PeerGalaxy

Oregon's Peer Support Directory

PeerGalaxy Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring over 82,000 monthly offerings of FREE telephone- and online-accessible peer support, recovery support + wellness activities!

Over 30+ warmlines plus webinars, workshops, job postings, special events, consumer input opportunities and more.

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

Click the Accessibility Button on the right side, halfway down in the middle, for enhanced viewing and/or access options!  Click the Translate Button in the lower left corner for language options. 

Your use of this site is subject to the Privacy Policy, Terms and Conditions of Use.  Reminder: Fees or charges may be charged by your carrier for sending or receiving SMS text messaging, phone, or data.

If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

How Events are Sorted:

First, at the top of the list: Disaster Hotline & Oregon Safe + Strong Helpline.

Next in the list: Bundled “All Day” Events for organizations with events happening at multiple times throughout the day and/or in many formats or locations; these are bundled into a single listing to prevent endless scrolling.  Usually these offer a lookup by zip code or other criteria. 

Lastly, Time-Specific Events listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  Warmlines and places east of Oregon’s time zone tend to start earlier (e.g. 4am in Oregon is 7am in New York).

Oct
5
Wed
0 – Hotline – SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline @ 1-800-985-5990 (Multilingual), 1-800-846-8517 (TTY) – Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free
Oct 5 all-day
0 - Hotline - SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline @ 1-800-985-5990 (Multilingual), 1-800-846-8517 (TTY) - Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration - 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free

Excerpt(s) from link:

https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/disaster-distress-helpline

Disaster Distress Helpline

SAMHSA’s Disaster Distress Helpline provides 24/7, 365-day-a-year crisis counseling and support to people experiencing emotional distress related to natural or human-caused disasters.

The Disaster Distress Helpline, 1-800-985-5990, is a 24/7, 365-day-a-year, national hotline dedicated to providing immediate crisis counseling for people who are experiencing emotional distress related to any natural or human-caused disaster. This toll-free, multilingual, and confidential crisis support service is available to all residents in the United States and its territories. Stress, anxiety, and other depression-like symptoms are common reactions after a disaster. Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746 to connect with a trained crisis counselor.

Counseling Services

The Disaster Distress Helpline puts people in need of counseling on the path to recovery. Our staff members provide counseling and support before, during, and after disasters and refer people to local disaster-related resources for follow-up care and support. Since its launch in February 2012, the Disaster Distress Helpline has provided counseling and support in response to disasters such as Hurricane Sandy, the Boston Marathon bombing, and the Ebola outbreak.

The Disaster Distress Helpline is staffed by trained counselors from a network of crisis call centers located across the United States. These counselors provide:

  • Crisis counseling for people in emotional distress related to any natural or human-caused disaster
  • Information on how to recognize distress and its effects on individuals and families
  • Tips for healthy coping
  • Referrals to local crisis call centers for additional follow-up care and support

When you call or text, crisis counselors will listen to what’s on your mind with patience and without judgment. There is no need to give any identifying information when you contact the Disaster Distress Helpline. The counselor may ask you for some basic information at the end of the call, but these questions are optional and are intended to help SAMHSA keep track of the types of calls it receives.

Who Should Contact the Disaster Distress Helpline?

This crisis support service is for anyone experiencing emotional distress related to disasters such as:

The Disaster Distress Helpline also answers calls and texts related to infectious disease outbreaks, such as the Ebola outbreak, incidents of community unrest, and other traumatic events.

The impact of crises may affect people in different ways. Learn how to recognize the warning signs and risk factors for emotional distress related to natural and human-caused disasters.

The Disaster Distress Helpline is open to everyone. This includes survivors of disasters; loved ones of victims; first responders; rescue, recovery, and relief workers; clergy; and parents and caregivers. You may call for yourself or on behalf of someone else.

Call or Text

From the United States and its territories, call 1-800-985-5990 to connect with a trained crisis counselor, 24/7. Spanish-speakers can call the hotline and press “2” for 24/7 bilingual support.

Callers to the hotline can also connect with counselors in over 100 other languages via 3rd-party interpretation services; to connect with a counselor in your primary language, simply indicate your preferred language to the responding counselor and she/he will connect to a live interpreter (interpretation in less commonly-spoken languages may require calling back at an appointed time). Learn more and download information about the Disaster Distress Helpline in 30 of the most commonly-spoken languages in the U.S.

To connect with a live DDH crisis counselor 24/7 via SMS, from the 50 states text “TalkWithUs” for English or “Hablanos” for Spanish to 66746. Spanish-speakers from Puerto Rico can text “Hablanos” to 1-787-339-2663.

Texting is subscription-based and only involves a few steps:

  1. Enroll in the service by texting TalkWithUs or Hablanos exactly as written. It’s important to do this before sending your first text message because otherwise the enrollment may fail, and you will not be able to speak with a counselor, or you may accidentally subscribe to another service.
  2. Look for confirmation that your subscription was successful. You will receive a Success! message if it was.
  3. To unsubscribe, text Stop or Unsubscribe to 66746 (or 1-787-339-2663 from Puerto Rico) at any time. For help, text Help to 66746 (or 1-787-339-2663 from Puerto Rico).

Standard text and data message rates will apply when texting from mobile phones. International text and data rates may apply from within U.S. territories and free association nations. SAMHSA will not sell your phone numbers to other parties.

The Disaster Distress Helpline’s TTY number 1-800-846-8517 is available 24/7 to Deaf and hard of hearing individuals, who can also utilize the texting options or their preferred Relay service (including 7-1-1) to connect with the main DDH hotline 1-800-985-5990, 24/7.

Other Inquiries

If you’re not in immediate need of crisis counseling support and would like to contact us for other reasons, send an email. Contact us for:

  • Technical problems. If you encountered a technical problem while trying to contact the Disaster Distress Helpline, please include your name and preferred contact information in your email if you wish to receive a reply.
  • Provider inquiries. Providers with specific inquiries about technical assistance and support, requests for materials, and exploring collaborations are encouraged to send an email.
  • Feedback. To provide feedback about your experience reaching out to the Disaster Distress Helpline, send an email describing your experience and SAMHSA will look into the matter. Please include your name and preferred contact information if you wish to receive a reply.
  • Social media inquiries. Email us with questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline’s use of social media.
  • All media inquiries. Members of the media with questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline are encouraged to call the SAMHSA Media Services Team at 1-240-276-2130.

Our staff appreciate hearing from people about their experiences. SAMHSA takes feedback about our services, whether it is positive or negative, very seriously.

SAMHSA also encourages public promotion of the Disaster Distress Helpline. Anyone can use the Disaster Distress Helpline logo and telephone number on their website and link to the Disaster Distress Helpline’s materials and social media properties.

Call 211 for information about disaster-related evacuations, shelters, food and clothing distribution, volunteer opportunities, and other resources and referrals. Or visit the national 211 Call Center Search website to find the 211 information and referral center nearest you.

Last Updated: 11/11/2019

Deaf/Hard of Hearing & Spanish

Deaf/Hard of Hearing

Spanish Speakers

Twitter Tweets:

Facebook

Follow the Disaster Distress Helpline on Facebook.

00 – Hotlilne – Nation Wide Launch of 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline – 24/7 @ online event register for details.
Oct 5 all-day

 

Oregon is ready for nationwide launch of 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline

Starting July 16, people in Oregon and nationwide will be able to call, text or chat 988, a new three-digit number, available 24/7, that will directly connect anyone experiencing a behavioral health crisis to compassionate care and support from trained crisis counselors. The 988 dialing-code connects callers to the existing National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, a network of local crisis call-centers throughout the country. In Oregon, 988 call-centers are operated by Lines for Life statewide, and Northwest Human Services in Marion and Polk counties.

How Does 988 Work?

988 was established in July 2022 to improve access to crisis services in a way that meets our country’s growing suicide and mental health-related crisis care needs. 988 provides easier access to behavioral health crisis services, which are distinct from the public safety purposes of 911 (where the focus is on dispatching Emergency Medical Services, fire and police as needed).

911 continues to operate as it does across the state. For serious and life-threatening situations, 988 call centers work with local mental health providers to support appropriate interventions.

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and Oregon’s 988 call centers are collaborating with 911 Public Safety Answering Points to develop a roadmap on how 911 and 988 can coordinate with each other in the future.

988 crisis counselors are trained to use the least invasive interventions. Oftentimes, responding to a call, text or chat is all that is needed to help someone in crisis. In fact, more than 95 percent of current calls are resolved over the phone.

If a 988 call cannot be resolved over the phone, a mobile crisis team or first responder may be dispatched.

Other important facts to know:

  • 988 is available through every landline, cell phone and voice-over internet device in the United States, as well as text and chat.
  • The current technology for 988 routes callers by area code, not geolocation.
  • 988 is not currently available when phones are locked or do not have prepaid minutes.
  • The transition to 988 does not impact the availability of crisis services for veterans and military service members. They can call 988 and press 1 to connect with the Veterans Crisis Line.
  • For support in Spanish, callers can press 2 to connect with the Red Nacional de Prevención del Suicidio.

The 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline has an infographic with more information on what happens when people call, text or chat.

Community partners interested in helping promote 988 can use posters, social media shareables and other materials about 988 from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration at samhsa.gov/988. Learn more about 988 in Oregon on OHA’s 988 webpage. Read OHA’s press release about 988.

