PeerGalaxy

Oregon's Peer Support Directory

PeerGalaxy Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring over 82,000 monthly offerings of FREE telephone- and online-accessible peer support, recovery support + wellness activities!

Over 30+ warmlines plus webinars, workshops, job postings, special events, consumer input opportunities and more.

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

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If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

How Events are Sorted:

First, at the top of the list: Disaster Hotline & Oregon Safe + Strong Helpline.

Next in the list: Bundled “All Day” Events for organizations with events happening at multiple times throughout the day and/or in many formats or locations; these are bundled into a single listing to prevent endless scrolling.  Usually these offer a lookup by zip code or other criteria. 

Lastly, Time-Specific Events listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  Warmlines and places east of Oregon’s time zone tend to start earlier (e.g. 4am in Oregon is 7am in New York).

Oct
5
Wed
01 – Chatline – Text HELP to 741741 to Connect with a Crisis Counselor for Crisis / Depression – Anytime 24/7/365 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Text Messaging
Oct 5 all-day

CHATLINE

FREE Text Messaging to Connect with a Crisis Counselor for Depression / Crisis, etc.

Anytime 24/7/365 Weekdays and Weekends

Text HELP to 741741  

An alternative way to connect is through Facebook Messenger at this link: https://www.messenger.com/t/204427966369963/?messaging_source=source%3Apages%3Amessage_shortlink

You aren’t alone – support is out there! 

How you feel NOW may not last Forever.

Connecting with someone who cares and listens can make a difference and can help us get through our most difficult moments.

Whether it’s friends, family, or community – Everyone needs Somebody to lean on!

NOTE: Wait time can vary.  Usually a response comes pretty quickly in under 5 minutes.  Sometimes the wait can be 5 to 15 minutes or longer if there is a disaster or other reason.

 

Who are the Crisis Counselors? They are trained volunteers who—with the support of full-time Crisis Text Line staff—use active listening, collaborative problem solving, and safety planning to help texters in their moment of crisis.

Crisis doesn’t just mean suicide; it’s any painful emotion for which you need support. 

This service is for short term needs and is not a substitute for a friend or professional therapist.

For more information, check out the Frequently Asked Questions at this link: https://www.crisistextline.org/about-us/faq/ 

crisis text line banner

01 – Helpline – DEQH DESI LGBTQ+ Helpline for South Asians – 24/7 Form or 5-7pm PST Phone on Thursdays and Sundays @ Phone or Email Form
Oct 5 all-day

 

Desi LGBTQ+ Helpline for ​South Asians

100% confidential support for South Asian lesbian, gay, bi, queer, Trans, Non-BINARY, questioning individuals in the United States

What is DeQH?

  • We are trained South Asian LGBQ/TGNB+ peer support volunteers
  • Call or write us with questions, concerns, struggles, and hopes
  • ​It’s always free — and 100% confidential

DeQH can help with…

  • questions on gender, identity, coming out
  • dealing with family, culture, or faith
  • trying to find community in your area
  • advice for a friend or family member
  • listening as you work through things

(1) Write to us anytime 24/7 online email form

Fill out our online contact form. You’ll hear back from a trained volunteer within a week.

Write to us now!

(2) Or call us by phone on Thursdays and/or Sundays 5-7pm evening nights

Trained volunteers are available to talk between:

  • Thursdays, 8-10 PM Eastern (5-7 PM Pacific)
  • Sundays, 8-10 PM Eastern (5-7 PM Pacific)

Call us at 908-367-3374 to talk.

(If you leave a message at any other time, we can call you back if requested.)

LGBQ/TGNB+? We serve individuals who are lesbian, gay, bisexual,  queer, questioning, intersex, transgender, gender non-binary, genderqueer, pansexual, kothi, hijra, and beyond.
South Asian? We serve people of South Asian heritage, including Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Burma, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Tibet, as well as from South Asian communities in diaspora, such as Fiji and the Caribbean.
01 – Support Line – L4L Racial Equity Support Line – BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free – Lines for Life – Weekdays – 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone
Oct 5 all-day
01 - Support Line - L4L Racial Equity Support Line - BIPOC Lived Experience @ 1-503-575-3764 or Toll Free - Lines for Life - Weekdays - 8:30am to 5:00pm PST @ Phone

 

Crisis / Support Line For Racial Equity Support

503-575-3764
Answered by BIPOC counselors 
M-F from 8:30 AM -5:00 PM PST

The Racial Equity Support Line is a service led and staffed by people with lived experience of racism. We offer support to those who are feeling the emotional impacts of racist violence and microaggressions, as well as the emotional impacts of immigration struggles and other cross-cultural issues.

Many of us experience racism every day.

Unfortunately, we live in a culture where racist acts happen often. From workplaces to housing to healthcare, we know that our communities aren’t getting the same kind of treatment as others.

Experiencing racism can harm our mental wellness.

Whether in small acts, or violent ones, racial bias can have serious emotional impacts. Racism changes how we see the world around us. It’s stressful to worry about how people see us as different or dangerous. It’s exhausting to notice the ways that people treat us as less-than, day in and day out. It’s heartbreaking to turn on the news and learn about more violence against people who look like us.

We get it. And we’re here to talk. To support. To connect.

The person who answers may be a stranger – but we understand what you’re going through. We’ll listen to your situation as you talk through your feelings, and we may offer resources based on what seems most helpful to you.

Call us today at 503-575-3764.

This line is available weekdays from 8:30am to 5pm, Pacific Standard Time.

If you have questions or want to reach the Director of Equity Initiatives, please email Donna Harrell at DonnaH@linesforlife.org.

Toll-Free Access

If you need toll-free access, call any line at Lines for Life and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line during its operating hours.

For example, you can call the Suicide Prevention Crisis Line @ 1-877-273-8255 or the Safe+Strong Helpline @ 1-800-923-4457 and ask to be transferred to the Racial Equity Support Line between 8:30am and 5pm PST.

04 – Resources – For Families and Children Facing Tragic Events – Racial Stress – Racism – Hate Crimes
Oct 5 all-day

 

Resources for Families and Children Facing Tragic Events

Racial Stress – Racism – Hate Crimes

 

Childrens Mental Health Network

Helpful Resources to Address the Mass Shooting in Uvalde, Texas
Many thanks to Michelle Zabel, MSS, Assistant Dean, and Director, The Institute for Innovation and Implementation, for compiling this list of resources in response to the horrific mass shooting in Texas earlier this week.

Helping Young People Cope With Mental Health Challenges
Vox Media’s NowThis is linking arms with Ken Burns and PBS to share an upcoming documentary titled “Hiding in Plain Sight: Youth Mental Illness.” Scenes from the forthcoming film will be shared across NowThis social platforms throughout Mental Health Awareness Month in May. NowThis will host a live TikTok conversation about the topic, as well. The goal, Burns said, is “to get this material out to young people around the country.” The film itself will debut at the end of June on PBS.

Uplift by Youth Era: Teaching Youth Peer Support Skills
More than 500 youth signed up for the most recent Uplift event! Studied by the University of Oxford and co-designed with young adults, Uplift by Youth Era is the future of peer support. Empower a young person in your life to be who they need, and apply to join the next Uplift training in June!

Randolph “Randy” Muck September 14, 1955 to April 21, 2021 in Memoriam
On the first anniversary of his death, several of us who knew and worked with Randy write this tribute to remember and honor his impact on so many people. Randy provided much-needed leadership from within the federal government to develop and disseminate evidence-based substance use treatments designed for adolescents and their families. He was successful because he had a rare ability to connect with all the groups important to improving adolescent treatment: provider organizations, schools, juvenile justice, counselors, federal agency decision-makers, researchers, private foundations, and most importantly—adolescents and their families. He saw how these groups could align their different interests and collaborate. This, in turn, helped youth, families, and systems of care in ways that continue to have an impact.

HHS Awards Nearly $25 Million to Expand Access to School-Based Health Services
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), through the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), recently announced nearly $25 million will be made available to improve and strengthen access to school-based health services in communities across the country. Awards will support local partnerships between schools and health centers to provide children and youth with the comprehensive physical and mental health care they need.

Investing in Prevention Makes Good Financial Sense
Primary prevention—including screening and intervention before negative health outcomes occur—is relatively inexpensive. The higher-risk behaviors it is designed to reduce are so costly to the healthcare system that it is staggeringly wasteful not to make sure that screening and treatment referrals are readily implemented and faithfully reimbursed by insurers and that interventions are convenient for parents and their children.

PAX Good Behavior Game
Speaking of prevention…
The PAX Good Behavior Game is an evidence-based universal preventive intervention applied by teachers in the classroom. This evidence-based practice consists of research-based strategies with origins in behavioral science, neuroscience, and cultural wisdom that operate together to improve children’s self-regulation. Teachers implement these strategies as part of their daily routines in carrying out tasks such as getting students’ attention, selecting students for tasks, transitioning from one task to the next, working as part of a team, limiting problematic behavior, and reinforcing pro-social behavior.

HHS Launches New Maternal Mental Health Hotline
The Maternal Mental Health Hotline is a new, confidential, toll-free hotline for expecting and new moms experiencing mental health challenges. Those who contact the hotline can receive a range of support, including brief interventions from trained culturally and trauma-informed counselors and referrals to both community-based and telehealth providers as needed. Callers also will receive evidence-based information and referrals to support groups and other community resources.

Six Things You Need To Know About Music and Health
A growing body of research suggests that listening to or performing music affects the brain in ways that may help promote health and manage disease symptoms. More justification for the plethora of music videos posted in Friday Update!

Know Your Rights: Parity for Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Benefits
This brochure gives an overview of the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008. It lists some common limits placed on mental health and substance use disorder benefits and services.

Going Digital: Behavioral Health Tech
Aaahhhh!!! Less than 20 days!!! Well? Have you registered for the 2022 Going Digital: Behavioral Health Tech summit on June 8-9th yet? Can’t make it? Wondering if you can access all of the sessions with our hundreds of speakers after June 8-9th? YES, but ONLY if you register in advance. So, you should probably get on that.

Building a More Equitable Juvenile Justice System for Everyone
Racial inequities regarding the policing of children, and the subsequent disparities in their treatment within the juvenile justice system, have been problems in this country for far too long. It is encouraging that many states and counties are not only recognizing these issues but are taking action. The CSG Justice Center is committed to providing research-driven, data-informed solutions to our partners to continue building safer and stronger communities for everyone, especially our youth.

Disruptions to School and Home Life Among High School Students During the COVID-19 Pandemic — Adolescent Behaviors and Experiences Survey, United States, January–June 2021
Young people have experienced disruptions to school and home life since the COVID-19 pandemic began in March 2020. From January to June 2021, CDC conducted the Adolescent Behaviors and Experiences Survey (ABES), an online survey of a probability-based, nationally representative sample of U.S. public- and private-school students in grades 9–12. ABES data were used to estimate the prevalence of disruptions and adverse experiences during the pandemic, including parental and personal job loss, homelessness, hunger, emotional or physical abuse by a parent or other adult at home, receipt of telemedicine, and difficulty completing schoolwork. Prevalence estimates are presented for all students by sex, race and ethnicity, grade, sexual identity, and difficulty completing schoolwork.

CDC Survey Finds the Pandemic Had a Big Impact on Teens’ Mental Health
According to a survey published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than four in 10 teens report feeling “persistently sad or hopeless” during the COVID-19 pandemic. Girls were twice as likely to experience mental health troubles compared to boys. And LGBTQ students were hit the hardest. The CDC’s findings were gathered from online surveys from a sample of 7,700 US students during the first six months of 2021.

New Initiative to Define Policy Recommendations for Embedding Equity into 988
The Kennedy-Satcher Center for Mental Health Equity & Beacon Health Options are joining forces to create and develop an equitable crisis response for the future of behavioral health service delivery ahead of the July 2022 launch of 988.

State Policymakers Can Support Equitable School-based Telemental Health Services
This brief presents five ways state policymakers can support equitable school-based telemental health services, with recommendations based on relevant policy context, existing research, and—in some cases—feedback from interviews with five TMH providers who testified to on-the-ground experience with these interventions.

 

University of MaryLand School of Social Work Institue for Innovation and Implimentation logo

SAMHSA Resources

 

General Resources
For Parents & Caregivers
For Providers

 

Daniel Tiger

Helping Children with Tragic Events in the News

In times of community or world-wide crisis, it’s easy to assume that young children don’t know what’s going on. But one thing’s for sure — children are very sensitive to how their parents feel. They’re keenly aware of the expressions on their parents’ faces and the tone of their voices. Children can sense when their parents are really worried, whether they’re watching the news or talking about it with others. No matter what children know about a “crisis,” it’s especially scary for children to realize that their parents are scared.

Some Scary, Confusing Images

The way that news is presented on television can be quite confusing for a young child. The same video segment may be shown over and over again through the day, as if each showing was a different event. Someone who has died turns up alive and then dies again and again. Children often become very anxious since they don’t understand much about videotape replays, closeups, and camera angles. Any televised danger seems close to home to them because the tragic scenes are taking place on the TV set in their own living room. Children can’t tell the difference between what’s close and what’s far away, what’s real and what’s pretend, or what’s new and what’s re-run.

The younger the children are, the more likely they are to be interested in scenes of close-up faces, particularly if the people are expressing some strong feelings. When there’s tragic news, the images on TV are most often much too graphic and disturbing for young children.

“Who will take care of me?”

In times of crisis, children want to know, “Who will take care of me?” They’re dependent on adults for their survival and security. They’re naturally self-centered. They need to hear very clearly that their parents are doing all they can to take care of them and to keep them safe. They also need to hear that people in the government and other grown-ups they don’t even know are working hard to keep them safe, too.

Helping Children Feel More Secure

Play is one of the important ways young children have of dealing with their concerns. Of course, playing about violent news can be scary and sometimes unsafe, so adults need to be nearby to help redirect that kind of play into nurturing themes, such as a hospital for the wounded or a pretend meal for emergency workers.

When children are scared and anxious, they might become more dependent, clingy, and afraid to go to bed at night. Whining, aggressive behavior, or toilet “accidents” may be their way of asking for more comfort from the important adults in their lives. Little by little, as the adults around them become more confident, hopeful and secure, our children probably will, too.

Turn Off the TV

When there’s something tragic in the news, many parents get concerned about what and how to tell their children. It’s even harder than usual if we’re struggling with our own powerful feelings about what has happened. Adults are sometimes surprised that their own reactions to a televised crisis are so strong, but great loss and devastation in the news often reawaken our own earlier losses and fears – even some we think we might have “forgotten”

It’s easy to allow ourselves to get drawn into watching televised news of a crisis for hours and hours; however, exposing ourselves to so many tragedies can make us feel hopeless, insecure, and even depressed. We help our children and ourselves if we’re able to limit our own television viewing. Our children need us to spend time with them – away from the frightening images on the screen.

Talking and Listening

Even if we wanted to, it would be impossible to give our children all the reasons for such things as war, terrorists, abuse, murders, major fires, hurricanes, and earthquakes. If they ask questions, our best answer may be to ask them, “What do you think happened?” If the answer is “I don’t know,” then the simplest reply might be something like, “I’m sad about the news, and I’m worried. But I love you, and I’m here to care for you.”

If we don’t let children know it’s okay to feel sad and scared, they may think something is wrong with them when they do feel that way. They certainly don’t need to hear all the details of what’s making us sad or scared, but if we can help them accept their own feelings as natural and normal, their feelings will be much more manageable for them.

Angry feelings are part of being human, especially when we feel powerless. One of the most important messages we can give our children is, “It’s okay to be angry, but it’s not okay to hurt ourselves or others.” Besides giving children the right to their anger, we can help them find constructive things to do with their feelings. This way, we’ll be giving them useful tools that will serve them all their life, and help them to become the worlds’ future peacemakers — the world’s future “helpers.”

