize heat exhaustion and heat stroke and what to do:
    Heat Exhaustion    What you should do
    Faint or dizzy

    Move to a cooler location.

    Sip water.

    Apply cool, wet cloths to as much of your body as possible.

    Lie down and loosen your clothing.

If the person has vomited and it continues, seek medical attention immediately.

Heavy sweating
Fast, weak pulse
Nausea or vomiting
Cold, pale, clammy skin
Muscle cramps
Heat Stroke    What you should do
High body temperature (above 103°F)

Call 911 immediately – heat stroke is a medical emergency.

Move the person to a cooler environment.

Reduce the person’s body temperature with cool cloths or even a bath.

Do NOT give fluids.

Health Threats from Extreme Heat

Infants and young children

Infants and young children are sensitive to the effects of extreme heat, and must rely on other people to keep them cool and hydrated.

  • Never leave infants or children in a parked car. (Nor should pets be left in parked cars—they can suffer heat-related illness too.)
  • Dress infants and children in loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Seek medical care immediately if your child has symptoms of heat-related illness.

People with chronic medical conditions

People of any age with a chronic medical condition are less likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature. Also, they may be taking medications that can worsen the impact of extreme heat. People in this category need the following information:

  • Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
  • Learn about how any medications you take affects your body’s ability to regulate temperature.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Check the local news for health and safety updates regularly.
  • Avoid use the stove or oven to cook — it will make you and your house hotter.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Take cool showers or baths to cool down.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or someone you know experiences symptoms of heat-related illness.

Athletes and outdoor sports enthusiasts

People who exercise in extreme heat are more likely to become dehydrated and get heat-related illness. STOP all activity and get to a cool environment if you feel faint or weak.

  • Drink more water than usual and take a drink before you are thirsty. Muscle cramping may be an early sign of heat-related illness.
  • Limit outdoor activity, especially midday when the sun is hottest.
  • Schedule workouts, practices, and activities earlier or later in the day when the temperature is cooler.
  • Pace activity. Start activities slow and pick up the pace gradually. Remember it may take 1-2 weeks of exposure to high temperatures before your body fully adjusts.
  • Monitor a teammate’s condition, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Wear and reapply sunscreen as indicated on the package.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or a teammate has symptoms of heat-related illness.
  • Learn about Oregon School Activities Association (OSAA) heat policies and guidance if you are an athlete, parent of an athlete, coach, trainer or athletics director. This guidance applies to members of OSAA, so if you engage in club sports, you may want to ask if they have similar policies.

Outdoor workers

People who work outdoors, whether as a source of income or for DIY home projects and landscaping, are more likely to become dehydrated. This makes them more likely to get heat-related illness. STOP all activity and get to a cool environment if you feel faint or weak.

  • Drink from two to four cups of water every hour while working. Take a drink BEFORE you are thirsty.
  • Avoid alcohol or liquids containing large amounts of sugar.
  • Ask your employer if tasks can be scheduled for earlier or later in the day to avoid midday heat. If you have DIY projects at home, consider moving work to the coolest parts of the day.
  • Wear a brimmed hat and loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Spend time in air-conditioned buildings during breaks and after work.
  • Encourage co-workers or those helping you with home projects to take breaks to cool off and drink water.
  • Wear and reapply sunscreen as indicated on the package.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you or a co-worker has symptoms of heat-related illness.
  • For more information, please visit the CDC’s page on Heat Stress and visit OR-OSHA’s heat stress page.

Heat and low income

  • Drink more water than usual and take a drink BEFORE you are thirsty.
  • If you have air conditioning, use it to keep your home cool.
  • If you can’t afford to use your air conditioning:
  • If you live outdoors, identify public spaces with air conditioning and check to see if cooling centers are available in your community. 211 INFO’s Severe Weather Extreme Heat Cooling Center List, local service agencies and emergency management often have this information in locations where it is available.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor, and have someone do the same for you.
  • Seek medical care immediately if you have, or someone you know has, symptoms of heat-related illness.

 Fact Sheets

FAQ: Extreme Heat and Public Health

OR-OSHA Resources