 

00 – Hotline – VideoPhone+ASL DEAF – Accessible Hotline @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) – Anytime 24/7/365 – Weekdays and Weekends @ VideoPhone+ASL
Oct 5 all-day
00 - Hotline - VideoPhone+ASL DEAF - Accessible Hotline @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) - Anytime 24/7/365 - Weekdays and Weekends @ VideoPhone+ASL

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

00 – SAMHSA – Substance and Mental Health Services Administration – Distress Helpline Videophone for American Sign Language Users – 24/7 @ phone
Oct 5 all-day
Disaster Distress Helpline Videophone for American Sign Language Users
Find answers to the most frequently asked questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline Videophone for American Sign Language Users.

The Disaster Distress Helpline (DDH) is a 24/7, year-round, confidential, multi-lingual crisis counseling and emotional support resource for survivors, responders, and anyone in the U.S./territories struggling with distress or other mental health concerns related to any natural or human-caused disaster. Calls and texts to 1-800-985-5990 are answered by trained counselors from a network of independently operated crisis centers located across the country. https://www.samhsa.gov/ddh

 

Video: Why a DDH VP for ASL users? (1 minute, 30 seconds)

While most people impacted by disaster will be able to bounce back fairly quickly with help from their support networks, others may experience significant emotional distress or other mental health concerns that can impede recovery. Deaf and hard of hearing people may be especially at risk for disaster-related distress. Barriers to accessibility for mental healthcare, emergency preparedness, and disaster relief services are just a few distress risk factors that Deaf/HoH people face throughout the disaster cycle.

In addition, the vast majority of crisis hotlines are set up to accommodate hearing, not Deaf/HoH, callers. While video Relay connections can offer 3rd-party interpretation between ASL users and hearing counselors, the responding counselor still may not fully understand the needs or be able to communicate effectively via the interpreter, especially if the caller is in crisis. While crisis chat and text services can seem like a sufficient alternative to hearing hotlines, Deaf people might understandably assume that responding chat/text counselors may not understand their needs as Deaf individuals, and therefore may be resistant in accessing these options.

 

Video: Who can access the DDH VP? (1 minute)

The DDH VP is intended for American Sign Language users, regardless of fluency level or whether they are fully Deaf or hard of hearing. The common denominator is that ASL is the language being used between the caller & counselor. Callers who cannot communicate at all in ASL should not use the DDH VP. These callers should call or text the DDH 1-800-985-5990 via their standard phone device.

Video: Who answers DDH VP calls? (1 minute)

The national Disaster Distress Helpline is a network of independently operated crisis centers located across the United States. DeafLEAD is the not-for-profit crisis center that staffs and responds to DDH VP calls, 24/7/365. DeafLEAD’s mission is to “provide individuals who are Deaf and hard of hearing with comprehensive, unified and continuous support by enhancing socio-emotional development, effective communication and leadership through education.” Learn more about DeafLEAD

 

Video: Why a DDH VP for ASL users? (1 minute, 30 seconds)

While most people impacted by disaster will be able to bounce back fairly quickly with help from their support networks, others may experience significant emotional distress or other mental health concerns that can impede recovery. Deaf and hard of hearing people may be especially at risk for disaster-related distress. Barriers to accessibility for mental healthcare, emergency preparedness, and disaster relief services are just a few distress risk factors that Deaf/HoH people face throughout the disaster cycle.

In addition, the vast majority of crisis hotlines are set up to accommodate hearing, not Deaf/HoH, callers. While video Relay connections can offer 3rd-party interpretation between ASL users and hearing counselors, the responding counselor still may not fully understand the needs or be able to communicate effectively via the interpreter, especially if the caller is in crisis. While crisis chat and text services can seem like a sufficient alternative to hearing hotlines, Deaf people might understandably assume that responding chat/text counselors may not understand their needs as Deaf individuals, and therefore may be resistant in accessing these options.

Video: Who can access the DDH VP? (1 minute)

The DDH VP is intended for American Sign Language users, regardless of fluency level or whether they are fully Deaf or hard of hearing. The common denominator is that ASL is the language being used between the caller & counselor. Callers who cannot communicate at all in ASL should not use the DDH VP. These callers should call or text the DDH 1-800-985-5990 via their standard phone device.

Video: What happens if no one answers? (1 minute)

Sometimes callers to the Disaster Distress Helpline Videophone (“DDH VP”) may not get through on the first try because of high call volume, or might get disconnected because of poor WiFi or cellphone service, etc. If you experience any technical difficulties when connecting to the DDH VP, first try calling or connecting again. Sometimes it may take 1 or 2 attempts to get through. If you’re attempting to connect through the “ASL Now Link” at the DDH website, and you are not able to get through, you can try connecting from a different browser for the 2nd attempt (for example, if the first time you tried was through Google Chrome, for the 2nd attempt, try Microsoft Edge or Mozilla Firefox). If for whatever reason you’re still not able to get through and you’re wanting to connect with the DDH as quickly as possible, you can also try texting to 1-800-985-5990; your text will likely be answered by a hearing DDH crisis worker, and they are still trained to support anyone experiencing distress or other mental health concerns.

 

Video: Who funds and operates the DDH? (1 minute)

The DDH is funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA; a division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) and is administered by the nonprofit Vibrant Emotional Health; Vibrant also administers the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-TALK) for SAMHSA, of which the DDH is a sub-network. Learn more about SAMHSA and Vibrant

01 – Chatline – Text HELP to 741741 to Connect with a Crisis Counselor for Crisis / Depression – Anytime 24/7/365 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Text Messaging
Oct 5 all-day

CHATLINE

FREE Text Messaging to Connect with a Crisis Counselor for Depression / Crisis, etc.

Anytime 24/7/365 Weekdays and Weekends

Text HELP to 741741  

An alternative way to connect is through Facebook Messenger at this link: https://www.messenger.com/t/204427966369963/?messaging_source=source%3Apages%3Amessage_shortlink

You aren’t alone – support is out there! 

How you feel NOW may not last Forever.

Connecting with someone who cares and listens can make a difference and can help us get through our most difficult moments.

Whether it’s friends, family, or community – Everyone needs Somebody to lean on!

NOTE: Wait time can vary.  Usually a response comes pretty quickly in under 5 minutes.  Sometimes the wait can be 5 to 15 minutes or longer if there is a disaster or other reason.

 

Who are the Crisis Counselors? They are trained volunteers who—with the support of full-time Crisis Text Line staff—use active listening, collaborative problem solving, and safety planning to help texters in their moment of crisis.

Crisis doesn’t just mean suicide; it’s any painful emotion for which you need support. 

This service is for short term needs and is not a substitute for a friend or professional therapist.

For more information, check out the Frequently Asked Questions at this link: https://www.crisistextline.org/about-us/faq/ 

crisis text line banner

01 – Helpline – CBL – Call Blackline – Voice and Text Support for the Black, Black LGBTQ+, Brown, Native and Muslim Community – (800) 604-5841 @ Call/Text
Oct 5 all-day

Call toll-free anytime 24/7

(800) 604-5841

BlackLine® provides a space for peer support, counseling, witnessing and affirming the lived experiences to folxs who are most impacted by systematic oppression with an LGBTQ+ Black Femme Lens.

Call BlackLine® prioritizes BIPOC
(Black, Indigenous and People of Color).

By us for us.

 

01 – Support Line – L4L Racial Equity Support Line – BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free – Lines for Life – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Oct 5 all-day
01 - Support Line - L4L Racial Equity Support Line - BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free - Lines for Life - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis / Support Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 8:30am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Toll-Free Access

If you need toll-free access, call any line at Lines for Life and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line during its operating hours.

For example, you can call the Suicide Prevention Crisis Line @ 1-877-273-8255 or the Safe+Strong Helpline @ 1-800-923-4457 and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line between 8:30am and 5pm PST.

02 – Urgent Info – Services and Resources in Response to the War in Ukraine
Oct 5 all-day

 

Resources in Response to the War on Ukraine

The recent attack on Ukraine has impacted many families in the United States, especially our military and veteran families and those who have family living in the region. The NCTSN and our partners have resources for those families who may need support during this time:
 

Military and Veteran Family Resources
 
Working Effectively with Military Families: 10 Key Concepts All Providers Should Know
 
Understanding Child Trauma & Resilience: For Military Parents and Caregivers
 
Honoring Our Babies and Toddlers: Supporting Young Children Affected by a Military Parent’s Deployment, Injury, or Death (Zero to Three)
 
Sesame Street for Military Families
 
Community Support for Military Children and Families Throughout the Deployment Cycle (Center for Study of Traumatic Stress, CSTS)
 
Strengthening Military Families to Support Children’s Well-Being
 
Helping Children Cope During Deployment
 
Military Children and Families: Supporting Health and Managing Risk (webinar)
 
Impact of the Military Mission & Combat Deployment on the Service Members
 
Understanding Deployment Related Stressors & Long-term Health in Military Service Members & Veterans:

The Millennium Cohort Study (webinar)
 
An Overview of the Military Family Experience and Culture
 
Talking to Children about War
 
Age-Related Reactions to a Traumatic Event
 
Psychological First Aid for Displaced Children and Families

Traumatic Separation and Refugee and Immigrant Children: Tips for Current Caregivers

Understanding Refugee Trauma:

For School Personnel For Mental Health Professionals  and For Primary Care Providers

Coping in Hard Times: Fact Sheet for Parents

Youth and School Personnel

Helping Children with Traumatic Grief: Young Children

School-Age Children and Teens
 

 

Military Child Education Coalition Resources to Support Ukrainian Military Children & Their Families

As the situation on the ground in Ukraine continues to evolve, and military families deal with potential deployments, we are reminded of the many uncertainties military-connected children experience as a part of the military lifestyle. We are also reminded of the stress and insecurity that can accompany such unpredictable circumstances.

