PeerGalaxy Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring offerings of telephone + online peer support + wellness activities! 

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

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If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

Training Opportunities in July 2020
List Provided Courtesy of State of Oregon, Oregon Health Authority
Click here to download PDF Format, 16 pages

How Events are Sorted:

First, at the top of the list: Disaster Hotline & Oregon Safe + Strong Helpline.

Next in the list: Bundled “All Day” Events for organizations with events happening at multiple times throughout the day and/or in many formats or locations; these are bundled into a single listing to prevent endless scrolling.  Usually these offer a lookup by zip code or other criteria. 

Lastly, Time-Specific Events listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  Warmlines and places east of Oregon’s time zone tend to start earlier (e.g. 4am in Oregon is 7am in New York).

Jan
18
Tue
CAKE – 8 Best Support Groups for People Who Lost a Spouse or Partner @ online register for details
Jan 18 all-day

 

 8 Best Online Support Groups for Someone Who Lost a Partner

Coping with the aftermath of a huge loss like this is often lonely. Despite being surrounded by loved ones, it’s hard to feel heard and understood. Leaning on those who have experienced the same grief as you is an effective way to find comfort.

Because we can’t always find this support in person, the internet is a great way to connect with others. There are a number of online support groups specifically for grief and loss.

When searching for that perfect space in cyberspace, look for key indicators of a healthy, active community. Follow these tips below:

  • Effective moderation – Some online communities are unorganized. This isn’t ideal when dealing with strong emotions and real experiences. Make sure your online support group has a strong group of moderators to keep discussions under control.
  • Active posts – You don’t want to find yourself in a digital ghost town. Unfortunately, not all support groups last forever. Look for recent posts to ensure your voice will be heard.
  • Helpful discussion – Not all groups are helpful. Make sure you feel safe and comfortable in the digital support landscape.

Luckily, we’ve done the hard work for you. Below, you’ll find our top suggestions for online support groups ideal for anyone who has suffered the death of a partner.

1. Grief Support on Reddit

Reddit is an online platform with different subreddits for just about anything you can imagine, including grief. The Grief Support group has over 15,000 active members, and it’s a place to share stories, ask questions, and seek advice.

Reading through the stories and questions of others is an integral part of the grieving process. Learning from others who experienced the same things months or even years ago provides much-needed perspective and assistance in this time of mourning.

However, note this group is for any type of loss, though many members did lose their spouse or significant other.

2. Widowers on Reddit

Another Reddit group that deals with grief, specifically for those who have lost a partner, is Widowers. As the group description states, Widowers is a place for anyone who has lost a companion to share and heal.

With over 5,000 active members, this is a community for coming to terms with powerful feelings and experiences. The moderator’s welcome message sums this group up in a few profound words. They write, “We are as varied as the whole world. Except in our grief. In that, we are united and virtually universal.”

3. Cancer Care Bereavement Group

For those who have lost a spouse or partner to cancer, Cancer Care’s support group is here to help. This is a free, 15-week online support group intended for those who lost a spouse within the past 18 months. An oncology social worker leads the group, ensuring that every user experiences real growth.

Losing a spouse to cancer often feels different than losing a spouse in another way. It comes with unique feelings and methods of coping. Finding others to process this with makes a world of a difference.

4. Soaring Spirits

Soaring Spirits is a secular organization that helps people heal throughout the grieving process. They offer members of the community all the tools they need to get started on their path towards a new life. With both online and in-person opportunities, this is a great resource.

Soaring Spirits has a number of grief programs. From an online forum to a widowed pen pal group, there are a lot of ways to get the help you need. There is no need to be a paying member to use these services.

5. National Widowers Organization

The National Widowers Organization is a way to learn more about how men, in particular, deal with the loss of a partner. With specialized support groups for men, this organization helps men to adjust to a new life without their partner.

All resources are free, and you can even find local meetups with others struggling with life after the loss of a partner. Men often suffer many things alone, but this doesn’t have to be one of them.

6. Open to Hope

Open to Hope is a nonprofit that connects people to stories of grief, loss, and survival. While this isn’t a way to talk to others one-on-one, listening to and reading stories similar to your own is often a form of support in itself.

Join the 2 million listeners by following the podcast or read through Open to Hope’s articles. With over 100,000 active readers and 530 unique authors, this is the place to find understanding.

7. Widows Connection

Widows Connection is a place for women to get the peer-to-peer support they need after losing a spouse. This is something that affects women of all stages of life. Managing these new life changes, whether they include financial or family challenges, is never easy.

Widows Connection includes more than just emotional support. It also has legal, financial, and other practice advice specifically for widowed women. The annual fee costs $40, and it includes access to the full range of support resources.

8. The Sisterhood of Widows

Finally, the Sisterhood of Widows is another great support community for women experiencing the loss of a partner. The goal of this Sisterhood is to help women create a new life after the death of a loved one. It’s a way to connect with others to gain insight into your own grief and loneliness.

The Sisterhood of Widows has several Facebook groups specifically for women. There’s no fee to join. As long as you’re ready to start your path to recovery, the Sisterhood is waiting.

5 Tips for Finding an In-Person Support Group

While an online community is a great way to begin your own emotional healing, it is also beneficial to find in-person support. You might be surprised by just how many groups are available in your area. Here are some tips for finding the right group near you.

Start with the list above

Your first step is to use the list of online groups above. Many of these include an in-person group search feature. The larger, national organizations are often facilitating in-person meetings, especially around larger cities.

Ask local organizations

If you don’t have any luck with the organizations above, think local. In-person grief support groups are typically held at:

  • Libraries
  • Community centers
  • Senior centers
  • Churchs

Search online for places and organizations near you to see what they offer. You might also need to call and ask yourself. Don’t feel uncomfortable about asking — it’s common to ask about emotional support groups. They’re more common than you think.

Browse Meetup.com

Meetup is an online platform for connecting with others with similar interests. It’s not just used for fun activities and hangouts. Many widow groups post on Meetup to arrange local events, support groups, and more. Search your local area to see what’s near you.

Search “widow support group + your city” 

Don’t underestimate the power of a simple Google search. By searching your city name and “widow support group” or “grief support group,” you might find just what you’re looking for. It’s also effective to search for these events on social media as well.

Create your own group

Finally, if you don’t find what you’re looking for, why not start your own group? You don’t have to face these feelings alone. More likely than not, there are others locally who are dealing with a similar type of loss.

They might be waiting for an opportunity to connect with others in the same situation. Reach out to local community centers, churches, and organizations to start your own support group.

Find Peace in Connecting with Others

Dealing with the death of a loved one is never easy. It’s especially challenging when this loved one was a partner or spouse. While books on grief and other resources make sense of those feelings, this is only one side of the story.

Sometimes the best growth happens when you have the opportunity to share your experience with others and feel heard by those who “get it.” A support group is a perfect way to find the right listening ear and to grow your own perspective. Learn from each other and grieve together.

For more help with the loss of a loved one, review our guides for handling the first death anniversary as well as what to say on a death anniversary.

VA – VisionAware – Support Groups and Other Resources For the Blind and Visually Impaired @ Online Event Register Online
Jan 18 all-day

 

 

support group sitting around table

Importance of Joining a Support Group

If you’ve been diagnosed with an eye condition, have a family member who has, or have become a caregiver, joining a support group may be the most important thing you’ll ever do. Whether online or in your local community, such groups offer the opportunity to talk to others; share common concerns, frustrations, and stories; and find solutions to your vision-related difficulties. For more information on support groups, you can read Support Groups and the Adjustment Process.

Check out Finding Support Groups for more information including links to directory listings of support groups.

Support Group Resources and Supportive Communities Meeting Virtually

  • The APH Directory of Services allows you to find local support groups as well as organizations that offer counseling and adjustment services, low vision services, mobility training, and vocational rehabilitation.
  • ILVSG TeleSupport – This support group is designed for older adults with low vision who may not have access to the internet or other in-person groups. It is a monthly meeting offered over the phone and there are no fees or obligations. It is designed for low vision seniors anywhere in the U.S. who have no access to the Internet or cannot attend a live support group. Learn more at: MD Support — TeleSupport or call toll-free at 1-888-866-6148 to get started!

 

  • The Friendship Line – The Institute on Aging established this toll-free line for older adults who may be depressed, lonely, disabled, or in crisis.  It is both a crisis “hotline” and a ‘warmline” for emotional support. Trained volunteers answer the calls and make calls. The Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including: providing emotional support, elder abuse reporting, well-being checks, grief support through assistance and reassurance, active suicide intervention, information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities. Volunteers will also call people on a regular basis to help monitor their  physical and mental health concerns. This service can improve the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Reach out today and call 1-800-971-0016. To learn more, visit Senior Intervention Hotline for Crisis Support Services.

 

  • Social Call – This Covia program connects adults 60 and older to new friends on the phone or video calls. Volunteers are “matched” to participants with the goal of building friendships through weekly calls.  This free service is a great way to socialize and make connections when you can’t get out in your community. Go to: Social Call | Covia Corporate or call 1-877-797-7299 to get started. 

 

  • Covia Well Connected and Well Connected Espanol– This program, previously known as Senior Center without Walls, offers enrichment, community, fun, support and learning groups for older adults who may be homebound. All groups meet over the phone and/or on-line and are free. They offer support groups specifically for the visually impaired. It is a rich and supportive community and there is something for everyone! Visit their website to check out the catalog of offerings and learn how it all works. Call 1-877-797-7299 to register and get started.  

 

  • Mather Telephone Topics – Join Telephone Topics to learn about a variety of topics: wellness, music, sports, history. Participate in live discussions and enjoy live performances from home. All you do is call the phone number or log on to the Zoom meeting. Participation is FREE and open to everyone, anywhere! Learn more at: Aging Well Discussions and Programs | Telephone Topics (mather.com)  Then click on “Download Schedule” and choose an option that interests you. If you have questions about Telephone Topics, call 1-888-600-2560.

 

  • Eye2Eye is a free phone-based peer support program which offers emotional support, assessment, information, and referrals to people who are blind or visually impaired and their families. It helps people cope with the challenges of adjusting to vision loss, using trained peer support specialists who are also blind or visually impaired. They serve people in more than twenty states.
  • The American Council of the Blind (ACB) has a list of helpful resources for people with vision loss and their families. It also has a national directory of affiliates in each state. Seniors can find information through the ACB affiliate Alliance on Aging and Vision Loss.

 

 

 

 

  • Vision Exchange is an online resource for support group leaders who facilitate support groups for adults with vision loss. The purpose is to exchange ideas, information, and community resources to help adults with low vision be more independent

 

  • The Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) was the first community-based nonprofit organization in the country to address the needs of families and friends providing long-term care at home. FCA now offers programs at national, state, and local levels to support and sustain caregivers, and has an online family support group.

 

 

Phone emotional peer support line for blind persons

Rutgers has launched the nation’s first peer support helpline for the legally blind and their families.

Eye2Eye – 833-932-3931 (83-EYE2EYE-1) – is staffed 24/7 by peer support specialists who are legally blind and understand the challenges callers face.

The program, which is funded by a grant from the Lavelle Fund for the Blind, serves residents in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. The helpline assists people with vision impairments and blindness to work through some of the practical and emotional challenges associated with losing vision. Services include peer support, clinical assessment and referrals to resources for help with mental health, employment and technology. The program also offers callers resilience training to promote wellness, strength and self-care.

