PeerGalaxy Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring offerings of telephone + online peer support + wellness activities! 

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

Click the Accessibility Button on the right side, halfway down in the middle, for enhanced viewing and/or access options!  Click the Translate Button in the lower left corner for language options.

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If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

How Events are Sorted:

First, at the top of the list: Disaster Hotline & Oregon Safe + Strong Helpline.

Next in the list: Bundled “All Day” Events for organizations with events happening at multiple times throughout the day and/or in many formats or locations; these are bundled into a single listing to prevent endless scrolling.  Usually these offer a lookup by zip code or other criteria. 

Lastly, Time-Specific Events listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  Warmlines and places east of Oregon’s time zone tend to start earlier (e.g. 4am in Oregon is 7am in New York).

Aug
2
Mon
01 – Support Line – L4L Racial Equity Support Line – BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free – Lines for Life – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Aug 2 all-day
01 - Support Line - L4L Racial Equity Support Line - BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free - Lines for Life - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis / Support Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 8:30am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Toll-Free Access

If you need toll-free access, call any line at Lines for Life and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line during its operating hours.

For example, you can call the Suicide Prevention Crisis Line @ 1-877-273-8255 or the Safe+Strong Helpline @ 1-800-923-4457 and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line between 8:30am and 5pm PST.

02 – Urgent Info – Heat Emergency – Cooling Shelters – Air Conditioners – Health and Safety – Weekdays and Weekends
Aug 2 all-day
Cooling Shelters – Air Conditioners – Health and Safety
Cooling Shelters & Emergency Assistance
2021 has had unusually warm weather in June with potential temperatures over 110 degrees Fahrenheit in Portland and other parts of the state.  Finding safe, cool shelter and staying hydrated (drinking water) can be important, as there may be health risks with exposure to such high outdoor temperatures.
Health and Safety Information
State of Oregon, Oregon Health Authority provides health information and FACT SHEETS and more in various languages.
Preventing Heat Related Illnesses Oregon (Oregon Health Authority) : 
First Aid Information (Multnomah County)
What should you do before a Heat Wave (Red Cross) :
Alerts for Excessive Heat Conditions  
Where to find a Cooling Center
HOURS Monday-Friday 8am-6pm
CALL 211 or 866-698-6155 
TEXT your zip code to 898211 (TXT211)
Cooling Center Websites Selected Counties

Multnomah County / Portlandhttps://www.multco.us/help-when-its-hot

Washington County (map) / Hillsboro & Beaverton
Benton County / Corvallis
Polk County / Dallas
Marion County / Salem
 ROCC / Salem (open until 8pm extended hours for certain days)
 ARCHES / Turner
Linn County / Albany
CHANCE Heat Shelter  (water + snacks)
Air Conditioning and Energy Assistance
You may also be able to speak with your health care provider about health related needs such as air conditioners.  Assistance may be available from local resources or a medical benefit through the Oregon Health Plan. For more information go to the Care Oregon website:  https://www.careoregon.org/members/more-careoregon-services/health-related-services
Have A Backup Plan For Heat Emergencies
Ready. Gov recommends that everyone have a backup plan for emergencies of all kinds, including extreme heat. Your plan should include what you can do before a heat emergency and how to safe during the crisis. For important items consider when creating a backup plan for heat emergencies visit  https://www.ready.gov/heat.   
  • How to keep  your home cool and what to do if it gets too hot.
  • How to stay safe during a heat emergency
  • How to recognize and respond to heat related illness
Responding to Extreme Heat For the Disabled
Disability Rights of Oregon warns that extreme weather can be threat to people living it disabilities.  Use these links to learn more about the risks and respond to them.

From more information visit: https://www.droregon.org/extreme-heat-resources

Disability Rights of Oregon provides tips to help the disabled to stay safe and healthy

Drink a lot of water!

Many people don’t realize how much faster they get dehydrated when the heat is so intense. Some people have disabilities that may keep them from realizing how dehydrated they are. Avoid alcohol and energy drinks, as they can actually dehydrate you further.

The coolest place in your home

Find the coolest place to be in your home. Downstairs will usually be cooler than upstairs. Shadier places will be cooler than sunny places. Consider pulling curtains over windows facing the sun.

If you don’t have a home with air-conditioning, consider going to a public place with air conditioning, like a library, shopping center, theater, or other public building. Many public buildings around the state are open as cooling centers.

Make backup plan

Make a backup plan to stay cool. Make a plan for what to do if your home gets too hot. Even if you have air-conditioning, have a plan for what to do if the power goes out. Cooling centers and other public buildings are a good alternative.

Check the temperature in your home regularly

If you’re staying in a home without air-conditioning, use a thermometer or your thermostat to check the temperature in your home regularly. Some people who have disabilities and some people who are older have difficulty telling when their home has gotten too hot. As the temperature climbs, consider using a cooling center or other air-conditioned place for relief.

Beware parked cars!

Do not sit in a parked car, do not leave children in a parked car, and do not leave service animals, emotional support animals, or pets in a parked car! In intense heat and sunlight, it is not safe to stay in a parked car for any period of time, except with the engine on and the air-conditioning running.

The hottest part of the day

In Oregon, the hottest part of the day is usually between noon and evening. Take special care to stay cool and limit your activity during that time. If you choose to be active, early morning and late evening may be better times to be active. Letting in cool air overnight can help keep your home from overheating.

Check in with your network

If you live alone, check in with family, friends, neighbors, and other supports regularly throughout the weekend.

Extreme Heat Can Make Asphalt Dangerous to animals and people!

Even under normal, temperatures can heat asphalt surfaces to and cause contact burns on the feet of animals and people. At only 87 Degrees, asphalt can heat to 143 Degrees Fahrenheit! But at 125 Degrees, skin can be destroyed in 60 seconds. Take steps to protect your animals feet and your own and to avoid heat stroke. Avoid walking during the hottest parts of the day, and make sure your dogs and other animals have access to shade and clean water.

Additional Resources
For additional resources:
  • Contact your county or city government
  • Local churches
AM – All Month – Renters, Tenants and Landlords – Support, Resources, Assistance & Info – During COVID-19 Pandemic
Aug 2 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program

Information and Application For Tenants and Landlords

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program is open as of May 19th. OHCS is working with local organizations to provide more than $200 million in assistance to low-income Oregonians that have been financially impacted by COVID-19. OHCS created a partner toolkit to help communities promote this vital resource. This packet includes check lists for tenants and landlords, application information and documentation, frequently asked questions, and other helpful information related to the program.

Vista De Verificacion Del Inquilino 

Solicitud En Papel

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP) helps eligible low-income households with their past due rent and utilities. This program uses funds from the federal Emergency Rental Assistance Program, which allocated a collective total of $280 million to Oregon, the City of Portland, and multiple counties in the state. In most cases, approved applications will result in payments made directly to landlords and utility providers.

Beginning May 19, 2021, qualified renters who have experienced financial hardship due to the coronavirus pandemic, and are at risk of homelessness or housing instability, may apply for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP). This program is not a loan, which means those who receive assistance will not have to pay back funds so long as they are used as approved and not duplicating other assistance programs. Assistance is offered to all eligible renters regardless of their citizenship or immigration status, and it will not impact the recipient’s eligibility for other federally funded programs such as food stamps, Medicaid, Medicare, social security, WIC or public housing.

Renters who are eligible for the program may request rent and/or utility assistance dating back to March 13, 2020 (prior expenses are not eligible). OERAP will cover up to 12 months of past due rent and three months of forward rent, once all past due rent is paid. OERAP will also cover past due utility costs including electricity, gas, home energy services, water, sewer, trash removal, internet and bulk fuels. Costs that will NOT be covered include: homeowner costs, homeowner utilities, landlord-paid utilities, landlord-paid property taxes, property insurance, phone, and renter insurance.

If approved, in most cases, payments will be made directly to the landlord, property owner or utility company on the tenant’s behalf via direct deposit or check. OERAP funds are not first-come-first-serve. Funds will be distributed based on a formula that prioritizes applications based on need. Everyone who turns in a completed application will have their application reviewed.

Click on this link to apply for Emergency Rental Assistance

Apply for OERAP Now

To learn more about eligibility, applying and the program itself, scroll down or use the buttons below to jump to a section.

 

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
DISCLAIMER: Information is provided solely as a courtesy without guarantees or warranties of any kind whatsoever.  Use at your own risk and expense.
HTH – Hand to Hold – You are not alone! – Support for NICU Parents
Aug 2 all-day

 

Sponsor Logo

https://handtohold.org/

Sponsor Purpose Statement

 

You are not alone!

Having a baby in the NICU is life-altering. But you don’t have to do it alone. Join the Hand to Hold Community for compassionate one-on-one connection with NICU parents and Hand to Hold Family Support Specialists at any point in your unique journey.

Our Mission

Hand to Hold® provides personalized support before, during and after a NICU stay to help ensure all NICU families thrive.

What We Do

ONE TO ONE SUPPORT

Having a baby in the NICU is life-altering. But you don’t have to do it alone We’re here for you when you need us, at any stage in your journey.

Request a peer mentor today and get connected, and supported by, a trained, NICU graduate peer mentor. Hand to Hold carefully matches seasoned NICU and bereaved parents with new parents in need of support. Hand to Hold carefully matches seasoned NICU and bereaved parents with new parents in need of support. d

Hand to Hold understands that a high-risk pregnancy, a complicated birth, a NICU stay or the loss of a baby are very traumatic and isolating experiences.  Find support at any stage of your journey through our virtual support groups, podcasts, private Facebook communities and Peer Mentor Program.

Virtual support groups allow families to access support at all stages of the NICU journey, from the comfort of your own home. To learn more about our Family Support Specialists hosting the groups, visit our staff page.

If you are a professional, and not a NICU parent, we kindly ask that you please respect the privacy of the families who join our groups by not registering for, and joining, a session. Having professionals in a peer support group changes the dynamics and impact for the parents involved as observers cannot participate from a place of lived experience

p

PODCASTS
BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT

Wherever you are in your grief, we want you to know that you are not alone. There is a community of families ready to support you, whether it is today, a month from today, or a year from today.

No one understands what it’s like to suffer the loss of a baby like a parent who has been there. Hand to Hold trains and matches parents who have experienced a loss to provide peer support to bereaved families. If you have experienced a loss, you may request a Peer Mentor at any time.

COMING SOON: VIRTUAL CHAT
NEWS, ARTICLES & FAMILY STORIES

 

Contact Us

Toll-Free: 855-424-6428
Parent Support ext. 1
Online Store ext. 3

13740 Research Blvd., Suite L5
Austin, Texas 78750

Website: https://handtohold.org/

Media inquiries: mediainquiry@handtohold.org

Questions about the store: store@handtohold.org

Warmline – LFL – Lines for Life – Military Helpline – Phone – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Aug 2 all-day

 

 

The Military Helpline serves 24-hours a day

CALL:  (888) 457-4838 (24/7/365)

TEXT:  MIL1 to 839863 (8am-11pm PST daily)

The Military Helpline, available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, provides compassionate, confidential crisis intervention and referral among the military community.

The line is answered by a highly trained staff and a dedicated team of volunteer crisis workers, many of whom have a military background. All possess a strong understanding of the serious issues that can impact service members, veterans and their families, including the loss of a job, family strife, home foreclosure, post-traumatic stress, and other medical and health care concerns.

The Military Helpline has your back. (888) 457-4838

Download informational material about the Military Helpline:

– Informational Packet (5 pages/922K)
– Flyer (691K)

The Military Helpline is a service of Lines for Life, a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to preventing substance abuse and suicide.

Administrative Office
5100 SW Macadam Avenue, Suite 400
Portland, OR 97239
info@LinesForLife.org
p 503.244.5211 or 800.282.7035

Warmline – SFSP – San Francisco Suicide Prevention – Drug and Relapse Prevention Lines – 415-367-3400 & 415 /834-1144 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Aug 2 all-day

Agency Logo

 

Drug & Relapse Lines

Drug Line

415 /362-3400

Relapse Line

415 /834-1144

Because substance abuse and addiction is so closely intertwined with suicide and emotional pain, San Francisco Suicide Prevention established these two programs to assist people who were struggling with substance related issues as well as their friends and families.  The Drug Line and Relapse Line provide referrals to specialized treatment programs, crisis intervention, information on addictions and recovery, and emotional support along the recovery continuum.

 

San Francisco Suicide Prevention’s Telephone Hotlines

Crisis Line:

415/781-0500 in San Francisco, CA
800/273- TALK (8255) outside of San Francisco

Could you benefit from some emotional support? Are you having thoughts of suicide? Trained volunteers are available 24 hours, 7 days a week to listen and help you sort things out. You do not need to be suicidal to speak with us.

Drug Line:

415/362-3400

Do you feel you want to reduce your drug and alcohol use? Do you need to enroll in a DUI program? Want to find the nearest needle exchange program? We take a harm reduction approach to substance use. We are available to explore your options with you 24 hours a day.