For 24 years, MCEC® has worked to establish programs and resources for parents, educators, and students to help them navigate unique challenges associated with the military lifestyle. Programs like our Student 2 Student® peer-to-peer support system, parent workshops, and professional development for educators all work together to more effectively respond to the unique emotional needs of military children.

MCEC® is also answering the call from our allies. Upon a request from the National Association of Ukrainian Psychologists, seeking resources for serving military families, the American Psychological Association and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences reached out to MCEC®.

We responded with the tools listed below, which, we believe, can be immediately helpful to families during these extremely trying times.

Developing Positive Coping Strategies

Fostering Resilience in Children

Helping Military-Connected Children with Daily Stress & Frustration

Raising a Confident Child in an Uncertain World

Supporting Children through Natural Disasters & Loss

Turning Stress into Strength

Anxiety in Young Children

Depression in Youth

Community Crises & Disasters

Activity Web of Support

MCEC Webinar Resources

National Child Traumatic Stress Network Resources

A one-on-one English program for Ukrainian Youth

ENGin is a nonprofit organization that pairs Ukrainian youth with English-speakers for free online conversation practice and cross-cultural connection. We work with students age 13-30 and volunteers age 14+.

ENGin pairs English learners with volunteers from around the world to conduct weekly online speaking sessions. Every learner and volunteer is screened to ensure their fit for the program. Participants are then matched based on preferences, interests, and availability to ensure an effective and mutually enjoyable communication experience. After a match is made, ENGin supports learners and volunteers throughout their participation in the program with tips, resources, and problem resolution.  

Students Join Here

Volunteer Apply Here

 

Helpline Resources
 

SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline – call or text 1-800-985-5990 (for Spanish, press “2”) to be connected to a trained counselor 24/7/365.
 
Military OneSource – call 1-800-342-9647 for eligible DOD service members and their families.
 
Veterans Crisis Line – call 1-800-273-8255, press “1” or text 838255 for all service members.
 
PTSD Consultation Program – for providers who treat Veterans. Ask a question by calling 866-948-7880<tel:866-948-7880> or emailing PTSDconsult@va.gov<mail to:PTSDconsult@va.gov>.
 

For those that are needing technical assistance or additional resources, please don’t hesitate to contact:

For those that are needing technical assistance or additional resources, please don’t hesitate to contact:

Dr. Greg Leskin gleskin@mednet.ucla.edu<mailto:gleskin@mednet.ucla.edu> for Military and Veteran Family resource questions and

Dr. Melissa Brymer at mbrymer@mednet.ucla.edu<mailto:mbrymer@mednet.ucla.edu> for all other questions.

 

Resources In Europe

eucap provides provides support for autistic people in crisis situations

Supporting autistic people in crisis situations

How can you deal with difficult situations if you have limited knowledge of autism? How to best support an autistic person in an acute crisis and challenging conditions? View brief basic information compiled by EUCAP and Autism Europe on this page or download as a pdf file here. More translated versions will be added as they become available.

 

Teenergizer support for Ukranian teens

 

Teenage peer-to-peer counselling service offers lifeline to youngsters in Ukraine

An online counselling service for teenagers has made the world of difference to one youngster who struggled to cope with grief.

Click Here For More Information

 

LiLi Center Logo

Ukraine Peer-to-Peer Support Group

The events happening in Ukraine have affected many in different ways. We want to support those affected directly or indirectly by offering a safe place to express their emotions in a supportive and safe environment. Our peer-to-peer networks are a way for people to support each other in a safe and secure space. If you are interested to express your feelings about the war, need guidance or resources The LiLi Centre is here for you.

For More Information Visit :  https://www.lilicentre.ch/en/home

Where: LiLi Centre
When:  
Wednesdays 09:30-11:30, and Thursdays 17:00-19:00

Who:    Anyone impacted by the situation in Ukraine seeking support and community
Cost:    Free, Sponsored by the LiLi Centre’s Mental Health Initiative (MHI)

NOTE: If you have a need to speak with a mental health professional privately about how you are coping, we are happy to put you in touch with our network of providers and/or connect you to our low-cost and no-cost counselling clinic.

04 – BEAM – Black Emotional and Mental Health Collective – Girl Did You Know? – Mental Health Suppor Services You Can Reach Out To!
Oct 5 all-day
05 – Warmline – 877-360-LGBT(5428) – National Resource Center on LGBTQ+ Aging – 24/7 @ Phone
Oct 5 all-day

SAGE National LGBTQ+ Elder Hotline

877-360-LGBT(5428)

Talk and be heard at the SAGE LGBTQ+ Elder Hotline. We connect LGBTQ+ older people who want to talk with friendly responders who are ready to listen. If you are an LGBTQ+ elder or care for one, call the free SAGE Hotline, toll-free, at 877-360-LGBT(5428). Hotline responders:

  • Are certified in crisis response
  • Offer support without judgment
  • Answer questions factually and confidentially
  • Provide information about community support resources such as healthcare, transportation, counseling, legal services, and emotional support programs

The SAGE LGBTQ+ Elder Hotline is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, in English and Spanish, with translation in 180 languages.

Members of our community are likely to live alone and feel isolated. Through our hotline, we can connect everyone with a phone to an LGBTQ+ responder who is friendly, knowledgeable, and ready to listen. The hotline is managed by our partner United Way Worldwide.

The National Resource Center on LGBTQ+ Aging is the country’s first and only technical assistance resource center focused on improving the quality of services and supports offered to lesbian, gay, bisexual and/or transgender older adults, their families and caregivers.

AM – All Month – Veterans Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255, Veterans and Military Families Resources and Information
Oct 5 all-day

CRISIS LINES AND WARMLINES

 

Veterans Crisis Line: 800-273-8255, Press 1

Women Veterans Hotline: 855-829-663

Vet Center Call Center: 877-WAR-VETS (927-8387)

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Caregiver Support Line: 855-260-3274

Lines for Life Military Help Line:  Call 1-888-457-4838

Senior Loneliness Line:  Call 503-200-1633

The Trevor Project:  866-488-7386

 

RESOURCES AND INFORMATION

Veteran Resource Navigator

The coronavirus pandemic has changed our world. But it has not changed Oregon’s commitment to those who served and fought for us.

This comprehensive online resource guide is meant to assist veterans from all walks of life in finding the benefits that are most useful to their unique circumstances at this time.

These benefits and resources are yours, earned through your faithful and honorable service to our nation; they are also an investment in the state of Oregon, because your success is our success.

Oregon veterans are a diverse community, but we are united in our shared service, and this has never been truer than it is today. We are all in this together, and we are not defeated. We will stand again, united.


If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance, please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.


Resources by Topic Area

COVID Economic Resources

Economic

Emergency aid, employment, disability, taxes, scams, veteran-owned businesses

COVID Housing and Food Resources

Housing and Food

Housing security and support, homelessness resources, food

COVID Education Resources

Education

Federal VA resources, Voc Rehab re-entry, GI Bill updates, apprenticeships info

COVID Resources

Other Resources

Resources for families, aging veterans, and Oregon OEM COVID-19 resources

COVID Health and Wellness Resources

Health and Wellness

Healthcare, mental health, medical transportation, crisis hotlines

COVID Agency Resources

Agency Resources

Changes and updates about ODVA’s programs and resources

 

LOCATE VETERANS SERVICES IN OREGON

 

Veteran Services by County

Click on the  map below to access resources in your county.

 

VETERANS SERVICES IN OREGON BY CATEGORY

Click on the Image Below to find services by category

 

COVID-19 ALERT – Due to COVID-19, many County Offices are limiting in-person services and are providing services by phone.

Please call your County Veteran Service Office before going in to confirm how they can best serve you during this time.

 

If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance,

please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.

Contact ODVA Headquarters

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs
700 Summer St NE
Salem, OR 97301

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned. Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy, so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

Print out your VA Welcome Kit

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned.

Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

Download your VA Welcome Kit

Feel free to share this guide with friends or family members who need help with their benefits too. You can print out copies for yourself and others:

Download our guides to VA benefits and services

For Veterans

For family members

 

Other Resources Available to Veterans and Military Service Members

DD214 & Military Records Request:

https://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records

Veteran Resource Navigator site by ODVA:

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

(Oregon)Military Help Line:  

Call 888-457-4838

VA Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255:

Press 1.VA Confidential crisis chat at net or text to 838255 

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD:

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/

Defining Discharge Status:

https://militarybenefits.info/character-of-discharge/#:~:text=There%20are%206%20types%20of,DD%20214%20must%20have%20a

How to apply for a discharge status upgrade:

https://www.va.gov/discharge-upgrade-instructions/

Oregon Supportive Services for Vets & Families (Housing):

https://caporegon.org/what-we-do/ssvf/

Clackamas County VSO’s (Veteran Service Officers):

https://www.clackamas.us/socialservices/veterans.html

Portland VA Clinic that can help with homelessness & medical care:

https://www.portland.va.gov/locations/crrc.asp

 

National Resource Directory (NRD)

https://nrd.gov/

The National Resource Directory (NRD) is a resource website that connects wounded warriors, Service Members, Veterans, their families, and caregivers to programs and services that support them. The NRD is hosted, managed, maintained, sustained and developed by the Defense Health Agency’s Recovery Coordination Program.