Recent studies show that one-third of people with vision loss suffer from depression and anxiety. This risk has gone largely unaddressed in the medical community, which has focused more on the practical problems faced by the visually impaired, such as finding employment and navigating everyday tasks, said Steven Silverstein, a clinical psychologist and vision researcher who co-directs the program with Cherie Castellano, the National Peer Support Call Center program director at  Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care.

The Eye2Eye peers all have different forms of visual impairments, and these began at different times during their lives. This allows for a ‘cultural connection’ between callers with a wide range of vision problems and life concerns, and our peer counselors.”

Steven Silverstein, clinical psychologist and vision researcher

Jan
19
Wed
CAKE – 8 Best Support Groups for People Who Lost a Spouse or Partner @ online register for details
Jan 19 all-day

 

 8 Best Online Support Groups for Someone Who Lost a Partner

Coping with the aftermath of a huge loss like this is often lonely. Despite being surrounded by loved ones, it’s hard to feel heard and understood. Leaning on those who have experienced the same grief as you is an effective way to find comfort.

Because we can’t always find this support in person, the internet is a great way to connect with others. There are a number of online support groups specifically for grief and loss.

When searching for that perfect space in cyberspace, look for key indicators of a healthy, active community. Follow these tips below:

  • Effective moderation – Some online communities are unorganized. This isn’t ideal when dealing with strong emotions and real experiences. Make sure your online support group has a strong group of moderators to keep discussions under control.
  • Active posts – You don’t want to find yourself in a digital ghost town. Unfortunately, not all support groups last forever. Look for recent posts to ensure your voice will be heard.
  • Helpful discussion – Not all groups are helpful. Make sure you feel safe and comfortable in the digital support landscape.

Luckily, we’ve done the hard work for you. Below, you’ll find our top suggestions for online support groups ideal for anyone who has suffered the death of a partner.

1. Grief Support on Reddit

Reddit is an online platform with different subreddits for just about anything you can imagine, including grief. The Grief Support group has over 15,000 active members, and it’s a place to share stories, ask questions, and seek advice.

Reading through the stories and questions of others is an integral part of the grieving process. Learning from others who experienced the same things months or even years ago provides much-needed perspective and assistance in this time of mourning.

However, note this group is for any type of loss, though many members did lose their spouse or significant other.

2. Widowers on Reddit

Another Reddit group that deals with grief, specifically for those who have lost a partner, is Widowers. As the group description states, Widowers is a place for anyone who has lost a companion to share and heal.

With over 5,000 active members, this is a community for coming to terms with powerful feelings and experiences. The moderator’s welcome message sums this group up in a few profound words. They write, “We are as varied as the whole world. Except in our grief. In that, we are united and virtually universal.”

3. Cancer Care Bereavement Group

For those who have lost a spouse or partner to cancer, Cancer Care’s support group is here to help. This is a free, 15-week online support group intended for those who lost a spouse within the past 18 months. An oncology social worker leads the group, ensuring that every user experiences real growth.

Losing a spouse to cancer often feels different than losing a spouse in another way. It comes with unique feelings and methods of coping. Finding others to process this with makes a world of a difference.

4. Soaring Spirits

Soaring Spirits is a secular organization that helps people heal throughout the grieving process. They offer members of the community all the tools they need to get started on their path towards a new life. With both online and in-person opportunities, this is a great resource.

Soaring Spirits has a number of grief programs. From an online forum to a widowed pen pal group, there are a lot of ways to get the help you need. There is no need to be a paying member to use these services.

5. National Widowers Organization

The National Widowers Organization is a way to learn more about how men, in particular, deal with the loss of a partner. With specialized support groups for men, this organization helps men to adjust to a new life without their partner.

All resources are free, and you can even find local meetups with others struggling with life after the loss of a partner. Men often suffer many things alone, but this doesn’t have to be one of them.

6. Open to Hope

Open to Hope is a nonprofit that connects people to stories of grief, loss, and survival. While this isn’t a way to talk to others one-on-one, listening to and reading stories similar to your own is often a form of support in itself.

Join the 2 million listeners by following the podcast or read through Open to Hope’s articles. With over 100,000 active readers and 530 unique authors, this is the place to find understanding.

7. Widows Connection

Widows Connection is a place for women to get the peer-to-peer support they need after losing a spouse. This is something that affects women of all stages of life. Managing these new life changes, whether they include financial or family challenges, is never easy.

Widows Connection includes more than just emotional support. It also has legal, financial, and other practice advice specifically for widowed women. The annual fee costs $40, and it includes access to the full range of support resources.

8. The Sisterhood of Widows

Finally, the Sisterhood of Widows is another great support community for women experiencing the loss of a partner. The goal of this Sisterhood is to help women create a new life after the death of a loved one. It’s a way to connect with others to gain insight into your own grief and loneliness.

The Sisterhood of Widows has several Facebook groups specifically for women. There’s no fee to join. As long as you’re ready to start your path to recovery, the Sisterhood is waiting.

5 Tips for Finding an In-Person Support Group

While an online community is a great way to begin your own emotional healing, it is also beneficial to find in-person support. You might be surprised by just how many groups are available in your area. Here are some tips for finding the right group near you.

Start with the list above

Your first step is to use the list of online groups above. Many of these include an in-person group search feature. The larger, national organizations are often facilitating in-person meetings, especially around larger cities.

Ask local organizations

If you don’t have any luck with the organizations above, think local. In-person grief support groups are typically held at:

  • Libraries
  • Community centers
  • Senior centers
  • Churchs

Search online for places and organizations near you to see what they offer. You might also need to call and ask yourself. Don’t feel uncomfortable about asking — it’s common to ask about emotional support groups. They’re more common than you think.

Browse Meetup.com

Meetup is an online platform for connecting with others with similar interests. It’s not just used for fun activities and hangouts. Many widow groups post on Meetup to arrange local events, support groups, and more. Search your local area to see what’s near you.

Search “widow support group + your city” 

Don’t underestimate the power of a simple Google search. By searching your city name and “widow support group” or “grief support group,” you might find just what you’re looking for. It’s also effective to search for these events on social media as well.

Create your own group

Finally, if you don’t find what you’re looking for, why not start your own group? You don’t have to face these feelings alone. More likely than not, there are others locally who are dealing with a similar type of loss.

They might be waiting for an opportunity to connect with others in the same situation. Reach out to local community centers, churches, and organizations to start your own support group.

Find Peace in Connecting with Others

Dealing with the death of a loved one is never easy. It’s especially challenging when this loved one was a partner or spouse. While books on grief and other resources make sense of those feelings, this is only one side of the story.

Sometimes the best growth happens when you have the opportunity to share your experience with others and feel heard by those who “get it.” A support group is a perfect way to find the right listening ear and to grow your own perspective. Learn from each other and grieve together.

For more help with the loss of a loved one, review our guides for handling the first death anniversary as well as what to say on a death anniversary.

VA – VisionAware – Support Groups and Other Resources For the Blind and Visually Impaired @ Online Event Register Online
Jan 19 all-day

 

 

support group sitting around table

Importance of Joining a Support Group

If you’ve been diagnosed with an eye condition, have a family member who has, or have become a caregiver, joining a support group may be the most important thing you’ll ever do. Whether online or in your local community, such groups offer the opportunity to talk to others; share common concerns, frustrations, and stories; and find solutions to your vision-related difficulties. For more information on support groups, you can read Support Groups and the Adjustment Process.

Check out Finding Support Groups for more information including links to directory listings of support groups.

Support Group Resources and Supportive Communities Meeting Virtually

  • The APH Directory of Services allows you to find local support groups as well as organizations that offer counseling and adjustment services, low vision services, mobility training, and vocational rehabilitation.
  • ILVSG TeleSupport – This support group is designed for older adults with low vision who may not have access to the internet or other in-person groups. It is a monthly meeting offered over the phone and there are no fees or obligations. It is designed for low vision seniors anywhere in the U.S. who have no access to the Internet or cannot attend a live support group. Learn more at: MD Support — TeleSupport or call toll-free at 1-888-866-6148 to get started!

 

  • The Friendship Line – The Institute on Aging established this toll-free line for older adults who may be depressed, lonely, disabled, or in crisis.  It is both a crisis “hotline” and a ‘warmline” for emotional support. Trained volunteers answer the calls and make calls. The Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including: providing emotional support, elder abuse reporting, well-being checks, grief support through assistance and reassurance, active suicide intervention, information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities. Volunteers will also call people on a regular basis to help monitor their  physical and mental health concerns. This service can improve the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Reach out today and call 1-800-971-0016. To learn more, visit Senior Intervention Hotline for Crisis Support Services.

 

  • Social Call – This Covia program connects adults 60 and older to new friends on the phone or video calls. Volunteers are “matched” to participants with the goal of building friendships through weekly calls.  This free service is a great way to socialize and make connections when you can’t get out in your community. Go to: Social Call | Covia Corporate or call 1-877-797-7299 to get started. 

 

  • Covia Well Connected and Well Connected Espanol– This program, previously known as Senior Center without Walls, offers enrichment, community, fun, support and learning groups for older adults who may be homebound. All groups meet over the phone and/or on-line and are free. They offer support groups specifically for the visually impaired. It is a rich and supportive community and there is something for everyone! Visit their website to check out the catalog of offerings and learn how it all works. Call 1-877-797-7299 to register and get started.  

 

  • Mather Telephone Topics – Join Telephone Topics to learn about a variety of topics: wellness, music, sports, history. Participate in live discussions and enjoy live performances from home. All you do is call the phone number or log on to the Zoom meeting. Participation is FREE and open to everyone, anywhere! Learn more at: Aging Well Discussions and Programs | Telephone Topics (mather.com)  Then click on “Download Schedule” and choose an option that interests you. If you have questions about Telephone Topics, call 1-888-600-2560.

 

  • Eye2Eye is a free phone-based peer support program which offers emotional support, assessment, information, and referrals to people who are blind or visually impaired and their families. It helps people cope with the challenges of adjusting to vision loss, using trained peer support specialists who are also blind or visually impaired. They serve people in more than twenty states.
  • The American Council of the Blind (ACB) has a list of helpful resources for people with vision loss and their families. It also has a national directory of affiliates in each state. Seniors can find information through the ACB affiliate Alliance on Aging and Vision Loss.

 

 

 

 

  • Vision Exchange is an online resource for support group leaders who facilitate support groups for adults with vision loss. The purpose is to exchange ideas, information, and community resources to help adults with low vision be more independent

 

  • The Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) was the first community-based nonprofit organization in the country to address the needs of families and friends providing long-term care at home. FCA now offers programs at national, state, and local levels to support and sustain caregivers, and has an online family support group.

 

 

Phone emotional peer support line for blind persons

Rutgers has launched the nation’s first peer support helpline for the legally blind and their families.

Eye2Eye – 833-932-3931 (83-EYE2EYE-1) – is staffed 24/7 by peer support specialists who are legally blind and understand the challenges callers face.

The program, which is funded by a grant from the Lavelle Fund for the Blind, serves residents in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. The helpline assists people with vision impairments and blindness to work through some of the practical and emotional challenges associated with losing vision. Services include peer support, clinical assessment and referrals to resources for help with mental health, employment and technology. The program also offers callers resilience training to promote wellness, strength and self-care.

Recent studies show that one-third of people with vision loss suffer from depression and anxiety. This risk has gone largely unaddressed in the medical community, which has focused more on the practical problems faced by the visually impaired, such as finding employment and navigating everyday tasks, said Steven Silverstein, a clinical psychologist and vision researcher who co-directs the program with Cherie Castellano, the National Peer Support Call Center program director at  Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care.