Relapse Line:

415/834-1144

Are you considering relapsing? Have you already relapsed? We’re here to provide you with emotional support during this challenging time 24 hours a day.

AIDS/HIV Nightline:

415/434-AIDS (2437) or
800/273-AIDS (2437)

“I just tested HIV+, now what?”  “Am I at risk for HIV?”  “Where can I get tested?” If you need to talk about HIV, we are always here for you. Compassionate and informed volunteers can take your call, day or night.

TTY:

415/227-0245

Are you hearing impaired or hard of hearing? We’re here for you 24/7 and can offer you the same competent services that we offer on the crisis line.

Email us for information or speakers

Do you need information about suicide prevention or a speaker for your organization? Has your company, school or agency experienced a suicide of a colleague?  Or perhaps you just need information about the agency?  Please email our general information email and we will respond within a few days.

Click Here To Chat

CHAT HOURS 24/7

Crisis Text Line

  • 24/7 Confidential Support, Text MYLIFE to 741741

 

Warmline – LFL – Lines for Life – BIPOC Crisis Line for Racial Equity Support – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Aug 2 @ 8:30 am – 5:00 pm
Warmline - LFL - Lines for Life - BIPOC Crisis Line for Racial Equity Support - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 9am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Aug
3
Tue
01 – Support Line – L4L Racial Equity Support Line – BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free – Lines for Life – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Aug 3 all-day
01 - Support Line - L4L Racial Equity Support Line - BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free - Lines for Life - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis / Support Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 8:30am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Toll-Free Access

If you need toll-free access, call any line at Lines for Life and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line during its operating hours.

For example, you can call the Suicide Prevention Crisis Line @ 1-877-273-8255 or the Safe+Strong Helpline @ 1-800-923-4457 and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line between 8:30am and 5pm PST.

02 – Urgent Info – Heat Emergency – Cooling Shelters – Air Conditioners – Health and Safety – Weekdays and Weekends
Aug 3 all-day
Cooling Shelters – Air Conditioners – Health and Safety
Cooling Shelters & Emergency Assistance
2021 has had unusually warm weather in June with potential temperatures over 110 degrees Fahrenheit in Portland and other parts of the state.  Finding safe, cool shelter and staying hydrated (drinking water) can be important, as there may be health risks with exposure to such high outdoor temperatures.
Health and Safety Information
State of Oregon, Oregon Health Authority provides health information and FACT SHEETS and more in various languages.
Preventing Heat Related Illnesses Oregon (Oregon Health Authority) : 
First Aid Information (Multnomah County)
What should you do before a Heat Wave (Red Cross) :
Alerts for Excessive Heat Conditions  
Where to find a Cooling Center
HOURS Monday-Friday 8am-6pm
CALL 211 or 866-698-6155 
TEXT your zip code to 898211 (TXT211)
Cooling Center Websites Selected Counties

Multnomah County / Portlandhttps://www.multco.us/help-when-its-hot

Washington County (map) / Hillsboro & Beaverton
Benton County / Corvallis
Polk County / Dallas
Marion County / Salem
 ROCC / Salem (open until 8pm extended hours for certain days)
 ARCHES / Turner
Linn County / Albany
CHANCE Heat Shelter  (water + snacks)
Air Conditioning and Energy Assistance
You may also be able to speak with your health care provider about health related needs such as air conditioners.  Assistance may be available from local resources or a medical benefit through the Oregon Health Plan. For more information go to the Care Oregon website:  https://www.careoregon.org/members/more-careoregon-services/health-related-services
Have A Backup Plan For Heat Emergencies
Ready. Gov recommends that everyone have a backup plan for emergencies of all kinds, including extreme heat. Your plan should include what you can do before a heat emergency and how to safe during the crisis. For important items consider when creating a backup plan for heat emergencies visit  https://www.ready.gov/heat.   
  • How to keep  your home cool and what to do if it gets too hot.
  • How to stay safe during a heat emergency
  • How to recognize and respond to heat related illness
Responding to Extreme Heat For the Disabled
Disability Rights of Oregon warns that extreme weather can be threat to people living it disabilities.  Use these links to learn more about the risks and respond to them.

From more information visit: https://www.droregon.org/extreme-heat-resources

Disability Rights of Oregon provides tips to help the disabled to stay safe and healthy

Drink a lot of water!

Many people don’t realize how much faster they get dehydrated when the heat is so intense. Some people have disabilities that may keep them from realizing how dehydrated they are. Avoid alcohol and energy drinks, as they can actually dehydrate you further.

The coolest place in your home

Find the coolest place to be in your home. Downstairs will usually be cooler than upstairs. Shadier places will be cooler than sunny places. Consider pulling curtains over windows facing the sun.

If you don’t have a home with air-conditioning, consider going to a public place with air conditioning, like a library, shopping center, theater, or other public building. Many public buildings around the state are open as cooling centers.

Make backup plan

Make a backup plan to stay cool. Make a plan for what to do if your home gets too hot. Even if you have air-conditioning, have a plan for what to do if the power goes out. Cooling centers and other public buildings are a good alternative.

Check the temperature in your home regularly

If you’re staying in a home without air-conditioning, use a thermometer or your thermostat to check the temperature in your home regularly. Some people who have disabilities and some people who are older have difficulty telling when their home has gotten too hot. As the temperature climbs, consider using a cooling center or other air-conditioned place for relief.

Beware parked cars!

Do not sit in a parked car, do not leave children in a parked car, and do not leave service animals, emotional support animals, or pets in a parked car! In intense heat and sunlight, it is not safe to stay in a parked car for any period of time, except with the engine on and the air-conditioning running.

The hottest part of the day

In Oregon, the hottest part of the day is usually between noon and evening. Take special care to stay cool and limit your activity during that time. If you choose to be active, early morning and late evening may be better times to be active. Letting in cool air overnight can help keep your home from overheating.

Check in with your network

If you live alone, check in with family, friends, neighbors, and other supports regularly throughout the weekend.

Extreme Heat Can Make Asphalt Dangerous to animals and people!

Even under normal, temperatures can heat asphalt surfaces to and cause contact burns on the feet of animals and people. At only 87 Degrees, asphalt can heat to 143 Degrees Fahrenheit! But at 125 Degrees, skin can be destroyed in 60 seconds. Take steps to protect your animals feet and your own and to avoid heat stroke. Avoid walking during the hottest parts of the day, and make sure your dogs and other animals have access to shade and clean water.

Additional Resources
For additional resources:
  • Contact your county or city government
  • Local churches
AM – All Month – Renters, Tenants and Landlords – Support, Resources, Assistance & Info – During COVID-19 Pandemic
Aug 3 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program

Information and Application For Tenants and Landlords

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program is open as of May 19th. OHCS is working with local organizations to provide more than $200 million in assistance to low-income Oregonians that have been financially impacted by COVID-19. OHCS created a partner toolkit to help communities promote this vital resource. This packet includes check lists for tenants and landlords, application information and documentation, frequently asked questions, and other helpful information related to the program.

Vista De Verificacion Del Inquilino 

Solicitud En Papel

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP) helps eligible low-income households with their past due rent and utilities. This program uses funds from the federal Emergency Rental Assistance Program, which allocated a collective total of $280 million to Oregon, the City of Portland, and multiple counties in the state. In most cases, approved applications will result in payments made directly to landlords and utility providers.

Beginning May 19, 2021, qualified renters who have experienced financial hardship due to the coronavirus pandemic, and are at risk of homelessness or housing instability, may apply for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP). This program is not a loan, which means those who receive assistance will not have to pay back funds so long as they are used as approved and not duplicating other assistance programs. Assistance is offered to all eligible renters regardless of their citizenship or immigration status, and it will not impact the recipient’s eligibility for other federally funded programs such as food stamps, Medicaid, Medicare, social security, WIC or public housing.

Renters who are eligible for the program may request rent and/or utility assistance dating back to March 13, 2020 (prior expenses are not eligible). OERAP will cover up to 12 months of past due rent and three months of forward rent, once all past due rent is paid. OERAP will also cover past due utility costs including electricity, gas, home energy services, water, sewer, trash removal, internet and bulk fuels. Costs that will NOT be covered include: homeowner costs, homeowner utilities, landlord-paid utilities, landlord-paid property taxes, property insurance, phone, and renter insurance.

If approved, in most cases, payments will be made directly to the landlord, property owner or utility company on the tenant’s behalf via direct deposit or check. OERAP funds are not first-come-first-serve. Funds will be distributed based on a formula that prioritizes applications based on need. Everyone who turns in a completed application will have their application reviewed.

Click on this link to apply for Emergency Rental Assistance

Apply for OERAP Now

To learn more about eligibility, applying and the program itself, scroll down or use the buttons below to jump to a section.

 

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
DISCLAIMER: Information is provided solely as a courtesy without guarantees or warranties of any kind whatsoever.  Use at your own risk and expense.
HTH – Hand to Hold – You are not alone! – Support for NICU Parents
Aug 3 all-day

 

Sponsor Logo

https://handtohold.org/

Sponsor Purpose Statement

 

You are not alone!

Having a baby in the NICU is life-altering. But you don’t have to do it alone. Join the Hand to Hold Community for compassionate one-on-one connection with NICU parents and Hand to Hold Family Support Specialists at any point in your unique journey.

Our Mission

Hand to Hold® provides personalized support before, during and after a NICU stay to help ensure all NICU families thrive.

What We Do

ONE TO ONE SUPPORT

Having a baby in the NICU is life-altering. But you don’t have to do it alone We’re here for you when you need us, at any stage in your journey.

Request a peer mentor today and get connected, and supported by, a trained, NICU graduate peer mentor. Hand to Hold carefully matches seasoned NICU and bereaved parents with new parents in need of support. Hand to Hold carefully matches seasoned NICU and bereaved parents with new parents in need of support. d

Hand to Hold understands that a high-risk pregnancy, a complicated birth, a NICU stay or the loss of a baby are very traumatic and isolating experiences.  Find support at any stage of your journey through our virtual support groups, podcasts, private Facebook communities and Peer Mentor Program.

Virtual support groups allow families to access support at all stages of the NICU journey, from the comfort of your own home. To learn more about our Family Support Specialists hosting the groups, visit our staff page.

If you are a professional, and not a NICU parent, we kindly ask that you please respect the privacy of the families who join our groups by not registering for, and joining, a session. Having professionals in a peer support group changes the dynamics and impact for the parents involved as observers cannot participate from a place of lived experience

p

PODCASTS
BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT

Wherever you are in your grief, we want you to know that you are not alone. There is a community of families ready to support you, whether it is today, a month from today, or a year from today.

No one understands what it’s like to suffer the loss of a baby like a parent who has been there. Hand to Hold trains and matches parents who have experienced a loss to provide peer support to bereaved families. If you have experienced a loss, you may request a Peer Mentor at any time.

COMING SOON: VIRTUAL CHAT
NEWS, ARTICLES & FAMILY STORIES

 

Contact Us

Toll-Free: 855-424-6428
Parent Support ext. 1
Online Store ext. 3

13740 Research Blvd., Suite L5
Austin, Texas 78750

Website: https://handtohold.org/

Media inquiries: mediainquiry@handtohold.org

Questions about the store: store@handtohold.org

Warmline – LFL – Lines for Life – Military Helpline – Phone – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Aug 3 all-day

 

 

The Military Helpline serves 24-hours a day

CALL:  (888) 457-4838 (24/7/365)

TEXT:  MIL1 to 839863 (8am-11pm PST daily)

The Military Helpline, available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, provides compassionate, confidential crisis intervention and referral among the military community.

The line is answered by a highly trained staff and a dedicated team of volunteer crisis workers, many of whom have a military background. All possess a strong understanding of the serious issues that can impact service members, veterans and their families, including the loss of a job, family strife, home foreclosure, post-traumatic stress, and other medical and health care concerns.

The Military Helpline has your back. (888) 457-4838

Download informational material about the Military Helpline:

– Informational Packet (5 pages/922K)
– Flyer (691K)

The Military Helpline is a service of Lines for Life, a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to preventing substance abuse and suicide.

Administrative Office
5100 SW Macadam Avenue, Suite 400
Portland, OR 97239
info@LinesForLife.org
p 503.244.5211 or 800.282.7035

Warmline – SFSP – San Francisco Suicide Prevention – Drug and Relapse Prevention Lines – 415-367-3400 & 415 /834-1144 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Aug 3 all-day

Agency Logo

 

Drug & Relapse Lines

Drug Line

415 /362-3400

Relapse Line

415 /834-1144

Because substance abuse and addiction is so closely intertwined with suicide and emotional pain, San Francisco Suicide Prevention established these two programs to assist people who were struggling with substance related issues as well as their friends and families.  The Drug Line and Relapse Line provide referrals to specialized treatment programs, crisis intervention, information on addictions and recovery, and emotional support along the recovery continuum.