It provides access to services and resources at the national, state and local levels to support recovery, rehabilitation and community reintegration. Visitors can find information on a variety of topics that supply an abundance of vetted resources. For help finding resources on the site, visit the How to Use this site section of the NRD. Please see below for some of our major categories.

 

The National Recovery Directory is a partnership among the Departments of Defense, Labor, and Veterans Affairs. Information contained within the NRD is from federal, state, and local government agencies; Veteran and military service organizations; non-profit and community-based organizations; academic institutions and professional associations that provide assistance to wounded warriors and their families.

GLOSSARIES

Find definitions to commonly used terms in VA, DoD, DOL, and other federal government agencies.

NRD FACT SHEET

Get to know your NRD: why it was created, who operates it, and all the resources meant for you.

KEY CONTACTS

Find contacts in the Departments of Defense, Labor, and Veterans Affairs and Military Services.

 

 

 

 

Tue, January 25, 2022, 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM PST

ONLINE EVENT

Semper Fi & America’s Fund offers a Caregiver Support Program encompassing a variety of activities, education, support tools and resource connections designed to assist the spouses, parents, siblings, extended family members, or close friends who drop everything to care for a catastrophically wounded, critically ill or injured service member. The Caregiver Support Program provides different types of events to suit the busy schedules of our caregivers.

Join MVCN with special guest Karen Hetherington, Director of Case Management for the Semper Fi & America’s Fund, a non-profit that assists catastrophically wounded, ill and injured service members. Ms. Hetherington will share about Semper Fi & America’s Fund’s programs and answer questions.

Come learn how Semper Fi & America’s Fund can help you!

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

**Please SAVE your confirmation email as it contains information to join the Zoom group.** Check your spam or junk folder if you do not receive an email confirmation from Eventbrite.Find other peer support opportunities on our Caregiver Calendar on the MVCN website. https://www.redcross.org/caregiversVisit the safe and secure, caregiver-only Online Community available 24/7 for support. https://mvcn.force.com/login.

 

 

 

 

Dual Diagnosis Anonymous

 

 

“You protected us, now we support you!”

https://ddainc.org/dda-veterans-page/

DDA was founded by a highly decorated veteran, Corbett Monica. After serving in the Vietnam War, like other veterans, returning to home only find anguish, trauma, and remorse. After suffering from severe PTSD, OCD, survivors guilt, and addictions, Corbett found a way to transcend from destructive means with the inception of Dual Diagnosis Anonymous (DDA) providing hope and recovery through our peer support which is now his legacy.

Culturally responsive DDA’s Veterans meetings are intended to provide a safe venue to be open about depression, post-traumatic stress, alcohol and drug use, abuse, and addiction as well as serve as a resource for navigation of the telehealth system, It will encourage healthy solutions for adapting to the changing times. Specifically. the project will Improve access for Veterans and military service members to dual diagnosis services through the creation of on-line recovery support groups and on-line DDA meetings.

This project will serve Veterans throughout the state and is beginning outreach through Veterans publications, local newspapers, the VA, Veterans websites, list services, and anything else that will help identify Oregonians who can use the services.

 

More Ways to Connect

Join our Private Online Group

DDA Veterans Resource Group and Chatroom: www.facebook.com/groups/345810496697764

In Person Meetings

 

Wednesdays 5pm to 7pm

1520 Sherman Ave North Bend, OR 97459

Online Meetings

 

Tuesdays 12pm-1pm Pacific Time Zone

Join Zoom Meeting https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84398341923 Meeting ID: 843 9834 1923

By Phone

Give our Central Office a call at (503)-222-6484

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES AND LINKS

VA National Center on PTSD

                PTSD Treatment Decision Aid

                Educational Materials

                Mobile Apps

                Whiteboard Videos

                Consultation Program

 

VA Healthcare – Community Care network

Minority Veterans of America

https://www.minorityvets.org/

 

Vet Centers:

Central Oregon Vet Center

Eugene Vet Center

Grants Pass Vet Center

Portland Vet Center

Salem Vet Center

 

Community Based Outpatient Clinics:

Bend CBOC

Morrow County VA Telehealth Clinic (Boardman OR)

Brookings VA Clinic

Wallowa County VA Telehealth Clinic (Enterprise OR)

Eugene Health Care Center

Eugene VA Downtown Clinic

Fairview Clinic

Grants Pass West VA CBOC

Hillsboro CBOC

Klamath Falls CBOC

La Grande CBOC

Lincoln City Clinic

North Bend VA Clinic

Community Resource and Referral Center (CRRC)

Salem CBOC

North Coast CBOC

 

Military Children Resources

Military kids face unique psychological challenges related to military life. Compared to their non-military peers, military kids are many times more likely to move multiple times during their school careers and have a parent absent for long periods of time in potentially dangerous locations – factors that can greatly stress military kids’ mental health.

The Defense Health Agency maintains two online resources to support military children use the links povided below:

  • Military Kids Connect is an online community specifically for military children ages 6-17, and provides access to age-appropriate resources for military kids and also for parents, caregivers, and educators to help them understand and support military kids at home and in school.
  • Sesame Street for Military Families is a free, bilingual (English and Spanish) website where families can find information and multimedia resources on the topics of military deployments, multiple deployments, homecomings, injuries, grief, and self-expression.
AM – All Month – Hispanic Heritage Month – AFSP – American Foundation for Suicide Prevention – An Introduction to Suicide Prevention For Latinx and Hispanic Communities – Resources
Oct 5 all-day

 

 

 

Hispanic Heritage Month

AFSP – American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

An Introduction to Suicide Prevention For Latinx and Hispanic Communities – Resources

¡Feliz mes de la herencia hispana! Today, September 15, marks the start of National Hispanic Heritage Month, in which we celebrate the histories, cultures and contributions of Latinx and Hispanic people in the United States including Puerto Rico. It is also an opportunity to reflect on the progress we’ve made to advance mental health for Latinx and Hispanic communities.

One of those ways is through partnerships. It is our privilege to be partnering with the National Latino Behavioral Health Association (NLBHA) and others for the 2022 National Latino Behavioral Health Conference taking place September 15 and 16, featuring remarks from AFSP’s Chief Medical Officer Dr. Christine Yu-Moutier, and Vice President of Public Relations María de los Ángeles Corral.

Another way in which we are making inroads is through new programming. We are thrilled to announce that this October, in collaboration with NLBHA, we will be launching Talk Saves Lives™ (TSL): An Introduction to Suicide Prevention for Latinx and Hispanic Communities, a much-needed and vital new resource for mental health and suicide awareness education for communities of Latinx and Hispanic heritage. The presentation will be available in English and Spanish, in person and virtually.

Join us this month as we shine a light on mental health resources for Latinx and Hispanic communities, as well as the stories and perspectives of individuals who have reflected on their cultural background and how it can impact their experiences with mental health through our Real Stories blog over the years. You can find those resources, stories, social shareables and more here. Another great resource is our website! It can be translated into Spanish by clicking on the “Accessibility” top right button, then “Choose language,” then “Spanish.”

National Hispanic Heritage Month is a time to celebrate and support Latinx and Hispanic communities.

We encourage you to share the resources above, this month and beyond.

 

FIND RESOURCES

 

AM – All Month – ODVA – Oregon Dept of Veterans Affairs – Veterans Resource number (1-800-698-2411) & Veteran Resource Listings
Oct 5 all-day

 

Veteran Resource Navigator

The Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs (ODVA) has a comprehensive online resource guide (VETERAN RESOURCE NAVIGATOR) available to assist veterans in finding the benefits that are most useful to their unique circumstances at this time.

 

Use the link below for the Veteran Resource Navigator

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx)

 

USE THIS LINK TO OPEN THE VA WELCOME KIT

Print out your VA Welcome Kit

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned.

Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy, so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

Download your VA Welcome Kit

You are welcome to share this guide with friends or family members who need help with their benefits too. You can print out copies for yourself and others:

Download our guides to VA benefits and services

For Veterans

For family members

Other Resources Available to Veterans and Military Service Members

DD214 & Military Records Request:

https://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records

Veteran Resource Navigator site by ODVA:

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

(Oregon)Military Help Line:  

Call 888-457-4838

VA Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255:

Press 1.VA Confidential crisis chat at net or text to 838255 

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD:

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/

Defining Discharge Status:

https://militarybenefits.info/character-of-discharge/#:~:text=There%20are%206%20types%20of,DD%20214%20must%20have%20a

How to apply for a discharge status upgrade:

https://www.va.gov/discharge-upgrade-instructions/

Oregon Supportive Services for Vets & Families (Housing):

https://caporegon.org/what-we-do/ssvf/

Clackamas County VSO’s (Veteran Service Officers):

https://www.clackamas.us/socialservices/veterans.html

Portland VA Clinic that can help with homelessness & medical care:

https://www.portland.va.gov/locations/crrc.asp

Portland VA Mental Health Clinic:

https://www.portland.va.gov/services/mentalhealth.asp

Veterans Crisis Line/ Suicide Prevention:

https://www.veteranscrisisline.net/

 

If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance,

please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.