The Eye2Eye peers all have different forms of visual impairments, and these began at different times during their lives. This allows for a ‘cultural connection’ between callers with a wide range of vision problems and life concerns, and our peer counselors.”

Steven Silverstein, clinical psychologist and vision researcher

Jan
20
Thu
CAKE – 8 Best Support Groups for People Who Lost a Spouse or Partner @ online register for details
Jan 20 all-day

 

 8 Best Online Support Groups for Someone Who Lost a Partner

Coping with the aftermath of a huge loss like this is often lonely. Despite being surrounded by loved ones, it’s hard to feel heard and understood. Leaning on those who have experienced the same grief as you is an effective way to find comfort.

Because we can’t always find this support in person, the internet is a great way to connect with others. There are a number of online support groups specifically for grief and loss.

When searching for that perfect space in cyberspace, look for key indicators of a healthy, active community. Follow these tips below:

  • Effective moderation – Some online communities are unorganized. This isn’t ideal when dealing with strong emotions and real experiences. Make sure your online support group has a strong group of moderators to keep discussions under control.
  • Active posts – You don’t want to find yourself in a digital ghost town. Unfortunately, not all support groups last forever. Look for recent posts to ensure your voice will be heard.
  • Helpful discussion – Not all groups are helpful. Make sure you feel safe and comfortable in the digital support landscape.

Luckily, we’ve done the hard work for you. Below, you’ll find our top suggestions for online support groups ideal for anyone who has suffered the death of a partner.

1. Grief Support on Reddit

Reddit is an online platform with different subreddits for just about anything you can imagine, including grief. The Grief Support group has over 15,000 active members, and it’s a place to share stories, ask questions, and seek advice.

Reading through the stories and questions of others is an integral part of the grieving process. Learning from others who experienced the same things months or even years ago provides much-needed perspective and assistance in this time of mourning.

However, note this group is for any type of loss, though many members did lose their spouse or significant other.

2. Widowers on Reddit

Another Reddit group that deals with grief, specifically for those who have lost a partner, is Widowers. As the group description states, Widowers is a place for anyone who has lost a companion to share and heal.

With over 5,000 active members, this is a community for coming to terms with powerful feelings and experiences. The moderator’s welcome message sums this group up in a few profound words. They write, “We are as varied as the whole world. Except in our grief. In that, we are united and virtually universal.”

3. Cancer Care Bereavement Group

For those who have lost a spouse or partner to cancer, Cancer Care’s support group is here to help. This is a free, 15-week online support group intended for those who lost a spouse within the past 18 months. An oncology social worker leads the group, ensuring that every user experiences real growth.

Losing a spouse to cancer often feels different than losing a spouse in another way. It comes with unique feelings and methods of coping. Finding others to process this with makes a world of a difference.

4. Soaring Spirits

Soaring Spirits is a secular organization that helps people heal throughout the grieving process. They offer members of the community all the tools they need to get started on their path towards a new life. With both online and in-person opportunities, this is a great resource.

Soaring Spirits has a number of grief programs. From an online forum to a widowed pen pal group, there are a lot of ways to get the help you need. There is no need to be a paying member to use these services.

5. National Widowers Organization

The National Widowers Organization is a way to learn more about how men, in particular, deal with the loss of a partner. With specialized support groups for men, this organization helps men to adjust to a new life without their partner.

All resources are free, and you can even find local meetups with others struggling with life after the loss of a partner. Men often suffer many things alone, but this doesn’t have to be one of them.

6. Open to Hope

Open to Hope is a nonprofit that connects people to stories of grief, loss, and survival. While this isn’t a way to talk to others one-on-one, listening to and reading stories similar to your own is often a form of support in itself.

Join the 2 million listeners by following the podcast or read through Open to Hope’s articles. With over 100,000 active readers and 530 unique authors, this is the place to find understanding.

7. Widows Connection

Widows Connection is a place for women to get the peer-to-peer support they need after losing a spouse. This is something that affects women of all stages of life. Managing these new life changes, whether they include financial or family challenges, is never easy.

Widows Connection includes more than just emotional support. It also has legal, financial, and other practice advice specifically for widowed women. The annual fee costs $40, and it includes access to the full range of support resources.

8. The Sisterhood of Widows

Finally, the Sisterhood of Widows is another great support community for women experiencing the loss of a partner. The goal of this Sisterhood is to help women create a new life after the death of a loved one. It’s a way to connect with others to gain insight into your own grief and loneliness.

The Sisterhood of Widows has several Facebook groups specifically for women. There’s no fee to join. As long as you’re ready to start your path to recovery, the Sisterhood is waiting.

5 Tips for Finding an In-Person Support Group

While an online community is a great way to begin your own emotional healing, it is also beneficial to find in-person support. You might be surprised by just how many groups are available in your area. Here are some tips for finding the right group near you.

Start with the list above

Your first step is to use the list of online groups above. Many of these include an in-person group search feature. The larger, national organizations are often facilitating in-person meetings, especially around larger cities.

Ask local organizations

If you don’t have any luck with the organizations above, think local. In-person grief support groups are typically held at:

  • Libraries
  • Community centers
  • Senior centers
  • Churchs

Search online for places and organizations near you to see what they offer. You might also need to call and ask yourself. Don’t feel uncomfortable about asking — it’s common to ask about emotional support groups. They’re more common than you think.

Browse Meetup.com

Meetup is an online platform for connecting with others with similar interests. It’s not just used for fun activities and hangouts. Many widow groups post on Meetup to arrange local events, support groups, and more. Search your local area to see what’s near you.

Search “widow support group + your city” 

Don’t underestimate the power of a simple Google search. By searching your city name and “widow support group” or “grief support group,” you might find just what you’re looking for. It’s also effective to search for these events on social media as well.

Create your own group

Finally, if you don’t find what you’re looking for, why not start your own group? You don’t have to face these feelings alone. More likely than not, there are others locally who are dealing with a similar type of loss.

They might be waiting for an opportunity to connect with others in the same situation. Reach out to local community centers, churches, and organizations to start your own support group.

Find Peace in Connecting with Others

Dealing with the death of a loved one is never easy. It’s especially challenging when this loved one was a partner or spouse. While books on grief and other resources make sense of those feelings, this is only one side of the story.

Sometimes the best growth happens when you have the opportunity to share your experience with others and feel heard by those who “get it.” A support group is a perfect way to find the right listening ear and to grow your own perspective. Learn from each other and grieve together.

For more help with the loss of a loved one, review our guides for handling the first death anniversary as well as what to say on a death anniversary.

VA – VisionAware – Support Groups and Other Resources For the Blind and Visually Impaired @ Online Event Register Online
Jan 20 all-day

 

 

support group sitting around table

Importance of Joining a Support Group

If you’ve been diagnosed with an eye condition, have a family member who has, or have become a caregiver, joining a support group may be the most important thing you’ll ever do. Whether online or in your local community, such groups offer the opportunity to talk to others; share common concerns, frustrations, and stories; and find solutions to your vision-related difficulties. For more information on support groups, you can read Support Groups and the Adjustment Process.

Check out Finding Support Groups for more information including links to directory listings of support groups.

Support Group Resources and Supportive Communities Meeting Virtually

  • The APH Directory of Services allows you to find local support groups as well as organizations that offer counseling and adjustment services, low vision services, mobility training, and vocational rehabilitation.
  • ILVSG TeleSupport – This support group is designed for older adults with low vision who may not have access to the internet or other in-person groups. It is a monthly meeting offered over the phone and there are no fees or obligations. It is designed for low vision seniors anywhere in the U.S. who have no access to the Internet or cannot attend a live support group. Learn more at: MD Support — TeleSupport or call toll-free at 1-888-866-6148 to get started!

 

  • The Friendship Line – The Institute on Aging established this toll-free line for older adults who may be depressed, lonely, disabled, or in crisis.  It is both a crisis “hotline” and a ‘warmline” for emotional support. Trained volunteers answer the calls and make calls. The Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including: providing emotional support, elder abuse reporting, well-being checks, grief support through assistance and reassurance, active suicide intervention, information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities. Volunteers will also call people on a regular basis to help monitor their  physical and mental health concerns. This service can improve the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Reach out today and call 1-800-971-0016. To learn more, visit Senior Intervention Hotline for Crisis Support Services.

 

  • Social Call – This Covia program connects adults 60 and older to new friends on the phone or video calls. Volunteers are “matched” to participants with the goal of building friendships through weekly calls.  This free service is a great way to socialize and make connections when you can’t get out in your community. Go to: Social Call | Covia Corporate or call 1-877-797-7299 to get started. 

 

  • Covia Well Connected and Well Connected Espanol– This program, previously known as Senior Center without Walls, offers enrichment, community, fun, support and learning groups for older adults who may be homebound. All groups meet over the phone and/or on-line and are free. They offer support groups specifically for the visually impaired. It is a rich and supportive community and there is something for everyone! Visit their website to check out the catalog of offerings and learn how it all works. Call 1-877-797-7299 to register and get started.  

 

  • Mather Telephone Topics – Join Telephone Topics to learn about a variety of topics: wellness, music, sports, history. Participate in live discussions and enjoy live performances from home. All you do is call the phone number or log on to the Zoom meeting. Participation is FREE and open to everyone, anywhere! Learn more at: Aging Well Discussions and Programs | Telephone Topics (mather.com)  Then click on “Download Schedule” and choose an option that interests you. If you have questions about Telephone Topics, call 1-888-600-2560.

 

  • Eye2Eye is a free phone-based peer support program which offers emotional support, assessment, information, and referrals to people who are blind or visually impaired and their families. It helps people cope with the challenges of adjusting to vision loss, using trained peer support specialists who are also blind or visually impaired. They serve people in more than twenty states.
  • The American Council of the Blind (ACB) has a list of helpful resources for people with vision loss and their families. It also has a national directory of affiliates in each state. Seniors can find information through the ACB affiliate Alliance on Aging and Vision Loss.

 

 

 

 

  • Vision Exchange is an online resource for support group leaders who facilitate support groups for adults with vision loss. The purpose is to exchange ideas, information, and community resources to help adults with low vision be more independent

 

  • The Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) was the first community-based nonprofit organization in the country to address the needs of families and friends providing long-term care at home. FCA now offers programs at national, state, and local levels to support and sustain caregivers, and has an online family support group.

 

 

Phone emotional peer support line for blind persons

Rutgers has launched the nation’s first peer support helpline for the legally blind and their families.

Eye2Eye – 833-932-3931 (83-EYE2EYE-1) – is staffed 24/7 by peer support specialists who are legally blind and understand the challenges callers face.

The program, which is funded by a grant from the Lavelle Fund for the Blind, serves residents in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. The helpline assists people with vision impairments and blindness to work through some of the practical and emotional challenges associated with losing vision. Services include peer support, clinical assessment and referrals to resources for help with mental health, employment and technology. The program also offers callers resilience training to promote wellness, strength and self-care.

Recent studies show that one-third of people with vision loss suffer from depression and anxiety. This risk has gone largely unaddressed in the medical community, which has focused more on the practical problems faced by the visually impaired, such as finding employment and navigating everyday tasks, said Steven Silverstein, a clinical psychologist and vision researcher who co-directs the program with Cherie Castellano, the National Peer Support Call Center program director at  Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care.

The Eye2Eye peers all have different forms of visual impairments, and these began at different times during their lives. This allows for a ‘cultural connection’ between callers with a wide range of vision problems and life concerns, and our peer counselors.”