 

San Francisco Suicide Prevention’s Telephone Hotlines

Crisis Line:

415/781-0500 in San Francisco, CA
800/273- TALK (8255) outside of San Francisco

Could you benefit from some emotional support? Are you having thoughts of suicide? Trained volunteers are available 24 hours, 7 days a week to listen and help you sort things out. You do not need to be suicidal to speak with us.

Drug Line:

415/362-3400

Do you feel you want to reduce your drug and alcohol use? Do you need to enroll in a DUI program? Want to find the nearest needle exchange program? We take a harm reduction approach to substance use. We are available to explore your options with you 24 hours a day.

Relapse Line:

415/834-1144

Are you considering relapsing? Have you already relapsed? We’re here to provide you with emotional support during this challenging time 24 hours a day.

AIDS/HIV Nightline:

415/434-AIDS (2437) or
800/273-AIDS (2437)

“I just tested HIV+, now what?”  “Am I at risk for HIV?”  “Where can I get tested?” If you need to talk about HIV, we are always here for you. Compassionate and informed volunteers can take your call, day or night.

TTY:

415/227-0245

Are you hearing impaired or hard of hearing? We’re here for you 24/7 and can offer you the same competent services that we offer on the crisis line.

Email us for information or speakers

Do you need information about suicide prevention or a speaker for your organization? Has your company, school or agency experienced a suicide of a colleague?  Or perhaps you just need information about the agency?  Please email our general information email and we will respond within a few days.

Click Here To Chat

CHAT HOURS 24/7

Crisis Text Line

  • 24/7 Confidential Support, Text MYLIFE to 741741

 

Warmline – LFL – Lines for Life – BIPOC Crisis Line for Racial Equity Support – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Aug 3 @ 8:30 am – 5:00 pm
Warmline - LFL - Lines for Life - BIPOC Crisis Line for Racial Equity Support - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 9am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Aug
4
Wed
01 – Support Line – L4L Racial Equity Support Line – BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free – Lines for Life – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Aug 4 all-day
01 - Support Line - L4L Racial Equity Support Line - BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free - Lines for Life - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis / Support Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 8:30am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Toll-Free Access

If you need toll-free access, call any line at Lines for Life and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line during its operating hours.

For example, you can call the Suicide Prevention Crisis Line @ 1-877-273-8255 or the Safe+Strong Helpline @ 1-800-923-4457 and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line between 8:30am and 5pm PST.

02 – Urgent Info – Heat Emergency – Cooling Shelters – Air Conditioners – Health and Safety – Weekdays and Weekends
Aug 4 all-day
Cooling Shelters – Air Conditioners – Health and Safety
Cooling Shelters & Emergency Assistance
2021 has had unusually warm weather in June with potential temperatures over 110 degrees Fahrenheit in Portland and other parts of the state.  Finding safe, cool shelter and staying hydrated (drinking water) can be important, as there may be health risks with exposure to such high outdoor temperatures.
Health and Safety Information
State of Oregon, Oregon Health Authority provides health information and FACT SHEETS and more in various languages.
Preventing Heat Related Illnesses Oregon (Oregon Health Authority) : 
First Aid Information (Multnomah County)
What should you do before a Heat Wave (Red Cross) :
Alerts for Excessive Heat Conditions  
Where to find a Cooling Center
HOURS Monday-Friday 8am-6pm
CALL 211 or 866-698-6155 
TEXT your zip code to 898211 (TXT211)
Cooling Center Websites Selected Counties

Multnomah County / Portlandhttps://www.multco.us/help-when-its-hot

Washington County (map) / Hillsboro & Beaverton
Benton County / Corvallis
Polk County / Dallas
Marion County / Salem
 ROCC / Salem (open until 8pm extended hours for certain days)
 ARCHES / Turner
Linn County / Albany
CHANCE Heat Shelter  (water + snacks)
Air Conditioning and Energy Assistance
You may also be able to speak with your health care provider about health related needs such as air conditioners.  Assistance may be available from local resources or a medical benefit through the Oregon Health Plan. For more information go to the Care Oregon website:  https://www.careoregon.org/members/more-careoregon-services/health-related-services
Have A Backup Plan For Heat Emergencies
Ready. Gov recommends that everyone have a backup plan for emergencies of all kinds, including extreme heat. Your plan should include what you can do before a heat emergency and how to safe during the crisis. For important items consider when creating a backup plan for heat emergencies visit  https://www.ready.gov/heat.   
  • How to keep  your home cool and what to do if it gets too hot.
  • How to stay safe during a heat emergency
  • How to recognize and respond to heat related illness
Responding to Extreme Heat For the Disabled
Disability Rights of Oregon warns that extreme weather can be threat to people living it disabilities.  Use these links to learn more about the risks and respond to them.

From more information visit: https://www.droregon.org/extreme-heat-resources

Disability Rights of Oregon provides tips to help the disabled to stay safe and healthy

Drink a lot of water!

Many people don’t realize how much faster they get dehydrated when the heat is so intense. Some people have disabilities that may keep them from realizing how dehydrated they are. Avoid alcohol and energy drinks, as they can actually dehydrate you further.

The coolest place in your home

Find the coolest place to be in your home. Downstairs will usually be cooler than upstairs. Shadier places will be cooler than sunny places. Consider pulling curtains over windows facing the sun.

If you don’t have a home with air-conditioning, consider going to a public place with air conditioning, like a library, shopping center, theater, or other public building. Many public buildings around the state are open as cooling centers.

Make backup plan

Make a backup plan to stay cool. Make a plan for what to do if your home gets too hot. Even if you have air-conditioning, have a plan for what to do if the power goes out. Cooling centers and other public buildings are a good alternative.

Check the temperature in your home regularly

If you’re staying in a home without air-conditioning, use a thermometer or your thermostat to check the temperature in your home regularly. Some people who have disabilities and some people who are older have difficulty telling when their home has gotten too hot. As the temperature climbs, consider using a cooling center or other air-conditioned place for relief.

Beware parked cars!

Do not sit in a parked car, do not leave children in a parked car, and do not leave service animals, emotional support animals, or pets in a parked car! In intense heat and sunlight, it is not safe to stay in a parked car for any period of time, except with the engine on and the air-conditioning running.

The hottest part of the day

In Oregon, the hottest part of the day is usually between noon and evening. Take special care to stay cool and limit your activity during that time. If you choose to be active, early morning and late evening may be better times to be active. Letting in cool air overnight can help keep your home from overheating.

Check in with your network

If you live alone, check in with family, friends, neighbors, and other supports regularly throughout the weekend.

Extreme Heat Can Make Asphalt Dangerous to animals and people!

Even under normal, temperatures can heat asphalt surfaces to and cause contact burns on the feet of animals and people. At only 87 Degrees, asphalt can heat to 143 Degrees Fahrenheit! But at 125 Degrees, skin can be destroyed in 60 seconds. Take steps to protect your animals feet and your own and to avoid heat stroke. Avoid walking during the hottest parts of the day, and make sure your dogs and other animals have access to shade and clean water.

Additional Resources
For additional resources:
  • Contact your county or city government
  • Local churches
AM – All Month – Renters, Tenants and Landlords – Support, Resources, Assistance & Info – During COVID-19 Pandemic
Aug 4 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program

Information and Application For Tenants and Landlords

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program is open as of May 19th. OHCS is working with local organizations to provide more than $200 million in assistance to low-income Oregonians that have been financially impacted by COVID-19. OHCS created a partner toolkit to help communities promote this vital resource. This packet includes check lists for tenants and landlords, application information and documentation, frequently asked questions, and other helpful information related to the program.

Vista De Verificacion Del Inquilino 

Solicitud En Papel

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP) helps eligible low-income households with their past due rent and utilities. This program uses funds from the federal Emergency Rental Assistance Program, which allocated a collective total of $280 million to Oregon, the City of Portland, and multiple counties in the state. In most cases, approved applications will result in payments made directly to landlords and utility providers.

Beginning May 19, 2021, qualified renters who have experienced financial hardship due to the coronavirus pandemic, and are at risk of homelessness or housing instability, may apply for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP). This program is not a loan, which means those who receive assistance will not have to pay back funds so long as they are used as approved and not duplicating other assistance programs. Assistance is offered to all eligible renters regardless of their citizenship or immigration status, and it will not impact the recipient’s eligibility for other federally funded programs such as food stamps, Medicaid, Medicare, social security, WIC or public housing.

Renters who are eligible for the program may request rent and/or utility assistance dating back to March 13, 2020 (prior expenses are not eligible). OERAP will cover up to 12 months of past due rent and three months of forward rent, once all past due rent is paid. OERAP will also cover past due utility costs including electricity, gas, home energy services, water, sewer, trash removal, internet and bulk fuels. Costs that will NOT be covered include: homeowner costs, homeowner utilities, landlord-paid utilities, landlord-paid property taxes, property insurance, phone, and renter insurance.

If approved, in most cases, payments will be made directly to the landlord, property owner or utility company on the tenant’s behalf via direct deposit or check. OERAP funds are not first-come-first-serve. Funds will be distributed based on a formula that prioritizes applications based on need. Everyone who turns in a completed application will have their application reviewed.

Click on this link to apply for Emergency Rental Assistance

Apply for OERAP Now

To learn more about eligibility, applying and the program itself, scroll down or use the buttons below to jump to a section.

 

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
DISCLAIMER: Information is provided solely as a courtesy without guarantees or warranties of any kind whatsoever.  Use at your own risk and expense.
HTH – Hand to Hold – You are not alone! – Support for NICU Parents
Aug 4 all-day

 

Sponsor Logo

https://handtohold.org/

Sponsor Purpose Statement

 

You are not alone!

Having a baby in the NICU is life-altering. But you don’t have to do it alone. Join the Hand to Hold Community for compassionate one-on-one connection with NICU parents and Hand to Hold Family Support Specialists at any point in your unique journey.

Our Mission

Hand to Hold® provides personalized support before, during and after a NICU stay to help ensure all NICU families thrive.

What We Do

ONE TO ONE SUPPORT

Having a baby in the NICU is life-altering. But you don’t have to do it alone We’re here for you when you need us, at any stage in your journey.

Request a peer mentor today and get connected, and supported by, a trained, NICU graduate peer mentor. Hand to Hold carefully matches seasoned NICU and bereaved parents with new parents in need of support. Hand to Hold carefully matches seasoned NICU and bereaved parents with new parents in need of support. d

Hand to Hold understands that a high-risk pregnancy, a complicated birth, a NICU stay or the loss of a baby are very traumatic and isolating experiences.  Find support at any stage of your journey through our virtual support groups, podcasts, private Facebook communities and Peer Mentor Program.

Virtual support groups allow families to access support at all stages of the NICU journey, from the comfort of your own home. To learn more about our Family Support Specialists hosting the groups, visit our staff page.

If you are a professional, and not a NICU parent, we kindly ask that you please respect the privacy of the families who join our groups by not registering for, and joining, a session. Having professionals in a peer support group changes the dynamics and impact for the parents involved as observers cannot participate from a place of lived experience

p

PODCASTS
BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT

Wherever you are in your grief, we want you to know that you are not alone. There is a community of families ready to support you, whether it is today, a month from today, or a year from today.

No one understands what it’s like to suffer the loss of a baby like a parent who has been there. Hand to Hold trains and matches parents who have experienced a loss to provide peer support to bereaved families. If you have experienced a loss, you may request a Peer Mentor at any time.

COMING SOON: VIRTUAL CHAT
NEWS, ARTICLES & FAMILY STORIES

 

Contact Us

Toll-Free: 855-424-6428
Parent Support ext. 1
Online Store ext. 3

13740 Research Blvd., Suite L5
Austin, Texas 78750

Website: https://handtohold.org/

Media inquiries: mediainquiry@handtohold.org

Questions about the store: store@handtohold.org

Warmline – LFL – Lines for Life – Military Helpline – Phone – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Aug 4 all-day

 

 

The Military Helpline serves 24-hours a day

CALL:  (888) 457-4838 (24/7/365)

TEXT:  MIL1 to 839863 (8am-11pm PST daily)

The Military Helpline, available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, provides compassionate, confidential crisis intervention and referral among the military community.

The line is answered by a highly trained staff and a dedicated team of volunteer crisis workers, many of whom have a military background. All possess a strong understanding of the serious issues that can impact service members, veterans and their families, including the loss of a job, family strife, home foreclosure, post-traumatic stress, and other medical and health care concerns.

The Military Helpline has your back. (888) 457-4838

Download informational material about the Military Helpline:

– Informational Packet (5 pages/922K)
– Flyer (691K)

The Military Helpline is a service of Lines for Life, a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to preventing substance abuse and suicide.