 

Contact ODVA Headquarters

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs
700 Summer St NE
Salem, OR 97301

Web: https://www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/default.aspx

Phone: (800) 692-9666 or (503) 373-2085

Fax: (503) 373-2392

Email:orvetsbenefits@odva.state.or.us

AM – All Month – Support, Resources, Assistance & Info for Renters and Landlords during COVID-19 Pandemic
Oct 5 all-day

 

Support, Resources, Assistance & Info for Tenants and Landlords During COVID-19

Apoyo, recursos, asistencia e información para inquilinos y propietarios durante COVID-19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program

(OERAP) helps eligible low-income households with their past due rent and utilities. This program uses funds from the federal Emergency Rental Assistance Program, which allocated a collective total of $280 million to Oregon, the City of Portland, and multiple counties in the state. In most cases, approved applications will result in payments made directly to landlords and utility providers.

Renters who are eligible for the program may request rent and/or utility assistance dating back to March 13, 2020 (prior expenses are not eligible). OERAP will cover up to 12 months of past due rent and three months of forward rent, once all past due rent is paid. OERAP will also cover past due utility costs including electricity, gas, home energy services, water, sewer, trash removal, internet and bulk fuels. Costs that will NOT be covered include: homeowner costs, homeowner utilities, landlord-paid utilities, landlord-paid property taxes, property insurance, phone, and renter insurance.

If approved, in most cases, payments will be made directly to the landlord, property owner or utility company on the tenant’s behalf via direct deposit or check. OERAP funds are not first-come-first-serve. Funds will be distributed based on a formula that prioritizes applications based on need. Everyone who turns in a completed application will have their application reviewed.

Click on the link below to apply for Emergency Rental Assistance

APPLY FOR ASSISTANCE WITH THIS LINK

Important Update:

Safe Harbor Eviction Protection Period Extended

  • Oregon Legislators recently held a special session to extend eviction protections known as “Safe Harbor” protections in Oregon (SB 278). As a result of recent legislation, tenants have protection from eviction upon showing their documentation of rental assistance application to their landlord. These protections replace the 60-day period (90 days in some jurisdictions) and now cover the entire time an application is being processed (up until September 30, 2022.)
  • In order to be protected, tenants must give proof of application to their landlord right away (by June 30, 2022 at the latest, or at or before any first court appearance, whichever is sooner.)
  • Anyone who has already applied for assistance and shown documentation of their application to their landlord at or before any first court appearance is now protected from nonpayment eviction until their application is processed.
  • Landlords are required to give 10 days of notice of termination of tenancy for nonpayment until September 30, 2022.
  • Landlords may begin eviction proceedings if you’ve missed rent and haven’t begun an application – apply to an open rental assistance program right away to access these protections!
  • If your application is closed or denied or paid in an amount that is less than is owed, your landlord can move forward with the eviction process for unpaid months.
  • If you have questions about eviction protections, please visit the Oregon Law Center’s website for updates at www.oregonlawhelp.org.

Eviction Defense Project

Is your landlord taking you to eviction court?

Get fast and free legal help from legal aid’s
new Eviction Defense Project

The Eviction Defense Project provides free legal assistance to low-income tenants facing eviction court cases. 

Contact us right away so we can review your case before it is too late.
Have your court case number and hearing date ready. 

Eviction court moves fast. Don’t wait.

Eviction Defense Project

¿Su arrendador lo ha llevado a la corte de desalojo?

Obtenga ayuda legal rápida y gratuita del nuevo Proyecto de Defensa contra Desalojos de los Servicios Legales.

El Proyecto de Defensa contra Desalojos brinda asistencia legal gratuita a inquilinos de bajos recursos que enfrentan casos de desalojo en la corte. 

Comuníquese con nosotros de inmediato para que podamos revisar su caso antes de que sea demasiado tarde.
Tenga a la mano el número de su caso y la fecha de la audiencia. 

La corte de desalojo se mueve rápido. No espere.

Important Information

for Oregon Renters and Landlords

There is no longer an eviction freeze in Oregon. Renters who are behind on rent or can’t pay future rent should apply for help.

Renters can apply to programs for help paying back and future rent and utilities through:

 

  • 211info.org or call 211 for information on local rent programs, or
  • oregonrentalassistance.org for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP)
    • NOTE: OERAP paused accepting applications on 12/1/21 for at least six weeks while waiting for new state money.

Payments go directly to landlords and utility companies.

Renters should show their landlords proof that they applied for rent help as soon as possible.

Renters are now protected from eviction until their application for rent help is processed if they show proof to their landlord.

 

  • If renters show their landlord proof that they applied for rent help before June 30, 2022, they cannot be evicted until
    • after the application is processed or
    • after September 30, 2022 – whichever is sooner.
  • Renters who already have a court case for unpaid rent should show proof that they applied for help to both their landlord and the judge to get extra time.
  • Until September 30, 2022, any notice to pay rent from a landlord must give 10 days to pay. Notices must also include special information about rent help programs and other protections.

 

Back Rent from April 2020 – June 2021: Time to Pay

The deadline to pay back rent owed for April 2020 – June 2021 is February 28, 2022. Landlords cannot evict tenants for rent owed from this period until March 1, 2022.

 

  • Renters who owe rent from this time period should apply for rent help as soon as possible before March 1, 2022.

 

Landlord Guarantee Program:

Landlords who have delayed evictions for renters who applied for rent help may qualify for this program. More information is available here.

 

  • NOTE: The Landlord Guarantee Program has paused accepting applications while making changes to the program. To get an email when the application system opens up, please share your email address with LGP@homeforward.org.

 

Other Important Changes:

Landlords with renters that owe rent for the April 2020 – June 2021 period cannot:

 

  • evict renters for rent owed for this period (until March 1, 2022)
  • charge fees for unpaid rent for this period, and
  • report renters for past due rent to a consumer credit reporting agency.

Unpaid rent from April 2020 – March 2022 cannot count against renters in future rental applications. (Oregon law SB 282)

Guests – Renters may share housing until February 28, 2022, as long as they are not breaking any laws. This means that until that time, landlords cannot evict or fine renters for having more guests than the landlord’s guest policy allows.

Resources

 

  • Landlords and renters can find more details at the City of Portland’s website (statewide information is available).

 

Qué hay de nuevo:

Información importante para inquilinos y propietarios de Oregón

Ya no existe un congelamiento de desalojos en Oregón. Los inquilinos que están atrasados ​​en el alquiler o que no pueden pagar el alquiler futuro deben solicitar ayuda.

Los inquilinos pueden solicitar programas de ayuda para pagar el alquiler y los servicios públicos atrasados ​​y futuros a través de:

 

  • 211info.org o llame al 211 para obtener información sobre los programas locales de alquiler, o
  • oregonrentalassistance.org para el Programa de Asistencia de Alquiler de Emergencia de Oregón (OERAP)
    • NOTA: OERP detuvo la aceptación de solicitudes el 1/12/21 durante al menos seis semanas mientras esperaba nuevos fondos estatales.

Los pagos van directamente a los propietarios y las empresas de servicios públicos.

Los inquilinos deben mostrar a sus propietarios pruebas de que solicitaron ayuda para el alquiler lo antes posible.

Los inquilinos ahora están protegidos contra el desalojo hasta que se procese su solicitud de ayuda para el alquiler si muestran pruebas al propietario.

 

  • Si los inquilinos le muestran al propietario prueba de que solicitaron ayuda para el alquiler antes del 30 de junio de 2022 , no pueden ser desalojados hasta que
    • después de que se procese la solicitud o
    • después del 30 de septiembre de 2022, lo que ocurra primero.
  • Los inquilinos que ya tienen un caso en la corte por alquiler impago deben mostrar prueba de que solicitaron ayuda tanto al propietario como al juez para obtener tiempo adicional.
  • Hasta el 30 de septiembre de 2022, cualquier aviso para pagar la renta de un arrendador debe dar 10 días para pagar. Los avisos también deben incluir información especial sobre los programas de ayuda para el alquiler y otras protecciones.

 

Alquiler atrasado de abril de 2020 a junio de 2021: hora de pagar

La fecha límite para pagar el alquiler adeudado de abril de 2020 a junio de 2021 es el 28 de febrero de 2022 . Los propietarios no pueden desalojar a los inquilinos por el alquiler adeudado desde este período hasta el 1 de marzo de 2022.

 

  • Los inquilinos que adeudan el alquiler de este período deben solicitar ayuda para el alquiler lo antes posible antes del 1 de marzo de 2022.

 

Programa de Garantía del Propietario:

Los propietarios que han retrasado los desalojos de los inquilinos que solicitaron ayuda para el alquiler pueden calificar para este programa. Más información está disponible aquí .

 

  • NOTA: El Programa de Garantía del Propietario ha dejado de aceptar solicitudes mientras realiza cambios en el programa. Para recibir un correo electrónico cuando se abra el sistema de solicitud, comparta su dirección de correo electrónico con LGP@homeforward.org .

 

Otros cambios importantes:

Los propietarios con inquilinos que adeudan alquiler para el período de abril de 2020 a junio de 2021 no pueden :

 

  • desalojar a los inquilinos por el alquiler adeudado durante este período (hasta el 1 de marzo de 2022)
  • cobrar cargos por el alquiler no pagado durante este período, y
  • informe a los inquilinos por alquileres atrasados ​​a una agencia de informes de crédito al consumidor.