Helpful Hints

  • Do your best to keep the television off, or at least limit how much your child sees of any news event.
  • Try to keep yourself calm. Your presence can help your child feel more secure.
  • Give your child extra comfort and physical affection, like hugs or snuggling up together with a favorite book. Physical comfort goes a long way towards providing inner security. That closeness can nourish you, too.
  • Try to keep regular routines as normal as possible. Children and adults count on their familiar pattern of everyday life.
  • Plan something that you and your child enjoy doing together, like taking a walk, going on a picnic, having some quiet time, or doing something silly. It can help to know there are simple things in life that can help us feel better, in good times and in bad.
  • Even if children don’t mention what they’ve seen or heard in the news, it can help to ask what they think has happened. If parents don’t bring up the subject, children can be left with their misinterpretations. You may be really surprised at how much your child has heard from others.
  • Focus attention on the helpers, like the police, firemen, doctors, nurses, paramedics, and volunteers. It’s reassuring to know there are many caring people who are doing all they can to help others in this world.
  • Let your child know if you’re making a donation, going to a town meeting, writing a letter or e-mail of support, or taking some other action. It can help children to know that adults take many different active roles and that we don’t give in to helplessness in times of worldwide crisis.

 

 

What do we tell our children? How do we reassure them of their own safety?
At The Dougy Center in Portland, Oregon, we’ve provided grief support groups for children, teens, young adults and their parents or adult caregivers since 1982.

Based on our experience, here are some things for adults to keep in mind as you struggle with how to talk with children following tragic events, such as natural disasters, plane crashes, or school shootings.

1. Don’t project your fears onto your children. They take their cues from the adults around them.
You can’t hear the news about children being murdered or communities devastated by natural disasters without thinking about how you’d feel if it happened to your family, friends, or hometown. The outpouring of care and empathy for the families who lost loved ones will be powerful, and…we all know it could have been our friends, our child, our family and community members who died or were injured.

Identifying with the senselessness and randomness makes us all feel more vulnerable. But we should remember that children don’t always see things the same way that adults do, and it won’t be helpful to them for us to fall apart. They need to see that we care, that we feel terrible about this tragedy, and that we will do everything we can to keep them safe. They will take their cues from our behavior.

It’s okay to show emotion. We can model for children that feeling sad, scared, and upset is normal after tragedies. But we don’t want to overwhelm them with our emotions, or put them in the position of having to ‘parent,’ or take care of, the adults around them. Make sure you also model taking care of yourself, by sharing with trusted and supportive adult friends, eating (and drinking) healthfully.

2. Try to limit their access to the recurring news and exposure to the tragedy over and over.
Over-exposure to the graphic and emotional news can be overwhelming for children and can cause unnecessary anxiety and fear. Some children who repeatedly watched the footage of planes crashing into the towers on 9/11 thought it was happening again and again. Some children (and some adults) may have difficulty getting graphic scenes and images out of their minds. Too much exposure can fuel their fear, so don’t let them sit and watch the news over and over. Better yet, set the example of not doing so yourself as well.

3. Understand that you can’t completely shield them from what happened.
It would be next to impossible to hide these events from children, as much as we wish we could. You might be able to shield your own child in your home, for example, by not turning on (or owning) a television, but you can’t protect your children from hearing about it from other kids. The fact is, they will hear about it, so although they don’t “need” to know about it, pretending we can shield them is magical thinking.

That said, you don’t need to give them more information than they can handle, or more than they’re asking for. A simple, “Did they talk about what happened in _____ today at school?” would be a good starter. They need to know that you’re not trying to hide the truth from them, that you’re open to talking about it, but that you’re also not forcing them to do so.

4. Model truth-telling and build trust with your children by letting them hear things, even hard things, from you directly.
Eight days after the 9/11 attacks, I was meeting in small groups with pre-school workers in New York City, talking about how to respond to the young children in their care about the events. A man asked to speak to me privately after one of the trainings, and asked for my advice around his 7-year-old daughter. For the last week, since September 12th, she had been having stomach aches and difficulty sleeping. He said it was not tied to the events of 9/11 because, “We don’t have a television.” As his story unfolded it was evident that he did not want to have to explain to his child why people would do such horrible things, a normal dilemma that we face as parents and adults. This child was experiencing physical reactions, as it turned out, not primarily because of her reaction to the events of 9/11, but because she was unable to share her fears and concerns and questions in her own home, faced with her parents’ denial.

Here are some principles to keep in mind as you talk with children:

1. There is no one typical reaction one can or should expect from children.
Their responses will vary all over the ‘emotional’ map, from seeming disinterest to nightmares, eating issues, and anxiety. How any specific child will respond will depend on their age, previous experience with death and loss, and their personality style. Fearful children will tend to worry; quiet children may keep their feelings to themselves; those who want to appear unfazed may exhibit a sense of bravado or lack of caring. Of course, children directly affected – those who had a family member die; those who witnessed the tragedy; those who had friends die – will tend to have longer-term reactions and needs. Watch for changes in behavior, or concerning trends. While it would be normal to have heightened anxiety and sleeplessness, any concerning behavior or troubling symptoms should be taken seriously, and if warranted, professional help sought.

2. Many children will have an increased sense of fear about their safety.
Understandably. So will many adults. After a shooting at an Oregon mall in December 2012, the news outlets were filled with people who said they’d never take their children there again. Others said they’d return as soon as it opened in order to support the stores and employees who had experienced the traumatic events, and whose livelihoods were going to suffer as a result of the several day closure. Some runners in the Boston Marathon vowed to return; others said they would never do so again.

While we can’t guarantee to our children that nothing bad will ever happen to them, we can provide assurance that these events are relatively rare, and that we will do everything we can to keep them safe. Children may have many questions about the events, particularly about natural disasters. Answer their questions with language that fits their developmental stage. It’s okay if you don’t know the answer to a question. If it’s a question that might have an answer, offer to look up more information. You can also ask children what they think the answer is as they often have thoughts and ideas they want to share with you. In the case of natural disasters, if your child is fearful of something like that happening in your community, talk with them about the safety plan that you have in place for your family and home. You can also look into what community safety measures are in place and whatever elements are relevant with your children. Many children will be reassured knowing that there are specific, tangible things they and your family can do if something occurs. Some examples include, picking a meeting place, keeping flashlights in every bedroom, talking about where you will keep emergency water and food.

3. Children want, need, and deserve the truth.
In over 30 years of providing grief support to thousands of children and teens at The Dougy Center for Grieving Children & Families, we have never heard a child say, “I’m glad I was lied to.” Many, however, struggle with anger and lack of trust toward parents or other adults who lied to them. When we don’t tell the truth, they learn that we cannot be trusted. As difficult as it can be at times, and as horrendous as the truth may be, children want, need, and deserve the truth. Being able to talk openly and honestly with your children about tragic events and other losses, creates a foundation of trust, enabling them to come to you in the future with their questions, fears, and concerns.

 

How race-related stress affects you and your relationship with your child

What effect does racism have on your health and well-being?

Not only does racism impact you as a parent, it can also impact how you interact with your children. Experiences of racism build on each other and can chip away at your emotional, physical and spiritual resources as a parent, contributing to race-related stress. Race-related stress can make it hard to have the space needed to take care of yourself as a parent, which reduces the emotional space you need to adequately take care of your children.

 

Physical effects

Physical Effects

Physical Effects can include increased hypertension, illness and risky behaviors such as substance use.

 

Emotional effects

Emotional Effects

Emotional effects can include depression, anxiety, anger, irritability and aggression.

 

Spiritual effects

Spiritual Effects

Spiritual effects can include a decreased sense of purpose, lack of connection with the larger community, isolation from larger social groups and reduced involvement in communal activities that you enjoy.

 

Potential reactions to racial stress or trauma

Insecure feelings

Insecure Feelings

Feelings of shame and lack of confidence due to feeling that a situation cannot be changed.

Lack of trust

Lack of Trust

Feeling detached or a lack of trust for others due to experiencing multiple losses or letdowns. This can make it very difficult to seek out help and to identify potential safe sources of support.

Triggers

Triggers

Reminders of the event, such as particular people or situations, can also trigger strong emotional or physical responses (e.g., crying or rapid heartbeat).

Emotions

Difficulty Controlling Emotions

Difficulty controlling emotional responses (going from “zero to one hundred”) can occur as the body helps you adapt to potentially unsafe situations, making you feel constantly on “alert.”

The body’s response to the experience of racism can make accessing resources to cope with the situation difficult. Race-related stress is unique in that it threatens psychological resources that are needed to cope and fulfill basic needs such as financial support, housing, access to jobs, etc.

When your body is in stress mode, it is geared up to help you and your child survive, which sometimes leads to impulsive decisions. If you live in a chronic state of stress related to racism, you can start to engage in survival coping. Survival coping can help you to deal with very hard or potentially life-threatening situations. However, if you continue to exist in this mode long-term, it can make it difficult to enjoy being in the moment with your child and can reduce your ability to feel safe and in control.

 

What impact can racial stress have on your parenting?

Experiencing race-related stress can also impact the quality of parenting relationships in the following ways:

Impostor syndrome

When you are exposed to racism repeatedly, you often start doubting yourself and can feel like you are an imposter in dominant culture settings or in settings where you feel as though you do not belong. Your inner thoughts might sound something like: “Am I being judged?” “Am I worthy?” “I got lucky.” “I only got this because I am Black.”

Being overly alert (hypervigilance)

Experiencing racial stress can make you more aware of potential dangers and negative experiences that can occur. This, in turn, can make the experience of parenting even more stressful. When you interact with your children, you can sometimes be reminded of negative race-related experiences that you had when you were a child. This reminder can amp up emotional responses, or hyperarousal, making it hard for you to “keep your cool” and be open to flexible problem solving.

“Helicopter parenting” (monitoring in fear)

These experiences of racism and unwarranted blame or lack of acceptance can make you want to protect your children so much, that you don’t allow them to explore in the way that they need to. You may shelter them from failures, which everyone needs to experience in order to learn how to manage everyday life. You may tend to be overly cautious or suspicious. Examples can include not allowing your children to have sleepovers or go to the park, even with your supervision.

Difficulty regulating emotions

  • When your past influences your emotional state, it can affect your emotional responses to both big and minor stressors with children, such as when they misbehave. This, in turn, can lead to being overprotective or overuse of physical discipline, as a means of survival.
  • For children, having parents who can keep perspective (stay cool) when children are upset, or misbehaving is very important. Likewise, it is important to stay calm when disciplining a child, otherwise discipline may go overboard. Both of these things can be hard if you are having difficulty controlling your emotions.

Avoidance

  • Avoiding situations that are related to racism can be a needed strategy to survive; such as instances that may involve violence or threat to yourself or your family. Sometimes you may avoid reminders of past experiences due to the pain or discomfort they cause.
  • If you find yourself avoiding strong feelings or situations with your child that bring up painful memories, it may make it hard to show affection and support for your child. It may even make it difficult to know how to provide emotional support for your child during times of stress. For instance, if your child brings up their own experience of oppression or an event in their life reminds you of something from your own childhood.

Mistrusting others

  • Racism can lead to distrust or mistrust of other communities. Internalized racism is when you begin to accept negative messages about your own abilities and inherent worth by the dominant group in society.
  • When you use society’s norms to judge yourself, you can feel depressed, unworthy and just not good enough. You are taught in many ways to take these feelings and paint them onto another group.
  • Intra and interracial violence, contention among disenfranchised communities or color, and the way the media conveys information about people of color, contribute to this.
  • This kind of coping can make you more vulnerable to racism, because on some level you may believe in racial hierarchy and difference when you belittle other groups. And when you show your children that it is right to discriminate against certain other groups, you make them more vulnerable to discrimination that they face.

Minimizing racism

  • Racism is overwhelming, as is the history of violence. You are sometimes taught that accepting this and minimizing racism is the only thing you can do. But when you ignore racism, and accept powerlessness, you encourage your kids to internalize racism. This can lead to increased levels of depression, anxiety and externalizing behaviors (e.g., engaging in risky behaviors, such as alcohol or substance use).
  • When you believe that you should be able to handle and manage it all without a break or without asking for help, you are at increased risk for health problems and can miss important cues about your well-being and safety.

Self-blame

Experiencing chronically unfair and dangerous discriminatory practices due to race can lead to feelings of low worth. For parents, this can also lead to a questioning of your parenting choices and abilities.

Unbalanced Racial and Ethnic Socialization (RES)

Unbalanced messaging or communication about race and ethnicity occurs when you only promote messages of mistrust, preparation for bias, or only give racial pride messages to your children.

 

Strategies to deal with racial stress and practice self-care.

So, what can you do to mitigate racial stress?

As parents, it is important to develop positive identities and share your cultural identities with your children. Positive cultural identity and advocacy are protective factors against racism, which can help to reduce and prevent racial stress.

There are many other ways to cope with stress and everyone has different preferences. Reducing stress can also allow you to model healthy coping strategies for your child. Here are some suggestions you can try.

You are not the only person dealing with race-related stress and connecting with other people with similar experiences and feelings can help you to successfully navigate racism.

  • Talk with family and trusted friends specifically about racialized events that have occurred and how to handle them
  • Start or join a group with others who may have had similar experiences and similar interests, like a book club that reads books by Black authors, or spend time with other African American parents who have the same concerns you do about how your children are treated at the school.
  • Seek out activities that you can do with your friends or family (e.g., exercising, cooking, watching a family show or movie together, etc.)

 

Legislation
Much of the debate today is around gun control. Below are links to two bills currently pending in Congress.

HR 1446 Enhanced Background Check Act of 2021

HR 8 Bipartisan Background Checks Act of 2021

 

 

05 – Warmline – 877-360-LGBT(5428) – National Resource Center on LGBTQ+ Aging – 24/7 @ Phone
Oct 5 all-day

SAGE National LGBTQ+ Elder Hotline

877-360-LGBT(5428)

Talk and be heard at the SAGE LGBTQ+ Elder Hotline. We connect LGBTQ+ older people who want to talk with friendly responders who are ready to listen. If you are an LGBTQ+ elder or care for one, call the free SAGE Hotline, toll-free, at 877-360-LGBT(5428). Hotline responders:

  • Are certified in crisis response
  • Offer support without judgment
  • Answer questions factually and confidentially
  • Provide information about community support resources such as healthcare, transportation, counseling, legal services, and emotional support programs

The SAGE LGBTQ+ Elder Hotline is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, in English and Spanish, with translation in 180 languages.

Members of our community are likely to live alone and feel isolated. Through our hotline, we can connect everyone with a phone to an LGBTQ+ responder who is friendly, knowledgeable, and ready to listen. The hotline is managed by our partner United Way Worldwide.

The National Resource Center on LGBTQ+ Aging is the country’s first and only technical assistance resource center focused on improving the quality of services and supports offered to lesbian, gay, bisexual and/or transgender older adults, their families and caregivers.

4D – 4th Dimension Recovery – Recovery Meetings – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online Via ZOOM
Oct 5 all-day

 

4th Dimension Recovery

 Recovery Meetings – Monday through Sunday

MONDAYS

Love Wins @ 5:30PM

Welcomes youth, LGBTQ+ non-binary and POC. Low-key NA book study meeting that offers an inclusive, safe space for marginalized people.

ZOOM: https://www.zoom.us/j/904315993

A New Freedom, A New Happiness @ 7:15PM

AA Big Book study for all. Newcomers welcome.

No More Methin’ Around @ 9PM

New CMA meeting started by young people in the community!

Night Owls @ 11PM

 

TUESDAYS

Open 4 Attack @ 5:30PM

Men’s open recovery meeting that promotes strength through vulnerability and positive feedback

Southern Comfort @ 7:30PM

Traditional weekly AA speaker meeting that celebrates birthdays.

HYBRID, Zoom ID: 345-408-4670

 

WEDNESDAYS

SOUNDS OF RECOVERY @ 6:00PM

Energized open recovery meeting that holds a safe space for creative shares such as dance, music, poetry, etc.

Night Owls @ 11PM

 

THURSDAYS

KNUCKLEHEADS @ 7:30-9:00PM

Hybrid AA Closed Men’s meeting. We meet frequently so that newcomers may find the fellowship they seek. HYBRID ZOOM ID: 779-832-085 PW: Knucks

Night Owls @ 11PM

 

FRIDAYS

Sick Friends 7:00PM

OPEN AA MEETING: welcoming of people from all stages of the recovery journey. COME FOR THE COFFEE STAY FOR THE MESSAGE

Night Owls @ 11:PM

 

SATURDAYS

FOUNDATIONS @ 6:30PM

H.A. meeting started by young people in the community!

SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE @ 8:00PM

Weekly Saturday night speaker meeting. @ new speakers every week!

HIBRID ZOOM ID: 438-175-7799 PW SNL

Night Owls @ 11PM

 

SUNDAYS

QUEENS W/A SOLUTION @ 10:00AM

A diverse NA meeting for female identifying and non-binary persons with a strong group conscious & reliable home group.