Steven Silverstein, clinical psychologist and vision researcher

Jan
21
Fri
CAKE – 8 Best Support Groups for People Who Lost a Spouse or Partner @ online register for details
Jan 21 all-day

 

 8 Best Online Support Groups for Someone Who Lost a Partner

Coping with the aftermath of a huge loss like this is often lonely. Despite being surrounded by loved ones, it’s hard to feel heard and understood. Leaning on those who have experienced the same grief as you is an effective way to find comfort.

Because we can’t always find this support in person, the internet is a great way to connect with others. There are a number of online support groups specifically for grief and loss.

When searching for that perfect space in cyberspace, look for key indicators of a healthy, active community. Follow these tips below:

  • Effective moderation – Some online communities are unorganized. This isn’t ideal when dealing with strong emotions and real experiences. Make sure your online support group has a strong group of moderators to keep discussions under control.
  • Active posts – You don’t want to find yourself in a digital ghost town. Unfortunately, not all support groups last forever. Look for recent posts to ensure your voice will be heard.
  • Helpful discussion – Not all groups are helpful. Make sure you feel safe and comfortable in the digital support landscape.

Luckily, we’ve done the hard work for you. Below, you’ll find our top suggestions for online support groups ideal for anyone who has suffered the death of a partner.

1. Grief Support on Reddit

Reddit is an online platform with different subreddits for just about anything you can imagine, including grief. The Grief Support group has over 15,000 active members, and it’s a place to share stories, ask questions, and seek advice.

Reading through the stories and questions of others is an integral part of the grieving process. Learning from others who experienced the same things months or even years ago provides much-needed perspective and assistance in this time of mourning.

However, note this group is for any type of loss, though many members did lose their spouse or significant other.

2. Widowers on Reddit

Another Reddit group that deals with grief, specifically for those who have lost a partner, is Widowers. As the group description states, Widowers is a place for anyone who has lost a companion to share and heal.

With over 5,000 active members, this is a community for coming to terms with powerful feelings and experiences. The moderator’s welcome message sums this group up in a few profound words. They write, “We are as varied as the whole world. Except in our grief. In that, we are united and virtually universal.”

3. Cancer Care Bereavement Group

For those who have lost a spouse or partner to cancer, Cancer Care’s support group is here to help. This is a free, 15-week online support group intended for those who lost a spouse within the past 18 months. An oncology social worker leads the group, ensuring that every user experiences real growth.

Losing a spouse to cancer often feels different than losing a spouse in another way. It comes with unique feelings and methods of coping. Finding others to process this with makes a world of a difference.

4. Soaring Spirits

Soaring Spirits is a secular organization that helps people heal throughout the grieving process. They offer members of the community all the tools they need to get started on their path towards a new life. With both online and in-person opportunities, this is a great resource.

Soaring Spirits has a number of grief programs. From an online forum to a widowed pen pal group, there are a lot of ways to get the help you need. There is no need to be a paying member to use these services.

5. National Widowers Organization

The National Widowers Organization is a way to learn more about how men, in particular, deal with the loss of a partner. With specialized support groups for men, this organization helps men to adjust to a new life without their partner.

All resources are free, and you can even find local meetups with others struggling with life after the loss of a partner. Men often suffer many things alone, but this doesn’t have to be one of them.

6. Open to Hope

Open to Hope is a nonprofit that connects people to stories of grief, loss, and survival. While this isn’t a way to talk to others one-on-one, listening to and reading stories similar to your own is often a form of support in itself.

Join the 2 million listeners by following the podcast or read through Open to Hope’s articles. With over 100,000 active readers and 530 unique authors, this is the place to find understanding.

7. Widows Connection

Widows Connection is a place for women to get the peer-to-peer support they need after losing a spouse. This is something that affects women of all stages of life. Managing these new life changes, whether they include financial or family challenges, is never easy.

Widows Connection includes more than just emotional support. It also has legal, financial, and other practice advice specifically for widowed women. The annual fee costs $40, and it includes access to the full range of support resources.

8. The Sisterhood of Widows

Finally, the Sisterhood of Widows is another great support community for women experiencing the loss of a partner. The goal of this Sisterhood is to help women create a new life after the death of a loved one. It’s a way to connect with others to gain insight into your own grief and loneliness.

The Sisterhood of Widows has several Facebook groups specifically for women. There’s no fee to join. As long as you’re ready to start your path to recovery, the Sisterhood is waiting.

5 Tips for Finding an In-Person Support Group

While an online community is a great way to begin your own emotional healing, it is also beneficial to find in-person support. You might be surprised by just how many groups are available in your area. Here are some tips for finding the right group near you.

Start with the list above

Your first step is to use the list of online groups above. Many of these include an in-person group search feature. The larger, national organizations are often facilitating in-person meetings, especially around larger cities.

Ask local organizations

If you don’t have any luck with the organizations above, think local. In-person grief support groups are typically held at:

  • Libraries
  • Community centers
  • Senior centers
  • Churchs

Search online for places and organizations near you to see what they offer. You might also need to call and ask yourself. Don’t feel uncomfortable about asking — it’s common to ask about emotional support groups. They’re more common than you think.

Browse Meetup.com

Meetup is an online platform for connecting with others with similar interests. It’s not just used for fun activities and hangouts. Many widow groups post on Meetup to arrange local events, support groups, and more. Search your local area to see what’s near you.

Search “widow support group + your city” 

Don’t underestimate the power of a simple Google search. By searching your city name and “widow support group” or “grief support group,” you might find just what you’re looking for. It’s also effective to search for these events on social media as well.

Create your own group

Finally, if you don’t find what you’re looking for, why not start your own group? You don’t have to face these feelings alone. More likely than not, there are others locally who are dealing with a similar type of loss.

They might be waiting for an opportunity to connect with others in the same situation. Reach out to local community centers, churches, and organizations to start your own support group.

Find Peace in Connecting with Others

Dealing with the death of a loved one is never easy. It’s especially challenging when this loved one was a partner or spouse. While books on grief and other resources make sense of those feelings, this is only one side of the story.

Sometimes the best growth happens when you have the opportunity to share your experience with others and feel heard by those who “get it.” A support group is a perfect way to find the right listening ear and to grow your own perspective. Learn from each other and grieve together.

For more help with the loss of a loved one, review our guides for handling the first death anniversary as well as what to say on a death anniversary.

VA – VisionAware – Support Groups and Other Resources For the Blind and Visually Impaired @ Online Event Register Online
Jan 21 all-day

 

 

support group sitting around table

Importance of Joining a Support Group

If you’ve been diagnosed with an eye condition, have a family member who has, or have become a caregiver, joining a support group may be the most important thing you’ll ever do. Whether online or in your local community, such groups offer the opportunity to talk to others; share common concerns, frustrations, and stories; and find solutions to your vision-related difficulties. For more information on support groups, you can read Support Groups and the Adjustment Process.

Check out Finding Support Groups for more information including links to directory listings of support groups.

Support Group Resources and Supportive Communities Meeting Virtually

  • The APH Directory of Services allows you to find local support groups as well as organizations that offer counseling and adjustment services, low vision services, mobility training, and vocational rehabilitation.
  • ILVSG TeleSupport – This support group is designed for older adults with low vision who may not have access to the internet or other in-person groups. It is a monthly meeting offered over the phone and there are no fees or obligations. It is designed for low vision seniors anywhere in the U.S. who have no access to the Internet or cannot attend a live support group. Learn more at: MD Support — TeleSupport or call toll-free at 1-888-866-6148 to get started!

 

  • The Friendship Line – The Institute on Aging established this toll-free line for older adults who may be depressed, lonely, disabled, or in crisis.  It is both a crisis “hotline” and a ‘warmline” for emotional support. Trained volunteers answer the calls and make calls. The Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including: providing emotional support, elder abuse reporting, well-being checks, grief support through assistance and reassurance, active suicide intervention, information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities. Volunteers will also call people on a regular basis to help monitor their  physical and mental health concerns. This service can improve the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Reach out today and call 1-800-971-0016. To learn more, visit Senior Intervention Hotline for Crisis Support Services.

 

  • Social Call – This Covia program connects adults 60 and older to new friends on the phone or video calls. Volunteers are “matched” to participants with the goal of building friendships through weekly calls.  This free service is a great way to socialize and make connections when you can’t get out in your community. Go to: Social Call | Covia Corporate or call 1-877-797-7299 to get started. 

 

  • Covia Well Connected and Well Connected Espanol– This program, previously known as Senior Center without Walls, offers enrichment, community, fun, support and learning groups for older adults who may be homebound. All groups meet over the phone and/or on-line and are free. They offer support groups specifically for the visually impaired. It is a rich and supportive community and there is something for everyone! Visit their website to check out the catalog of offerings and learn how it all works. Call 1-877-797-7299 to register and get started.  

 

  • Mather Telephone Topics – Join Telephone Topics to learn about a variety of topics: wellness, music, sports, history. Participate in live discussions and enjoy live performances from home. All you do is call the phone number or log on to the Zoom meeting. Participation is FREE and open to everyone, anywhere! Learn more at: Aging Well Discussions and Programs | Telephone Topics (mather.com)  Then click on “Download Schedule” and choose an option that interests you. If you have questions about Telephone Topics, call 1-888-600-2560.

 

  • Eye2Eye is a free phone-based peer support program which offers emotional support, assessment, information, and referrals to people who are blind or visually impaired and their families. It helps people cope with the challenges of adjusting to vision loss, using trained peer support specialists who are also blind or visually impaired. They serve people in more than twenty states.
  • The American Council of the Blind (ACB) has a list of helpful resources for people with vision loss and their families. It also has a national directory of affiliates in each state. Seniors can find information through the ACB affiliate Alliance on Aging and Vision Loss.

 

 

 

 

  • Vision Exchange is an online resource for support group leaders who facilitate support groups for adults with vision loss. The purpose is to exchange ideas, information, and community resources to help adults with low vision be more independent

 

  • The Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) was the first community-based nonprofit organization in the country to address the needs of families and friends providing long-term care at home. FCA now offers programs at national, state, and local levels to support and sustain caregivers, and has an online family support group.

 

 

Phone emotional peer support line for blind persons

Rutgers has launched the nation’s first peer support helpline for the legally blind and their families.

Eye2Eye – 833-932-3931 (83-EYE2EYE-1) – is staffed 24/7 by peer support specialists who are legally blind and understand the challenges callers face.

The program, which is funded by a grant from the Lavelle Fund for the Blind, serves residents in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. The helpline assists people with vision impairments and blindness to work through some of the practical and emotional challenges associated with losing vision. Services include peer support, clinical assessment and referrals to resources for help with mental health, employment and technology. The program also offers callers resilience training to promote wellness, strength and self-care.

Recent studies show that one-third of people with vision loss suffer from depression and anxiety. This risk has gone largely unaddressed in the medical community, which has focused more on the practical problems faced by the visually impaired, such as finding employment and navigating everyday tasks, said Steven Silverstein, a clinical psychologist and vision researcher who co-directs the program with Cherie Castellano, the National Peer Support Call Center program director at  Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care.

The Eye2Eye peers all have different forms of visual impairments, and these began at different times during their lives. This allows for a ‘cultural connection’ between callers with a wide range of vision problems and life concerns, and our peer counselors.”

Steven Silverstein, clinical psychologist and vision researcher

Jan
22
Sat
CAKE – 8 Best Support Groups for People Who Lost a Spouse or Partner @ online register for details
Jan 22 all-day

 

 8 Best Online Support Groups for Someone Who Lost a Partner

Coping with the aftermath of a huge loss like this is often lonely. Despite being surrounded by loved ones, it’s hard to feel heard and understood. Leaning on those who have experienced the same grief as you is an effective way to find comfort.