Administrative Office
5100 SW Macadam Avenue, Suite 400
Portland, OR 97239
info@LinesForLife.org
p 503.244.5211 or 800.282.7035

Warmline – SFSP – San Francisco Suicide Prevention – Drug and Relapse Prevention Lines – 415-367-3400 & 415 /834-1144 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Aug 4 all-day

Agency Logo

 

Drug & Relapse Lines

Drug Line

415 /362-3400

Relapse Line

415 /834-1144

Because substance abuse and addiction is so closely intertwined with suicide and emotional pain, San Francisco Suicide Prevention established these two programs to assist people who were struggling with substance related issues as well as their friends and families.  The Drug Line and Relapse Line provide referrals to specialized treatment programs, crisis intervention, information on addictions and recovery, and emotional support along the recovery continuum.

 

San Francisco Suicide Prevention’s Telephone Hotlines

Crisis Line:

415/781-0500 in San Francisco, CA
800/273- TALK (8255) outside of San Francisco

Could you benefit from some emotional support? Are you having thoughts of suicide? Trained volunteers are available 24 hours, 7 days a week to listen and help you sort things out. You do not need to be suicidal to speak with us.

Drug Line:

415/362-3400

Do you feel you want to reduce your drug and alcohol use? Do you need to enroll in a DUI program? Want to find the nearest needle exchange program? We take a harm reduction approach to substance use. We are available to explore your options with you 24 hours a day.

Relapse Line:

415/834-1144

Are you considering relapsing? Have you already relapsed? We’re here to provide you with emotional support during this challenging time 24 hours a day.

AIDS/HIV Nightline:

415/434-AIDS (2437) or
800/273-AIDS (2437)

“I just tested HIV+, now what?”  “Am I at risk for HIV?”  “Where can I get tested?” If you need to talk about HIV, we are always here for you. Compassionate and informed volunteers can take your call, day or night.

TTY:

415/227-0245

Are you hearing impaired or hard of hearing? We’re here for you 24/7 and can offer you the same competent services that we offer on the crisis line.

Email us for information or speakers

Do you need information about suicide prevention or a speaker for your organization? Has your company, school or agency experienced a suicide of a colleague?  Or perhaps you just need information about the agency?  Please email our general information email and we will respond within a few days.

Click Here To Chat

CHAT HOURS 24/7

Crisis Text Line

  • 24/7 Confidential Support, Text MYLIFE to 741741

 

Warmline – LFL – Lines for Life – BIPOC Crisis Line for Racial Equity Support – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Aug 4 @ 8:30 am – 5:00 pm
Warmline - LFL - Lines for Life - BIPOC Crisis Line for Racial Equity Support - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 9am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Aug
5
Thu
01 – Support Line – L4L Racial Equity Support Line – BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free – Lines for Life – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Aug 5 all-day
01 - Support Line - L4L Racial Equity Support Line - BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free - Lines for Life - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis / Support Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 8:30am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Toll-Free Access

If you need toll-free access, call any line at Lines for Life and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line during its operating hours.

For example, you can call the Suicide Prevention Crisis Line @ 1-877-273-8255 or the Safe+Strong Helpline @ 1-800-923-4457 and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line between 8:30am and 5pm PST.

02 – Urgent Info – Heat Emergency – Cooling Shelters – Air Conditioners – Health and Safety – Weekdays and Weekends
Aug 5 all-day
Cooling Shelters – Air Conditioners – Health and Safety
Cooling Shelters & Emergency Assistance
2021 has had unusually warm weather in June with potential temperatures over 110 degrees Fahrenheit in Portland and other parts of the state.  Finding safe, cool shelter and staying hydrated (drinking water) can be important, as there may be health risks with exposure to such high outdoor temperatures.
Health and Safety Information
State of Oregon, Oregon Health Authority provides health information and FACT SHEETS and more in various languages.
Preventing Heat Related Illnesses Oregon (Oregon Health Authority) : 
First Aid Information (Multnomah County)
What should you do before a Heat Wave (Red Cross) :
Alerts for Excessive Heat Conditions  
Where to find a Cooling Center
HOURS Monday-Friday 8am-6pm
CALL 211 or 866-698-6155 
TEXT your zip code to 898211 (TXT211)
Cooling Center Websites Selected Counties

Multnomah County / Portlandhttps://www.multco.us/help-when-its-hot

Washington County (map) / Hillsboro & Beaverton
Benton County / Corvallis
Polk County / Dallas
Marion County / Salem
 ROCC / Salem (open until 8pm extended hours for certain days)
 ARCHES / Turner
Linn County / Albany
CHANCE Heat Shelter  (water + snacks)
Air Conditioning and Energy Assistance
You may also be able to speak with your health care provider about health related needs such as air conditioners.  Assistance may be available from local resources or a medical benefit through the Oregon Health Plan. For more information go to the Care Oregon website:  https://www.careoregon.org/members/more-careoregon-services/health-related-services
Have A Backup Plan For Heat Emergencies
Ready. Gov recommends that everyone have a backup plan for emergencies of all kinds, including extreme heat. Your plan should include what you can do before a heat emergency and how to safe during the crisis. For important items consider when creating a backup plan for heat emergencies visit  https://www.ready.gov/heat.   
  • How to keep  your home cool and what to do if it gets too hot.
  • How to stay safe during a heat emergency
  • How to recognize and respond to heat related illness
Responding to Extreme Heat For the Disabled
Disability Rights of Oregon warns that extreme weather can be threat to people living it disabilities.  Use these links to learn more about the risks and respond to them.

From more information visit: https://www.droregon.org/extreme-heat-resources

Disability Rights of Oregon provides tips to help the disabled to stay safe and healthy

Drink a lot of water!

Many people don’t realize how much faster they get dehydrated when the heat is so intense. Some people have disabilities that may keep them from realizing how dehydrated they are. Avoid alcohol and energy drinks, as they can actually dehydrate you further.

The coolest place in your home

Find the coolest place to be in your home. Downstairs will usually be cooler than upstairs. Shadier places will be cooler than sunny places. Consider pulling curtains over windows facing the sun.

If you don’t have a home with air-conditioning, consider going to a public place with air conditioning, like a library, shopping center, theater, or other public building. Many public buildings around the state are open as cooling centers.

Make backup plan

Make a backup plan to stay cool. Make a plan for what to do if your home gets too hot. Even if you have air-conditioning, have a plan for what to do if the power goes out. Cooling centers and other public buildings are a good alternative.

Check the temperature in your home regularly

If you’re staying in a home without air-conditioning, use a thermometer or your thermostat to check the temperature in your home regularly. Some people who have disabilities and some people who are older have difficulty telling when their home has gotten too hot. As the temperature climbs, consider using a cooling center or other air-conditioned place for relief.

Beware parked cars!

Do not sit in a parked car, do not leave children in a parked car, and do not leave service animals, emotional support animals, or pets in a parked car! In intense heat and sunlight, it is not safe to stay in a parked car for any period of time, except with the engine on and the air-conditioning running.

The hottest part of the day

In Oregon, the hottest part of the day is usually between noon and evening. Take special care to stay cool and limit your activity during that time. If you choose to be active, early morning and late evening may be better times to be active. Letting in cool air overnight can help keep your home from overheating.

Check in with your network

If you live alone, check in with family, friends, neighbors, and other supports regularly throughout the weekend.

Extreme Heat Can Make Asphalt Dangerous to animals and people!

Even under normal, temperatures can heat asphalt surfaces to and cause contact burns on the feet of animals and people. At only 87 Degrees, asphalt can heat to 143 Degrees Fahrenheit! But at 125 Degrees, skin can be destroyed in 60 seconds. Take steps to protect your animals feet and your own and to avoid heat stroke. Avoid walking during the hottest parts of the day, and make sure your dogs and other animals have access to shade and clean water.

Additional Resources
For additional resources:
  • Contact your county or city government
  • Local churches
AM – All Month – Renters, Tenants and Landlords – Support, Resources, Assistance & Info – During COVID-19 Pandemic
Aug 5 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program

Information and Application For Tenants and Landlords

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program is open as of May 19th. OHCS is working with local organizations to provide more than $200 million in assistance to low-income Oregonians that have been financially impacted by COVID-19. OHCS created a partner toolkit to help communities promote this vital resource. This packet includes check lists for tenants and landlords, application information and documentation, frequently asked questions, and other helpful information related to the program.

Vista De Verificacion Del Inquilino 

Solicitud En Papel

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP) helps eligible low-income households with their past due rent and utilities. This program uses funds from the federal Emergency Rental Assistance Program, which allocated a collective total of $280 million to Oregon, the City of Portland, and multiple counties in the state. In most cases, approved applications will result in payments made directly to landlords and utility providers.

Beginning May 19, 2021, qualified renters who have experienced financial hardship due to the coronavirus pandemic, and are at risk of homelessness or housing instability, may apply for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP). This program is not a loan, which means those who receive assistance will not have to pay back funds so long as they are used as approved and not duplicating other assistance programs. Assistance is offered to all eligible renters regardless of their citizenship or immigration status, and it will not impact the recipient’s eligibility for other federally funded programs such as food stamps, Medicaid, Medicare, social security, WIC or public housing.

Renters who are eligible for the program may request rent and/or utility assistance dating back to March 13, 2020 (prior expenses are not eligible). OERAP will cover up to 12 months of past due rent and three months of forward rent, once all past due rent is paid. OERAP will also cover past due utility costs including electricity, gas, home energy services, water, sewer, trash removal, internet and bulk fuels. Costs that will NOT be covered include: homeowner costs, homeowner utilities, landlord-paid utilities, landlord-paid property taxes, property insurance, phone, and renter insurance.

If approved, in most cases, payments will be made directly to the landlord, property owner or utility company on the tenant’s behalf via direct deposit or check. OERAP funds are not first-come-first-serve. Funds will be distributed based on a formula that prioritizes applications based on need. Everyone who turns in a completed application will have their application reviewed.

Click on this link to apply for Emergency Rental Assistance

Apply for OERAP Now

To learn more about eligibility, applying and the program itself, scroll down or use the buttons below to jump to a section.

 

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
DISCLAIMER: Information is provided solely as a courtesy without guarantees or warranties of any kind whatsoever.  Use at your own risk and expense.
HTH – Hand to Hold – You are not alone! – Support for NICU Parents
Aug 5 all-day

 

Sponsor Logo

https://handtohold.org/

Sponsor Purpose Statement

 

You are not alone!

Having a baby in the NICU is life-altering. But you don’t have to do it alone. Join the Hand to Hold Community for compassionate one-on-one connection with NICU parents and Hand to Hold Family Support Specialists at any point in your unique journey.

Our Mission

Hand to Hold® provides personalized support before, during and after a NICU stay to help ensure all NICU families thrive.

What We Do

ONE TO ONE SUPPORT

Having a baby in the NICU is life-altering. But you don’t have to do it alone We’re here for you when you need us, at any stage in your journey.

Request a peer mentor today and get connected, and supported by, a trained, NICU graduate peer mentor. Hand to Hold carefully matches seasoned NICU and bereaved parents with new parents in need of support. Hand to Hold carefully matches seasoned NICU and bereaved parents with new parents in need of support. d

Hand to Hold understands that a high-risk pregnancy, a complicated birth, a NICU stay or the loss of a baby are very traumatic and isolating experiences.  Find support at any stage of your journey through our virtual support groups, podcasts, private Facebook communities and Peer Mentor Program.

Virtual support groups allow families to access support at all stages of the NICU journey, from the comfort of your own home. To learn more about our Family Support Specialists hosting the groups, visit our staff page.

If you are a professional, and not a NICU parent, we kindly ask that you please respect the privacy of the families who join our groups by not registering for, and joining, a session. Having professionals in a peer support group changes the dynamics and impact for the parents involved as observers cannot participate from a place of lived experience

p

PODCASTS
BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT

Wherever you are in your grief, we want you to know that you are not alone. There is a community of families ready to support you, whether it is today, a month from today, or a year from today.

No one understands what it’s like to suffer the loss of a baby like a parent who has been there. Hand to Hold trains and matches parents who have experienced a loss to provide peer support to bereaved families. If you have experienced a loss, you may request a Peer Mentor at any time.

COMING SOON: VIRTUAL CHAT
NEWS, ARTICLES & FAMILY STORIES

 

Contact Us

Toll-Free: 855-424-6428
Parent Support ext. 1
Online Store ext. 3

13740 Research Blvd., Suite L5
Austin, Texas 78750

Website: https://handtohold.org/

Media inquiries: mediainquiry@handtohold.org

Questions about the store: store@handtohold.org

Warmline – LFL – Lines for Life – Military Helpline – Phone – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Aug 5 all-day

 

 

The Military Helpline serves 24-hours a day

CALL:  (888) 457-4838 (24/7/365)

TEXT:  MIL1 to 839863 (8am-11pm PST daily)

The Military Helpline, available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, provides compassionate, confidential crisis intervention and referral among the military community.

The line is answered by a highly trained staff and a dedicated team of volunteer crisis workers, many of whom have a military background. All possess a strong understanding of the serious issues that can impact service members, veterans and their families, including the loss of a job, family strife, home foreclosure, post-traumatic stress, and other medical and health care concerns.