El alquiler impago de abril de 2020 a marzo de 2022 no se puede descontar de los inquilinos en futuras solicitudes de alquiler. (Ley de Oregón SB 282)

Invitados : los inquilinos pueden compartir la vivienda hasta el 28 de febrero de 2022 , siempre que no infrinjan ninguna ley. Esto significa que hasta ese momento, los propietarios no pueden desalojar ni multar a los inquilinos por tener más invitados de los que permite la política de invitados del propietario.

Congelación de ejecuciones hipotecarias

El congelamiento de ejecuciones hipotecarias para propietarios de viviendas finaliza el 31 de diciembre de 2021 .

Obtenga más información en la División de Regulación Financiera de Oregón .

Recursos

 

    • Los inquilinos pueden comunicarse con Legal Aid Services of Oregon o Oregon Law Center para obtener más información sobre sus derechos y protecciones legales .
  • Los propietarios e inquilinos pueden encontrar más detalles en el sitio web de la ciudad de Portland (hay información disponible en todo el estado).

 

Need help paying your rent?
Need help getting into housing?
A Housing Counselor can provide guidance on various housing stability programs such as:
  • Emergency Rent Assistance
  • Energy Conservation programs
  • Renter support programs
  • Homeless Services
  • Family Shelters
  • Severe weather shelters
  • Rent Well Tenant Education Courses
  • Supportive Services for Veteran’s Families

Find a Housing Counselor

Showing 1 through 10 out of 43 items
Other Resources:
Legal Aid Services of Oregon
Oregon Housing and Community Services Department
Portland Housing Bureau – Rental Services Office
U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing Council of Oregon
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
(503) 213-1281
Oregon State Tenants Association – Manufactured and Floating Home Communities

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

Oregon Housing and Community Services has partnered with the Oregon State Bar to help landlords and tenants understand recent changes to Oregon laws. ​


Source: Oregon State Bar
Landlords materials are available below in the following languages:

Printed copies of these pamphlets can be ordered in quantities of 25 through the Oregon State Bar’s online catalog. There is no charge for the first order, up to 100 copies, of each language. If you need larger quantities, please contact the Oregon State Bar here.

Oregon LGP Program Details

Reimbursement for Eligible Costs

Did you wait through the “safe harbor?” Get paid.

Landlords, Apply to Forgive Tenant Debt

(503) 802-853

 

Program Guidelines and Information

If you would like some support understanding program eligibility and the application process, please view these training materials or call us today at (503) 802-8532.

Review the landlord training video below for additional information on the “safe harbor” law and a walk-through of the application portal steps.

To report suspected fraud, please email   LGP@homeforward.org.

 

 

 

Warmline – LFL – Lines for Life – Military Helpline – Phone – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Oct 5 all-day

 

 

The Military Helpline serves 24-hours a day

CALL:  (888) 457-4838 (24/7/365)

TEXT:  MIL1 to 839863 (8am-11pm PST daily)

The Military Helpline, available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, provides compassionate, confidential crisis intervention and referral among the military community.

The line is answered by a highly trained staff and a dedicated team of volunteer crisis workers, many of whom have a military background. All possess a strong understanding of the serious issues that can impact service members, veterans and their families, including the loss of a job, family strife, home foreclosure, post-traumatic stress, and other medical and health care concerns.

The Military Helpline has your back. (888) 457-4838

Download informational material about the Military Helpline:

– Informational Packet (5 pages/922K)
– Flyer (691K)

The Military Helpline is a service of Lines for Life, a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to preventing substance abuse and suicide.

Administrative Office
5100 SW Macadam Avenue, Suite 400
Portland, OR 97239
info@LinesForLife.org
p 503.244.5211 or 800.282.7035

Warmline – SFSP – San Francisco Suicide Prevention – Drug and Relapse Prevention Lines – (415) 367-3400 & (415) 834-1144 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Oct 5 all-day

Agency Logo

 

Drug & Relapse Lines

Drug Line

415 /362-3400

Relapse Line

415 /834-1144

Because substance abuse and addiction is so closely intertwined with suicide and emotional pain, San Francisco Suicide Prevention established these two programs to assist people who were struggling with substance related issues as well as their friends and families.  The Drug Line and Relapse Line provide referrals to specialized treatment programs, crisis intervention, information on addictions and recovery, and emotional support along the recovery continuum.

 

San Francisco Suicide Prevention’s Telephone Hotlines

Crisis Line:

415/781-0500 in San Francisco, CA
800/273- TALK (8255) outside of San Francisco

Could you benefit from some emotional support? Are you having thoughts of suicide? Trained volunteers are available 24 hours, 7 days a week to listen and help you sort things out. You do not need to be suicidal to speak with us.

Drug Line:

415/362-3400

Do you feel you want to reduce your drug and alcohol use? Do you need to enroll in a DUI program? Want to find the nearest needle exchange program? We take a harm reduction approach to substance use. We are available to explore your options with you 24 hours a day.

Relapse Line:

415/834-1144

Are you considering relapsing? Have you already relapsed? We’re here to provide you with emotional support during this challenging time 24 hours a day.

AIDS/HIV Nightline:

415/434-AIDS (2437) or
800/273-AIDS (2437)

“I just tested HIV+, now what?”  “Am I at risk for HIV?”  “Where can I get tested?” If you need to talk about HIV, we are always here for you. Compassionate and informed volunteers can take your call, day or night.

TTY:

415/227-0245

Are you hearing impaired or hard of hearing? We’re here for you 24/7 and can offer you the same competent services that we offer on the crisis line.

Email us for information or speakers

Do you need information about suicide prevention or a speaker for your organization? Has your company, school or agency experienced a suicide of a colleague?  Or perhaps you just need information about the agency?  Please email our general information email and we will respond within a few days.

Click Here To Chat

CHAT HOURS 24/7

Crisis Text Line

  • 24/7 Confidential Support, Text MYLIFE to 741741

 

Warmline – LFL – Lines for Life – BIPOC Crisis Line for Racial Equity Support – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Oct 5 @ 8:30 am – 5:00 pm
Warmline - LFL - Lines for Life - BIPOC Crisis Line for Racial Equity Support - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 9am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Oct
6
Thu
0 – Hotline – SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline @ 1-800-985-5990 (Multilingual), 1-800-846-8517 (TTY) – Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free
Oct 6 all-day
0 - Hotline - SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline @ 1-800-985-5990 (Multilingual), 1-800-846-8517 (TTY) - Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration - 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free

Excerpt(s) from link:

https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/disaster-distress-helpline

Disaster Distress Helpline

SAMHSA’s Disaster Distress Helpline provides 24/7, 365-day-a-year crisis counseling and support to people experiencing emotional distress related to natural or human-caused disasters.

The Disaster Distress Helpline, 1-800-985-5990, is a 24/7, 365-day-a-year, national hotline dedicated to providing immediate crisis counseling for people who are experiencing emotional distress related to any natural or human-caused disaster. This toll-free, multilingual, and confidential crisis support service is available to all residents in the United States and its territories. Stress, anxiety, and other depression-like symptoms are common reactions after a disaster. Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746 to connect with a trained crisis counselor.

Counseling Services

The Disaster Distress Helpline puts people in need of counseling on the path to recovery. Our staff members provide counseling and support before, during, and after disasters and refer people to local disaster-related resources for follow-up care and support. Since its launch in February 2012, the Disaster Distress Helpline has provided counseling and support in response to disasters such as Hurricane Sandy, the Boston Marathon bombing, and the Ebola outbreak.

The Disaster Distress Helpline is staffed by trained counselors from a network of crisis call centers located across the United States. These counselors provide:

  • Crisis counseling for people in emotional distress related to any natural or human-caused disaster
  • Information on how to recognize distress and its effects on individuals and families
  • Tips for healthy coping
  • Referrals to local crisis call centers for additional follow-up care and support

When you call or text, crisis counselors will listen to what’s on your mind with patience and without judgment. There is no need to give any identifying information when you contact the Disaster Distress Helpline. The counselor may ask you for some basic information at the end of the call, but these questions are optional and are intended to help SAMHSA keep track of the types of calls it receives.

Who Should Contact the Disaster Distress Helpline?

This crisis support service is for anyone experiencing emotional distress related to disasters such as:

The Disaster Distress Helpline also answers calls and texts related to infectious disease outbreaks, such as the Ebola outbreak, incidents of community unrest, and other traumatic events.

The impact of crises may affect people in different ways. Learn how to recognize the warning signs and risk factors for emotional distress related to natural and human-caused disasters.

The Disaster Distress Helpline is open to everyone. This includes survivors of disasters; loved ones of victims; first responders; rescue, recovery, and relief workers; clergy; and parents and caregivers. You may call for yourself or on behalf of someone else.

Call or Text

From the United States and its territories, call 1-800-985-5990 to connect with a trained crisis counselor, 24/7. Spanish-speakers can call the hotline and press “2” for 24/7 bilingual support.

Callers to the hotline can also connect with counselors in over 100 other languages via 3rd-party interpretation services; to connect with a counselor in your primary language, simply indicate your preferred language to the responding counselor and she/he will connect to a live interpreter (interpretation in less commonly-spoken languages may require calling back at an appointed time). Learn more and download information about the Disaster Distress Helpline in 30 of the most commonly-spoken languages in the U.S.

To connect with a live DDH crisis counselor 24/7 via SMS, from the 50 states text “TalkWithUs” for English or “Hablanos” for Spanish to 66746. Spanish-speakers from Puerto Rico can text “Hablanos” to 1-787-339-2663.