Because we can’t always find this support in person, the internet is a great way to connect with others. There are a number of online support groups specifically for grief and loss.

When searching for that perfect space in cyberspace, look for key indicators of a healthy, active community. Follow these tips below:

  • Effective moderation – Some online communities are unorganized. This isn’t ideal when dealing with strong emotions and real experiences. Make sure your online support group has a strong group of moderators to keep discussions under control.
  • Active posts – You don’t want to find yourself in a digital ghost town. Unfortunately, not all support groups last forever. Look for recent posts to ensure your voice will be heard.
  • Helpful discussion – Not all groups are helpful. Make sure you feel safe and comfortable in the digital support landscape.

Luckily, we’ve done the hard work for you. Below, you’ll find our top suggestions for online support groups ideal for anyone who has suffered the death of a partner.

1. Grief Support on Reddit

Reddit is an online platform with different subreddits for just about anything you can imagine, including grief. The Grief Support group has over 15,000 active members, and it’s a place to share stories, ask questions, and seek advice.

Reading through the stories and questions of others is an integral part of the grieving process. Learning from others who experienced the same things months or even years ago provides much-needed perspective and assistance in this time of mourning.

However, note this group is for any type of loss, though many members did lose their spouse or significant other.

2. Widowers on Reddit

Another Reddit group that deals with grief, specifically for those who have lost a partner, is Widowers. As the group description states, Widowers is a place for anyone who has lost a companion to share and heal.

With over 5,000 active members, this is a community for coming to terms with powerful feelings and experiences. The moderator’s welcome message sums this group up in a few profound words. They write, “We are as varied as the whole world. Except in our grief. In that, we are united and virtually universal.”

3. Cancer Care Bereavement Group

For those who have lost a spouse or partner to cancer, Cancer Care’s support group is here to help. This is a free, 15-week online support group intended for those who lost a spouse within the past 18 months. An oncology social worker leads the group, ensuring that every user experiences real growth.

Losing a spouse to cancer often feels different than losing a spouse in another way. It comes with unique feelings and methods of coping. Finding others to process this with makes a world of a difference.

4. Soaring Spirits

Soaring Spirits is a secular organization that helps people heal throughout the grieving process. They offer members of the community all the tools they need to get started on their path towards a new life. With both online and in-person opportunities, this is a great resource.

Soaring Spirits has a number of grief programs. From an online forum to a widowed pen pal group, there are a lot of ways to get the help you need. There is no need to be a paying member to use these services.

5. National Widowers Organization

The National Widowers Organization is a way to learn more about how men, in particular, deal with the loss of a partner. With specialized support groups for men, this organization helps men to adjust to a new life without their partner.

All resources are free, and you can even find local meetups with others struggling with life after the loss of a partner. Men often suffer many things alone, but this doesn’t have to be one of them.

6. Open to Hope

Open to Hope is a nonprofit that connects people to stories of grief, loss, and survival. While this isn’t a way to talk to others one-on-one, listening to and reading stories similar to your own is often a form of support in itself.

Join the 2 million listeners by following the podcast or read through Open to Hope’s articles. With over 100,000 active readers and 530 unique authors, this is the place to find understanding.

7. Widows Connection

Widows Connection is a place for women to get the peer-to-peer support they need after losing a spouse. This is something that affects women of all stages of life. Managing these new life changes, whether they include financial or family challenges, is never easy.

Widows Connection includes more than just emotional support. It also has legal, financial, and other practice advice specifically for widowed women. The annual fee costs $40, and it includes access to the full range of support resources.

8. The Sisterhood of Widows

Finally, the Sisterhood of Widows is another great support community for women experiencing the loss of a partner. The goal of this Sisterhood is to help women create a new life after the death of a loved one. It’s a way to connect with others to gain insight into your own grief and loneliness.

The Sisterhood of Widows has several Facebook groups specifically for women. There’s no fee to join. As long as you’re ready to start your path to recovery, the Sisterhood is waiting.

5 Tips for Finding an In-Person Support Group

While an online community is a great way to begin your own emotional healing, it is also beneficial to find in-person support. You might be surprised by just how many groups are available in your area. Here are some tips for finding the right group near you.

Start with the list above

Your first step is to use the list of online groups above. Many of these include an in-person group search feature. The larger, national organizations are often facilitating in-person meetings, especially around larger cities.

Ask local organizations

If you don’t have any luck with the organizations above, think local. In-person grief support groups are typically held at:

  • Libraries
  • Community centers
  • Senior centers
  • Churchs

Search online for places and organizations near you to see what they offer. You might also need to call and ask yourself. Don’t feel uncomfortable about asking — it’s common to ask about emotional support groups. They’re more common than you think.

Browse Meetup.com

Meetup is an online platform for connecting with others with similar interests. It’s not just used for fun activities and hangouts. Many widow groups post on Meetup to arrange local events, support groups, and more. Search your local area to see what’s near you.

Search “widow support group + your city” 

Don’t underestimate the power of a simple Google search. By searching your city name and “widow support group” or “grief support group,” you might find just what you’re looking for. It’s also effective to search for these events on social media as well.

Create your own group

Finally, if you don’t find what you’re looking for, why not start your own group? You don’t have to face these feelings alone. More likely than not, there are others locally who are dealing with a similar type of loss.

They might be waiting for an opportunity to connect with others in the same situation. Reach out to local community centers, churches, and organizations to start your own support group.

Find Peace in Connecting with Others

Dealing with the death of a loved one is never easy. It’s especially challenging when this loved one was a partner or spouse. While books on grief and other resources make sense of those feelings, this is only one side of the story.

Sometimes the best growth happens when you have the opportunity to share your experience with others and feel heard by those who “get it.” A support group is a perfect way to find the right listening ear and to grow your own perspective. Learn from each other and grieve together.

For more help with the loss of a loved one, review our guides for handling the first death anniversary as well as what to say on a death anniversary.

VA – VisionAware – Support Groups and Other Resources For the Blind and Visually Impaired @ Online Event Register Online
Jan 22 all-day

 

 

support group sitting around table

Importance of Joining a Support Group

If you’ve been diagnosed with an eye condition, have a family member who has, or have become a caregiver, joining a support group may be the most important thing you’ll ever do. Whether online or in your local community, such groups offer the opportunity to talk to others; share common concerns, frustrations, and stories; and find solutions to your vision-related difficulties. For more information on support groups, you can read Support Groups and the Adjustment Process.

Check out Finding Support Groups for more information including links to directory listings of support groups.

Support Group Resources and Supportive Communities Meeting Virtually

  • The APH Directory of Services allows you to find local support groups as well as organizations that offer counseling and adjustment services, low vision services, mobility training, and vocational rehabilitation.
  • ILVSG TeleSupport – This support group is designed for older adults with low vision who may not have access to the internet or other in-person groups. It is a monthly meeting offered over the phone and there are no fees or obligations. It is designed for low vision seniors anywhere in the U.S. who have no access to the Internet or cannot attend a live support group. Learn more at: MD Support — TeleSupport or call toll-free at 1-888-866-6148 to get started!

 

  • The Friendship Line – The Institute on Aging established this toll-free line for older adults who may be depressed, lonely, disabled, or in crisis.  It is both a crisis “hotline” and a ‘warmline” for emotional support. Trained volunteers answer the calls and make calls. The Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including: providing emotional support, elder abuse reporting, well-being checks, grief support through assistance and reassurance, active suicide intervention, information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities. Volunteers will also call people on a regular basis to help monitor their  physical and mental health concerns. This service can improve the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Reach out today and call 1-800-971-0016. To learn more, visit Senior Intervention Hotline for Crisis Support Services.

 

  • Social Call – This Covia program connects adults 60 and older to new friends on the phone or video calls. Volunteers are “matched” to participants with the goal of building friendships through weekly calls.  This free service is a great way to socialize and make connections when you can’t get out in your community. Go to: Social Call | Covia Corporate or call 1-877-797-7299 to get started. 

 

  • Covia Well Connected and Well Connected Espanol– This program, previously known as Senior Center without Walls, offers enrichment, community, fun, support and learning groups for older adults who may be homebound. All groups meet over the phone and/or on-line and are free. They offer support groups specifically for the visually impaired. It is a rich and supportive community and there is something for everyone! Visit their website to check out the catalog of offerings and learn how it all works. Call 1-877-797-7299 to register and get started.  

 

  • Mather Telephone Topics – Join Telephone Topics to learn about a variety of topics: wellness, music, sports, history. Participate in live discussions and enjoy live performances from home. All you do is call the phone number or log on to the Zoom meeting. Participation is FREE and open to everyone, anywhere! Learn more at: Aging Well Discussions and Programs | Telephone Topics (mather.com)  Then click on “Download Schedule” and choose an option that interests you. If you have questions about Telephone Topics, call 1-888-600-2560.

 

  • Eye2Eye is a free phone-based peer support program which offers emotional support, assessment, information, and referrals to people who are blind or visually impaired and their families. It helps people cope with the challenges of adjusting to vision loss, using trained peer support specialists who are also blind or visually impaired. They serve people in more than twenty states.
  • The American Council of the Blind (ACB) has a list of helpful resources for people with vision loss and their families. It also has a national directory of affiliates in each state. Seniors can find information through the ACB affiliate Alliance on Aging and Vision Loss.

 

 

 

 

  • Vision Exchange is an online resource for support group leaders who facilitate support groups for adults with vision loss. The purpose is to exchange ideas, information, and community resources to help adults with low vision be more independent

 

  • The Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) was the first community-based nonprofit organization in the country to address the needs of families and friends providing long-term care at home. FCA now offers programs at national, state, and local levels to support and sustain caregivers, and has an online family support group.

 

 

Phone emotional peer support line for blind persons

Rutgers has launched the nation’s first peer support helpline for the legally blind and their families.

Eye2Eye – 833-932-3931 (83-EYE2EYE-1) – is staffed 24/7 by peer support specialists who are legally blind and understand the challenges callers face.

The program, which is funded by a grant from the Lavelle Fund for the Blind, serves residents in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. The helpline assists people with vision impairments and blindness to work through some of the practical and emotional challenges associated with losing vision. Services include peer support, clinical assessment and referrals to resources for help with mental health, employment and technology. The program also offers callers resilience training to promote wellness, strength and self-care.

Recent studies show that one-third of people with vision loss suffer from depression and anxiety. This risk has gone largely unaddressed in the medical community, which has focused more on the practical problems faced by the visually impaired, such as finding employment and navigating everyday tasks, said Steven Silverstein, a clinical psychologist and vision researcher who co-directs the program with Cherie Castellano, the National Peer Support Call Center program director at  Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care.

The Eye2Eye peers all have different forms of visual impairments, and these began at different times during their lives. This allows for a ‘cultural connection’ between callers with a wide range of vision problems and life concerns, and our peer counselors.”

Steven Silverstein, clinical psychologist and vision researcher

Jan
23
Sun
CAKE – 8 Best Support Groups for People Who Lost a Spouse or Partner @ online register for details
Jan 23 all-day

 

 8 Best Online Support Groups for Someone Who Lost a Partner

Coping with the aftermath of a huge loss like this is often lonely. Despite being surrounded by loved ones, it’s hard to feel heard and understood. Leaning on those who have experienced the same grief as you is an effective way to find comfort.

Because we can’t always find this support in person, the internet is a great way to connect with others. There are a number of online support groups specifically for grief and loss.