The Military Helpline has your back. (888) 457-4838

Download informational material about the Military Helpline:

– Informational Packet (5 pages/922K)
– Flyer (691K)

The Military Helpline is a service of Lines for Life, a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to preventing substance abuse and suicide.

Administrative Office
5100 SW Macadam Avenue, Suite 400
Portland, OR 97239
info@LinesForLife.org
p 503.244.5211 or 800.282.7035

Warmline – SFSP – San Francisco Suicide Prevention – Drug and Relapse Prevention Lines – 415-367-3400 & 415 /834-1144 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Aug 5 all-day

Agency Logo

 

Drug & Relapse Lines

Drug Line

415 /362-3400

Relapse Line

415 /834-1144

Because substance abuse and addiction is so closely intertwined with suicide and emotional pain, San Francisco Suicide Prevention established these two programs to assist people who were struggling with substance related issues as well as their friends and families.  The Drug Line and Relapse Line provide referrals to specialized treatment programs, crisis intervention, information on addictions and recovery, and emotional support along the recovery continuum.

 

San Francisco Suicide Prevention’s Telephone Hotlines

Crisis Line:

415/781-0500 in San Francisco, CA
800/273- TALK (8255) outside of San Francisco

Could you benefit from some emotional support? Are you having thoughts of suicide? Trained volunteers are available 24 hours, 7 days a week to listen and help you sort things out. You do not need to be suicidal to speak with us.

Drug Line:

415/362-3400

Do you feel you want to reduce your drug and alcohol use? Do you need to enroll in a DUI program? Want to find the nearest needle exchange program? We take a harm reduction approach to substance use. We are available to explore your options with you 24 hours a day.

Relapse Line:

415/834-1144

Are you considering relapsing? Have you already relapsed? We’re here to provide you with emotional support during this challenging time 24 hours a day.

AIDS/HIV Nightline:

415/434-AIDS (2437) or
800/273-AIDS (2437)

“I just tested HIV+, now what?”  “Am I at risk for HIV?”  “Where can I get tested?” If you need to talk about HIV, we are always here for you. Compassionate and informed volunteers can take your call, day or night.

TTY:

415/227-0245

Are you hearing impaired or hard of hearing? We’re here for you 24/7 and can offer you the same competent services that we offer on the crisis line.

Email us for information or speakers

Do you need information about suicide prevention or a speaker for your organization? Has your company, school or agency experienced a suicide of a colleague?  Or perhaps you just need information about the agency?  Please email our general information email and we will respond within a few days.

Click Here To Chat

CHAT HOURS 24/7

Crisis Text Line

  • 24/7 Confidential Support, Text MYLIFE to 741741

 

Warmline – LFL – Lines for Life – BIPOC Crisis Line for Racial Equity Support – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Aug 5 @ 8:30 am – 5:00 pm
Warmline - LFL - Lines for Life - BIPOC Crisis Line for Racial Equity Support - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 9am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Aug
6
Fri
01 – Support Line – L4L Racial Equity Support Line – BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free – Lines for Life – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Aug 6 all-day
01 - Support Line - L4L Racial Equity Support Line - BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free - Lines for Life - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis / Support Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 8:30am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Toll-Free Access

If you need toll-free access, call any line at Lines for Life and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line during its operating hours.

For example, you can call the Suicide Prevention Crisis Line @ 1-877-273-8255 or the Safe+Strong Helpline @ 1-800-923-4457 and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line between 8:30am and 5pm PST.

02 – Urgent Info – Heat Emergency – Cooling Shelters – Air Conditioners – Health and Safety – Weekdays and Weekends
Aug 6 all-day
Cooling Shelters – Air Conditioners – Health and Safety
Cooling Shelters & Emergency Assistance
2021 has had unusually warm weather in June with potential temperatures over 110 degrees Fahrenheit in Portland and other parts of the state.  Finding safe, cool shelter and staying hydrated (drinking water) can be important, as there may be health risks with exposure to such high outdoor temperatures.
Health and Safety Information
State of Oregon, Oregon Health Authority provides health information and FACT SHEETS and more in various languages.
Preventing Heat Related Illnesses Oregon (Oregon Health Authority) : 
First Aid Information (Multnomah County)
What should you do before a Heat Wave (Red Cross) :
Alerts for Excessive Heat Conditions  
Where to find a Cooling Center
HOURS Monday-Friday 8am-6pm
CALL 211 or 866-698-6155 
TEXT your zip code to 898211 (TXT211)
Cooling Center Websites Selected Counties

Multnomah County / Portlandhttps://www.multco.us/help-when-its-hot

Washington County (map) / Hillsboro & Beaverton
Benton County / Corvallis
Polk County / Dallas
Marion County / Salem
 ROCC / Salem (open until 8pm extended hours for certain days)
 ARCHES / Turner
Linn County / Albany
CHANCE Heat Shelter  (water + snacks)
Air Conditioning and Energy Assistance
You may also be able to speak with your health care provider about health related needs such as air conditioners.  Assistance may be available from local resources or a medical benefit through the Oregon Health Plan. For more information go to the Care Oregon website:  https://www.careoregon.org/members/more-careoregon-services/health-related-services
Have A Backup Plan For Heat Emergencies
Ready. Gov recommends that everyone have a backup plan for emergencies of all kinds, including extreme heat. Your plan should include what you can do before a heat emergency and how to safe during the crisis. For important items consider when creating a backup plan for heat emergencies visit  https://www.ready.gov/heat.   
  • How to keep  your home cool and what to do if it gets too hot.
  • How to stay safe during a heat emergency
  • How to recognize and respond to heat related illness
Responding to Extreme Heat For the Disabled
Disability Rights of Oregon warns that extreme weather can be threat to people living it disabilities.  Use these links to learn more about the risks and respond to them.

From more information visit: https://www.droregon.org/extreme-heat-resources

Disability Rights of Oregon provides tips to help the disabled to stay safe and healthy

Drink a lot of water!

Many people don’t realize how much faster they get dehydrated when the heat is so intense. Some people have disabilities that may keep them from realizing how dehydrated they are. Avoid alcohol and energy drinks, as they can actually dehydrate you further.

The coolest place in your home

Find the coolest place to be in your home. Downstairs will usually be cooler than upstairs. Shadier places will be cooler than sunny places. Consider pulling curtains over windows facing the sun.

If you don’t have a home with air-conditioning, consider going to a public place with air conditioning, like a library, shopping center, theater, or other public building. Many public buildings around the state are open as cooling centers.

Make backup plan

Make a backup plan to stay cool. Make a plan for what to do if your home gets too hot. Even if you have air-conditioning, have a plan for what to do if the power goes out. Cooling centers and other public buildings are a good alternative.

Check the temperature in your home regularly

If you’re staying in a home without air-conditioning, use a thermometer or your thermostat to check the temperature in your home regularly. Some people who have disabilities and some people who are older have difficulty telling when their home has gotten too hot. As the temperature climbs, consider using a cooling center or other air-conditioned place for relief.

Beware parked cars!

Do not sit in a parked car, do not leave children in a parked car, and do not leave service animals, emotional support animals, or pets in a parked car! In intense heat and sunlight, it is not safe to stay in a parked car for any period of time, except with the engine on and the air-conditioning running.

The hottest part of the day

In Oregon, the hottest part of the day is usually between noon and evening. Take special care to stay cool and limit your activity during that time. If you choose to be active, early morning and late evening may be better times to be active. Letting in cool air overnight can help keep your home from overheating.

Check in with your network

If you live alone, check in with family, friends, neighbors, and other supports regularly throughout the weekend.

Extreme Heat Can Make Asphalt Dangerous to animals and people!

Even under normal, temperatures can heat asphalt surfaces to and cause contact burns on the feet of animals and people. At only 87 Degrees, asphalt can heat to 143 Degrees Fahrenheit! But at 125 Degrees, skin can be destroyed in 60 seconds. Take steps to protect your animals feet and your own and to avoid heat stroke. Avoid walking during the hottest parts of the day, and make sure your dogs and other animals have access to shade and clean water.

Additional Resources
For additional resources:
  • Contact your county or city government
  • Local churches
AM – All Month – Renters, Tenants and Landlords – Support, Resources, Assistance & Info – During COVID-19 Pandemic
Aug 6 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program

Information and Application For Tenants and Landlords

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program is open as of May 19th. OHCS is working with local organizations to provide more than $200 million in assistance to low-income Oregonians that have been financially impacted by COVID-19. OHCS created a partner toolkit to help communities promote this vital resource. This packet includes check lists for tenants and landlords, application information and documentation, frequently asked questions, and other helpful information related to the program.

Vista De Verificacion Del Inquilino 

Solicitud En Papel

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP) helps eligible low-income households with their past due rent and utilities. This program uses funds from the federal Emergency Rental Assistance Program, which allocated a collective total of $280 million to Oregon, the City of Portland, and multiple counties in the state. In most cases, approved applications will result in payments made directly to landlords and utility providers.

Beginning May 19, 2021, qualified renters who have experienced financial hardship due to the coronavirus pandemic, and are at risk of homelessness or housing instability, may apply for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP). This program is not a loan, which means those who receive assistance will not have to pay back funds so long as they are used as approved and not duplicating other assistance programs. Assistance is offered to all eligible renters regardless of their citizenship or immigration status, and it will not impact the recipient’s eligibility for other federally funded programs such as food stamps, Medicaid, Medicare, social security, WIC or public housing.

Renters who are eligible for the program may request rent and/or utility assistance dating back to March 13, 2020 (prior expenses are not eligible). OERAP will cover up to 12 months of past due rent and three months of forward rent, once all past due rent is paid. OERAP will also cover past due utility costs including electricity, gas, home energy services, water, sewer, trash removal, internet and bulk fuels. Costs that will NOT be covered include: homeowner costs, homeowner utilities, landlord-paid utilities, landlord-paid property taxes, property insurance, phone, and renter insurance.

If approved, in most cases, payments will be made directly to the landlord, property owner or utility company on the tenant’s behalf via direct deposit or check. OERAP funds are not first-come-first-serve. Funds will be distributed based on a formula that prioritizes applications based on need. Everyone who turns in a completed application will have their application reviewed.

Click on this link to apply for Emergency Rental Assistance

Apply for OERAP Now

To learn more about eligibility, applying and the program itself, scroll down or use the buttons below to jump to a section.

 

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
DISCLAIMER: Information is provided solely as a courtesy without guarantees or warranties of any kind whatsoever.  Use at your own risk and expense.
HTH – Hand to Hold – You are not alone! – Support for NICU Parents
Aug 6 all-day

 

Sponsor Logo

https://handtohold.org/

Sponsor Purpose Statement

 

You are not alone!

Having a baby in the NICU is life-altering. But you don’t have to do it alone. Join the Hand to Hold Community for compassionate one-on-one connection with NICU parents and Hand to Hold Family Support Specialists at any point in your unique journey.

Our Mission

Hand to Hold® provides personalized support before, during and after a NICU stay to help ensure all NICU families thrive.

What We Do

ONE TO ONE SUPPORT

Having a baby in the NICU is life-altering. But you don’t have to do it alone We’re here for you when you need us, at any stage in your journey.

Request a peer mentor today and get connected, and supported by, a trained, NICU graduate peer mentor. Hand to Hold carefully matches seasoned NICU and bereaved parents with new parents in need of support. Hand to Hold carefully matches seasoned NICU and bereaved parents with new parents in need of support. d

Hand to Hold understands that a high-risk pregnancy, a complicated birth, a NICU stay or the loss of a baby are very traumatic and isolating experiences.  Find support at any stage of your journey through our virtual support groups, podcasts, private Facebook communities and Peer Mentor Program.

Virtual support groups allow families to access support at all stages of the NICU journey, from the comfort of your own home. To learn more about our Family Support Specialists hosting the groups, visit our staff page.

If you are a professional, and not a NICU parent, we kindly ask that you please respect the privacy of the families who join our groups by not registering for, and joining, a session. Having professionals in a peer support group changes the dynamics and impact for the parents involved as observers cannot participate from a place of lived experience

p

PODCASTS
BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT

Wherever you are in your grief, we want you to know that you are not alone. There is a community of families ready to support you, whether it is today, a month from today, or a year from today.

No one understands what it’s like to suffer the loss of a baby like a parent who has been there. Hand to Hold trains and matches parents who have experienced a loss to provide peer support to bereaved families. If you have experienced a loss, you may request a Peer Mentor at any time.

COMING SOON: VIRTUAL CHAT
NEWS, ARTICLES & FAMILY STORIES

 

Contact Us

Toll-Free: 855-424-6428
Parent Support ext. 1
Online Store ext. 3

13740 Research Blvd., Suite L5
Austin, Texas 78750

Website: https://handtohold.org/

Media inquiries: mediainquiry@handtohold.org

Questions about the store: store@handtohold.org

Warmline – LFL – Lines for Life – Military Helpline – Phone – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Aug 6 all-day

 

 

The Military Helpline serves 24-hours a day

CALL:  (888) 457-4838 (24/7/365)

TEXT:  MIL1 to 839863 (8am-11pm PST daily)

The Military Helpline, available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, provides compassionate, confidential crisis intervention and referral among the military community.