Texting is subscription-based and only involves a few steps:

  1. Enroll in the service by texting TalkWithUs or Hablanos exactly as written. It’s important to do this before sending your first text message because otherwise the enrollment may fail, and you will not be able to speak with a counselor, or you may accidentally subscribe to another service.
  2. Look for confirmation that your subscription was successful. You will receive a Success! message if it was.
  3. To unsubscribe, text Stop or Unsubscribe to 66746 (or 1-787-339-2663 from Puerto Rico) at any time. For help, text Help to 66746 (or 1-787-339-2663 from Puerto Rico).

Standard text and data message rates will apply when texting from mobile phones. International text and data rates may apply from within U.S. territories and free association nations. SAMHSA will not sell your phone numbers to other parties.

The Disaster Distress Helpline’s TTY number 1-800-846-8517 is available 24/7 to Deaf and hard of hearing individuals, who can also utilize the texting options or their preferred Relay service (including 7-1-1) to connect with the main DDH hotline 1-800-985-5990, 24/7.

Other Inquiries

If you’re not in immediate need of crisis counseling support and would like to contact us for other reasons, send an email. Contact us for:

  • Technical problems. If you encountered a technical problem while trying to contact the Disaster Distress Helpline, please include your name and preferred contact information in your email if you wish to receive a reply.
  • Provider inquiries. Providers with specific inquiries about technical assistance and support, requests for materials, and exploring collaborations are encouraged to send an email.
  • Feedback. To provide feedback about your experience reaching out to the Disaster Distress Helpline, send an email describing your experience and SAMHSA will look into the matter. Please include your name and preferred contact information if you wish to receive a reply.
  • Social media inquiries. Email us with questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline’s use of social media.
  • All media inquiries. Members of the media with questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline are encouraged to call the SAMHSA Media Services Team at 1-240-276-2130.

Our staff appreciate hearing from people about their experiences. SAMHSA takes feedback about our services, whether it is positive or negative, very seriously.

SAMHSA also encourages public promotion of the Disaster Distress Helpline. Anyone can use the Disaster Distress Helpline logo and telephone number on their website and link to the Disaster Distress Helpline’s materials and social media properties.

Call 211 for information about disaster-related evacuations, shelters, food and clothing distribution, volunteer opportunities, and other resources and referrals. Or visit the national 211 Call Center Search website to find the 211 information and referral center nearest you.

Last Updated: 11/11/2019

Deaf/Hard of Hearing & Spanish

Deaf/Hard of Hearing

Spanish Speakers

Twitter Tweets:

Facebook

Follow the Disaster Distress Helpline on Facebook.

00 – Hotlilne – Nation Wide Launch of 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline – 24/7 @ online event register for details.
Oct 6 all-day

 

Oregon is ready for nationwide launch of 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline

Starting July 16, people in Oregon and nationwide will be able to call, text or chat 988, a new three-digit number, available 24/7, that will directly connect anyone experiencing a behavioral health crisis to compassionate care and support from trained crisis counselors. The 988 dialing-code connects callers to the existing National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, a network of local crisis call-centers throughout the country. In Oregon, 988 call-centers are operated by Lines for Life statewide, and Northwest Human Services in Marion and Polk counties.

How Does 988 Work?

988 was established in July 2022 to improve access to crisis services in a way that meets our country’s growing suicide and mental health-related crisis care needs. 988 provides easier access to behavioral health crisis services, which are distinct from the public safety purposes of 911 (where the focus is on dispatching Emergency Medical Services, fire and police as needed).

911 continues to operate as it does across the state. For serious and life-threatening situations, 988 call centers work with local mental health providers to support appropriate interventions.

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and Oregon’s 988 call centers are collaborating with 911 Public Safety Answering Points to develop a roadmap on how 911 and 988 can coordinate with each other in the future.

988 crisis counselors are trained to use the least invasive interventions. Oftentimes, responding to a call, text or chat is all that is needed to help someone in crisis. In fact, more than 95 percent of current calls are resolved over the phone.

If a 988 call cannot be resolved over the phone, a mobile crisis team or first responder may be dispatched.

Other important facts to know:

  • 988 is available through every landline, cell phone and voice-over internet device in the United States, as well as text and chat.
  • The current technology for 988 routes callers by area code, not geolocation.
  • 988 is not currently available when phones are locked or do not have prepaid minutes.
  • The transition to 988 does not impact the availability of crisis services for veterans and military service members. They can call 988 and press 1 to connect with the Veterans Crisis Line.
  • For support in Spanish, callers can press 2 to connect with the Red Nacional de Prevención del Suicidio.

The 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline has an infographic with more information on what happens when people call, text or chat.

Community partners interested in helping promote 988 can use posters, social media shareables and other materials about 988 from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration at samhsa.gov/988. Learn more about 988 in Oregon on OHA’s 988 webpage. Read OHA’s press release about 988.

 

00 – Hotline – VideoPhone+ASL DEAF – Accessible Hotline @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) – Anytime 24/7/365 – Weekdays and Weekends @ VideoPhone+ASL
Oct 6 all-day
00 - Hotline - VideoPhone+ASL DEAF - Accessible Hotline @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) - Anytime 24/7/365 - Weekdays and Weekends @ VideoPhone+ASL

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

00 – SAMHSA – Substance and Mental Health Services Administration – Distress Helpline Videophone for American Sign Language Users – 24/7 @ phone
Oct 6 all-day
Disaster Distress Helpline Videophone for American Sign Language Users
Find answers to the most frequently asked questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline Videophone for American Sign Language Users.

The Disaster Distress Helpline (DDH) is a 24/7, year-round, confidential, multi-lingual crisis counseling and emotional support resource for survivors, responders, and anyone in the U.S./territories struggling with distress or other mental health concerns related to any natural or human-caused disaster. Calls and texts to 1-800-985-5990 are answered by trained counselors from a network of independently operated crisis centers located across the country. https://www.samhsa.gov/ddh

 

Video: Why a DDH VP for ASL users? (1 minute, 30 seconds)

While most people impacted by disaster will be able to bounce back fairly quickly with help from their support networks, others may experience significant emotional distress or other mental health concerns that can impede recovery. Deaf and hard of hearing people may be especially at risk for disaster-related distress. Barriers to accessibility for mental healthcare, emergency preparedness, and disaster relief services are just a few distress risk factors that Deaf/HoH people face throughout the disaster cycle.

In addition, the vast majority of crisis hotlines are set up to accommodate hearing, not Deaf/HoH, callers. While video Relay connections can offer 3rd-party interpretation between ASL users and hearing counselors, the responding counselor still may not fully understand the needs or be able to communicate effectively via the interpreter, especially if the caller is in crisis. While crisis chat and text services can seem like a sufficient alternative to hearing hotlines, Deaf people might understandably assume that responding chat/text counselors may not understand their needs as Deaf individuals, and therefore may be resistant in accessing these options.

 

Video: Who can access the DDH VP? (1 minute)

The DDH VP is intended for American Sign Language users, regardless of fluency level or whether they are fully Deaf or hard of hearing. The common denominator is that ASL is the language being used between the caller & counselor. Callers who cannot communicate at all in ASL should not use the DDH VP. These callers should call or text the DDH 1-800-985-5990 via their standard phone device.

Video: Who answers DDH VP calls? (1 minute)

The national Disaster Distress Helpline is a network of independently operated crisis centers located across the United States. DeafLEAD is the not-for-profit crisis center that staffs and responds to DDH VP calls, 24/7/365. DeafLEAD’s mission is to “provide individuals who are Deaf and hard of hearing with comprehensive, unified and continuous support by enhancing socio-emotional development, effective communication and leadership through education.” Learn more about DeafLEAD

 

Video: Why a DDH VP for ASL users? (1 minute, 30 seconds)

While most people impacted by disaster will be able to bounce back fairly quickly with help from their support networks, others may experience significant emotional distress or other mental health concerns that can impede recovery. Deaf and hard of hearing people may be especially at risk for disaster-related distress. Barriers to accessibility for mental healthcare, emergency preparedness, and disaster relief services are just a few distress risk factors that Deaf/HoH people face throughout the disaster cycle.

In addition, the vast majority of crisis hotlines are set up to accommodate hearing, not Deaf/HoH, callers. While video Relay connections can offer 3rd-party interpretation between ASL users and hearing counselors, the responding counselor still may not fully understand the needs or be able to communicate effectively via the interpreter, especially if the caller is in crisis. While crisis chat and text services can seem like a sufficient alternative to hearing hotlines, Deaf people might understandably assume that responding chat/text counselors may not understand their needs as Deaf individuals, and therefore may be resistant in accessing these options.

Video: Who can access the DDH VP? (1 minute)

The DDH VP is intended for American Sign Language users, regardless of fluency level or whether they are fully Deaf or hard of hearing. The common denominator is that ASL is the language being used between the caller & counselor. Callers who cannot communicate at all in ASL should not use the DDH VP. These callers should call or text the DDH 1-800-985-5990 via their standard phone device.