ZOOM: 818-48810-739 PW: queens

S.M.A.R.T @ 5:30PM

To learn CBT skill for coping wi/addiction in recovery

F*CK DRUGS GET HIGH ON LIFE @ 7:00PM

Open NA meeting with a growing community presence

Night Owls @ 11PM

 

Want to start a new meeting at Milwaukie 4D?

Contact ELLY at: 971-865-9732

 

AA OR A58 – Alcoholics Anonymous Oregon Area 58 – Find A Meeting In Oregon – English, Spanish, Hearing Impaired – Weekdays & Weekends
Oct 5 all-day

 

 

Find an AA Meeting In Oregon

Meetings in Spanish – Hearing Impaired Meetings – Online & In-Person – Hot Lines – Phone Apps

Looking for a local AA meeting?

Meeting lists are provided by local Districts, Intergroups and Central Offices.

You can use the district map page to find the District you’re interested in and then visit the meeting list and/or website for that district.  If a District has no website, the nearest Intergroup or Central Office may be listed.

Hotline phone numbers listed below may also help.

If interested, you can download the meeting guide app from following the links below.

 

District Websites With Meeting Lists

Link: 

https://www.aa-oregon.org/find-meetings/#districtlinks 

Click the link above for the List of Oregon AA Districts with AA Meetings and Hotlines plus Phone Apps.

AA Portland Districts map page.

For a detailed view of Districts in the Portland area, visit the map page.

Link:

https://www.aa-oregon.org/portland-districts/

NOTE: Districts, Intergroups and Central Offices are independent service entities; Oregon Area 58 is not responsible for the content of their web sites.

Higher resolution maps of the District boundaries in Portland and in Oregon are also available for download.

District Websites

 

Hotlines

Tel: (971) 601-9220  Astoria / Seaside

Tel: (503) 739-4856  Tillamook

Link: Website & meeting list

 

~~~

 

District 2

Depoe Bay, Lincoln City, Newport, Siletz, South Beach, Toledo and Waldport

24-Hour Hotline

Tel: (541) 265-1953

 

Para Preguntas Llamar:

Tel: (541) 574-7842

 

Link: Website & meeting list

 

~~~

 

District 3

Arlington, Boardman, Condon, Fossil, Hepper, Hermiston, Ione, Mission, Pendleton and Pilot Rock

 

Hotline

Tel: (800) 410-5953

Link: Website & meeting list

 

~~~

 

Districts 4 & 28

Salem, Dallas

 

Hotline

Tel: (503) 399-0599

Link: Website & meeting list

 

~~~

 

District 5

Bend, Burns, Chemult, Culver, John Day, La Pine, Madras, Metolius, Mt. Vernon, Prineville, Redmond, Sisters, Sunriver, Terrabonne, Tumalo, and Warm Springs

 

24-Hour Hotline:

Tel: (541) 548-0440

Link: Website & meetings list

 

~~~

 

District 6

Emerald Valley Intergroup:

Eugene, Alvadore, Cottage Grove, Creswell, Junction City, Lowell, Springfield, Veneta

 

24-Hour Hotline:

Tel: (541) 342-4113

Link: Website & meetings list

 

~~~

 

District 7

Josephine County Intergroup & Central Office

 

24-Hour Hotline:

Tel: (541) 474-0782

Link: Website & meeting list

 

District 8

Coos Bay, Florence, Gardiner, Lakeside, Mapleton, North Bend, Reedsport

 

24-Hour Hotline:

Tel: (541) 269-3265

Link: Website & meeting list

 

District 9

Northwest/Downtown Portland

 

24-Hour Hotline:

Tel: (503) 223-8569

Link: Website & meeting list 

 

District 10

Beaverton, Portland, Tigard

 

24-Hour Hotline:

Tel: (503) 223-8569

Link: Website & meeting list

 

District 11

Gresham & East County

 

24-Hour Hotline:

Tel: (503) 223-8569

Link: Website & meeting list

 

District 12

Eastside Portland

 

24-Hour Hotline:

Tel: (503) 223-8569

Link: Meeting schedule (on Portland Intergroup web site)

 

District 13

Roseburg, Canyonville, Drain, Glendale, Riddle

 

24-Hour Hotline:

Tel: (541) 673-7552

Link: Website & meeting list

 

District 14

Bingen/White Salmon WA, Carson WA, Goldendale WA, Hood River, Maupin, Moro, Odell, Parkdale, Stevenson WA, The Dalles, Tygh Valley

 

24-Hour Hotline:

Tel: (833) 423-3683 = (833-HAD-ENUF)

Link: Website & meeting list

 

District 15

Clackamas, Milwaukie, West Linn

 

24-Hour Hotline:

Tel: (503) 223-8569

Link: Website & meeting list

 

District 16

Applegate, Ashland, Butte Falls, Central Point,
Eagle Point, Gold Hill, Jacksonville, Medford,
Phoenix, Prospect, Rogue River, Ruch, Talent,
& White City

 

24-Hour Hotline:

Tel: (541) 773-4848

Link: Website & meeting list

 

District 17

Klamath & Lake Counties

 

24-Hour Hotline:

Tel: (541) 883-4970

Link: Website & meeting list

 

District 18

Clatskanie, Ranier, St. Helens, Scappoose, Vernonia

 

24-hour Hotline:

Tel: (503) 366-0667  Columbia County

Link: Website & meeting list

 

District 19

Southwest of Eugene

 

24 Hour Hotline:

Tel: (541) 342-4113

Link: Website (Emerald Valley Intergroup) & meeting list

 

District 20

Springfield

 

24 Hour Hotline:

Tel: (541) 342-4113

Link: Web site (Emerald Valley Intergroup) & meeting list

 

District 21

Albany, Corvallis, Lebanon, Willamette Valley

 

24-Hour Hotline:

Tel: (541) 967-4252

Link: Web site & meeting list

 

District 22

McMinnville, Newberg

24-Hour Hotlines:
Tel: (503) 472-1172 (McMinnville)
Tel: (888) 472-1172 (Newberg)

Link: Website & meeting list

 

District 23

Tualatin

 

24-Hour Hotline:

Tel: (503) 684-0415

Link: Website (Westside Central Office) & meeting list

 

District 24

Eastside Portland

 

24-Hour Hotline:

Tel: (503) 223-8569

Link: Website & meeting list (on Portland Intergroup web site)

 

District 25

Estacada, Gresham

 

24-Hour Hotline:

Tel: (503) 223-8569

Link: Website & meeting list (on Portland Intergroup web site)

 

District 26

North Portland

 

24-Hour Hotline:

Tel: (503) 223-8569

Link: Website & meeting list (on Portland Intergroup web site)

 

District 27

Southeast Portland

 

24-Hour Hotline:

Tel: (503) 223-8569

Link: Website & meeting list (on Portland Intergroup web site)

 

Districts 28 (and 4)

Salem, Dallas

 

Hotline:

Tel: (503) 399-0599

Link: Website & meeting list

 

District 29

Baker, Union & Wallowa Counties

 

24-Hour Hotline:

Tel: (541) 624-5117

Link: Website & meeting list

 

District 30

Oregon South Coast – Bandon, Brookings, Coquille, Gold Beach, Langlois, Myrtle Point, Port Oxford

 

24-Hour Hotlines:

Tel: (541) 347-1720  Bandon

Tel: (541) 469-2440  Brookings

Link: Website & meeting list

 

District 31

Hillsboro

 

24-Hour Hotline:

Tel: 503-684-0415

Link: Website (Westside Central Office) & meeting list

 

District 32

Canyon City, John Day, Mount Vernon

 

24-Hour Hotline:

Tel: (541) 548-0440

Link: Website & meeting list (Central Oregon Intergroup)

 

Districts 34 & 35

Spanish Language districts for the entire state.

 

Para ayuda llame las 24 Horas al

Tel: (971) 327-5523

Link: Meeting list (en Español)

 

District 36

Southwest Portland and parts of Lake Oswego

 

Link: Website and meeting list

 

District 37

Wilsonville, Sherwood, and West Linn

 

Link: Website (Westside Central Office) & meeting list

 

Download District maps of Portland and Oregon in higher resolution formats:

 

Portland Districts Map 11×17

1 file(s) 670.00 KB

 

Portland Districts Map 36×42

1 file(s) 1.06 MB

 

Oregon Districts Map 11×17

1 file(s) 755.71 KB

 

~~~

 

Meetings en Español

 

Directorio de Grupos Hispaños:

 

Directory of Spanish-speaking Groups

1 file(s) 105.75 KB

 

~~~

 

Distrito 28, 34 & 35

Oficina Intergrupal Hispaña De Salem Oregon
2495 Lancaster Dr. NE | Salem, OR 97303
(503) 899-2652

 

Distrito 28

Salem

 

Para ayuda llame las 24 Horas al

Tel: (971) 327-5523

Link: Meeting schedule

 

Distrito 34

Para ayuda llame las 24 Horas al

Tel: (971) 327-5523

Link: Meeting list (en Español)

 

Distrito 35

Para ayuda llame las 24 Horas al

Tel: (971) 327-5523

Link: Website

Link: Meeting list (en Español)