The line is answered by a highly trained staff and a dedicated team of volunteer crisis workers, many of whom have a military background. All possess a strong understanding of the serious issues that can impact service members, veterans and their families, including the loss of a job, family strife, home foreclosure, post-traumatic stress, and other medical and health care concerns.

The Military Helpline has your back. (888) 457-4838

Download informational material about the Military Helpline:

– Informational Packet (5 pages/922K)
– Flyer (691K)

The Military Helpline is a service of Lines for Life, a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to preventing substance abuse and suicide.

Administrative Office
5100 SW Macadam Avenue, Suite 400
Portland, OR 97239
info@LinesForLife.org
p 503.244.5211 or 800.282.7035

Warmline – SFSP – San Francisco Suicide Prevention – Drug and Relapse Prevention Lines – 415-367-3400 & 415 /834-1144 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Aug 6 all-day

Agency Logo

 

Drug & Relapse Lines

Drug Line

415 /362-3400

Relapse Line

415 /834-1144

Because substance abuse and addiction is so closely intertwined with suicide and emotional pain, San Francisco Suicide Prevention established these two programs to assist people who were struggling with substance related issues as well as their friends and families.  The Drug Line and Relapse Line provide referrals to specialized treatment programs, crisis intervention, information on addictions and recovery, and emotional support along the recovery continuum.

 

San Francisco Suicide Prevention’s Telephone Hotlines

Crisis Line:

415/781-0500 in San Francisco, CA
800/273- TALK (8255) outside of San Francisco

Could you benefit from some emotional support? Are you having thoughts of suicide? Trained volunteers are available 24 hours, 7 days a week to listen and help you sort things out. You do not need to be suicidal to speak with us.

Drug Line:

415/362-3400

Do you feel you want to reduce your drug and alcohol use? Do you need to enroll in a DUI program? Want to find the nearest needle exchange program? We take a harm reduction approach to substance use. We are available to explore your options with you 24 hours a day.

Relapse Line:

415/834-1144

Are you considering relapsing? Have you already relapsed? We’re here to provide you with emotional support during this challenging time 24 hours a day.

AIDS/HIV Nightline:

415/434-AIDS (2437) or
800/273-AIDS (2437)

“I just tested HIV+, now what?”  “Am I at risk for HIV?”  “Where can I get tested?” If you need to talk about HIV, we are always here for you. Compassionate and informed volunteers can take your call, day or night.

TTY:

415/227-0245

Are you hearing impaired or hard of hearing? We’re here for you 24/7 and can offer you the same competent services that we offer on the crisis line.

Email us for information or speakers

Do you need information about suicide prevention or a speaker for your organization? Has your company, school or agency experienced a suicide of a colleague?  Or perhaps you just need information about the agency?  Please email our general information email and we will respond within a few days.

Click Here To Chat

CHAT HOURS 24/7

Crisis Text Line

  • 24/7 Confidential Support, Text MYLIFE to 741741

 

Warmline – LFL – Lines for Life – BIPOC Crisis Line for Racial Equity Support – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Aug 6 @ 8:30 am – 5:00 pm
Warmline - LFL - Lines for Life - BIPOC Crisis Line for Racial Equity Support - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 9am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Aug
7
Sat
02 – Urgent Info – Heat Emergency – Cooling Shelters – Air Conditioners – Health and Safety – Weekdays and Weekends
Aug 7 all-day
Cooling Shelters – Air Conditioners – Health and Safety
Cooling Shelters & Emergency Assistance
2021 has had unusually warm weather in June with potential temperatures over 110 degrees Fahrenheit in Portland and other parts of the state.  Finding safe, cool shelter and staying hydrated (drinking water) can be important, as there may be health risks with exposure to such high outdoor temperatures.
Health and Safety Information
State of Oregon, Oregon Health Authority provides health information and FACT SHEETS and more in various languages.
Preventing Heat Related Illnesses Oregon (Oregon Health Authority) : 
First Aid Information (Multnomah County)
What should you do before a Heat Wave (Red Cross) :
Alerts for Excessive Heat Conditions  
Where to find a Cooling Center
HOURS Monday-Friday 8am-6pm
CALL 211 or 866-698-6155 
TEXT your zip code to 898211 (TXT211)
Cooling Center Websites Selected Counties

Multnomah County / Portlandhttps://www.multco.us/help-when-its-hot

Washington County (map) / Hillsboro & Beaverton
Benton County / Corvallis
Polk County / Dallas
Marion County / Salem
 ROCC / Salem (open until 8pm extended hours for certain days)
 ARCHES / Turner
Linn County / Albany
CHANCE Heat Shelter  (water + snacks)
Air Conditioning and Energy Assistance
You may also be able to speak with your health care provider about health related needs such as air conditioners.  Assistance may be available from local resources or a medical benefit through the Oregon Health Plan. For more information go to the Care Oregon website:  https://www.careoregon.org/members/more-careoregon-services/health-related-services
Have A Backup Plan For Heat Emergencies
Ready. Gov recommends that everyone have a backup plan for emergencies of all kinds, including extreme heat. Your plan should include what you can do before a heat emergency and how to safe during the crisis. For important items consider when creating a backup plan for heat emergencies visit  https://www.ready.gov/heat.   
  • How to keep  your home cool and what to do if it gets too hot.
  • How to stay safe during a heat emergency
  • How to recognize and respond to heat related illness
Responding to Extreme Heat For the Disabled
Disability Rights of Oregon warns that extreme weather can be threat to people living it disabilities.  Use these links to learn more about the risks and respond to them.

From more information visit: https://www.droregon.org/extreme-heat-resources

Disability Rights of Oregon provides tips to help the disabled to stay safe and healthy

Drink a lot of water!

Many people don’t realize how much faster they get dehydrated when the heat is so intense. Some people have disabilities that may keep them from realizing how dehydrated they are. Avoid alcohol and energy drinks, as they can actually dehydrate you further.

The coolest place in your home

Find the coolest place to be in your home. Downstairs will usually be cooler than upstairs. Shadier places will be cooler than sunny places. Consider pulling curtains over windows facing the sun.

If you don’t have a home with air-conditioning, consider going to a public place with air conditioning, like a library, shopping center, theater, or other public building. Many public buildings around the state are open as cooling centers.

Make backup plan

Make a backup plan to stay cool. Make a plan for what to do if your home gets too hot. Even if you have air-conditioning, have a plan for what to do if the power goes out. Cooling centers and other public buildings are a good alternative.

Check the temperature in your home regularly

If you’re staying in a home without air-conditioning, use a thermometer or your thermostat to check the temperature in your home regularly. Some people who have disabilities and some people who are older have difficulty telling when their home has gotten too hot. As the temperature climbs, consider using a cooling center or other air-conditioned place for relief.

Beware parked cars!

Do not sit in a parked car, do not leave children in a parked car, and do not leave service animals, emotional support animals, or pets in a parked car! In intense heat and sunlight, it is not safe to stay in a parked car for any period of time, except with the engine on and the air-conditioning running.

The hottest part of the day

In Oregon, the hottest part of the day is usually between noon and evening. Take special care to stay cool and limit your activity during that time. If you choose to be active, early morning and late evening may be better times to be active. Letting in cool air overnight can help keep your home from overheating.

Check in with your network

If you live alone, check in with family, friends, neighbors, and other supports regularly throughout the weekend.

Extreme Heat Can Make Asphalt Dangerous to animals and people!

Even under normal, temperatures can heat asphalt surfaces to and cause contact burns on the feet of animals and people. At only 87 Degrees, asphalt can heat to 143 Degrees Fahrenheit! But at 125 Degrees, skin can be destroyed in 60 seconds. Take steps to protect your animals feet and your own and to avoid heat stroke. Avoid walking during the hottest parts of the day, and make sure your dogs and other animals have access to shade and clean water.

Additional Resources
For additional resources:
  • Contact your county or city government
  • Local churches
AM – All Month – Renters, Tenants and Landlords – Support, Resources, Assistance & Info – During COVID-19 Pandemic
Aug 7 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program

Information and Application For Tenants and Landlords

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program is open as of May 19th. OHCS is working with local organizations to provide more than $200 million in assistance to low-income Oregonians that have been financially impacted by COVID-19. OHCS created a partner toolkit to help communities promote this vital resource. This packet includes check lists for tenants and landlords, application information and documentation, frequently asked questions, and other helpful information related to the program.

Vista De Verificacion Del Inquilino 

Solicitud En Papel

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP) helps eligible low-income households with their past due rent and utilities. This program uses funds from the federal Emergency Rental Assistance Program, which allocated a collective total of $280 million to Oregon, the City of Portland, and multiple counties in the state. In most cases, approved applications will result in payments made directly to landlords and utility providers.

Beginning May 19, 2021, qualified renters who have experienced financial hardship due to the coronavirus pandemic, and are at risk of homelessness or housing instability, may apply for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP). This program is not a loan, which means those who receive assistance will not have to pay back funds so long as they are used as approved and not duplicating other assistance programs. Assistance is offered to all eligible renters regardless of their citizenship or immigration status, and it will not impact the recipient’s eligibility for other federally funded programs such as food stamps, Medicaid, Medicare, social security, WIC or public housing.

Renters who are eligible for the program may request rent and/or utility assistance dating back to March 13, 2020 (prior expenses are not eligible). OERAP will cover up to 12 months of past due rent and three months of forward rent, once all past due rent is paid. OERAP will also cover past due utility costs including electricity, gas, home energy services, water, sewer, trash removal, internet and bulk fuels. Costs that will NOT be covered include: homeowner costs, homeowner utilities, landlord-paid utilities, landlord-paid property taxes, property insurance, phone, and renter insurance.

If approved, in most cases, payments will be made directly to the landlord, property owner or utility company on the tenant’s behalf via direct deposit or check. OERAP funds are not first-come-first-serve. Funds will be distributed based on a formula that prioritizes applications based on need. Everyone who turns in a completed application will have their application reviewed.

Click on this link to apply for Emergency Rental Assistance

Apply for OERAP Now

To learn more about eligibility, applying and the program itself, scroll down or use the buttons below to jump to a section.

 

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
DISCLAIMER: Information is provided solely as a courtesy without guarantees or warranties of any kind whatsoever.  Use at your own risk and expense.
HTH – Hand to Hold – You are not alone! – Support for NICU Parents
Aug 7 all-day

 

Sponsor Logo

https://handtohold.org/

Sponsor Purpose Statement

 

You are not alone!

Having a baby in the NICU is life-altering. But you don’t have to do it alone. Join the Hand to Hold Community for compassionate one-on-one connection with NICU parents and Hand to Hold Family Support Specialists at any point in your unique journey.

Our Mission

Hand to Hold® provides personalized support before, during and after a NICU stay to help ensure all NICU families thrive.

What We Do

ONE TO ONE SUPPORT

Having a baby in the NICU is life-altering. But you don’t have to do it alone We’re here for you when you need us, at any stage in your journey.

Request a peer mentor today and get connected, and supported by, a trained, NICU graduate peer mentor. Hand to Hold carefully matches seasoned NICU and bereaved parents with new parents in need of support. Hand to Hold carefully matches seasoned NICU and bereaved parents with new parents in need of support. d

Hand to Hold understands that a high-risk pregnancy, a complicated birth, a NICU stay or the loss of a baby are very traumatic and isolating experiences.  Find support at any stage of your journey through our virtual support groups, podcasts, private Facebook communities and Peer Mentor Program.

Virtual support groups allow families to access support at all stages of the NICU journey, from the comfort of your own home. To learn more about our Family Support Specialists hosting the groups, visit our staff page.

If you are a professional, and not a NICU parent, we kindly ask that you please respect the privacy of the families who join our groups by not registering for, and joining, a session. Having professionals in a peer support group changes the dynamics and impact for the parents involved as observers cannot participate from a place of lived experience

p

PODCASTS
BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT

Wherever you are in your grief, we want you to know that you are not alone. There is a community of families ready to support you, whether it is today, a month from today, or a year from today.

No one understands what it’s like to suffer the loss of a baby like a parent who has been there. Hand to Hold trains and matches parents who have experienced a loss to provide peer support to bereaved families. If you have experienced a loss, you may request a Peer Mentor at any time.

COMING SOON: VIRTUAL CHAT
NEWS, ARTICLES & FAMILY STORIES

 

Contact Us

Toll-Free: 855-424-6428
Parent Support ext. 1
Online Store ext. 3

13740 Research Blvd., Suite L5
Austin, Texas 78750

Website: https://handtohold.org/

Media inquiries: mediainquiry@handtohold.org

Questions about the store: store@handtohold.org

Warmline – LFL – Lines for Life – Military Helpline – Phone – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Aug 7 all-day

 

 

The Military Helpline serves 24-hours a day

CALL:  (888) 457-4838 (24/7/365)

TEXT:  MIL1 to 839863 (8am-11pm PST daily)

The Military Helpline, available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, provides compassionate, confidential crisis intervention and referral among the military community.