When searching for that perfect space in cyberspace, look for key indicators of a healthy, active community. Follow these tips below:

  • Effective moderation – Some online communities are unorganized. This isn’t ideal when dealing with strong emotions and real experiences. Make sure your online support group has a strong group of moderators to keep discussions under control.
  • Active posts – You don’t want to find yourself in a digital ghost town. Unfortunately, not all support groups last forever. Look for recent posts to ensure your voice will be heard.
  • Helpful discussion – Not all groups are helpful. Make sure you feel safe and comfortable in the digital support landscape.

Luckily, we’ve done the hard work for you. Below, you’ll find our top suggestions for online support groups ideal for anyone who has suffered the death of a partner.

1. Grief Support on Reddit

Reddit is an online platform with different subreddits for just about anything you can imagine, including grief. The Grief Support group has over 15,000 active members, and it’s a place to share stories, ask questions, and seek advice.

Reading through the stories and questions of others is an integral part of the grieving process. Learning from others who experienced the same things months or even years ago provides much-needed perspective and assistance in this time of mourning.

However, note this group is for any type of loss, though many members did lose their spouse or significant other.

2. Widowers on Reddit

Another Reddit group that deals with grief, specifically for those who have lost a partner, is Widowers. As the group description states, Widowers is a place for anyone who has lost a companion to share and heal.

With over 5,000 active members, this is a community for coming to terms with powerful feelings and experiences. The moderator’s welcome message sums this group up in a few profound words. They write, “We are as varied as the whole world. Except in our grief. In that, we are united and virtually universal.”

3. Cancer Care Bereavement Group

For those who have lost a spouse or partner to cancer, Cancer Care’s support group is here to help. This is a free, 15-week online support group intended for those who lost a spouse within the past 18 months. An oncology social worker leads the group, ensuring that every user experiences real growth.

Losing a spouse to cancer often feels different than losing a spouse in another way. It comes with unique feelings and methods of coping. Finding others to process this with makes a world of a difference.

4. Soaring Spirits

Soaring Spirits is a secular organization that helps people heal throughout the grieving process. They offer members of the community all the tools they need to get started on their path towards a new life. With both online and in-person opportunities, this is a great resource.

Soaring Spirits has a number of grief programs. From an online forum to a widowed pen pal group, there are a lot of ways to get the help you need. There is no need to be a paying member to use these services.

5. National Widowers Organization

The National Widowers Organization is a way to learn more about how men, in particular, deal with the loss of a partner. With specialized support groups for men, this organization helps men to adjust to a new life without their partner.

All resources are free, and you can even find local meetups with others struggling with life after the loss of a partner. Men often suffer many things alone, but this doesn’t have to be one of them.

6. Open to Hope

Open to Hope is a nonprofit that connects people to stories of grief, loss, and survival. While this isn’t a way to talk to others one-on-one, listening to and reading stories similar to your own is often a form of support in itself.

Join the 2 million listeners by following the podcast or read through Open to Hope’s articles. With over 100,000 active readers and 530 unique authors, this is the place to find understanding.

7. Widows Connection

Widows Connection is a place for women to get the peer-to-peer support they need after losing a spouse. This is something that affects women of all stages of life. Managing these new life changes, whether they include financial or family challenges, is never easy.

Widows Connection includes more than just emotional support. It also has legal, financial, and other practice advice specifically for widowed women. The annual fee costs $40, and it includes access to the full range of support resources.

8. The Sisterhood of Widows

Finally, the Sisterhood of Widows is another great support community for women experiencing the loss of a partner. The goal of this Sisterhood is to help women create a new life after the death of a loved one. It’s a way to connect with others to gain insight into your own grief and loneliness.

The Sisterhood of Widows has several Facebook groups specifically for women. There’s no fee to join. As long as you’re ready to start your path to recovery, the Sisterhood is waiting.

5 Tips for Finding an In-Person Support Group

While an online community is a great way to begin your own emotional healing, it is also beneficial to find in-person support. You might be surprised by just how many groups are available in your area. Here are some tips for finding the right group near you.

Start with the list above

Your first step is to use the list of online groups above. Many of these include an in-person group search feature. The larger, national organizations are often facilitating in-person meetings, especially around larger cities.

Ask local organizations

If you don’t have any luck with the organizations above, think local. In-person grief support groups are typically held at:

  • Libraries
  • Community centers
  • Senior centers
  • Churchs

Search online for places and organizations near you to see what they offer. You might also need to call and ask yourself. Don’t feel uncomfortable about asking — it’s common to ask about emotional support groups. They’re more common than you think.

Browse Meetup.com

Meetup is an online platform for connecting with others with similar interests. It’s not just used for fun activities and hangouts. Many widow groups post on Meetup to arrange local events, support groups, and more. Search your local area to see what’s near you.

Search “widow support group + your city” 

Don’t underestimate the power of a simple Google search. By searching your city name and “widow support group” or “grief support group,” you might find just what you’re looking for. It’s also effective to search for these events on social media as well.

Create your own group

Finally, if you don’t find what you’re looking for, why not start your own group? You don’t have to face these feelings alone. More likely than not, there are others locally who are dealing with a similar type of loss.

They might be waiting for an opportunity to connect with others in the same situation. Reach out to local community centers, churches, and organizations to start your own support group.

Find Peace in Connecting with Others

Dealing with the death of a loved one is never easy. It’s especially challenging when this loved one was a partner or spouse. While books on grief and other resources make sense of those feelings, this is only one side of the story.

Sometimes the best growth happens when you have the opportunity to share your experience with others and feel heard by those who “get it.” A support group is a perfect way to find the right listening ear and to grow your own perspective. Learn from each other and grieve together.

For more help with the loss of a loved one, review our guides for handling the first death anniversary as well as what to say on a death anniversary.

VA – VisionAware – Support Groups and Other Resources For the Blind and Visually Impaired @ Online Event Register Online
Jan 23 all-day

 

 

support group sitting around table

Importance of Joining a Support Group

If you’ve been diagnosed with an eye condition, have a family member who has, or have become a caregiver, joining a support group may be the most important thing you’ll ever do. Whether online or in your local community, such groups offer the opportunity to talk to others; share common concerns, frustrations, and stories; and find solutions to your vision-related difficulties. For more information on support groups, you can read Support Groups and the Adjustment Process.

Check out Finding Support Groups for more information including links to directory listings of support groups.

Support Group Resources and Supportive Communities Meeting Virtually

  • The APH Directory of Services allows you to find local support groups as well as organizations that offer counseling and adjustment services, low vision services, mobility training, and vocational rehabilitation.
  • ILVSG TeleSupport – This support group is designed for older adults with low vision who may not have access to the internet or other in-person groups. It is a monthly meeting offered over the phone and there are no fees or obligations. It is designed for low vision seniors anywhere in the U.S. who have no access to the Internet or cannot attend a live support group. Learn more at: MD Support — TeleSupport or call toll-free at 1-888-866-6148 to get started!

 

  • The Friendship Line – The Institute on Aging established this toll-free line for older adults who may be depressed, lonely, disabled, or in crisis.  It is both a crisis “hotline” and a ‘warmline” for emotional support. Trained volunteers answer the calls and make calls. The Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including: providing emotional support, elder abuse reporting, well-being checks, grief support through assistance and reassurance, active suicide intervention, information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities. Volunteers will also call people on a regular basis to help monitor their  physical and mental health concerns. This service can improve the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Reach out today and call 1-800-971-0016. To learn more, visit Senior Intervention Hotline for Crisis Support Services.

 

  • Social Call – This Covia program connects adults 60 and older to new friends on the phone or video calls. Volunteers are “matched” to participants with the goal of building friendships through weekly calls.  This free service is a great way to socialize and make connections when you can’t get out in your community. Go to: Social Call | Covia Corporate or call 1-877-797-7299 to get started. 

 

  • Covia Well Connected and Well Connected Espanol– This program, previously known as Senior Center without Walls, offers enrichment, community, fun, support and learning groups for older adults who may be homebound. All groups meet over the phone and/or on-line and are free. They offer support groups specifically for the visually impaired. It is a rich and supportive community and there is something for everyone! Visit their website to check out the catalog of offerings and learn how it all works. Call 1-877-797-7299 to register and get started.  

 

  • Mather Telephone Topics – Join Telephone Topics to learn about a variety of topics: wellness, music, sports, history. Participate in live discussions and enjoy live performances from home. All you do is call the phone number or log on to the Zoom meeting. Participation is FREE and open to everyone, anywhere! Learn more at: Aging Well Discussions and Programs | Telephone Topics (mather.com)  Then click on “Download Schedule” and choose an option that interests you. If you have questions about Telephone Topics, call 1-888-600-2560.

 

  • Eye2Eye is a free phone-based peer support program which offers emotional support, assessment, information, and referrals to people who are blind or visually impaired and their families. It helps people cope with the challenges of adjusting to vision loss, using trained peer support specialists who are also blind or visually impaired. They serve people in more than twenty states.
  • The American Council of the Blind (ACB) has a list of helpful resources for people with vision loss and their families. It also has a national directory of affiliates in each state. Seniors can find information through the ACB affiliate Alliance on Aging and Vision Loss.

 

 

 

 

  • Vision Exchange is an online resource for support group leaders who facilitate support groups for adults with vision loss. The purpose is to exchange ideas, information, and community resources to help adults with low vision be more independent

 

  • The Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) was the first community-based nonprofit organization in the country to address the needs of families and friends providing long-term care at home. FCA now offers programs at national, state, and local levels to support and sustain caregivers, and has an online family support group.

 

 

Phone emotional peer support line for blind persons

Rutgers has launched the nation’s first peer support helpline for the legally blind and their families.

Eye2Eye – 833-932-3931 (83-EYE2EYE-1) – is staffed 24/7 by peer support specialists who are legally blind and understand the challenges callers face.

The program, which is funded by a grant from the Lavelle Fund for the Blind, serves residents in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. The helpline assists people with vision impairments and blindness to work through some of the practical and emotional challenges associated with losing vision. Services include peer support, clinical assessment and referrals to resources for help with mental health, employment and technology. The program also offers callers resilience training to promote wellness, strength and self-care.

Recent studies show that one-third of people with vision loss suffer from depression and anxiety. This risk has gone largely unaddressed in the medical community, which has focused more on the practical problems faced by the visually impaired, such as finding employment and navigating everyday tasks, said Steven Silverstein, a clinical psychologist and vision researcher who co-directs the program with Cherie Castellano, the National Peer Support Call Center program director at  Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care.

The Eye2Eye peers all have different forms of visual impairments, and these began at different times during their lives. This allows for a ‘cultural connection’ between callers with a wide range of vision problems and life concerns, and our peer counselors.”

Steven Silverstein, clinical psychologist and vision researcher

Jan
24
Mon
CAKE – 8 Best Support Groups for People Who Lost a Spouse or Partner @ online register for details
Jan 24 all-day

 

 8 Best Online Support Groups for Someone Who Lost a Partner

Coping with the aftermath of a huge loss like this is often lonely. Despite being surrounded by loved ones, it’s hard to feel heard and understood. Leaning on those who have experienced the same grief as you is an effective way to find comfort.

Because we can’t always find this support in person, the internet is a great way to connect with others. There are a number of online support groups specifically for grief and loss.