 

~~~

 

Meetings for the Hearing Impaired

 

AA Meeting Schedule for the Hearing Impaired

Hotline Phone Numbers by City

Albany/Corvallis:                 541-967-4252
Astoria-Gearhart:                 971-601-9220
Baker City:                         541-624-5117
Bandon, Coquille:                541-347-1720
Boardman                          800-410-5953
Clatskanie, Rainier,              503-366-0667
  Scappoose, St Helens,

  Vernonia

Coos Bay, North Bend,          (541) 469-2440
  Lakeside, Reedsport,

  Florence, Gardiner,

  Mapleton

Bend:                                541-548-0440
Brookings:                          541-469-2440
Burns:                               541-548-0440
Cannon Beach:                    503-861-5526
Condon                              800-410-5953
The Dalles/Hood River:         800-999-9210
Echo                                  800-410-5953
Enterprise                          541-624-5117
Eugene:                             541-342-4113
Grants Pass:                       541-474-0782
Heppner                             800-410-5953
Hermiston:                         800-410-5953
Klamath:                            541-883-4970
La Grande:                         541-624-5117
Lincoln City:                       541-265-1953
Medford (District):               541-773-4848
McMinnville:                        503-472-1172
Newberg:                           888-472-1172
Newport:                            541-265-1953
Ontario (includes Boise):       208-344-6611
Pendleton:                          800-410-5953
Pilot Rock                           800-410-5953
Portland:                            503-223-8569
Westside Central Office:        503-684-0415
Roseburg:                          541-673-7552
Salem:                               503-399-0599
Seaside:                             971-601-9220
Siletz:                                541-265-1953
Umatilla                             800-410-5953
Yachats, Waldport, Toledo:    541-265-1953

 

 

AA Meeting Finder Applications

Meeting Guide App For Android

Meeting Guide App For iPhone

 

 

 

 

 

ALZ – Alzheimer’s Association – ALZConnected – Online Support Groups and Community – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online (register for details)
Oct 5 all-day

 

 

 

 

ALZConnected – Online Support Groups and Community – Daily

ALZConnected® (alzconnected.org), powered by the Alzheimer’s Association®, is a free online community for everyone affected by Alzheimer’s or another dementia, including:

  • People with the disease.
  • Caregivers.
  • Family members.
  • Friends.
  • Individuals who have lost someone to Alzheimer’s.

Support groups will be hosted via phone or video conference instead of in-person. Meeting schedules will be assessed on a month-to-month basis.

Please locate your local program in the Community Resource Finder or contact our 24/7 Helpline (800.272.3900) for details.

Use the Link Below For Online Support

https://www.alzconnected.org/signup.aspx

24/7 Helpline: 800.272.3900

Dial 711 to connect with a TRS operator

The Alzheimer’s Association 24/7 Helpline (800.272.3900) is available around the clock, 365 days a year. Through this free service, specialists and master’s-level clinicians offer confidential support and information to people living with the disease, caregivers, families and the public.

For Live Help Line Chat Click on the Link Below

MORE PROGRAMS AND SUPPORT GROUPS

The Alzheimer’s Association is here for you, day and night. Our programs and support services connect you with peers and professionals to help you make the plans and adjustments necessary to live your best life for as long as possible. Use these links to learn more about our offerings:

 

Alzheimer’s Association

Our Vision: A world without Alzheimer’s and all other dementia®.

Our Mission: The Alzheimer’s Association leads the way to end Alzheimer’s and all other dementia — by accelerating global research, driving risk reduction and early detection, and maximizing quality care and support.

Care and Support

We work on a national and local level to provide care and support for all those affected by Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

Research

As the largest nonprofit funder of Alzheimer’s research, the Association is committed to advancing vital research toward methods of treatment, prevention and, ultimately, a cure.

Advocacy

The Association is the leading voice for Alzheimer’s disease advocacy, fighting for critical Alzheimer’s research and care initiatives at the state and federal level.

225 N. Michigan Ave. Floor 17 Chicago, IL 60601

 

AM – All Month – Veterans Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255, Veterans and Military Families Resources and Information
Oct 5 all-day

CRISIS LINES AND WARMLINES

 

Veterans Crisis Line: 800-273-8255, Press 1

Women Veterans Hotline: 855-829-663

Vet Center Call Center: 877-WAR-VETS (927-8387)

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Caregiver Support Line: 855-260-3274

Lines for Life Military Help Line:  Call 1-888-457-4838

Senior Loneliness Line:  Call 503-200-1633

The Trevor Project:  866-488-7386

 

RESOURCES AND INFORMATION

Veteran Resource Navigator

The coronavirus pandemic has changed our world. But it has not changed Oregon’s commitment to those who served and fought for us.

This comprehensive online resource guide is meant to assist veterans from all walks of life in finding the benefits that are most useful to their unique circumstances at this time.

These benefits and resources are yours, earned through your faithful and honorable service to our nation; they are also an investment in the state of Oregon, because your success is our success.

Oregon veterans are a diverse community, but we are united in our shared service, and this has never been truer than it is today. We are all in this together, and we are not defeated. We will stand again, united.


If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance, please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.


Resources by Topic Area

COVID Economic Resources

Economic

Emergency aid, employment, disability, taxes, scams, veteran-owned businesses

COVID Housing and Food Resources

Housing and Food

Housing security and support, homelessness resources, food

COVID Education Resources

Education

Federal VA resources, Voc Rehab re-entry, GI Bill updates, apprenticeships info

COVID Resources

Other Resources

Resources for families, aging veterans, and Oregon OEM COVID-19 resources

COVID Health and Wellness Resources

Health and Wellness

Healthcare, mental health, medical transportation, crisis hotlines

COVID Agency Resources

Agency Resources

Changes and updates about ODVA’s programs and resources

 

LOCATE VETERANS SERVICES IN OREGON

 

Veteran Services by County

Click on the  map below to access resources in your county.

 

VETERANS SERVICES IN OREGON BY CATEGORY

Click on the Image Below to find services by category

 

COVID-19 ALERT – Due to COVID-19, many County Offices are limiting in-person services and are providing services by phone.

Please call your County Veteran Service Office before going in to confirm how they can best serve you during this time.

 

If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance,

please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.

Contact ODVA Headquarters

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs
700 Summer St NE
Salem, OR 97301

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned. Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy, so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

Print out your VA Welcome Kit

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned.

Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

Download your VA Welcome Kit

Feel free to share this guide with friends or family members who need help with their benefits too. You can print out copies for yourself and others:

Download our guides to VA benefits and services

For Veterans

For family members

 

Other Resources Available to Veterans and Military Service Members

DD214 & Military Records Request:

https://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records

Veteran Resource Navigator site by ODVA:

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

(Oregon)Military Help Line:  

Call 888-457-4838

VA Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255:

Press 1.VA Confidential crisis chat at net or text to 838255 

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD:

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/

Defining Discharge Status:

https://militarybenefits.info/character-of-discharge/#:~:text=There%20are%206%20types%20of,DD%20214%20must%20have%20a

How to apply for a discharge status upgrade:

https://www.va.gov/discharge-upgrade-instructions/

Oregon Supportive Services for Vets & Families (Housing):

https://caporegon.org/what-we-do/ssvf/

Clackamas County VSO’s (Veteran Service Officers):

https://www.clackamas.us/socialservices/veterans.html

Portland VA Clinic that can help with homelessness & medical care:

https://www.portland.va.gov/locations/crrc.asp

 

National Resource Directory (NRD)

https://nrd.gov/

The National Resource Directory (NRD) is a resource website that connects wounded warriors, Service Members, Veterans, their families, and caregivers to programs and services that support them. The NRD is hosted, managed, maintained, sustained and developed by the Defense Health Agency’s Recovery Coordination Program.

It provides access to services and resources at the national, state and local levels to support recovery, rehabilitation and community reintegration. Visitors can find information on a variety of topics that supply an abundance of vetted resources. For help finding resources on the site, visit the How to Use this site section of the NRD. Please see below for some of our major categories.

 

The National Recovery Directory is a partnership among the Departments of Defense, Labor, and Veterans Affairs. Information contained within the NRD is from federal, state, and local government agencies; Veteran and military service organizations; non-profit and community-based organizations; academic institutions and professional associations that provide assistance to wounded warriors and their families.

GLOSSARIES

Find definitions to commonly used terms in VA, DoD, DOL, and other federal government agencies.

NRD FACT SHEET

Get to know your NRD: why it was created, who operates it, and all the resources meant for you.

KEY CONTACTS

Find contacts in the Departments of Defense, Labor, and Veterans Affairs and Military Services.

 

 

 

 

Tue, January 25, 2022, 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM PST

ONLINE EVENT

Semper Fi & America’s Fund offers a Caregiver Support Program encompassing a variety of activities, education, support tools and resource connections designed to assist the spouses, parents, siblings, extended family members, or close friends who drop everything to care for a catastrophically wounded, critically ill or injured service member. The Caregiver Support Program provides different types of events to suit the busy schedules of our caregivers.

Join MVCN with special guest Karen Hetherington, Director of Case Management for the Semper Fi & America’s Fund, a non-profit that assists catastrophically wounded, ill and injured service members. Ms. Hetherington will share about Semper Fi & America’s Fund’s programs and answer questions.

Come learn how Semper Fi & America’s Fund can help you!

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

**Please SAVE your confirmation email as it contains information to join the Zoom group.** Check your spam or junk folder if you do not receive an email confirmation from Eventbrite.Find other peer support opportunities on our Caregiver Calendar on the MVCN website. https://www.redcross.org/caregiversVisit the safe and secure, caregiver-only Online Community available 24/7 for support. https://mvcn.force.com/login.

 

 

 

 

Dual Diagnosis Anonymous

 

 

“You protected us, now we support you!”

https://ddainc.org/dda-veterans-page/

DDA was founded by a highly decorated veteran, Corbett Monica. After serving in the Vietnam War, like other veterans, returning to home only find anguish, trauma, and remorse. After suffering from severe PTSD, OCD, survivors guilt, and addictions, Corbett found a way to transcend from destructive means with the inception of Dual Diagnosis Anonymous (DDA) providing hope and recovery through our peer support which is now his legacy.

Culturally responsive DDA’s Veterans meetings are intended to provide a safe venue to be open about depression, post-traumatic stress, alcohol and drug use, abuse, and addiction as well as serve as a resource for navigation of the telehealth system, It will encourage healthy solutions for adapting to the changing times. Specifically. the project will Improve access for Veterans and military service members to dual diagnosis services through the creation of on-line recovery support groups and on-line DDA meetings.

This project will serve Veterans throughout the state and is beginning outreach through Veterans publications, local newspapers, the VA, Veterans websites, list services, and anything else that will help identify Oregonians who can use the services.

 

More Ways to Connect

Join our Private Online Group

DDA Veterans Resource Group and Chatroom: www.facebook.com/groups/345810496697764

In Person Meetings

 

Wednesdays 5pm to 7pm

1520 Sherman Ave North Bend, OR 97459

Online Meetings

 

Tuesdays 12pm-1pm Pacific Time Zone

Join Zoom Meeting https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84398341923 Meeting ID: 843 9834 1923

By Phone

Give our Central Office a call at (503)-222-6484

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES AND LINKS

VA National Center on PTSD

                PTSD Treatment Decision Aid

                Educational Materials

                Mobile Apps

                Whiteboard Videos

                Consultation Program

 

VA Healthcare – Community Care network

Minority Veterans of America

https://www.minorityvets.org/

 

Vet Centers:

Central Oregon Vet Center

Eugene Vet Center

Grants Pass Vet Center

Portland Vet Center

Salem Vet Center

 

Community Based Outpatient Clinics:

Bend CBOC

Morrow County VA Telehealth Clinic (Boardman OR)

Brookings VA Clinic

Wallowa County VA Telehealth Clinic (Enterprise OR)

Eugene Health Care Center

Eugene VA Downtown Clinic

Fairview Clinic

Grants Pass West VA CBOC

Hillsboro CBOC

Klamath Falls CBOC

La Grande CBOC

Lincoln City Clinic

North Bend VA Clinic

Community Resource and Referral Center (CRRC)

Salem CBOC

North Coast CBOC

 

Military Children Resources

Military kids face unique psychological challenges related to military life. Compared to their non-military peers, military kids are many times more likely to move multiple times during their school careers and have a parent absent for long periods of time in potentially dangerous locations – factors that can greatly stress military kids’ mental health.

The Defense Health Agency maintains two online resources to support military children use the links povided below:

  • Military Kids Connect is an online community specifically for military children ages 6-17, and provides access to age-appropriate resources for military kids and also for parents, caregivers, and educators to help them understand and support military kids at home and in school.
  • Sesame Street for Military Families is a free, bilingual (English and Spanish) website where families can find information and multimedia resources on the topics of military deployments, multiple deployments, homecomings, injuries, grief, and self-expression.
AM – All Month – Brain Injury Awareness Month – Hydrocephalus Awareness – Support Groups, Events, Resources
Oct 5 all-day

 

Brain Injury Awareness Month — Hydrocephalus Awareness

Support Groups, Events, Resources, Advocacy

 

Facts about Hydrocephalus


Although you may have not heard the word hydrocephalus (hi-dro-seff-a-lus), it is not an uncommon condition. Hydrocephalus has no ethnic or gender preferences – and it can develop at any time during gestation all the way through to senior adulthood.

Here are a few facts about Hydrocephalus:

  • Hydrocephalus is one of the most common birth defects, each year one out of every 500 births results in hydrocephalus
  • Another 6,000 children annually develop hydrocephalus during the first 2 years of life
  • Brain injury occurs every 15 seconds in this country – and in some cases leads to the development of hydrocephalus
  • There are approximately 75,000 discharges a year from hospitals in the U.S. with a diagnosis of hydrocephalus
  • More than 50% of hydrocephalus cases are congenital
  • 70-90% of children born with spina bifida also develop hydrocephalus
  • CSF shunting procedures account for approximately $100 million in health care spending in the United States alone – half of this amount is spent on shunt revisions
  • In the past 25+ years, death rates associated with hydrocephalus have decreased from 54% to 5%, and the occurrence of intellectual disability has decreased from 62% to 30%
  • Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus affects adults and can cause dementia, difficulty in walking and, urinary incontinence
  • No statistics are kept (by our government), for those who develop

 

HELP LINES, PEER SUPPORT, SUPPORT GROUPS

 

 

The Hydrocephalus Association wants you to know that You Are Not Alone – We Are Here For You!

The Hydrocephalus Association staff and teams of trained volunteers are ready to answer your questions and listen to your concerns,  either by phone or email. Simply click on one of the following links to get connected to a volunteer or staff member for support, information, and connection.

 

PEER SUPPORT

To get connected with an HA Peer, please use this link to connect to a request from, after you complete it  your HA Peer will reach out to you very soon!

FOR ONE-TO-ONE PEER SUPPORT, CLICK HERE

 

CALL THE HA HELPLINE

Call (888) 598-3789 or email info@hydroassoc.org for support, resources, and answers to your questions.

Monday through Friday from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM Eastern.

EMAIL HA CYBER VOLUNTEERS

Do you have a question about hydrocephalus? Treatment? Ongoing care?  The impact of the condition on all aspects of life? Our cyber volunteers are ready to answer your questions and share their experience via email.

You can submit them via email by clicking here!

 

Virtual Meet-ups

When: Every Saturday
Adults with Hydrocephalus Meet-Up (DC, MD, VA, PA, DE, NJ)
Lively and engaging conversation! We all need to see old friends, new faces, and have some fun with a community that knows us in a way that only those living the hydrocephalus journey do.

When:
Every Saturday
Contact: Sierra Smith and Sara Curran-Kellogg
Adults with Hydrocephalus Meet-Up (WA, OR, ID, CA, NV, UT, NM, AZ)
Lively and engaging conversation! We all need to see old friends, new faces, and have some fun with a community that knows us in a way that only those living the hydrocephalus journey do.

When:
1st Friday of the month
Contact: Kelly Varga
Adults with Hydrocephalus Meet-Up (FL, GA, AL, SC, MS)
Lively and engaging conversation! We all need to see old friends, new faces, and have some fun with a community that knows us in a way that only those living the hydrocephalus journey do.

When:
4th Sunday of the month
Contact: Jessica Coffaro
Teens Hang-Out
Come meet other teens with the condition! We’ll hang out, maybe play an icebreaker game, talk, and hopefully make some new friends.

When:
1st Sunday of the month
Contact: Olivia Maccoux and Tomas Rodriguez
Young Adults in their 20s Meet-Up
Come hang out with us and meet other young adults in their 20s living with hydrocephalus. We will have fun intros, icebreakers, and conversation. Let’s get to know each other!

When:
Every Saturday
Contact: info@hydroassoc.org
Dallas NPH Meet-Up
Join us for an NPH Community Network get together! We all need to see old friends, new faces, and have some fun with a community that knows us in a way that only those living the NPH journey do. We welcome all those living with NPH in the State of Texas and surrounding states!

When:
3rd Wednesday of the month
Contact: Gary Chaffee
Parents Supporting Parents of Adult Children with IDD
OPEN TO all parents of adults living with hydrocephalus and intellectual and developmental disabilities. Our community is diverse in the many ways and degrees that hydrocephalus impacts our loved ones. For those of us supporting children who are adults with intellectual disability (ID), physical disability, and/or learning challenges (LD), the road can be challenging and lonely. Questions of managing their care, self-advocacy, independent living, and finding success in the workforce all loom large. Join other parents on a similar journey for connection and great discussion.