The line is answered by a highly trained staff and a dedicated team of volunteer crisis workers, many of whom have a military background. All possess a strong understanding of the serious issues that can impact service members, veterans and their families, including the loss of a job, family strife, home foreclosure, post-traumatic stress, and other medical and health care concerns.

The Military Helpline has your back. (888) 457-4838

Download informational material about the Military Helpline:

– Informational Packet (5 pages/922K)
– Flyer (691K)

The Military Helpline is a service of Lines for Life, a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to preventing substance abuse and suicide.

Administrative Office
5100 SW Macadam Avenue, Suite 400
Portland, OR 97239
info@LinesForLife.org
p 503.244.5211 or 800.282.7035

Warmline – SFSP – San Francisco Suicide Prevention – Drug and Relapse Prevention Lines – 415-367-3400 & 415 /834-1144 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Aug 7 all-day

Agency Logo

 

Drug & Relapse Lines

Drug Line

415 /362-3400

Relapse Line

415 /834-1144

Because substance abuse and addiction is so closely intertwined with suicide and emotional pain, San Francisco Suicide Prevention established these two programs to assist people who were struggling with substance related issues as well as their friends and families.  The Drug Line and Relapse Line provide referrals to specialized treatment programs, crisis intervention, information on addictions and recovery, and emotional support along the recovery continuum.

 

San Francisco Suicide Prevention’s Telephone Hotlines

Crisis Line:

415/781-0500 in San Francisco, CA
800/273- TALK (8255) outside of San Francisco

Could you benefit from some emotional support? Are you having thoughts of suicide? Trained volunteers are available 24 hours, 7 days a week to listen and help you sort things out. You do not need to be suicidal to speak with us.

Drug Line:

415/362-3400

Do you feel you want to reduce your drug and alcohol use? Do you need to enroll in a DUI program? Want to find the nearest needle exchange program? We take a harm reduction approach to substance use. We are available to explore your options with you 24 hours a day.

Relapse Line:

415/834-1144

Are you considering relapsing? Have you already relapsed? We’re here to provide you with emotional support during this challenging time 24 hours a day.

AIDS/HIV Nightline:

415/434-AIDS (2437) or
800/273-AIDS (2437)

“I just tested HIV+, now what?”  “Am I at risk for HIV?”  “Where can I get tested?” If you need to talk about HIV, we are always here for you. Compassionate and informed volunteers can take your call, day or night.

TTY:

415/227-0245

Are you hearing impaired or hard of hearing? We’re here for you 24/7 and can offer you the same competent services that we offer on the crisis line.

Email us for information or speakers

Do you need information about suicide prevention or a speaker for your organization? Has your company, school or agency experienced a suicide of a colleague?  Or perhaps you just need information about the agency?  Please email our general information email and we will respond within a few days.

Click Here To Chat

CHAT HOURS 24/7

Crisis Text Line

  • 24/7 Confidential Support, Text MYLIFE to 741741

 

Aug
8
Sun
02 – Urgent Info – Heat Emergency – Cooling Shelters – Air Conditioners – Health and Safety – Weekdays and Weekends
Aug 8 all-day
Cooling Shelters – Air Conditioners – Health and Safety
Cooling Shelters & Emergency Assistance
2021 has had unusually warm weather in June with potential temperatures over 110 degrees Fahrenheit in Portland and other parts of the state.  Finding safe, cool shelter and staying hydrated (drinking water) can be important, as there may be health risks with exposure to such high outdoor temperatures.
Health and Safety Information
State of Oregon, Oregon Health Authority provides health information and FACT SHEETS and more in various languages.
Preventing Heat Related Illnesses Oregon (Oregon Health Authority) : 
First Aid Information (Multnomah County)
What should you do before a Heat Wave (Red Cross) :
Alerts for Excessive Heat Conditions  
Where to find a Cooling Center
HOURS Monday-Friday 8am-6pm
CALL 211 or 866-698-6155 
TEXT your zip code to 898211 (TXT211)
Cooling Center Websites Selected Counties

Multnomah County / Portlandhttps://www.multco.us/help-when-its-hot

Washington County (map) / Hillsboro & Beaverton
Benton County / Corvallis
Polk County / Dallas
Marion County / Salem
 ROCC / Salem (open until 8pm extended hours for certain days)
 ARCHES / Turner
Linn County / Albany
CHANCE Heat Shelter  (water + snacks)
Air Conditioning and Energy Assistance
You may also be able to speak with your health care provider about health related needs such as air conditioners.  Assistance may be available from local resources or a medical benefit through the Oregon Health Plan. For more information go to the Care Oregon website:  https://www.careoregon.org/members/more-careoregon-services/health-related-services
Have A Backup Plan For Heat Emergencies
Ready. Gov recommends that everyone have a backup plan for emergencies of all kinds, including extreme heat. Your plan should include what you can do before a heat emergency and how to safe during the crisis. For important items consider when creating a backup plan for heat emergencies visit  https://www.ready.gov/heat.   
  • How to keep  your home cool and what to do if it gets too hot.
  • How to stay safe during a heat emergency
  • How to recognize and respond to heat related illness
Responding to Extreme Heat For the Disabled
Disability Rights of Oregon warns that extreme weather can be threat to people living it disabilities.  Use these links to learn more about the risks and respond to them.

From more information visit: https://www.droregon.org/extreme-heat-resources

Disability Rights of Oregon provides tips to help the disabled to stay safe and healthy

Drink a lot of water!

Many people don’t realize how much faster they get dehydrated when the heat is so intense. Some people have disabilities that may keep them from realizing how dehydrated they are. Avoid alcohol and energy drinks, as they can actually dehydrate you further.

The coolest place in your home

Find the coolest place to be in your home. Downstairs will usually be cooler than upstairs. Shadier places will be cooler than sunny places. Consider pulling curtains over windows facing the sun.

If you don’t have a home with air-conditioning, consider going to a public place with air conditioning, like a library, shopping center, theater, or other public building. Many public buildings around the state are open as cooling centers.

Make backup plan

Make a backup plan to stay cool. Make a plan for what to do if your home gets too hot. Even if you have air-conditioning, have a plan for what to do if the power goes out. Cooling centers and other public buildings are a good alternative.

Check the temperature in your home regularly

If you’re staying in a home without air-conditioning, use a thermometer or your thermostat to check the temperature in your home regularly. Some people who have disabilities and some people who are older have difficulty telling when their home has gotten too hot. As the temperature climbs, consider using a cooling center or other air-conditioned place for relief.

Beware parked cars!

Do not sit in a parked car, do not leave children in a parked car, and do not leave service animals, emotional support animals, or pets in a parked car! In intense heat and sunlight, it is not safe to stay in a parked car for any period of time, except with the engine on and the air-conditioning running.

The hottest part of the day

In Oregon, the hottest part of the day is usually between noon and evening. Take special care to stay cool and limit your activity during that time. If you choose to be active, early morning and late evening may be better times to be active. Letting in cool air overnight can help keep your home from overheating.

Check in with your network

If you live alone, check in with family, friends, neighbors, and other supports regularly throughout the weekend.

Extreme Heat Can Make Asphalt Dangerous to animals and people!

Even under normal, temperatures can heat asphalt surfaces to and cause contact burns on the feet of animals and people. At only 87 Degrees, asphalt can heat to 143 Degrees Fahrenheit! But at 125 Degrees, skin can be destroyed in 60 seconds. Take steps to protect your animals feet and your own and to avoid heat stroke. Avoid walking during the hottest parts of the day, and make sure your dogs and other animals have access to shade and clean water.

Additional Resources
For additional resources:
  • Contact your county or city government
  • Local churches
AM – All Month – Renters, Tenants and Landlords – Support, Resources, Assistance & Info – During COVID-19 Pandemic
Aug 8 all-day

Oregon Covid-19 – Support For Tenants and Landlords

Resources & Assistance

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR TENANTS:

Statewide Eviction Moratorium

There is a new statewide eviction moratorium (HB 4401) that will last until June 30, 2021. This means that, with limited exceptions, landlords cannot evict renters for nonpayment or without cause until July of 2021.​

Renters must sign and return a “tenants declaration” to their landlord if they can’t afford their rent.

http://www.livingcully.org/

Instructions and tenant declarations forms are available from Living Cully in English and Spanish.

English Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-English.pdf

Spanish Version:

Eviction-Moratorium-Flyer and Form-Spainish.pdf

This form is also available from the following agencies and links:

Oregon Judicial Branch – Oregon Judicial Branch.

Oregon Law CenterOregon Law Center

Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program

Information and Application For Tenants and Landlords

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program is open as of May 19th. OHCS is working with local organizations to provide more than $200 million in assistance to low-income Oregonians that have been financially impacted by COVID-19. OHCS created a partner toolkit to help communities promote this vital resource. This packet includes check lists for tenants and landlords, application information and documentation, frequently asked questions, and other helpful information related to the program.

Vista De Verificacion Del Inquilino 

Solicitud En Papel

The Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP) helps eligible low-income households with their past due rent and utilities. This program uses funds from the federal Emergency Rental Assistance Program, which allocated a collective total of $280 million to Oregon, the City of Portland, and multiple counties in the state. In most cases, approved applications will result in payments made directly to landlords and utility providers.

Beginning May 19, 2021, qualified renters who have experienced financial hardship due to the coronavirus pandemic, and are at risk of homelessness or housing instability, may apply for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP). This program is not a loan, which means those who receive assistance will not have to pay back funds so long as they are used as approved and not duplicating other assistance programs. Assistance is offered to all eligible renters regardless of their citizenship or immigration status, and it will not impact the recipient’s eligibility for other federally funded programs such as food stamps, Medicaid, Medicare, social security, WIC or public housing.

Renters who are eligible for the program may request rent and/or utility assistance dating back to March 13, 2020 (prior expenses are not eligible). OERAP will cover up to 12 months of past due rent and three months of forward rent, once all past due rent is paid. OERAP will also cover past due utility costs including electricity, gas, home energy services, water, sewer, trash removal, internet and bulk fuels. Costs that will NOT be covered include: homeowner costs, homeowner utilities, landlord-paid utilities, landlord-paid property taxes, property insurance, phone, and renter insurance.

If approved, in most cases, payments will be made directly to the landlord, property owner or utility company on the tenant’s behalf via direct deposit or check. OERAP funds are not first-come-first-serve. Funds will be distributed based on a formula that prioritizes applications based on need. Everyone who turns in a completed application will have their application reviewed.

Click on this link to apply for Emergency Rental Assistance

Apply for OERAP Now

To learn more about eligibility, applying and the program itself, scroll down or use the buttons below to jump to a section.

 

Landlord/Tenant Law FAQ

 

 

https://www.osbar.org/index.html#

Is there an eviction moratorium in place right now?

Yes. There are three eviction moratoriums that apply to Oregonians right now. The most important one is Executive Order 20-56 (EO 20-56). It states that landlords are mostly unable to end tenancies without tenant cause. Also, landlords are unable to end tenancies for nonpayment from Oct. 1, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The second moratorium is House Bill 4213 (HB 4213) from the Oregon Legislature. HB 4213 allows tenants until April 1, 2021, to pay back any rent or other moneys that were not paid between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020. Landlords cannot serve a notice of termination or evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent that came due between April and September until after March 31, 2021.

The third moratorium on evictions is an order from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot terminate their tenancy except for cause until after Dec. 31, 2020.

In most cases, this is weaker than the protection provided by EO 20-56. This makes the executive order more relevant to Oregonians.

Can a landlord evict a tenant for nonpayment?

A landlord cannot serve a termination notice or file an eviction case for nonpayment until after Dec. 31, 2020. This includes nonpayment of rent, late fees or other payments associated with the tenancy incurred between April 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. Beginning Jan. 1, 2021, unless the law changes, landlords will be able to take action against tenants for missing payments that come due in 2021. This also applies to payments that came due between Oct. 1, 2020, and Dec. 31, 2020. There is a grace period through March 31, 2021, for payments incurred between April 1, 2020, and September 30, 2020.

For example, if a tenant did not pay rent in May of 2020 or September of 2020, but paid rent every month after that, the landlord would not be able to take action on the unpaid rent from May and September until April 1, 2021. But, if a tenant kept up with their rent during the emergency period but missed rent in January, a landlord could evict that person in January.

Under the CDC eviction moratorium, which lasts through Dec. 31, 2020, if a tenant files a declaration saying:

  • They are unable to pay their rent;
  • They make less than $99,000 per year;
  • They are trying to pay as much as they can, and;
  • They are trying to obtain all available government assistance, then a landlord cannot evict the tenant for nonpayment through Dec. 31, 2020.

The legality of the CDC eviction moratorium order has been challenged, but it is currently good law.

What about other kinds of notices?