When searching for that perfect space in cyberspace, look for key indicators of a healthy, active community. Follow these tips below:

  • Effective moderation – Some online communities are unorganized. This isn’t ideal when dealing with strong emotions and real experiences. Make sure your online support group has a strong group of moderators to keep discussions under control.
  • Active posts – You don’t want to find yourself in a digital ghost town. Unfortunately, not all support groups last forever. Look for recent posts to ensure your voice will be heard.
  • Helpful discussion – Not all groups are helpful. Make sure you feel safe and comfortable in the digital support landscape.

Luckily, we’ve done the hard work for you. Below, you’ll find our top suggestions for online support groups ideal for anyone who has suffered the death of a partner.

1. Grief Support on Reddit

Reddit is an online platform with different subreddits for just about anything you can imagine, including grief. The Grief Support group has over 15,000 active members, and it’s a place to share stories, ask questions, and seek advice.

Reading through the stories and questions of others is an integral part of the grieving process. Learning from others who experienced the same things months or even years ago provides much-needed perspective and assistance in this time of mourning.

However, note this group is for any type of loss, though many members did lose their spouse or significant other.

2. Widowers on Reddit

Another Reddit group that deals with grief, specifically for those who have lost a partner, is Widowers. As the group description states, Widowers is a place for anyone who has lost a companion to share and heal.

With over 5,000 active members, this is a community for coming to terms with powerful feelings and experiences. The moderator’s welcome message sums this group up in a few profound words. They write, “We are as varied as the whole world. Except in our grief. In that, we are united and virtually universal.”

3. Cancer Care Bereavement Group

For those who have lost a spouse or partner to cancer, Cancer Care’s support group is here to help. This is a free, 15-week online support group intended for those who lost a spouse within the past 18 months. An oncology social worker leads the group, ensuring that every user experiences real growth.

Losing a spouse to cancer often feels different than losing a spouse in another way. It comes with unique feelings and methods of coping. Finding others to process this with makes a world of a difference.

4. Soaring Spirits

Soaring Spirits is a secular organization that helps people heal throughout the grieving process. They offer members of the community all the tools they need to get started on their path towards a new life. With both online and in-person opportunities, this is a great resource.

Soaring Spirits has a number of grief programs. From an online forum to a widowed pen pal group, there are a lot of ways to get the help you need. There is no need to be a paying member to use these services.

5. National Widowers Organization

The National Widowers Organization is a way to learn more about how men, in particular, deal with the loss of a partner. With specialized support groups for men, this organization helps men to adjust to a new life without their partner.

All resources are free, and you can even find local meetups with others struggling with life after the loss of a partner. Men often suffer many things alone, but this doesn’t have to be one of them.

6. Open to Hope

Open to Hope is a nonprofit that connects people to stories of grief, loss, and survival. While this isn’t a way to talk to others one-on-one, listening to and reading stories similar to your own is often a form of support in itself.

Join the 2 million listeners by following the podcast or read through Open to Hope’s articles. With over 100,000 active readers and 530 unique authors, this is the place to find understanding.

7. Widows Connection

Widows Connection is a place for women to get the peer-to-peer support they need after losing a spouse. This is something that affects women of all stages of life. Managing these new life changes, whether they include financial or family challenges, is never easy.

Widows Connection includes more than just emotional support. It also has legal, financial, and other practice advice specifically for widowed women. The annual fee costs $40, and it includes access to the full range of support resources.

8. The Sisterhood of Widows

Finally, the Sisterhood of Widows is another great support community for women experiencing the loss of a partner. The goal of this Sisterhood is to help women create a new life after the death of a loved one. It’s a way to connect with others to gain insight into your own grief and loneliness.

The Sisterhood of Widows has several Facebook groups specifically for women. There’s no fee to join. As long as you’re ready to start your path to recovery, the Sisterhood is waiting.

5 Tips for Finding an In-Person Support Group

While an online community is a great way to begin your own emotional healing, it is also beneficial to find in-person support. You might be surprised by just how many groups are available in your area. Here are some tips for finding the right group near you.

Start with the list above

Your first step is to use the list of online groups above. Many of these include an in-person group search feature. The larger, national organizations are often facilitating in-person meetings, especially around larger cities.

Ask local organizations

If you don’t have any luck with the organizations above, think local. In-person grief support groups are typically held at:

  • Libraries
  • Community centers
  • Senior centers
  • Churchs

Search online for places and organizations near you to see what they offer. You might also need to call and ask yourself. Don’t feel uncomfortable about asking — it’s common to ask about emotional support groups. They’re more common than you think.

Browse Meetup.com

Meetup is an online platform for connecting with others with similar interests. It’s not just used for fun activities and hangouts. Many widow groups post on Meetup to arrange local events, support groups, and more. Search your local area to see what’s near you.

Search “widow support group + your city” 

Don’t underestimate the power of a simple Google search. By searching your city name and “widow support group” or “grief support group,” you might find just what you’re looking for. It’s also effective to search for these events on social media as well.

Create your own group

Finally, if you don’t find what you’re looking for, why not start your own group? You don’t have to face these feelings alone. More likely than not, there are others locally who are dealing with a similar type of loss.

They might be waiting for an opportunity to connect with others in the same situation. Reach out to local community centers, churches, and organizations to start your own support group.

Find Peace in Connecting with Others

Dealing with the death of a loved one is never easy. It’s especially challenging when this loved one was a partner or spouse. While books on grief and other resources make sense of those feelings, this is only one side of the story.

Sometimes the best growth happens when you have the opportunity to share your experience with others and feel heard by those who “get it.” A support group is a perfect way to find the right listening ear and to grow your own perspective. Learn from each other and grieve together.

For more help with the loss of a loved one, review our guides for handling the first death anniversary as well as what to say on a death anniversary.

VA – VisionAware – Support Groups and Other Resources For the Blind and Visually Impaired @ Online Event Register Online
Jan 24 all-day

 

 

support group sitting around table

Importance of Joining a Support Group

If you’ve been diagnosed with an eye condition, have a family member who has, or have become a caregiver, joining a support group may be the most important thing you’ll ever do. Whether online or in your local community, such groups offer the opportunity to talk to others; share common concerns, frustrations, and stories; and find solutions to your vision-related difficulties. For more information on support groups, you can read Support Groups and the Adjustment Process.

Check out Finding Support Groups for more information including links to directory listings of support groups.

Support Group Resources and Supportive Communities Meeting Virtually

  • The APH Directory of Services allows you to find local support groups as well as organizations that offer counseling and adjustment services, low vision services, mobility training, and vocational rehabilitation.
  • ILVSG TeleSupport – This support group is designed for older adults with low vision who may not have access to the internet or other in-person groups. It is a monthly meeting offered over the phone and there are no fees or obligations. It is designed for low vision seniors anywhere in the U.S. who have no access to the Internet or cannot attend a live support group. Learn more at: MD Support — TeleSupport or call toll-free at 1-888-866-6148 to get started!

 

  • The Friendship Line – The Institute on Aging established this toll-free line for older adults who may be depressed, lonely, disabled, or in crisis.  It is both a crisis “hotline” and a ‘warmline” for emotional support. Trained volunteers answer the calls and make calls. The Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including: providing emotional support, elder abuse reporting, well-being checks, grief support through assistance and reassurance, active suicide intervention, information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities. Volunteers will also call people on a regular basis to help monitor their  physical and mental health concerns. This service can improve the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Reach out today and call 1-800-971-0016. To learn more, visit Senior Intervention Hotline for Crisis Support Services.

 

  • Social Call – This Covia program connects adults 60 and older to new friends on the phone or video calls. Volunteers are “matched” to participants with the goal of building friendships through weekly calls.  This free service is a great way to socialize and make connections when you can’t get out in your community. Go to: Social Call | Covia Corporate or call 1-877-797-7299 to get started. 

 

  • Covia Well Connected and Well Connected Espanol– This program, previously known as Senior Center without Walls, offers enrichment, community, fun, support and learning groups for older adults who may be homebound. All groups meet over the phone and/or on-line and are free. They offer support groups specifically for the visually impaired. It is a rich and supportive community and there is something for everyone! Visit their website to check out the catalog of offerings and learn how it all works. Call 1-877-797-7299 to register and get started.  

 

  • Mather Telephone Topics – Join Telephone Topics to learn about a variety of topics: wellness, music, sports, history. Participate in live discussions and enjoy live performances from home. All you do is call the phone number or log on to the Zoom meeting. Participation is FREE and open to everyone, anywhere! Learn more at: Aging Well Discussions and Programs | Telephone Topics (mather.com)  Then click on “Download Schedule” and choose an option that interests you. If you have questions about Telephone Topics, call 1-888-600-2560.

 

  • Eye2Eye is a free phone-based peer support program which offers emotional support, assessment, information, and referrals to people who are blind or visually impaired and their families. It helps people cope with the challenges of adjusting to vision loss, using trained peer support specialists who are also blind or visually impaired. They serve people in more than twenty states.
  • The American Council of the Blind (ACB) has a list of helpful resources for people with vision loss and their families. It also has a national directory of affiliates in each state. Seniors can find information through the ACB affiliate Alliance on Aging and Vision Loss.

 

 

 

 

  • Vision Exchange is an online resource for support group leaders who facilitate support groups for adults with vision loss. The purpose is to exchange ideas, information, and community resources to help adults with low vision be more independent

 

  • The Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) was the first community-based nonprofit organization in the country to address the needs of families and friends providing long-term care at home. FCA now offers programs at national, state, and local levels to support and sustain caregivers, and has an online family support group.

 

 

Phone emotional peer support line for blind persons

Rutgers has launched the nation’s first peer support helpline for the legally blind and their families.

Eye2Eye – 833-932-3931 (83-EYE2EYE-1) – is staffed 24/7 by peer support specialists who are legally blind and understand the challenges callers face.

The program, which is funded by a grant from the Lavelle Fund for the Blind, serves residents in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. The helpline assists people with vision impairments and blindness to work through some of the practical and emotional challenges associated with losing vision. Services include peer support, clinical assessment and referrals to resources for help with mental health, employment and technology. The program also offers callers resilience training to promote wellness, strength and self-care.

Recent studies show that one-third of people with vision loss suffer from depression and anxiety. This risk has gone largely unaddressed in the medical community, which has focused more on the practical problems faced by the visually impaired, such as finding employment and navigating everyday tasks, said Steven Silverstein, a clinical psychologist and vision researcher who co-directs the program with Cherie Castellano, the National Peer Support Call Center program director at  Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care.

The Eye2Eye peers all have different forms of visual impairments, and these began at different times during their lives. This allows for a ‘cultural connection’ between callers with a wide range of vision problems and life concerns, and our peer counselors.”

Steven Silverstein, clinical psychologist and vision researcher

Jan
25
Tue
CAKE – 8 Best Support Groups for People Who Lost a Spouse or Partner @ online register for details
Jan 25 all-day

 

 8 Best Online Support Groups for Someone Who Lost a Partner

Coping with the aftermath of a huge loss like this is often lonely. Despite being surrounded by loved ones, it’s hard to feel heard and understood. Leaning on those who have experienced the same grief as you is an effective way to find comfort.

Because we can’t always find this support in person, the internet is a great way to connect with others. There are a number of online support groups specifically for grief and loss.

When searching for that perfect space in cyberspace, look for key indicators of a healthy, active community. Follow these tips below:

  • Effective moderation – Some online communities are unorganized. This isn’t ideal when dealing with strong emotions and real experiences. Make sure your online support group has a strong group of moderators to keep discussions under control.
  • Active posts – You don’t want to find yourself in a digital ghost town. Unfortunately, not all support groups last forever. Look for recent posts to ensure your voice will be heard.
  • Helpful discussion – Not all groups are helpful. Make sure you feel safe and comfortable in the digital support landscape.