When:
4th Wednesday of the month
Contact: Jackie Mullock
Flourishing in Mid-Life: Group for Women Age 40- 59!

 

Local Community Networks Of Support For Hydrocephalus

We encourage you to explore the local groups and networks available in your area. Be informed and stay connected!

Facebook

Oregon

Portland (& Vancouver, WA)

Online

info@hydroassoc.org

 

WEBINARS AND EDUCATION

We are pleased to offer educational webinars to help you stay informed and current on the latest news surrounding hydrocephalus. These interactive, free webinars are designed to educate our community on a variety of topics which include normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), research, shunt technology, and more.Our webinar series features presentations from medical professionals, researchers, and others with a direct connection to hydrocephalus. Each webinar is moderated by HA’s Support and Education Staff and are archived and accessible following the event in our webinar recordings. Our Support and Education Webinar Series is made possible through the generosity of our industry partner  Medtronic


Future Webinars

Please stay tuned for our 2022 Support and Education Webinar Series and more information regarding our future webinars.


Past Webinars

Congressional Fireside Chat – June 15, 2021

College Transition for Students with Hydrocephalus – December 14, 2021

College Planning for Students Who Learn Differently – March 10, 2021

Descripcion General de la hidrocefalia – July 17, 2021

 

 

National Hydrocephalus Foundation

National Hydrocephalus Foundation

 

What is Hydrocephalus?

Signs-of Hydrocephalus and Shunt Malfunctions

The most common signs are the following: Congenital Signs normally found in infants and children EARLY Enlargement of the head Irritability Lethargic Feeds poorly/Decrease in appetite Recurrent vomiting Prefers to be alone LATER Distended scalp veins High-pitched cry Increased muscle tone Enlarged and bulging fontanel “Sunset Eyes” (downward gaze) Acquired Signs normally found in older …

Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH) is a disorder, which usually strikes middle age to older adults. In NPH, the ventricles are enlarged, but there is no increase of pressure within the ventricles. The problem is thought to be due to the CSF not being fully reabsorbed by the body (through the arachnoid villi). NPH can be …

Hydrocephalus is diagnosed by a neurological exam and imaging techniques such as an ultrasound, CT scan, MRI, Fetal MRI (also referred to as Fast MRI, and is used on a pregnant woman who is carrying a child diagnosed with hydrocephalus) – and on occasion, a pressure-monitoring system. A doctor will order the appropriate tests according to …

Hydrocephalus Defined

Hydrocephalus is commonly referred to as “water on the brain.” The so-called “water” is actually cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a clear liquid that looks like water and is produced in the 4 ventricles (cavities) of the brain, connected by narrow pathways.  CSF is in constant production and absorption;  it has a defined pathway from the lateral …

Although you may have not heard the word hydrocephalus (hi-dro-seff-a-lus), it is not an uncommon condition. Hydrocephalus has no ethnic or gender preferences – and it can develop at any time during gestation all the way through to senior adulthood. Here are a few facts about Hydrocephalus: Hydrocephalus is one of the most common birth …

Treatment of Hydrocephalus

Shunts What is a Shunt? A shunt is a mechanical device designed to transport the excess CSF from or near the point of obstruction to a re-absorption site and it is implanted under the skin. There are many different types of shunts, but there is no perfect shunt. The quest continues for one, the shunt …

 

Youth Webinar Series

Hydrocephalus Canada and Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital are excited to share some helpful information and resources with you! Our Youth Webinar Series  focuses on topics that young people with hydrocephalus and/or spina bifida often have questions about.

Webinar #1 


Melissa Thorne

Presentation by Melissa Thorne, Co-Moderator, HB Alumni Network & Youth Facilitator

“If You’ve Got Questions, We’ve Got Answers”

Watch on YouTube

Who should attend
Youth from the hydrocephalus and spina bifida communities, ages 14-21. Parents are welcome to attend this webinar in support of their minor children.

What to expect
In this webinar, Melissa Thorne will share her insights as the Youth Facilitator at Holland Bloorview in the Spina Bifida and Spinal Cord Injury Clinic and Youth Engagement department, as well as a person with sbh. Having lived at Holland Bloorview as an inpatient for a year after having multiple orthopedic surgeries in grade 10, Melissa will share her story, her background and explain how she helps kids address challenges like ‘growing up ready’. We will also have a guest speaker! Melissa will follow her presentation with a question and answer session.

 

Webinar #2

               
Steph Di Martino     Melissa Thorne

Presentation by Steph Di Martino, Life Skills Coach and Melissa Thorne, Co-Moderator, HB Alumni Network & Youth Facilitator

“Social Skills and Friendship”

Watch on YouTube

Who should attend
Youth from the hydrocephalus and spina bifida communities, ages 14-21. Parents are welcome to attend this webinar in support of their minor children.

What to expect
In this webinar, Steph Di Martino will share her insights as a Life Skills Coach in the Transitions, Recreation and Like Skills Team at Holland Bloorview Kids Rehab. As a Life Skills Coach, Steph helps to provide experience-based activities to support learning using discussion, role play, problem-solving and peer mentoring with an experiential/immersive approach. Steph and Melissa will explore strategies to build conversation skills, talk about where to meet people your age, how to build connections, what to look for in a friend and help you become aware of what you bring to the table of friendship. Steph and Melissa will follow their presentation with a question and answer session.

 

Webinar #3

       
Kristen English    Melissa Thorne

Presentation by Kristen English, Therapeutic Recreation Specialist and Melissa Thorne, Co-Moderator, HB Alumni Network & Youth Facilitator

 “Community Interaction and Recreation”

Watch on YouTube

November 3 at 7:00 p.m. EDT

Who should attend
Youth from the hydrocephalus and spina bifida communities, ages 12-21. Parents are welcome to attend this webinar in support of their minor children.

What to expect
In this webinar, Kristen English will share her insights as a Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist in the Transitions, Recreation and Like Skills Team at Holland Bloorview Kids Rehab. Kristen provides adapted sport and recreation opportunities to children and youth with disabilities including wheelchair basketball, All Abilities Soccer and the Access Boom Sailing program. She is also a Master of Health Evaluation candidate at the University of Waterloo. You can expect Kristen and Melissa to address how to find meaning in recreation and leisure participation, explore sports and recreation in your community as well as look at equipment that can be adapted to your needs. Kristen and Melissa will follow their presentation with a question and answer session.

 

Webinar #4

               
Steph Di Martino      Melissa Thorne

Presentation by Steph Di Martino, Life Skills Coach and Melissa Thorne, Co-Moderator, HB Alumni Network & Youth Facilitator

“Life Skills and Independence – Transition to Adulthood”

Watch on YouTube

November 10 at 7:00 p.m. ET

Who should attend
Youth from the hydrocephalus and spina bifida communities, ages 14-21. Parents are welcome to attend this webinar in support of their minor children.

What to expect
In this webinar, Steph Di Martino will share her insights as a Life Skills Coach at Holland Bloorview. As a Life Skills Coach, Steph helps to provide experience-based activities to support learning using discussion, role play, problem-solving and peer mentoring with an experiential/immersive approach. You can expect Steph and Melissa to talk about tips and tricks for navigating the adult world, how to grow up ready and get involved in your own health care, learning responsibilities in the home (cooking, laundry, making plans, cleaning) as well as time management and organization. Steph and Melissa will follow their presentation with a question and answer session.

 

Webinar #5


Melissa Thorne

Steph Di Martino 

Kristen English

Presentation by all speakers from our Youth Webinar Series, including: Melissa Thorne, Co-Moderator, HB Alumni Network & Youth Facilitator, Steph Di Martino, Life Skills Coach and Kristen English, Therapeutic Recreation Specialist

“Still Have Questions? We Have Answers!”

Watch on YouTube

November 17 at 7:00 p.m. ET

Who should attend
Youth from the hydrocephalus and spina bifida communities, ages 14-21. Parents are welcome to attend this webinar in support of their minor children.

What to expect
In this webinar, Melissa, Steph and Kristen from Holland Bloorview will provide participants with a recap and overview of the key points of each webinar in our Youth Webinar Series. Participants will also be given the opportunity to participate in a breakout room with a clinician. Melissa, Steph and Kristen will follow their presentation with a general question and answer session.

Have questions you want to ask any of our presenters? Need more information?
Send your questions in advance of any or all webinars. Please submit your questions to awalters@hydrocephalus.ca or info@hydrocephalus.ca

 

HEALTH AND MENTAL HEALTH

Anxiety, Depression, and Hydrocephalus in Children and Adolescents

(You Tube)

This presentation will provide attendees with information and research regarding mood disorders that frequently occur in individuals with hydrocephalus. The discussion will include an emphasis upon incidence, prevention, and individual positive coping/adjustment. Discussions will also include family experiences of hydrocephalus and adjustment/coping experiences of parents and siblings of individuals with hydrocephalus.

Watch Now >

 

Anxiety, Depression, and Hydrocephalus in Adults and NPH

(You Tube)

This presentation will provide attendees with information and research regarding mood disorders that frequently occur in individuals with hydrocephalus. The discussion will include an emphasis upon incidence, prevention, and individual positive coping/adjustment. Discussions will also include family experiences of hydrocephalus and adjustment/coping experiences of caregivers of individuals with hydrocephalus.

Watch Now >

The Healthiest You: Finding Balance Through Nutrition and Lifestyle Techniques

(You Tube)

Join Bethany Holmes, CHHC, in discussing how to find balance through nutrition and lifestyle techniques. This session will focus on self-care and whole-body wellness for healing. Bethany will share her personal story of going through brain surgery and her recovery and healing process. You will learn the importance of eating real foods to fuel your brain and body, giving you the nutrients and energy you need to feel your best. In this session, you will also learn several lifestyle techniques that will help cultivate self-love and appreciation and how to better cope with anxiety and stress. We will also discuss balancing health with social life, work and everyday responsibilities.

Watch Now >

 

 

AM – All Month – Eating and/or Body Image Struggles – Resources for Peer Support, Recovery & Wellness
Oct 5 all-day
Eating Problems 
Body Image Struggles, Wellness, Support
A 12-step recovery program

https://www.foodaddicts.org/

Food addiction can take many forms. Symptoms include obesity, under eating, and bulimia. People often think of the term “eating disorders” when describing the disease of food addiction. Food addicts are obsessed with food, body size, and weight. We spend our days thinking about when and what we are going to eat or not eat. Binging, purging, and dieting are a way of life. The bottom line is that we can’t stop thinking about eating. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) offers relief from the symptoms of eating disorders and guidance on living in recovery.


ANAD – National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders
https://anad.org/get-help/
ANAD is committed to providing free, peer support services to anyone struggling with an eating disorder Our free, eating disorders Helpline is available for treatment referrals, support and encouragement, and general questions about eating disorders.
Call the Helpline // 888.375.7767
Support Group // Find a Support Group
Peer Mentors // Request a Mentor
 
Treatment // Search our national directory
Our Helpline is available Monday-Friday, 9am-9pm CST. We will return messages left outside these hours.
NEDA – National Eating Disorders Association
NEDA: External link  list of virtual support groups for different time zones offered by multiple organizations dedicated to eating disorder recovery across the United States.
CONTACT THE NEDA HELPLINE
  1. Online chat

    Online Chat

    Monday—Thursday 9am—9pm ET

    Friday 9am—5pm ET

  1. Call NEDA's eating disorders helpline

    Call

    (800) 931-2237

    Monday—Thursday 11am—9pm ET

    Friday 11am—5pm ET

    Translation services are available on the phone.

  1. Call NEDA's eating disorders helpline

    Text

    (800) 931-2237

    Pilot hours: Monday—Thursday 3pm—6pm ET

https://eatingdisorderfoundation.org/get-help/support-groups/

Eating Disorder Foundation Support Groups, Eating Disorder Foundation: External link  list of recurring virtual support groups for people recovering from eating disorders, as well as family members and friends who are supporting someone through recovery.

https://www.feast-ed.org/around-the-dinner-table-forum/

Around the Dinner Table Forum, FEAST: External link  online community of parents of eating disorder patients around the world.  [note, I would say parents/caregivers of family members or persons experiencing eating struggles or struggling with eating, not patients!]

https://www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk/sanctuary

The Sanctuary, Beat Eating Disorders: External link  information about an online chat room for U.K. residents recovering from an eating disorder.

https://rockrecoveryed.org/coffee-conversations-for-moms/

Coffee and Conversations for Moms, Rock Recovery: External link  monthly virtual support group for mothers who are recovering from an eating disorder.

https://centerfordiscovery.com/groups/

Free Eating Disorder and Mental Health Support Groups, Center for Discovery Eating Disorder Treatment: External link  free platform for peer-based support groups for anyone who has been affected by an eating disorder or seeking mental health support.

ARFID (Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder) / Duke University

  Support Group NameDuke ARFID Parent Education Group
  Contact Name Chantal Gil
Meeting Location  Virtual through our community website. Members must first sign up for a free membership to our website, and then they can register for a group. (https://eatingdisorders.dukehealth.org/)

Pro-Recovery Support Group, Monday Evenings

7:00 PM EST /4:00 PM PST

Pro-Recovery Support Group, Saturday Mornings

11:00 AM EST/ 8:00 AM PST

Pro-Recovery support groups are open to individuals, ages 18+, who are  experiencing and/or are on the journey to recovery from an eating disorder.

Register here.

Family and Friends Group, Wednesday Evenings

7:00 PM EST /4:00 PM PST

https://18percent.org

18percent is a free online community based off Slack, where one can receive peer to peer support. 18percent has channels on various mental health issues, one of which is eating disorders. They offer free, 24/7 eating disorder support in a moderated environment. For more information, click the link below and sign up.

Click Here to Learn More

The main aim of EDRC is to increase awareness and understanding of eating disorders for the public and for health professionals; to promote early diagnosis, effective treatment, and recovery; and to advocate for mental health parity legislation and effective insurance coverage. We collaborate with other organizations such as National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) in our effort to bring the needed attention to eating disorders.

The Lotus Collaborative: Online Eating Disorder Recovery Support Group

This group is for anyone struggling with an eating disorder to get recovery support as well as to practice giving recovery support to others. While this is not a therapy group, it is a supportive virtual environment in which to meet others working towards recovery, build relationships, gain insight, and practice recovery skills. ​Everyone working towards eating disorder recovery is welcome.

Where: This group will take place via Zoom Room Meetings (Phone app or web browser). Sign up at https://www.thelotuscollaborative.com/online-eating-disorder-recovery-support-group.html

When: Every Sunday, 1pm – 2:30pm

Contact: email: info@thelotuscollaborative.com or set up a consultation: https://www.thelotuscollaborative.com/contact-us.html

The Lotus Collaborative: Online Supporters Group

The Lotus Collaborative hosts a free online support group for the friends and family members supporting a loved one through eating disorder recovery. This group is a space for family members and friends to get support, ask questions and connect with others in the supporting role.

Where: This group will take place via Zoom Room Meetings (Phone app or web browser). Sign up at https://www.thelotuscollaborative.com/online-supporters-group.html

When: ​Every Thursday, 6pm – 7pm PST

Contact: email: info@thelotuscollaborative.com or set up a consultation: https://www.thelotuscollaborative.com/contact-us.html

AM – All Month – Hispanic Heritage Month – AFSP – American Foundation for Suicide Prevention – An Introduction to Suicide Prevention For Latinx and Hispanic Communities – Resources
Oct 5 all-day

 

 

 

Hispanic Heritage Month

AFSP – American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

An Introduction to Suicide Prevention For Latinx and Hispanic Communities – Resources

¡Feliz mes de la herencia hispana! Today, September 15, marks the start of National Hispanic Heritage Month, in which we celebrate the histories, cultures and contributions of Latinx and Hispanic people in the United States including Puerto Rico. It is also an opportunity to reflect on the progress we’ve made to advance mental health for Latinx and Hispanic communities.

One of those ways is through partnerships. It is our privilege to be partnering with the National Latino Behavioral Health Association (NLBHA) and others for the 2022 National Latino Behavioral Health Conference taking place September 15 and 16, featuring remarks from AFSP’s Chief Medical Officer Dr. Christine Yu-Moutier, and Vice President of Public Relations María de los Ángeles Corral.

Another way in which we are making inroads is through new programming. We are thrilled to announce that this October, in collaboration with NLBHA, we will be launching Talk Saves Lives™ (TSL): An Introduction to Suicide Prevention for Latinx and Hispanic Communities, a much-needed and vital new resource for mental health and suicide awareness education for communities of Latinx and Hispanic heritage. The presentation will be available in English and Spanish, in person and virtually.

Join us this month as we shine a light on mental health resources for Latinx and Hispanic communities, as well as the stories and perspectives of individuals who have reflected on their cultural background and how it can impact their experiences with mental health through our Real Stories blog over the years. You can find those resources, stories, social shareables and more here. Another great resource is our website! It can be translated into Spanish by clicking on the “Accessibility” top right button, then “Choose language,” then “Spanish.”

National Hispanic Heritage Month is a time to celebrate and support Latinx and Hispanic communities.

We encourage you to share the resources above, this month and beyond.

 

FIND RESOURCES

 

AM – All Month – NCPM – National Cancer Prevention Month – FFLCSN – Friend for Life Cancer Support Network – Peer Support
Oct 5 all-day

 

 

National Cancer Prevention Month

February 2022

 