None of the above explanations cover terminations “for cause” where the cause is something other than nonpayment. Causes that violate a rental agreement may include:

  • Destroying property.
  • Smoking where not allowed.
  • Allowing other people to move in.

A landlord can give a termination notice and seek to evict the tenant if they fail to move out at the end of the termination notice.

But, termination notices for no cause are prohibited by the state moratorium during the emergency period. A no-cause notice may be for a landlord reason such as wanting to repair the dwelling or convert it to a nonresidential use. However, under EO 20-56, a landlord may give a termination notice asking that the tenants move out in 90 days if the landlord or an immediate family member of the landlord wants to move in. This also applies if the landlord has sold the premises to someone who plans to move in.

Can a landlord still give a 24-hour inspection notice or does that violate social distancing?

Governor Brown has ordered all businesses to maintain social distancing within the workplace. She has not specifically addressed this issue. Nevertheless, the order suggests that a landlord should not be entering a rented property unless absolutely necessary (like for emergency repairs of leaks, breaks, power outages, etc.). The landlord should only perform an inspection while maintaining a distance of six feet from any other person. The landlord also should not come into contact with the surfaces of the home. If this cannot be done, then the landlord should wait until the state of emergency ends to conduct inspections.

Additionally, ORS 90.322(1)(f) allows a tenant to deny consent to a landlord who wishes to enter the premises with a 24-hour notice. The denial must be in writing and must be posted on the main entrance to the premises. A tenant cannot deny lawful access without risking the termination of the tenancy. So, any denial of entry for COVID-19 related reasons should state so in the written denial posted on the door.

A landlord who insists upon entry when a tenant has denied entry may be subject to civil penalties. In addition, failure to comply with the governor’s social distancing order is a Class C misdemeanor.

Where can a renter go for assistance if they receive an eviction notice?

If you are low-income, contact your local Legal Aid office. You can find your local office at https://oregonlawhelp.org/find-legal-help. If you do not qualify for legal aid services, contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (800) 452-7636.

If you are a veteran, disabled, elderly or under a certain income level, additional services may be available in your area. If you need help connecting to services in your area, call 311.

If your landlord tries to forcibly remove you from your home, call your local law enforcement.

The COVID-19 situation is changing on a daily basis. These answers are our best interpretation of the state’s precautions as of Oct. 5, 2020. Please check these websites to monitor changes:

-Elliott Farren, Oregon Law Center, Eugene

 

ASSISTANCE AND RESOURCES FOR LANDLORDS

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/housing-assistance/Pages/Landlord-tenant-resources.aspx

OHCS Landlord Compensation Fund

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

The Oregon Legislature  enacted an eviction moratorium and  established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund.
The Landlord Compensation Fund opened in February with a tremendous response through an online application portal to streamline the collection of landlord provided data on rent collections. The first round will fund up to $50 million in requests for unpaid rent. Participating landlords must accept 80 cents for every dollar of qualified rent-owed and this first funding round will include rent owed from April 2020 – February 2021. The program is not a “first come, first serve” basis, please see criteria below.
Please note:
FIRST ROUND DEADLINE: Friday, March 5 at 4:00pm.
If you are experiencing difficulties and have initiated an application and intend to submit it for the first-round funding – we are committed to working through these technical issues with you. If you are working on this application and need additional assistance with technical issues, you must complete the form at the following link by 4pm on Friday to secure your place in Round 1.
For those that would prefer to wait until the next round of funding, which will be open in April 2021, we will have funding to offer for carry-over and new applications submitted for the second round. As a reminder, the first round includes $50 million of the total $150 million in program funds.

As a reminder to all applicants, the deadline for first application round of the Landlord Compensation Fund program is4pm on Friday March 5, 2021.

The next application round will be opening in late March 2021 and will include another $50 million in assistance.

 

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/72622

Oregon Eviction Moratorium FAQ For Landlords

Moratorium on residential evictions in Oregon on the basis of nonpayment of rent or terminations without tenant cause. The following information is applicable statewide. View Frequently Asked Questions on this page.

OTHER RESOURCES
Legal Aid Services in Oregon
Oregon State Bar, Landlord Tenant Law
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Fair Housing of Oregon
Hotline: 1-800-424-3247 (for housing discrimination only)
Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT)
503-288-0130
Multifamily NW
503-213-1281
Manufactured Housing/Oregon State Tenants Association
(Information for mobile park tenants)
DISCLAIMER: Information is provided solely as a courtesy without guarantees or warranties of any kind whatsoever.  Use at your own risk and expense.
HTH – Hand to Hold – You are not alone! – Support for NICU Parents
Aug 8 all-day

 

Sponsor Logo

https://handtohold.org/

Sponsor Purpose Statement

 

You are not alone!

Having a baby in the NICU is life-altering. But you don’t have to do it alone. Join the Hand to Hold Community for compassionate one-on-one connection with NICU parents and Hand to Hold Family Support Specialists at any point in your unique journey.

Our Mission

Hand to Hold® provides personalized support before, during and after a NICU stay to help ensure all NICU families thrive.

What We Do

ONE TO ONE SUPPORT

Having a baby in the NICU is life-altering. But you don’t have to do it alone We’re here for you when you need us, at any stage in your journey.

Request a peer mentor today and get connected, and supported by, a trained, NICU graduate peer mentor. Hand to Hold carefully matches seasoned NICU and bereaved parents with new parents in need of support. Hand to Hold carefully matches seasoned NICU and bereaved parents with new parents in need of support. d

Hand to Hold understands that a high-risk pregnancy, a complicated birth, a NICU stay or the loss of a baby are very traumatic and isolating experiences.  Find support at any stage of your journey through our virtual support groups, podcasts, private Facebook communities and Peer Mentor Program.

Virtual support groups allow families to access support at all stages of the NICU journey, from the comfort of your own home. To learn more about our Family Support Specialists hosting the groups, visit our staff page.

If you are a professional, and not a NICU parent, we kindly ask that you please respect the privacy of the families who join our groups by not registering for, and joining, a session. Having professionals in a peer support group changes the dynamics and impact for the parents involved as observers cannot participate from a place of lived experience

p

PODCASTS
BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT

Wherever you are in your grief, we want you to know that you are not alone. There is a community of families ready to support you, whether it is today, a month from today, or a year from today.

No one understands what it’s like to suffer the loss of a baby like a parent who has been there. Hand to Hold trains and matches parents who have experienced a loss to provide peer support to bereaved families. If you have experienced a loss, you may request a Peer Mentor at any time.

COMING SOON: VIRTUAL CHAT
NEWS, ARTICLES & FAMILY STORIES

 

Contact Us

Toll-Free: 855-424-6428
Parent Support ext. 1
Online Store ext. 3

13740 Research Blvd., Suite L5
Austin, Texas 78750

Website: https://handtohold.org/

Media inquiries: mediainquiry@handtohold.org

Questions about the store: store@handtohold.org

Warmline – LFL – Lines for Life – Military Helpline – Phone – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Aug 8 all-day

 

 

The Military Helpline serves 24-hours a day

CALL:  (888) 457-4838 (24/7/365)

TEXT:  MIL1 to 839863 (8am-11pm PST daily)

The Military Helpline, available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, provides compassionate, confidential crisis intervention and referral among the military community.

The line is answered by a highly trained staff and a dedicated team of volunteer crisis workers, many of whom have a military background. All possess a strong understanding of the serious issues that can impact service members, veterans and their families, including the loss of a job, family strife, home foreclosure, post-traumatic stress, and other medical and health care concerns.

The Military Helpline has your back. (888) 457-4838

Download informational material about the Military Helpline:

– Informational Packet (5 pages/922K)
– Flyer (691K)

The Military Helpline is a service of Lines for Life, a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to preventing substance abuse and suicide.

Administrative Office
5100 SW Macadam Avenue, Suite 400
Portland, OR 97239
info@LinesForLife.org
p 503.244.5211 or 800.282.7035

Warmline – SFSP – San Francisco Suicide Prevention – Drug and Relapse Prevention Lines – 415-367-3400 & 415 /834-1144 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Aug 8 all-day

Agency Logo

 

Drug & Relapse Lines

Drug Line

415 /362-3400

Relapse Line

415 /834-1144

Because substance abuse and addiction is so closely intertwined with suicide and emotional pain, San Francisco Suicide Prevention established these two programs to assist people who were struggling with substance related issues as well as their friends and families.  The Drug Line and Relapse Line provide referrals to specialized treatment programs, crisis intervention, information on addictions and recovery, and emotional support along the recovery continuum.

 

San Francisco Suicide Prevention’s Telephone Hotlines

Crisis Line:

415/781-0500 in San Francisco, CA
800/273- TALK (8255) outside of San Francisco

Could you benefit from some emotional support? Are you having thoughts of suicide? Trained volunteers are available 24 hours, 7 days a week to listen and help you sort things out. You do not need to be suicidal to speak with us.

Drug Line:

415/362-3400

Do you feel you want to reduce your drug and alcohol use? Do you need to enroll in a DUI program? Want to find the nearest needle exchange program? We take a harm reduction approach to substance use. We are available to explore your options with you 24 hours a day.

Relapse Line:

415/834-1144

Are you considering relapsing? Have you already relapsed? We’re here to provide you with emotional support during this challenging time 24 hours a day.

AIDS/HIV Nightline:

415/434-AIDS (2437) or
800/273-AIDS (2437)

“I just tested HIV+, now what?”  “Am I at risk for HIV?”  “Where can I get tested?” If you need to talk about HIV, we are always here for you. Compassionate and informed volunteers can take your call, day or night.

TTY:

415/227-0245

Are you hearing impaired or hard of hearing? We’re here for you 24/7 and can offer you the same competent services that we offer on the crisis line.

Email us for information or speakers

Do you need information about suicide prevention or a speaker for your organization? Has your company, school or agency experienced a suicide of a colleague?  Or perhaps you just need information about the agency?  Please email our general information email and we will respond within a few days.

Click Here To Chat

CHAT HOURS 24/7

Crisis Text Line

  • 24/7 Confidential Support, Text MYLIFE to 741741

 

Aug
9
Mon
01 – Support Line – L4L Racial Equity Support Line – BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free – Lines for Life – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Aug 9 all-day
01 - Support Line - L4L Racial Equity Support Line - BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free - Lines for Life - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis / Support Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 8:30am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Toll-Free Access

If you need toll-free access, call any line at Lines for Life and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line during its operating hours.

For example, you can call the Suicide Prevention Crisis Line @ 1-877-273-8255 or the Safe+Strong Helpline @ 1-800-923-4457 and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line between 8:30am and 5pm PST.

02 – Urgent Info – Heat Emergency – Cooling Shelters – Air Conditioners – Health and Safety – Weekdays and Weekends
Aug 9 all-day
Cooling Shelters – Air Conditioners – Health and Safety
Cooling Shelters & Emergency Assistance
2021 has had unusually warm weather in June with potential temperatures over 110 degrees Fahrenheit in Portland and other parts of the state.  Finding safe, cool shelter and staying hydrated (drinking water) can be important, as there may be health risks with exposure to such high outdoor temperatures.
Health and Safety Information
State of Oregon, Oregon Health Authority provides health information and FACT SHEETS and more in various languages.
Preventing Heat Related Illnesses Oregon (Oregon Health Authority) : 
First Aid Information (Multnomah County)
What should you do before a Heat Wave (Red Cross) :
Alerts for Excessive Heat Conditions  
Where to find a Cooling Center
HOURS Monday-Friday 8am-6pm
CALL 211 or 866-698-6155 
TEXT your zip code to 898211 (TXT211)
Cooling Center Websites Selected Counties

Multnomah County / Portlandhttps://www.multco.us/help-when-its-hot

Washington County (map) / Hillsboro & Beaverton
Benton County / Corvallis
Polk County / Dallas
Marion County / Salem
 ROCC / Salem (open until 8pm extended hours for certain days)
 ARCHES / Turner
Linn County / Albany
CHANCE Heat Shelter  (water + snacks)
Air Conditioning and Energy Assistance
You may also be able to speak with your health care provider about health related needs such as air conditioners.  Assistance may be available from local resources or a medical benefit through the Oregon Health Plan. For more information go to the Care Oregon website:  https://www.careoregon.org/members/more-careoregon-services/health-related-services
Have A Backup Plan For Heat Emergencies
Ready. Gov recommends that everyone have a backup plan for emergencies of all kinds, including extreme heat. Your plan should include what you can do before a heat emergency and how to safe during the crisis. For important items consider when creating a backup plan for heat emergencies visit  https://www.ready.gov/heat.   
  • How to keep  your home cool and what to do if it gets too hot.
  • How to stay safe during a heat emergency
  • How to recognize and respond to heat related illness
Responding to Extreme Heat For the Disabled
Disability Rights of Oregon warns that extreme weather can be threat to people living it disabilities.  Use these links to learn more about the risks and respond to them.

How Extreme Weather Threatens People with Disabilities

Heat and People with Chronic Medical Conditions

FEMA: Be Prepared for Extreme Heat