Video: What happens if no one answers? (1 minute)

Sometimes callers to the Disaster Distress Helpline Videophone (“DDH VP”) may not get through on the first try because of high call volume, or might get disconnected because of poor WiFi or cellphone service, etc. If you experience any technical difficulties when connecting to the DDH VP, first try calling or connecting again. Sometimes it may take 1 or 2 attempts to get through. If you’re attempting to connect through the “ASL Now Link” at the DDH website, and you are not able to get through, you can try connecting from a different browser for the 2nd attempt (for example, if the first time you tried was through Google Chrome, for the 2nd attempt, try Microsoft Edge or Mozilla Firefox). If for whatever reason you’re still not able to get through and you’re wanting to connect with the DDH as quickly as possible, you can also try texting to 1-800-985-5990; your text will likely be answered by a hearing DDH crisis worker, and they are still trained to support anyone experiencing distress or other mental health concerns.

 

Video: Who funds and operates the DDH? (1 minute)

The DDH is funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA; a division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) and is administered by the nonprofit Vibrant Emotional Health; Vibrant also administers the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-TALK) for SAMHSA, of which the DDH is a sub-network. Learn more about SAMHSA and Vibrant

01 – Chatline – Text HELP to 741741 to Connect with a Crisis Counselor for Crisis / Depression – Anytime 24/7/365 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Text Messaging
Oct 6 all-day

CHATLINE

FREE Text Messaging to Connect with a Crisis Counselor for Depression / Crisis, etc.

Anytime 24/7/365 Weekdays and Weekends

Text HELP to 741741  

An alternative way to connect is through Facebook Messenger at this link: https://www.messenger.com/t/204427966369963/?messaging_source=source%3Apages%3Amessage_shortlink

You aren’t alone – support is out there! 

How you feel NOW may not last Forever.

Connecting with someone who cares and listens can make a difference and can help us get through our most difficult moments.

Whether it’s friends, family, or community – Everyone needs Somebody to lean on!

NOTE: Wait time can vary.  Usually a response comes pretty quickly in under 5 minutes.  Sometimes the wait can be 5 to 15 minutes or longer if there is a disaster or other reason.

 

Who are the Crisis Counselors? They are trained volunteers who—with the support of full-time Crisis Text Line staff—use active listening, collaborative problem solving, and safety planning to help texters in their moment of crisis.

Crisis doesn’t just mean suicide; it’s any painful emotion for which you need support. 

This service is for short term needs and is not a substitute for a friend or professional therapist.

For more information, check out the Frequently Asked Questions at this link: https://www.crisistextline.org/about-us/faq/ 

crisis text line banner

01 – Helpline – CBL – Call Blackline – Voice and Text Support for the Black, Black LGBTQ+, Brown, Native and Muslim Community – (800) 604-5841 @ Call/Text
Oct 6 all-day

Call toll-free anytime 24/7

(800) 604-5841

BlackLine® provides a space for peer support, counseling, witnessing and affirming the lived experiences to folxs who are most impacted by systematic oppression with an LGBTQ+ Black Femme Lens.

Call BlackLine® prioritizes BIPOC
(Black, Indigenous and People of Color).

By us for us.

 

01 – Support Line – L4L Racial Equity Support Line – BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free – Lines for Life – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Oct 6 all-day
01 - Support Line - L4L Racial Equity Support Line - BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free - Lines for Life - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis / Support Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 8:30am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Toll-Free Access

If you need toll-free access, call any line at Lines for Life and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line during its operating hours.

For example, you can call the Suicide Prevention Crisis Line @ 1-877-273-8255 or the Safe+Strong Helpline @ 1-800-923-4457 and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line between 8:30am and 5pm PST.

02 – Urgent Info – Services and Resources in Response to the War in Ukraine
Oct 6 all-day

 

Resources in Response to the War on Ukraine

The recent attack on Ukraine has impacted many families in the United States, especially our military and veteran families and those who have family living in the region. The NCTSN and our partners have resources for those families who may need support during this time:
 

Military and Veteran Family Resources
 
Working Effectively with Military Families: 10 Key Concepts All Providers Should Know
 
Understanding Child Trauma & Resilience: For Military Parents and Caregivers
 
Honoring Our Babies and Toddlers: Supporting Young Children Affected by a Military Parent’s Deployment, Injury, or Death (Zero to Three)
 
Sesame Street for Military Families
 
Community Support for Military Children and Families Throughout the Deployment Cycle (Center for Study of Traumatic Stress, CSTS)
 
Strengthening Military Families to Support Children’s Well-Being
 
Helping Children Cope During Deployment
 
Military Children and Families: Supporting Health and Managing Risk (webinar)
 
Impact of the Military Mission & Combat Deployment on the Service Members
 
Understanding Deployment Related Stressors & Long-term Health in Military Service Members & Veterans:

The Millennium Cohort Study (webinar)
 
An Overview of the Military Family Experience and Culture
 
Talking to Children about War
 
Age-Related Reactions to a Traumatic Event
 
Psychological First Aid for Displaced Children and Families

Traumatic Separation and Refugee and Immigrant Children: Tips for Current Caregivers

Understanding Refugee Trauma:

For School Personnel For Mental Health Professionals  and For Primary Care Providers

Coping in Hard Times: Fact Sheet for Parents

Youth and School Personnel

Helping Children with Traumatic Grief: Young Children

School-Age Children and Teens
 

 

Military Child Education Coalition Resources to Support Ukrainian Military Children & Their Families

As the situation on the ground in Ukraine continues to evolve, and military families deal with potential deployments, we are reminded of the many uncertainties military-connected children experience as a part of the military lifestyle. We are also reminded of the stress and insecurity that can accompany such unpredictable circumstances.

For 24 years, MCEC® has worked to establish programs and resources for parents, educators, and students to help them navigate unique challenges associated with the military lifestyle. Programs like our Student 2 Student® peer-to-peer support system, parent workshops, and professional development for educators all work together to more effectively respond to the unique emotional needs of military children.

MCEC® is also answering the call from our allies. Upon a request from the National Association of Ukrainian Psychologists, seeking resources for serving military families, the American Psychological Association and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences reached out to MCEC®.

We responded with the tools listed below, which, we believe, can be immediately helpful to families during these extremely trying times.

Developing Positive Coping Strategies

Fostering Resilience in Children

Helping Military-Connected Children with Daily Stress & Frustration

Raising a Confident Child in an Uncertain World

Supporting Children through Natural Disasters & Loss

Turning Stress into Strength

Anxiety in Young Children

Depression in Youth

Community Crises & Disasters

Activity Web of Support

MCEC Webinar Resources

National Child Traumatic Stress Network Resources

A one-on-one English program for Ukrainian Youth

ENGin is a nonprofit organization that pairs Ukrainian youth with English-speakers for free online conversation practice and cross-cultural connection. We work with students age 13-30 and volunteers age 14+.

ENGin pairs English learners with volunteers from around the world to conduct weekly online speaking sessions. Every learner and volunteer is screened to ensure their fit for the program. Participants are then matched based on preferences, interests, and availability to ensure an effective and mutually enjoyable communication experience. After a match is made, ENGin supports learners and volunteers throughout their participation in the program with tips, resources, and problem resolution.  

Students Join Here

Volunteer Apply Here

 

Helpline Resources
 

SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline – call or text 1-800-985-5990 (for Spanish, press “2”) to be connected to a trained counselor 24/7/365.
 
Military OneSource – call 1-800-342-9647 for eligible DOD service members and their families.
 
Veterans Crisis Line – call 1-800-273-8255, press “1” or text 838255 for all service members.
 
PTSD Consultation Program – for providers who treat Veterans. Ask a question by calling 866-948-7880<tel:866-948-7880> or emailing PTSDconsult@va.gov<mail to:PTSDconsult@va.gov>.
 

For those that are needing technical assistance or additional resources, please don’t hesitate to contact:

For those that are needing technical assistance or additional resources, please don’t hesitate to contact:

Dr. Greg Leskin gleskin@mednet.ucla.edu<mailto:gleskin@mednet.ucla.edu> for Military and Veteran Family resource questions and

Dr. Melissa Brymer at mbrymer@mednet.ucla.edu<mailto:mbrymer@mednet.ucla.edu> for all other questions.

 

Resources In Europe

eucap provides provides support for autistic people in crisis situations

Supporting autistic people in crisis situations

How can you deal with difficult situations if you have limited knowledge of autism? How to best support an autistic person in an acute crisis and challenging conditions? View brief basic information compiled by EUCAP and Autism Europe on this page or download as a pdf file here. More translated versions will be added as they become available.

 

Teenergizer support for Ukranian teens

 

Teenage peer-to-peer counselling service offers lifeline to youngsters in Ukraine

An online counselling service for teenagers has made the world of difference to one youngster who struggled to cope with grief.

Click Here For More Information

 

LiLi Center Logo

Ukraine Peer-to-Peer Support Group

The events happening in Ukraine have affected many in different ways. We want to support those affected directly or indirectly by offering a safe place to express their emotions in a supportive and safe environment. Our peer-to-peer networks are a way for people to support each other in a safe and secure space. If you are interested to express your feelings about the war, need guidance or resources The LiLi Centre is here for you.

For More Information Visit :  https://www.lilicentre.ch/en/home

Where: LiLi Centre
When:  
Wednesdays 09:30-11:30, and Thursdays 17:00-19:00

Who:    Anyone impacted by the situation in Ukraine seeking support and community
Cost:    Free, Sponsored by the LiLi Centre’s Mental Health Initiative (MHI)

NOTE: If you have a need to speak with a mental health professional privately about how you are coping, we are happy to put you in touch with our network of providers and/or connect you to our low-cost and no-cost counselling clinic.

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