Friend for Life is a network of cancer survivors and caregivers who provide compassionate, one-on-one support to others diagnosed with cancer, and to their loved ones. At your request, Friend for Life will match you with a trained volunteer who has experienced a form of cancer and course of treatment similar to yours. To help persons diagnosed with cancer and their loved ones navigate the path through diagnosis, treatment, and recovery by pairing them with a trained survivor of a similar experience, so they can face cancer with someone who’s been there.

Be Matched With A Volunteer

I can’t begin to tell you how comforting it was and is to have someone a phone call away.

If you have received a cancer diagnosis and would like to receive the support of a Friend for Life volunteer, use  the link below and please complete and submit our matching form. We ask that you describe your situation in as much detail as possible (type of cancer, stage, chemo drugs, alternative therapies, etc.) so that we can make an appropriate match. You may even include hobbies and interests. Please include what is most important to you from the match (particular diagnosis, chemo type, life situation, etc.).  If you are a family member, friend or co-worker who would like to receive the support of one of our volunteers, please provide what you know about the patient’s diagnosis, your relationship to that person, and what is concerning you at this time.

Use This Link

https://www.friend4life.org/get-matched/

Contact Us

Friend for Life Cancer Support Network
Phone: 502.893.0643
Toll-free: 866.374.3634
Fax: 502.896.3010
Email: staff@friend4life.org

AM – All Month – OAPS – Oregon Alliance to Prevent Suicide – Oregon LGBTQ2SIA+ Suicide Prevention – Youth Resources – Family Resources
Oct 5 all-day

The Oregon Alliance to Prevent Suicide has created a county-based LGBTQ+ Youth Resource List.  ( 14 Pages in PDF Format) 

>>> Check it out here <<<

and share with partners.

The Oregon Alliance to Prevent Suicide

Statewide Suicide Prevention Liaison:
Annette Marcus
Email:amarcus@aocmhp.org
Phone: (503) 399-7201

Suicide Prevention Project Specialist:
Jennifer Fraga
Email: jfraga@aocmhp.org
Phone: (503) 399-7201

MORE OREGON RESCOURCES

Crisis & Support Lines

OREGON LGBTQ CRISIS LINES

Local, state, national and LGBTQ crisis and support resources.

CRISIS & SUPPORT LINES

If you are experiencing a life-threatening emergency, please call 911.

If you or a friend are experiencing suicidal thoughts or are having a crisis and need support, contact Oregon’s Lines for Life: 800-273-8255.

Lines for Life will connect you with 24-hr crisis lines that provide crisis intervention and targeted support for youth, families, older adults, military service members and veterans for mental health crises and support, suicide prevention, help with addiction and recovery and racial equity and support – in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority.

English: 800-273-8255
En español: 888-628-9454
TTY: 800-799-4TTY (4889)

Oregon YouthLine: 877-968-8491.

Oregon YouthLine is a peer crisis line for youth ages 21 and younger. Teens are available to help daily, 4 to 10 p.m. Pacific Time (off-hour calls answered by adult call counselors) or chat online at the YouthLine website.

Text:teen2teen” to 839863
Chat online: at YouthLine website

24/7 Crisis Text Line: Text 741741 with the message “Home” for support any time, night or day.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline – National suicide prevention support, available 24/7. Call: 800-273-8255.

Nacional de Prevención del Suicidioin Spanish call: 888-628-9454.

LGBTQ CRISIS LINES & ONLINE CHAT

Trevor Lifeline (for LGBTQ youth) 24 hours: 1-866-488-7386.

TrevorChat is available 24/7 days a week, or you can text the word “START” to 678-678, available 24/7.

CHAT SPACE FOR LGBTQ YOUTH

Q Chat Space is an online community chat for LGBTQ youth and teens who are questioning their identity, ages 13-19, facilitated by staff and volunteers from LGBTQ community centers around the country. Provides a place to connect and get access to information and resources. Q Chat Space is a program of CenterLink, the national organization for LGBTQ community centers.

Oregon Child Abuse Hotline – to report child abuse and neglect call: 855-503-SAFE (7233), available 24/7.

PARENT SUPPORT LINES

Reach Out Oregon WarmlineParent Support Line call: 833-732-2467, Monday – Friday 12-7 pm PST (except for holidays).

A parent / caregiver support service that provides peer support, access to services and referrals for parents and caregivers with a child or youth experiencing emotional, behavioral and mental health challenges. The warmline is a project of Reach Out Oregon and the Oregon Family Support Network.

 

Oregon-Based LGBTQ Services& Support

OREGON LGBTQ RESOURCES & SUPPORTS

Selected resources listed on this website focus on providing services and support to reduce mental health risks and promote well-being for LGBTQ young people.

RESOURCES FOR PEOPLE OF COLOR

Asian Pacific Island Pride
Non-profit organization that serves LGBTQ API communities in greater Portland and provides safe and supportive environments to celebrate, educate and bring communities together. apipride@gmail.com

Native American Youth and Family Center (NAYA)
A multi-service agency that provides a wide range of services and supports for Native American children, youth, adults and families, including Two-Spirit and LGBTQ support groups and events.

PDX Latinx Pride – Pride events in Portland for the Latinx LGBTQ community, families and allies. Central facebook page provides a space to connect throughout the year – www.facebook.com/PDXlatinxpride

Portland Two-Spirit Society
P2SS is a social, cultural, educational, resource group for the LGBTIQ Native American/Alaskan Natives and their families; to come together and share, connect, reclaim, and restore culture and community.

Sankofa Collective Northwest
Sankofa provides support, education and advocacy for Black families, friends and LGBTQ people through monthly support groups, faith outreach, mini-grants and an annual Portland Black Pride celebration. Sankofa began as the first African American chapter of PFLAG in the U.S. and relaunched as the Sankofa Collective Northwest in 2016.

Utopia PDX – United Territories of Pacific Islanders Alliance Portland
Portland chapter of a nonprofit organization by and for queer and trans Pacific Islanders that provides support, community organizing, political engagement, and cultural stewardship. https://www.facebook.com/utopiaportland

 

YOUTH RESOURCES – STATE ACCESS

SMYRC (Sexual & Gender Minority Youth Resource Center)
SMYRC’s on-site center in Portland provides a safe, supervised, harassment-free space for sexual and gender minority youth ages 13-23 who participate in positive activities such as art, music, community organizing, open mic nights, drag shows, and support groups and receive services including case management, resource referral, counseling, and education. Through Bridge 13, SMYRC provides LGBTQ trainings, educational workshops and consultations for social support staff, health professionals, youth providers, and educators. SMRYC also helps families and youth find local resources in their communities that support LGBTQ youth and families.

Oregon Queer Youth Summit
A conference held by and for queer and trans identified youth and their allies from the state of Oregon. Leadership development and organizing events happens year-round.

SCHOOL RESOURCES – STATEWIDE

Oregon Safe Schools & Communities Coalition (OSSCC)
A coalition of public and private organizations in Oregon that supports community efforts to reduce youth suicide and risk behaviors for LGBTQ youth. Provides education, data collection, and support services to create safe schools and communities for youth, teachers, and families.

GSA (Genders & Sexualities Alliance) School Clubs
GSA school clubs are available in many Oregon schools to provide support for LGBTQ students and allies and to provide education and events to promote safer schools and communities. Individual GSAs are listed by county and by school. (See National listings for information on GSA Network – a national organization that provides education and training to help students and local GSA clubs in schools to advocate for safer schools and policies to protect LGBTQ students from harassment and victimization.)

GLSEN Oregon
State chapter of the national organization that works to ensure safe schools for all students. GLSEN’s state chapter supports students and educators to adopt LGBTQ-affirming public policy, plan teacher trainings, and hold events for students, educators, parents, and allies.

FAMILY RESOURCES

Basic Rights Oregon Fierce Families Network
Advocates for public policy that meets the needs of a breadth of the LGBTQ communities. Provides and distributes resources to help families understand their LGBTQ+ children.

Pride Foundation Scholarship Program
Community foundation that funds LGBTQ programs and supports in the Northwest, and funds scholarships for LGBTQ student leaders.

YOUTH & FAMILY RESOURCES BY COUNTY

BENTON COUNTY

Cheldelin Middle School Pride Club
Cheldelin Middle School sponsored group that provides a confidential, safe space for students to support each other.

Corvallis High School Sexuality And Gender Alliance (SAGA)
A Corvallis High School sponsored GSA group that promotes understanding, acceptance and inclusion of all.

CLACKAMAS COUNTY

Clackamas High School GSA
A Clackamas High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

Milwaukie High School & Milwaukie Academy of the Arts Queer-Straight Alliance
A Milwaukie High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

The Living Room
A safe space that provides peer support and youth drop-in services, resources to promote personal growth and leadership skills, to build relationships and promote positive development of LGBTQ youth and allies.

Youth ERA Clackamas
A youth-focused program of services that includes a drop-in center, crisis services, online support, wrap around services, training and technical assistance for youth-serving groups and agencies.

CLATSOP COUNTY

Astoria High School Rainbow Alliance (GSA)
An Astoria High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

Lower Columbia Q Center
A community center that provides a range of resources and support activities for LGBTQ youth and adults, including youth support and educational activities.

Seaside High School GSA
A Seaside High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

COLUMBIA COUNTY

Scappoose High School FLATH/GSA
A Scappoose High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

COOS COUNTY

PFLAG Coos Bay/South Coast
A Coos Bay/South Coast chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

Youth ERA Coos
A youth-focused program of services that includes a drop-in center, crisis services, online support, wrap around services, training and technical assistance for youth-serving groups and agencies.

CROOK COUNTY

PFLAG Central Oregon
A Central Oregon chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

PFLAG Prineville
A Prineville chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

CURRY COUNTY

Brookings-Harbor High School LGBTQ+ and Straight Alliance Club
A Brookings-Harbor High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

PFLAG Curry County
Curry County chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

DESCHUTES COUNTY

PFLAG Central Oregon
A Central Oregon chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

Mountain View High School GSA
A Mountain View High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

DOUGLAS COUNTY

PFLAG Douglas County
A Douglas County chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

HOOD RIVER COUNTY

Hood River Valley High School GSA
A Hood River Valley High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

JACKSON COUNTY

Lotus Rising Project
A community organization in Southern Oregon that provides activities and services for LGBTQ youth and adults.

Phoenix High School GSA
A Phoenix High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

Youth ERA Medford
A youth-focused program of services that includes a drop-in center, crisis services, online support, wrap around services, training and technical assistance for youth-serving groups and agencies.

JOSEPHINE COUNTY

Grants Pass High School Southern Oregon Pride (GSA)
A Grants Pass High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

PFLAG Grants Pass
A Grants Pass chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

LANE COUNTY

Churchill High School GSA
A Churchill High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

Sheldon High School GSA
A Sheldon High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

South Eugene High School GSA
A South Eugene High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

Trans*Ponder
A Lane County parent support group for families and caregivers with gender diverse children.

Willamette High School GSA
A Willamette High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion. https://www.facebook.com/Willamette-High-School-GSA-273630792665482

Youth ERA Eugene
A youth-focused program of services that includes a drop-in center, crisis services, online support, wrap around services, training and technical assistance for youth-serving groups and agencies.

LINCOLN COUNTY

Newport High School GSA
A Newport High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

PFLAG Oregon Central Coast
Oregon Central Coast chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

The Bravery Center
A resource center that provides a safe space for LGBTQ+ youth, ages 14-24, in Lincoln County.

LINN COUNTY

Intersection Connection via Zoom
A support group for area middle and high school students with regular meetings held on Zoom.

Out-N-About
A support group for high school-aged LGBTQ youth in Linn and Benton with regular meetings via Zoom.

MARION COUNTY

PFLAG Salem
Salem chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

Rainbow Youth
Support groups for middle and high school students in Marion and Polk Counties. Services include social activities, and individual support.

Youth ERA Salem
A youth-focused program of services that includes a drop-in center, crisis services, online support, wrap around services, training and technical assistance for youth-serving groups and agencies.

MULTNOMAH COUNTY

Asian Pacific Island Pride
Non-profit organization that serves LGBTQ API communities in greater Portland and provides safe and supportive environments to celebrate, educate and bring communities together. apipride@gmail.com

Brave Space, LLC
An organization that provides counseling and support and facilitates access to knowledgeable providers for transgender and genderqueer young people, adults and their families.

Bridging Voices
A chorus for LGBTQ+ and allied youth, ages 13-21 in a safe, accessible place for youth to experience empowerment and unity through music. Bridging Voices is Portland’s first LGBTQ+ and Allied Youth Chorus and is one of the largest choruses of its kind.

Cascade AIDS Project (CAP)
A multi-service agency that provides a range of health, education housing and peer support services for adults. Also provides services for youth. Includes Prism Health that provides gender affirming care.

Native American Youth and Family Center (NAYA)
A multi-service agency that provides a wide range of services and supports for Native American children, youth, adults and families, including Two-Spirit and LGBTQ support groups and events.

OHSU Transgender Health Program
Health care services for transgender for gender diverse children, youth and adults at Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU). Provides information, referrals and access to resources.

Outside In Transgender Health Services
Health care and social services for youth experiencing homelessness and others. Provides an LGBTQ affirming medical clinic, transgender care, housing assistance, a Queer Zone group and a community drop-in center.

P:ear
Organization that provides a safe space, food, recreation, and mentorship through art, barista, and bike mechanic programs for youth who are experiencing homelessness and unstable housing.

PFLAG Portland
Portland chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

Portland Two-Spirit Society
P2SS is a social, cultural, educational, resource group for the LGBTIQ Native American/Alaskan Natives and their families; to come together and share, connect, reclaim, and restore culture and community.

Prism Healthcare Clinic
Health care agency that provides a wide range of services for LGBTQ people, including primary care and behavioral health services and counseling, gender-affirming care and STI testing.

Q Center
Portland’s LGBTQ community center. Provides a range of support groups, activities and a directory of local LGBTQ resources and referrals. Support groups are provided for adults related to gender identity, addiction recovery, veterans, seniors and a support group for youth under age 18.

Quest Center for Integrative Health
Health center that provides health and mental health care to youth and adults that includes counseling, LGBTQ health services, HIV services and wellness care.

Sankofa Collective Northwest
Sankofa provides support, education and advocacy for Black families, friends and LGBTQ people through monthly support groups, faith outreach, mini-grants and an annual Portland Black Pride celebration. Sankofa began as the first African American chapter of PFLAG in the U.S. and relaunched as the Sankofa Collective Northwest in 2016.

SMYRC (Sexual & Gender Minority Youth Resource Center)
SMYRC’s on-site center in Portland provides a safe, supervised, harassment-free space for sexual and gender minority youth ages 13-23 who participate in positive activities such as art, music, community organizing, open mic nights, drag shows, and support groups and receive services including case management, resource referral, counseling, and education. Through Bridge 13, SMYRC provides LGBTQ trainings, educational workshops and consultations for social support staff, health professionals, youth providers, and educators.

TransActive Gender Project
A program at Lewis & Clark that provides services and support for transgender and gender diverse children, youth, and families, including support groups for children and youth (ages 4-18), caregivers and families, as well as advocacy, counseling and referrals.

POLK COUNTY

Dallas High School GSA
A Dallas High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion. https://www.facebook.com/Dallas-High-School-GSA-702785019853083

PFLAG Salem
A Salem chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

Rainbow Youth
Organization that provides safe and welcoming spaces for LGBTQIA+ youth and their friends to find connection, support, and friendship in Marion and Polk Counties. Provides support meetings for middle and high-school aged youth, ages 18 and under.

UMATILLA COUNTY

PFLAG Pendelton
Pendelton chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents.

UNION COUNTY

PFLAG Union County
Union County chapter of PFLAG that provides education, advocacy, and support for families and friends of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) persons, including ongoing support groups for parents. https://www.facebook.com/PflagUnionCounty

WALLOWA COUNTY

Safe Harbors
Community organization that provides education and outreach with crisis intervention and advocacy services for survivors of domestic, sexual and dating violence for youth and adults.

WASHINGTON COUNTY

Beaverton High School GSA
A Beaverton High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

Hillsboro High School GSA
A Hillsboro High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

Sherwood High School Sexuality & Gender Alliance (SAGA)
A Sherwood High School sponsored student club that provides support for LGBTQ and all students to promote understanding, acceptance, and inclusion.

 

 

Research-Based Publications for Families withLGBTQ Children

EVIDENCE-BASED FAMILY GUIDANCE RESOURCES

The evidence-based resources included here were developed by the Family Acceptance Project (FAP) and are rooted in FAP’s groundbreaking research with LGBTQ youth, young adults and families. This research and guidance from the lived experiences of ethnically, racially and religiously diverse families with LGBTQ young people enabled FAP to develop the first evidence-based family support model to prevent health risks and promote well-being for LGBTQ children and youth. FAP continues to produce a series of evidence-based resources to help to decrease health risks and promote well-being for LGBTQ children and youth.

FAMILY EDUCATION BOOKLETS

“Best Practice” Resources for Suicide Prevention for LGBTQ Youth
(English, Spanish & Chinese and a growing series of faith-based versions)

Key information from FAP’s research on how families can help support their lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBTQ) children to reduce health risks and support positive development. These family education booklets have been designated as “Best Practice” resources for suicide prevention for LGBTQ young people by the Best Practices Registry for Suicide Prevention.

HEALTHY FUTURES POSTER SERIES

Available from FAP in 10 languages, including English, Spanish, Chinese (traditional and simplified), Hindi, Korean, Japanese, Punjabi, Tagalog and Vietnamese. Other versions are in development.

Series of 3 posters that tell the “story” of family accepting and rejecting behaviors and show how these behaviors contribute to serious health risks including suicidal behavior and drug use and how they help protect against risk and promote well-being. Each poster includes common accepting and rejecting behaviors that are expressed across diverse cultures. The posters are available to download free in 4 sizes and include the camera-ready art to take to a commercial printer.

DEVELOPING THE FIELD OF FAMILY SUPPORT FOR LGBTQ CHILDREN & YOUTH

Providing Services & Support

Although it may seem surprising to many people who are concerned about the health and well-being of children and youth, before the Family Acceptance Project was established 20 years ago, no one had studied LGBTQ young people and families. As a result, many mainstream services, including government agencies, have not included services and support for diverse families with LGBTQ children. As the Family Acceptance Project has shown, families can learn to support their LGBTQ children when services are provided in ways that are culturally relevant for them. Culturally appropriate services are needed to help families learn to support their LGBTQ children to reduce serious health risks, strengthen families and support positive development. Use this website to learn about these issues to provide support for LGBTQ children, youth and families – urgently needed now as LGBTQ young people and families are coping with the losses from Covid-19.

FAITH COMMUNITIES AND THE WELL-BEING OF LGBTQ YOUTH

A publication for faith communities and families on supporting LGBTQ youth to prevent mental health risks and to increase support, published by the Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry. GAP is a professional organization of thought leaders in the field of psychiatry who provide guidance on addressing critical emerging mental health issues.

Selected National LGBTQ Services& Support

NATIONAL LGBTQ RESOURCES & SUPPORTS

Selected resources listed on this website focus on providing services and support to reduce mental health risks and promote well-being for LGBTQ young people.

ACCESS TO LGBTQ COMMUNITY CENTERS & LOCAL RESOURCES ACROSS THE U.S.

CenterLink
CenterLink is a nonprofit organization that provides capacity building and connects more than 270 LGBTQ community centers across the U.S. in 45 states, Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia, as well as several other countries. CenterLink provides a searchable database of LGBTQ centers where LGBTQ people, families, providers and others can find and access LGBTQ services in their communities, including counseling and support services.

Family Acceptance Project
The Family Acceptance Project (FAP) is a research, education and training program that helps ethnically, racially and religiously diverse families to support their LGBTQ children. FAP conducted the first research on LGBTQ youth and families and developed the first evidence-based family support model to help families to decrease rejection and health risks and to increase support and well-being for LGBTQ young people. FAP provides training for agencies, families, providers and religious leaders on increasing family support to reduce risk for suicide, homelessness and other serious health risks and using FAP’s multilingual educational materials and family support framework, also available online.

PFLAG
PFLAG is a national organization with 400 chapters across the U.S. that provides education and support for parents, families, and friends of LGBTQ people through individual and peer support groups, public education and advocacy. Parents and others can search PFLAG’s website to find chapters and support in local communities, in person and online. Local Oregon PFLAG chapters are listed by county under Oregon-Based LGBTQ Services & Support.

TransFamilies
TransFamilies provides support services and education for transgender people and their families, including an annual conference for families and their transgender children (Gender Odyssey). Formerly called Gender Diversity, TransFamilies provides online parent support groups in English & Spanish, a transgender youth leadership program and youth support groups, as well as training for schools and organizations.

Gender Spectrum 
Gender Spectrum provides education and support for families with transgender and gender diverse children and youth, support groups and an annual conference for children, youth and families. Gender Spectrum also provides training for schools and organizations working with children and teens.

SCHOOL-BASED RESOURCES

GSA Network – Genders & Sexualities Alliance (GSA) Network
GSA Network is a national youth-led organization that provides networking and support for GSAs – school clubs that provide education, peer support and activities to promote safer schools. GSA Network connects LGBTQ+ youth and school-based GSA clubs through peer support, leadership development, community organizing and advocacy and works with a network of 40 statewide organizations representing more than 4,000 GSA clubs across the country. GSAs in Oregon schools are listed by county under Oregon-Based LGBTQ Services & Support.

GLSEN
GLSEN is a national network of educators, students, and local GLSEN Chapters that work to promote safe schools for LGBTQ students. GLSEN provides resources for educators and students, conducts school climate research, provides guidance on comprehensive school policies and information on bullying and school safety.

Safe Schools Coalition
The Safe Schools Coalition is a public-private partnership in Washington State that was among the first school-based initiatives to support LGBTQ students. The Coalition hosts a longstanding website with resources to help promote safe schools and to implement its mission of “helping schools become safe places where every family can belong, where every educator can teach, and where every child can learn, regardless of gender, gender identity or sexual orientation.”

Campus Pride
Campus Pride is a national organization working to create a safer college environment for LGBTQ students by developing resources, programs and services to support LGBTQ and ally students on college campuses across the U.S. This includes hosting Camp Pride, a summer leadership camp for LGBTQ and ally students to learn campus strategies to develop supportive campus environments and leadership skills, LGBTQ college fairs and information on the campus safety, visibility and affirmation for LGBTQ students.

FAITH-BASED ORGANIZATIONS

Affirmation LGBTQ Mormons Families & Friends
An international organization that promotes understanding, acceptance, and self-determination for individuals with diverse sexual orientations, gender identities and expressions for current and former members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Provides allyship, ministering, and educational resources and an annual international conference.

Beloved Arise
An organization that provides resources and support to empower LGBTQ teens across Christian denominations through youth programs, advocacy and ally engagement opportunities and resources for other faith-based organizations.

Brethren Mennonite Council
A nonprofit group that is committed to providing mutual support for families with gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex members. This includes LGBTQ people, families and allies, to worship, educate and provide mutual support

DignityUSA
A national Catholic organization that provides support for people of all sexual orientations, genders, and gender identities—especially gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender persons. Provides opportunities for worship, service, education and social justice.

Equally Blessed
A coalition of Call to Action, DignityUSA, and New Ways Ministry that seeks to educate and inspire Catholics to take action on behalf of LGBTQ and intersex people, their families and friends.

Eshel
An organization that works with individuals, families, and the Orthodox Jewish community to support LGBTQ members. Eshel has chapters in cities in the U.S. and Canada that provide activities, parent retreats, a speakers bureau and access to LGBTQ resources in the U.S. and Israel.

Freed Hearts
A Christian organization that helps parents, LGBTQ people, educators, therapists, and churches to create safe spaces, inspiration and encouragement. Provides resources ranging from books, podcasts, video courses and social media, including a YouTube Channel.

Friends for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Concerns
A North American Quaker faith community that holds online gatherings and worship.

Fortunate Families
A national Catholic organization and parent network that supports LGBTQ family members and facilitates conversations with bishops, pastors and Catholic Church leadership through sharing personal stories and working to establish Catholic LGBTQ Ministries in dioceses, parishes, educational institutions, and communities.

Galva – 108
An international, nonprofit religious organization – Gay & Lesbian Vaishnava Association – that provides information and support to LGBTI Vaishnavas and Hindus, their friends, and other interested persons.

Jewish Queer Youth
A group that supports and empowers LGBTQ youth in the Jewish community with a focus on teens and young adults from Orthodox, Chasidic, and Sephardic communities. Provides Drop-In Center, and services for parents, teens, and families.

Keshet
An organization that works for the full equality of LGBTQ Jews and families. Helps Jewish organizations with the skills to build LGBTQ-affirming communities, spaces for queer Jewish youth, and advances for LGBTQ rights. Offers professional development, training and consultation, youth initiatives, programs for LGBTQ Jews of Color, leadership projects and community learning.

Many Voices
A Black church movement for gay and transgender justice. Equips and brings forward Black leaders that support LGBT equality and justice through educational workshops, seminars, and dialogues – in-person and online.

Mama Dragons
An organization founded by Mormon mothers with LGBTQ children that supports, educates, and empowers mothers of LGBTQ children through a private Facebook and regional groups to support and advocate for their LGBTQ children.

Muslim Alliance for Sexual and Gender Diversity
An organization that works to support, empower and connect LGBTQ Muslims. Provides educational classes, retreats, advocacy, and resources including lectures, films video, podcasts, and blogs.

Muslims for Progressive Values
An organization that reflects Islam as a source of dignity, justice, compassion, and love for all. Offers spiritual counseling, chaplain endorsement and lectures and speaking engagements. Provides support for LGBTQ people and access to resources.

Q Christian Fellowship
An organization that cultivates radical belonging among LGBTQ+ people and allies through an annual conference, community groups, Parent Summit, and a variety of resources.

United Church of Christ LGBT Ministries
Christian religious organization that includes local churches and a global ministry. Has a specific ministry to LGBTQ people and families.

Unity Fellowship Church Movement
Unity Fellowship Church Movement is the first affirming and welcoming Black church for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender persons with several congregations across the U.S. Members of the public can RSVP to attend services online.

AM – All Month – ODVA – Oregon Dept of Veterans Affairs – Veterans Resource number (1-800-698-2411) & Veteran Resource Listings
Oct 5 all-day

 

Veteran Resource Navigator

The Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs (ODVA) has a comprehensive online resource guide (VETERAN RESOURCE NAVIGATOR) available to assist veterans in finding the benefits that are most useful to their unique circumstances at this time.

 

Use the link below for the Veteran Resource Navigator

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx)

 

USE THIS LINK TO OPEN THE VA WELCOME KIT

Print out your VA Welcome Kit

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned.

Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy, so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

Download your VA Welcome Kit

You are welcome to share this guide with friends or family members who need help with their benefits too. You can print out copies for yourself and others:

Download our guides to VA benefits and services

For Veterans

For family members

Other Resources Available to Veterans and Military Service Members

DD214 & Military Records Request:

https://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records

Veteran Resource Navigator site by ODVA:

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

(Oregon)Military Help Line:  

Call 888-457-4838

VA Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255:

Press 1.VA Confidential crisis chat at net or text to 838255 

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD:

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/

Defining Discharge Status:

https://militarybenefits.info/character-of-discharge/#:~:text=There%20are%206%20types%20of,DD%20214%20must%20have%20a

How to apply for a discharge status upgrade:

https://www.va.gov/discharge-upgrade-instructions/

Oregon Supportive Services for Vets & Families (Housing):

https://caporegon.org/what-we-do/ssvf/

Clackamas County VSO’s (Veteran Service Officers):

https://www.clackamas.us/socialservices/veterans.html

Portland VA Clinic that can help with homelessness & medical care:

https://www.portland.va.gov/locations/crrc.asp

Portland VA Mental Health Clinic:

https://www.portland.va.gov/services/mentalhealth.asp

Veterans Crisis Line/ Suicide Prevention:

https://www.veteranscrisisline.net/

 

If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance,

please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.

 

Contact ODVA Headquarters

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs
700 Summer St NE
Salem, OR 97301

Web: https://www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/default.aspx

Phone: (800) 692-9666 or (503) 373-2085

Fax: (503) 373-2392

Email:orvetsbenefits@odva.state.or.us

AM – All Month – TQC -The Q Center – Virtual, Diverse Support Groups for People in the LGBTQ+ Community @ Online Regerster for Details
Oct 5 all-day

Sponsor Logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The Q Center: Out of Portland OR, Continues To Offer Several Virtual, Diverse Support Groups for People in the LGBTQ+ Community:

As the largest LGBTQ+ community center in the Pacific Northwest, Q Center proudly serves the LGBTQ2SIA+ communities of Portland Metro and Southwest Washington. Our drop-in and event space on North Mississippi Avenue is a frequent first stop for new arrivals in Portland, and for longtime residents who are newly out or questioning their sexual or gender identity.

Q Center also serves as an information hub for friends, partners, community, and family members of LGBTQ2SIA+ individuals. We pride ourselves on our collaborative approach and seek out ways to share resources with other nonprofits and public institutions locally and statewide.

 

To learn about the many groups offered by the Q Center, here is the link to their calendar page: https://www.pdxqcenter.org/calendar.

To register for any of these groups please either email info@pdxqcenter.org, or call 503-234-7837.  

AM – All Month – WVH – Willamette Vital Health – Willamette Valley Hospice is Now Called Willamette Vital Health
Oct 5 all-day

 

Willamette Valley Hospice is Now Called Willamette Vital Health

WVH has been renamed Willamette Vital Health to better reflect our full array of services – Hospice Care, Grief Care, Supportive Care, and the Tokarski Home. WVH is the same non-profit organization with the same mission that has existed for the last 40 years.

Receiving the right care at the right time is vital, and we offer experience at your side when facing serious illness and grief.

View the video below to hear from our Executive Director, Iria, our board member, Dr. Rick Cook, and volunteer, Eric. Learn more at our new website, wvh.org.

Willamette Vital Health – WVH Changes Name

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Grief Support Groups

WVH offers free grief support groups and workshops to anyone in our community who has faced the recent death of a loved one – whether or not they used WVH hospice or supportive care services. Families that utilized WVH hospice care for their loved one also have the option of short-term counseling with our bereavement counselors.

New grief support groups for adults begin March 30th and for those with children, a new group starts April 12th. Contact the Grief Care department at 503.588.3600 for more info.

*Masks will be required for indoor groups, as WVH is considered a healthcare facility.

 

AM – September is Suicide Prevention Month and National Recovery Month – Warmline – Resources
Oct 5 all-day

 

 

September is Suicide Prevention Month

and

National Recovery Month

This month, we share support and resources for suicide prevention and recovery from addiction.

SUICIDE PREVENTION MONTH

Every September, we strive to bring attention to suicide awareness and prevention. Suicide continues to be a leading cause of death in the United States; over 45,00 individuals lost their lives to suicide last year. Suicide rates across all populations have held consistently high since 2016, peaking in 2018. Some people report feeling that the topic of suicide is uncomfortable to talk about. Often after a suicide has occurred, loved ones and friends acknowledge that they thought something was wrong or saw signs they were concerned about but did not know what to do or felt uncomfortable saying or doing anything. Breaking that isolation and that discomfort can save lives, and we encourage engaging with the community around this, in events such as this education and discussion webinar on September 6 run by Mental Health America on identification and prevention of youth suicide.

Below is a list of organizations that contain helpful information and resources. Links provide signs to look for, tips on how best to support someone who could be at risk, as well as information on what to do in such a crisis. We continue to feel it is vital to share resources for immediate safety and long-term support, both for those suffering from suicidal thoughts and their families:

 


NATIONAL RECOVERY MONTH

Chronic alcohol use and drug use impact physical health and mental health, significantly reducing quality of life and shortening life spans.  Chronic addiction continues to be an ongoing national crisis, despite strong efforts in combating the disorder through expanded treatment access. Deaths due to addiction have increased, as well as a 59% increase in reports of alcohol abuse in 2020. There is some good news, overdose rates such as those caused by misuse of methadone have decreased, but we have a long way to go.

Isolation, boredom, frustration, and anxiety all contribute to increased substance use as an escape, as highlighted in this article. Recovery is a lengthy process and a lifetime of challenges for those who are successful in quitting drugs and alcohol. If you are struggling with a dependence on substances and feel like you cannot stop, or are watching someone you love or care about struggle with drugs or alcohol, we want you to know there is help, hope, and support. We wanted to highlight a list of major peer and professional support services that offer both in-person and remote connections, as well as other resources.

As always, please reach out to us here at the City of Boston Employee Assistance Program for immediate support and assistance. Have a safe and warm September.

 

BRMA – Brown Mamas – The Ultimate List of Support Groups for Black Moms
Oct 5 all-day

 

The Ultimate List of Support Groups for Black Moms

Brown Mamas – Pittsburgh & U.S.  – Brown Mamas, Inc. has been around for seven years in the Pittsburgh region.  Brown Mamas began in the living room of Muffy Mendoza.  What started as 5 moms has grown to over 4000  Our mamas love our Pittsburgh chapter so much that we are expanding.  If you are mom who is ready to not just find her tribe, but to inspire other mothers and be the change she wants to see in her community, click here to learn more about starting your own Brown Mamas chapter.

Black Moms Connect – Canada & U.S.

Mommin’ Society – North Carolina & Online

Moms of Black Boys United – Atlanta & Online

Moms Make It Work – NYC

Mocha Moms, Inc. – U.S. (seriously, everywhere)

Whine & Cheese – 27 Chapters in U.S. (including D.C., PA, South Carolina, New York, etc.)

Black Women Do Breastfeed

Motherwork by Mater Mea – NYC

Beautiful Brown Girls Brunch Club – New Jersey

District Motherhued’s DMV MomTribe – D.C. Metro Area

Soul Food for Your Baby – Hawthorne, Calif.

Black Moms Blog Events – Atlanta, GA

Birthing Beautiful Communities – Cleveland, OH

Tessera Collective – Online, Self-Care Support

Melanin Mommies – Pittsburgh, PA

Pittsburgh Black Breastfeeding Circle –

Not-So Melinated Support Groups for Black Moms

Moms Club

La Leche League

Circle of Moms

Meetup.com

Facebook Support Groups for Black Moms

Black Stay-At-Home Mom Village

Black Moms Connection

Black Moms in Charge

Single Black Mothers

Moms of Black Daughters

Moms of Black Sons

Black Moms in College & Beyond

Breast Milk Donation for Black Moms

Sisterhood for Young Black Moms

CA – Crim-Anon – Criminals Anonymous Fellowship – Virtual Online Meetings – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Oct 5 all-day

poster

 

CRIM ANON (Criminals Anonymous) Recovery Groups

Without YOU There Is No Us

Virtual Groups on Weekdays and Week Ends

About Crim-Anon (Criminals Anonymous)

We are a recovery fellowship comprised of men, women, youth, survivors, and their families that are committed to supporting and living a crime-free lifestyle. We welcome you to check out our website at www.crimanon.org. Zoom on in with us!  To join this meeting, use the ZOOM Link and Meeting ID provided below:

Join Zoom Meeting   https://zoom.us/j/6505312068

Meeting ID   650-531-2068

CONTACT US:
Criminal Anonymous World Services
2601 SE 160th Ave., Portland, OR 97236
Bear C: (971) 282-1903
Zane M: (503) 754-5217
Billy S: (971) 985-4849   bear01@crimanon.org
Hours of Operation    24/7 
Get in touch with our team at Criminal Anonymous World Services in Portland, OR if you need support, have any questions.
Grand Elders are available      24/7:
 Bear – (971) 282-1903
 Zane – (503) 754-5217
 Reina – (503) 446-0243
 Billy – (971) 985-4849
 Bo – (971) 772-8307
 Amber – (503) 799-2552
 Andrey M – (503) 660-9448
 Tara – (971) 323-2699
 DJ – (503) 501-1368
 Twila – (503) 936-5185
 Caitlin – (971) 804-2848
 Nick – (503) 465-7013
 Joanie – (503) 732-4115
 Michelle – (503) 875-7985
 Cliff – (971) 283-3133
 Dick – 503) 380-5800
 Melanie – (503) 922-5014
 Sean – (971) 276-5365

Crim Anon Website:

https://www.crimanon.org

Facebook Crim Anon Home Page

https://www.facebook.com/CriminalsAnonymous/

Facebook  Crim Anon Fellowship Page:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/475073000014931/

 

CL – Cancer Lifeline – Line, Chat, and Virtual Groups – Weekdays @ Online
Oct 5 all-day

 

 

 

 

CancerLine offers online and telephone peer support for persons experiencing or impacted by cancer.

Online Support Groups Links:

https://cancerlifeline.org/about-our-support-groups/

Phone:

206.297.2500 or toll-free 1.800.255.5505

Chat:

Weekdays 6am-2pm PST / 9am-5pm EST

https://cancerlifeline.org/lifeline-chat/

Online Support Groups

Our cancer support groups are designed to meet four key needs:

* Members have a place where emotions can be expressed and not judged
* Members gain a sense of community & inclusion with others in a similar situation
* Members find ways in which choice & control can be attained while living with cancer
* Members are provided with opportunities for education and information

While we are online, please note that our Support Group Norms require participation by both video and audio unless you have been granted an exception by Cancer Lifeline. To inquire about an exception, please call (206) 832-1271.

Current Support Groups

DDA – Dual Diagnosis Anonymous – Hope and Recovery Meetings – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Oct 5 all-day

Oregon DDA Logo

 

 

 

 

 

DDA Online Hope & Recovery Meetings – Every Day – 7 Days per Week

Hosted by DDA Chat Room and Resource Group

 

SUNDAY-10AM to 11 AM (PST): Join Zoom Meeting: https://zoom.us/j/302462886

SUNDAY- 5 to 6 PM (PST): Join Zoom Meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86467565130

MONDAY-10 to 11 AM(PST): Join Zoom Meeting https://zoom.us/j/373756106

MONDAY – MEN’S ONLY MEETING – Man in the Mirror – MONDAYS- 12 to 1 PM (PST)-Join Zoom Meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86467565130

MONDAY- 5 to 6 PM(PST): Join Zoom Meeting https://zoom.us/j/597932554

TUESDAY-10 to 11 AM(PST): Join Zoom Meeting https://zoom.us/j/510712003

TUESDAY- 12 pm to 1 PM (PST): https://us05web.zoom.us/j/86159625763?pwd=Y201cUMxMGZLalB3aWQ2TkxNOFBhQT09

TUESDAY- 5to 6 PM(PST): Join Zoom Meeting https://zoom.us/j/268498372WEDNESDAY- 10 to 11 AM(PST): Join Zoom Meeting https://zoom.us/j/373756106

WEDNESDAY- 12pm to 1PM (PST): https://us05web.zoom.us/j/86159625763?pwd=Y201cUMxMGZLalB3aWQ2TkxNOFBhQT09

WEDNESDAY- 6 to 7 PM (PST): Join Zoom Meeting https://zoom.us/j/243702929THURSDAY- 10 to 11 AM(PST) Book Study Meeting: Join Zoom Meeting https://zoom.us/j/510712003

THURSDAY- 5 to 6 PM(PST): Join Zoom Meeting https://zoom.us/j/268498372FRIDAY- 10 to 11 AM(PST): Join Zoom Meeting https://zoom.us/j/373756106

FRIDAY-5 to 6 pm(PST): Join Zoom Meeting https://zoom.us/j/597932554SATURDAY- 10 to 11 AM(PST): Join Zoom Meeting https://zoom.us/j/146152218

SATURDAY- 5 to 6 PM (PST): Join Zoom Mtg https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86467565130

 

Meetings from Other Areas

Chicago DDA– DDAers topic/discussion meeting Thursday at 4 pm (PST) Zoom ID: 873 6999 4674, password: ddago

Sacramento DDA- open DDA meeting Friday at 6 pm (PST) 

****The following information is new for Sacramento Friday 6 pm:

879 6889 0960

Passcode: 164673

 

DDA UK– visit DDA UK’s website for meeting links https://www.ddauk.org/

Monday 11:30 am (PST)-Step Study Workshop

Tuesday 11:00 am (PST) – DDA Meeting

Friday 11:00 am (PST)

Saturday 3:00 am (PST)

Sunday 11:30 am (PST)

 

Fairfax, Virginia DDA

Saturdays at 4 pm (PST) Meeting ID is: 892-5105-3549 and password: novadda

Fun In Recovery Events

Art night is continuing every Tuesday at 3 pm (PST). Can’t wait to socialize and build new skills in recovery with you all!!! https://us02web.zoom.us/j/88050830159

Music Hour – 430pm 1st Tuesday of every month, join us to listen to music and get your groove on! https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82801519944?pwd=R2VYTkpneVkrU3U2YVJHaDl4M0xnUT09 Meeting ID: 828 0151 9944 Passcode: DDADance!

Facebook Chatroom and Resource Page

facebook.com/groups/1053021475070135/?ref=group_browse

 

Dual Diagnosis Anonymous

Dual Diagnosis Anonymous (DDA) is a peer support group based on an authorized version of the 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous plus an additional 5 Steps that focus on Dual Diagnosis (mental illness and substance abuse). DDA’s unique 12 Steps Plus 5 Program offers hope for achieving the promise of recovery. Read more about the history of DDA at http://www.ddaoregon.com/about.htm.

Facebook DDA Oregon Page:
http://www.facebook.com/business/dashboard/#/pages/Portland-OR/Dual-Diagnosis-Anonymous-of-Oregon-Inc/90538964670

Thank you to sponsors for support: Oregon Health Authority, CareOregon, Yamhill County, Clackamas County, Multnomah County, and Washington County

GT – GamTalk – Online Chat for Gambling Issues – Weekdays and Weekends
Oct 5 all-day

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GAMTALK – Online support for Gambling Issues

24/7 Online Recovery Chat Forum (registration / login required)

https://www.gamtalk.org/chat/recovery/ 

Monday Nights Chat Forum (registration / login required)

Monday Evenings 6-9pm PST / 9pm-12am EST

https://www.gamtalk.org/chat/monday-evening/

Discussion Wall 

https://www.gamtalk.org/groups/community/ 

Stories of Hope

https://www.gamtalk.org/stories-of-hope/

Treatment & Support Resources including Oregon

https://www.gamtalk.org/treatment-support/

 

HLAAOR – Hearing Loss Association of America/Oregon – Meetings and Resources @ Online Register for Details
Oct 5 all-day

 

 

Hearing Loss Association of America/Oregon Meetings and Resources, 2021

HLAA of Portland meets the third Saturday each month (except June, July, and August) 10 am, in the Wistar Morris Conference Room in the Main Hospital Building on the Legacy Good Samaritan Campus, 1015 NW 22nd Ave. (at Marshall), Portland, 97210. Contact Mark Foster, president; email: hlaportland@gmail.com. Write P.O. Box 2112, Portland, OR 97208-2112; http://www.hlaa-or.org/portlandchapter.html.

HLAA of Lane County meets quarterly: second Thursday in March, June, Sept., and Dec., at 7 p.m. at the Hilyard Community Center, 2580 Hilyard St., Eugene. Right now we are scheduled to meet in person June 10 unless COVID-19 infections mandate otherwise.

Mail: P.O. Box 22501, Eugene, OR 97402. Clark Anderson; email: clarkoa@msn.com

HLAA of Linn and Benton counties meets the last Wednesday each month (except June, July, & Dec.) at 6:30 p.m. at the Reimar Building, next to Albany General Hospital, 1085 6th Ave. SW, Albany, OR 97321. Contact: John Hood-Fysh, email: jhoodfysh@gmail.com; 541/220-8541 (cell – call or text), 818 Broadalbin St. SW, Albany, OR 97321.

Note: HLAA of Douglas County no longer meets the requirements for a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. Reinstatement may occur, but right now, this group meets as a support group. Contacts: Vincent Portulano, president, email: HLAADC@outlook. com; or Ann Havens, secretary, 541/673-3119. Check with them for location for meetings and time.

NATIONAL HLAA EVENT CALENDARS

HLAA Calendar

https://www.hearingloss.org/programs-events/calendar/

HLAA Leaders Calendar

https://hlaagroups.hearingloss.org/g/HLAALeaders/calendar

HLAA Subgroups

https://hlaagroups.hearingloss.org/g/HLAALeaders/subgroups

HLAA Virtual Meetings / Captioned Recordings

https://www.hearingloss.org/hearing-help/communities/hlaa-national-virtual-meetings/

 

MORE RESOURCES

Hands and Voices
https://www.handsandvoicesor.org

Supports families and children who are deaf and hard of hearing, by connecting parents, mentorship, educational advocacy, community development and support programs. Collaborates with professionals to support families.

FACT Oregon
https://www.factoregon.org/

Supports, empowers and advocates for families who experience disability.

Family to Family Health Information Center
Oregon Family-to-Family Health Information Center | OHSU

Supports families and caregivers of children with special health needs to navigate the healthcare system. Many resources on the website.

AG Bell Oregon 
https://www.agbell.org/Connect/Oregon-Chapter

  • Facebook page – AG Bell Oreoon
  • Instagram – aobelloreoon

Local chapter of a national organization. The focus is to promote listening and spoken language education, advocate for accessibility, educational services, and health-related rights, and create connections and memories together.

Oregon Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) Program

https://www.oreown ov/oha/PDH/HeaIthvP eooleFamilies/Babies/HeaIthScreenino/He arinqscreenino/Paoes/index asox

For Providers: Information on EHDI Reporting, forms, protocols, facilities, OVERS Hearing Screening Module, 1-3-6 Newborn Hearing Screening Checklist For Parents: Information on hearing screening (what it involves and why it’s important), follow-up (what happens if a newborn doesn’t pass a screening), Early Intervention/Family Services, Guide By Your Side (a Hands & Voices program that matches trained parent guides with families who have recently found out their child has a hearing loss), and other resources for families

American Cochlear Implant Alliance

https://www.acialliance.org/

Facebook page

Twitter

Contains information about research, awareness, and advocacy around cochlear implants. Information about hearing loss and cochlear implants in general.

Oregon Association for Deaf
https://oad1921.org/

Advocates for the rights of people who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing in Oregon. The website contains articles, meeting and conference information, and youth opportunities.

Hearing Loss Association of America – Oregon State Association 
https://www.hlaa-or.org/about-us.html

Education, Information and Advocacy.

Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI)
https://www.cdc.oov/ncbddd/hearinqloss/e hdi-programs.html

Information about EHDI programs Information for families including:

     • Questions You May Want to Ask Your Child’s Audiologist

     • Just in Time for Pediatric Primary Care Providers

FACEBOOK EVENTS

ASL Social Chat:

EVERY SUNDAY @ 12:00noon to 2:00 pm

VANCOUVER MALL – Food Court [2nd floor]

Host by: Gary Holden

ASL Social Chat:

Host by: Gary Holden

PORTLAND OPEN-CAPTIONED MOVIES:

(See FB page for MORE information)

Order Tickets online @ bagdadmovies.com

Host by: Isaac Stone Dick

ASL NIGHT GAMES (announcing soon)

Every Second Saturday evening

ASL Game Night page for more information.

Host by: Stephen RodBjorn

World Deaf Timberfest

Camp Taloali

Contact for information: Andrea Albers

Pacific Northwest Deaf Golf Association (PNWDGA) and Portland Metro Deaf Golf Association (FB Page).

(See FB Page for MORE information)

Host by: Craig Marineau

Northwest Deaf Traveling League (NWDTL)

(Deaf/HOH Bowling Club)

Contact: Melody Kitty McDaniel and Andrea Albers

NW Deaf Poker Tournaments

Announcement in Jan/Feb 2022 !!!

Host by: James Forncrook

CYMASPACE: Announcement SOON

Host by: Myles de Bastion

Deaf Massage Therapist (see link below)

www.openhandhealth.com/book-now

Host by: Clara Bella Storry Parnell

(Email: clara@openhandhealth.com)

ASL Coffee Podcast – see announcements on regular posting:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/334857136618534/user/100069324005062/

ASL Coffee Chats @ 3pm on Fridays at Hidden Creek Community Center in Hillsboro

To find a Deaf ASL tutor or mentor, see ASL TUTORS AND MENTORS FB page.

Bridges in Oregon

https://www.facebook.com/BridgesOregon

Source: https://www.facebook.com/groups/portlandaslevents/

AG Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
AG Bell is another convenient resource for those seeking in-person hearing loss support groups, with 
41 active chapters across the United States and Puerto Rico. Specifically designed to support children with hearing loss and their families, AG Bell hosts everything from social events to informational sessions for individuals and families impacted by hearing loss; connect with your nearest chapter to learn more. You can also join the AG Bell Facebook group to connect with fellow members online.

DeafandHoH Forum

DeafandHoH is a website featuring hearing loss news, a discussion forum, resources for financial aid and other services, search directories for audiologists, hearing care facilities, speech-language pathologists, and more. The topics covered on the site include living with hearing loss, caring for a family member or friend with hearing loss, American Sign Language, and hearing loss products. You can also join open chat nights on select Wednesdays from 6pm-7pm PST / 9pm-10pm EST to enjoy live interaction!

 

CALL TO ACTION FOR PEER SUPPORT

https://www.nasmhpd.org/sites/default/files/Assessment-5_Deaf-and-Hard-of-Hearing-Peer-Support.pdf

https://www.transformation-center.org/home/community/deaf-and-hard-of-hearing-recovery-project/

https://www.nasmhpd.org/sites/default/files/BeingSeen.pdf

https://www.hearinglikeme.com/why-we-need-deaf-peer-support-in-our-communities/

https://nsuworks.nova.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1018&context=jadara

12-Step online for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Sounds of Sobriety (SOS):  This online email group was formed to help us who have a hearing loss (deaf, deafened, or hard of hearing) to find a place to recover from alcoholism. For many of us, face-to-face AA meetings no longer work. All members of AA, or those who think they may have a problem with alcohol, are welcome.    SOS_online_group-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Deaf Grateful:  This is a real-time open discussion meeting on Saturday at 4 pm (EST) for deaf & HOH people who have a desire to stop drinking. Meeting uses videoconferencing software (easily downloaded) that requires a high speed internet connection and a webcam. Our communication mode is ASL only (no audio). http://doda.omnijoin.com

Perspectives of people who are deaf and hard of hearing on mental health, recovery, and peer support

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23149648/

Is Telemental Health Services a Viable Alternative to Traditional Psychotherapy for Deaf Individuals?

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27260308/

https://www.arundellodge.org/omhc/telemental-health-for-deaf-and-hard-of-hearing/

Deaf Centric Approach / Peer Support Program

https://www.minnpost.com/mental-health-addiction/2016/01/alison-aubrecht-peer-support-program-takes-deaf-centric-approach-men/

HVN – Hearing Voices Network USA – Virtual Online Group Contacts – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online via Zoom
Oct 5 all-day

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Hearing Voices Network (HVN) is up and going for virtual support now, and almost every day of the week.

To see a list of groups sorted by state visit this link:

https://www.hearingvoicesusa.org/hvn-usa-groups-list/list/1

These groups are available for those who have voices, visions, altered realities, extreme states or moods.

All are welcome to join any group or multiple groups!
No insurance or registration is required!

Portland Hearing Voices Online:

FOLKTIME / Oregon City

Mondays @ 12:30pm to 1:30pm PST.

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82718505172

Meeting ID: 827 1850 5172

Wednesdays @ 12:30pm to 2:00pm PST.

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82718505172

Meeting ID: 827 1850 5172

One tap mobile

+16699006833,,82718505172# US (San Jose)

+12532158782,,82718505172# US (Tacoma)

Dial by your location

+1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)

+1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)

+1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)

+1 929 436 2866 US (New York)

+1 301 715 8592 US (Germantown)

+1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)

Meeting ID: 827 1850 5172

Contact Information:

Reggie Lee
hellothere@folktime.org

Website:

Do you experience voices, visions, have intense energy and/ or navigate through exploratory states of consciousness?

You are certainly not alone! In this group we will explore the significance of these experiences together in an open, non-judgmental way. We welcome and highly encourage the pondering and meaning of these experiences on an individual level. Are these experiences spiritual, supernatural, psychological, metaphysical, biological or something else? In this group we have the wonderful opportunity to learn from each other what these experiences could mean and hear multiple perspectives from different vantage points.

This is a free group. No referral is needed. Supportive friends and/or family are welcome.

 

Salem Hearing Voices Online with Aaron Benson / ProjectA.B.L.E.

Wednesdays @ 2pm to 3pm PST.

Online via Zoom.

For meeting link, visit:

https://projectable.org/what-we-do/activities/

 

Vancouver, Washington Hearing Voices Online with Chiara Caballero and John McDonald

* May not be meeting due to lack of facilitators and/or funding *

https://namiswwa.org/support-groups/hvn-hearing-voices-network-groups/

 

Find more groups with HVN USA here:

http://www.hearingvoicesusa.org/find-a-group

Plus,

HVN USA – Mondays 4:00pm EST. To access this group, email info@HearingVoicesUSA.org.

HVN USA – Tuesdays 5:30pm EST. To access this group, email info@HearingVoicesUSA.org.

HVN USA – Wednesdays 3:00pm EST. To access this group, email info@HearingVoicesUSA.org.

HVN USA – Thursdays 6:00pm EST. To access this group, email info@HearingVoicesUSA.org.

HVN USA – Saturdays 2:00pm EST. To access this group, email info@HearingVoicesUSA.org.

Visit this link for more information from the HVN USA website at: https://www.HearingVoicesUSA.org.

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