Luckily, we’ve done the hard work for you. Below, you’ll find our top suggestions for online support groups ideal for anyone who has suffered the death of a partner.

1. Grief Support on Reddit

Reddit is an online platform with different subreddits for just about anything you can imagine, including grief. The Grief Support group has over 15,000 active members, and it’s a place to share stories, ask questions, and seek advice.

Reading through the stories and questions of others is an integral part of the grieving process. Learning from others who experienced the same things months or even years ago provides much-needed perspective and assistance in this time of mourning.

However, note this group is for any type of loss, though many members did lose their spouse or significant other.

2. Widowers on Reddit

Another Reddit group that deals with grief, specifically for those who have lost a partner, is Widowers. As the group description states, Widowers is a place for anyone who has lost a companion to share and heal.

With over 5,000 active members, this is a community for coming to terms with powerful feelings and experiences. The moderator’s welcome message sums this group up in a few profound words. They write, “We are as varied as the whole world. Except in our grief. In that, we are united and virtually universal.”

3. Cancer Care Bereavement Group

For those who have lost a spouse or partner to cancer, Cancer Care’s support group is here to help. This is a free, 15-week online support group intended for those who lost a spouse within the past 18 months. An oncology social worker leads the group, ensuring that every user experiences real growth.

Losing a spouse to cancer often feels different than losing a spouse in another way. It comes with unique feelings and methods of coping. Finding others to process this with makes a world of a difference.

4. Soaring Spirits

Soaring Spirits is a secular organization that helps people heal throughout the grieving process. They offer members of the community all the tools they need to get started on their path towards a new life. With both online and in-person opportunities, this is a great resource.

Soaring Spirits has a number of grief programs. From an online forum to a widowed pen pal group, there are a lot of ways to get the help you need. There is no need to be a paying member to use these services.

5. National Widowers Organization

The National Widowers Organization is a way to learn more about how men, in particular, deal with the loss of a partner. With specialized support groups for men, this organization helps men to adjust to a new life without their partner.

All resources are free, and you can even find local meetups with others struggling with life after the loss of a partner. Men often suffer many things alone, but this doesn’t have to be one of them.

6. Open to Hope

Open to Hope is a nonprofit that connects people to stories of grief, loss, and survival. While this isn’t a way to talk to others one-on-one, listening to and reading stories similar to your own is often a form of support in itself.

Join the 2 million listeners by following the podcast or read through Open to Hope’s articles. With over 100,000 active readers and 530 unique authors, this is the place to find understanding.

7. Widows Connection

Widows Connection is a place for women to get the peer-to-peer support they need after losing a spouse. This is something that affects women of all stages of life. Managing these new life changes, whether they include financial or family challenges, is never easy.

Widows Connection includes more than just emotional support. It also has legal, financial, and other practice advice specifically for widowed women. The annual fee costs $40, and it includes access to the full range of support resources.

8. The Sisterhood of Widows

Finally, the Sisterhood of Widows is another great support community for women experiencing the loss of a partner. The goal of this Sisterhood is to help women create a new life after the death of a loved one. It’s a way to connect with others to gain insight into your own grief and loneliness.

The Sisterhood of Widows has several Facebook groups specifically for women. There’s no fee to join. As long as you’re ready to start your path to recovery, the Sisterhood is waiting.

5 Tips for Finding an In-Person Support Group

While an online community is a great way to begin your own emotional healing, it is also beneficial to find in-person support. You might be surprised by just how many groups are available in your area. Here are some tips for finding the right group near you.

Start with the list above

Your first step is to use the list of online groups above. Many of these include an in-person group search feature. The larger, national organizations are often facilitating in-person meetings, especially around larger cities.

Ask local organizations

If you don’t have any luck with the organizations above, think local. In-person grief support groups are typically held at:

  • Libraries
  • Community centers
  • Senior centers
  • Churchs

Search online for places and organizations near you to see what they offer. You might also need to call and ask yourself. Don’t feel uncomfortable about asking — it’s common to ask about emotional support groups. They’re more common than you think.

Browse Meetup.com

Meetup is an online platform for connecting with others with similar interests. It’s not just used for fun activities and hangouts. Many widow groups post on Meetup to arrange local events, support groups, and more. Search your local area to see what’s near you.

Search “widow support group + your city” 

Don’t underestimate the power of a simple Google search. By searching your city name and “widow support group” or “grief support group,” you might find just what you’re looking for. It’s also effective to search for these events on social media as well.

Create your own group

Finally, if you don’t find what you’re looking for, why not start your own group? You don’t have to face these feelings alone. More likely than not, there are others locally who are dealing with a similar type of loss.

They might be waiting for an opportunity to connect with others in the same situation. Reach out to local community centers, churches, and organizations to start your own support group.

Find Peace in Connecting with Others

Dealing with the death of a loved one is never easy. It’s especially challenging when this loved one was a partner or spouse. While books on grief and other resources make sense of those feelings, this is only one side of the story.

Sometimes the best growth happens when you have the opportunity to share your experience with others and feel heard by those who “get it.” A support group is a perfect way to find the right listening ear and to grow your own perspective. Learn from each other and grieve together.

For more help with the loss of a loved one, review our guides for handling the first death anniversary as well as what to say on a death anniversary.

VA – VisionAware – Support Groups and Other Resources For the Blind and Visually Impaired @ Online Event Register Online
Jan 25 all-day

 

 

support group sitting around table

Importance of Joining a Support Group

If you’ve been diagnosed with an eye condition, have a family member who has, or have become a caregiver, joining a support group may be the most important thing you’ll ever do. Whether online or in your local community, such groups offer the opportunity to talk to others; share common concerns, frustrations, and stories; and find solutions to your vision-related difficulties. For more information on support groups, you can read Support Groups and the Adjustment Process.

Check out Finding Support Groups for more information including links to directory listings of support groups.

Support Group Resources and Supportive Communities Meeting Virtually

  • The APH Directory of Services allows you to find local support groups as well as organizations that offer counseling and adjustment services, low vision services, mobility training, and vocational rehabilitation.
  • ILVSG TeleSupport – This support group is designed for older adults with low vision who may not have access to the internet or other in-person groups. It is a monthly meeting offered over the phone and there are no fees or obligations. It is designed for low vision seniors anywhere in the U.S. who have no access to the Internet or cannot attend a live support group. Learn more at: MD Support — TeleSupport or call toll-free at 1-888-866-6148 to get started!

 

  • The Friendship Line – The Institute on Aging established this toll-free line for older adults who may be depressed, lonely, disabled, or in crisis.  It is both a crisis “hotline” and a ‘warmline” for emotional support. Trained volunteers answer the calls and make calls. The Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including: providing emotional support, elder abuse reporting, well-being checks, grief support through assistance and reassurance, active suicide intervention, information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities. Volunteers will also call people on a regular basis to help monitor their  physical and mental health concerns. This service can improve the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Reach out today and call 1-800-971-0016. To learn more, visit Senior Intervention Hotline for Crisis Support Services.

 

  • Social Call – This Covia program connects adults 60 and older to new friends on the phone or video calls. Volunteers are “matched” to participants with the goal of building friendships through weekly calls.  This free service is a great way to socialize and make connections when you can’t get out in your community. Go to: Social Call | Covia Corporate or call 1-877-797-7299 to get started. 

 

  • Covia Well Connected and Well Connected Espanol– This program, previously known as Senior Center without Walls, offers enrichment, community, fun, support and learning groups for older adults who may be homebound. All groups meet over the phone and/or on-line and are free. They offer support groups specifically for the visually impaired. It is a rich and supportive community and there is something for everyone! Visit their website to check out the catalog of offerings and learn how it all works. Call 1-877-797-7299 to register and get started.  

 

  • Mather Telephone Topics – Join Telephone Topics to learn about a variety of topics: wellness, music, sports, history. Participate in live discussions and enjoy live performances from home. All you do is call the phone number or log on to the Zoom meeting. Participation is FREE and open to everyone, anywhere! Learn more at: Aging Well Discussions and Programs | Telephone Topics (mather.com)  Then click on “Download Schedule” and choose an option that interests you. If you have questions about Telephone Topics, call 1-888-600-2560.

 

  • Eye2Eye is a free phone-based peer support program which offers emotional support, assessment, information, and referrals to people who are blind or visually impaired and their families. It helps people cope with the challenges of adjusting to vision loss, using trained peer support specialists who are also blind or visually impaired. They serve people in more than twenty states.
  • The American Council of the Blind (ACB) has a list of helpful resources for people with vision loss and their families. It also has a national directory of affiliates in each state. Seniors can find information through the ACB affiliate Alliance on Aging and Vision Loss.

 

 

 

 

  • Vision Exchange is an online resource for support group leaders who facilitate support groups for adults with vision loss. The purpose is to exchange ideas, information, and community resources to help adults with low vision be more independent

 

  • The Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) was the first community-based nonprofit organization in the country to address the needs of families and friends providing long-term care at home. FCA now offers programs at national, state, and local levels to support and sustain caregivers, and has an online family support group.

 

 

Phone emotional peer support line for blind persons

Rutgers has launched the nation’s first peer support helpline for the legally blind and their families.

Eye2Eye – 833-932-3931 (83-EYE2EYE-1) – is staffed 24/7 by peer support specialists who are legally blind and understand the challenges callers face.

The program, which is funded by a grant from the Lavelle Fund for the Blind, serves residents in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. The helpline assists people with vision impairments and blindness to work through some of the practical and emotional challenges associated with losing vision. Services include peer support, clinical assessment and referrals to resources for help with mental health, employment and technology. The program also offers callers resilience training to promote wellness, strength and self-care.

Recent studies show that one-third of people with vision loss suffer from depression and anxiety. This risk has gone largely unaddressed in the medical community, which has focused more on the practical problems faced by the visually impaired, such as finding employment and navigating everyday tasks, said Steven Silverstein, a clinical psychologist and vision researcher who co-directs the program with Cherie Castellano, the National Peer Support Call Center program director at  Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care.

The Eye2Eye peers all have different forms of visual impairments, and these began at different times during their lives. This allows for a ‘cultural connection’ between callers with a wide range of vision problems and life concerns, and our peer counselors.”

Steven Silverstein, clinical psychologist and vision researcher

Jan
26
Wed
CAKE – 8 Best Support Groups for People Who Lost a Spouse or Partner @ online register for details
Jan 26 all-day

 

 8 Best Online Support Groups for Someone Who Lost a Partner

Coping with the aftermath of a huge loss like this is often lonely. Despite being surrounded by loved ones, it’s hard to feel heard and understood. Leaning on those who have experienced the same grief as you is an effective way to find comfort.

Because we can’t always find this support in person, the internet is a great way to connect with others. There are a number of online support groups specifically for grief and loss.

When searching for that perfect space in cyberspace, look for key indicators of a healthy, active community. Follow these tips below:

  • Effective moderation – Some online communities are unorganized. This isn’t ideal when dealing with strong emotions and real experiences. Make sure your online support group has a strong group of moderators to keep discussions under control.
  • Active posts – You don’t want to find yourself in a digital ghost town. Unfortunately, not all support groups last forever. Look for recent posts to ensure your voice will be heard.
  • Helpful discussion – Not all groups are helpful. Make sure you feel safe and comfortable in the digital support landscape.

Luckily, we’ve done the hard work for you. Below, you’ll find our top suggestions for online support groups ideal for anyone who has suffered the death of a partner.

1. Grief Support on Reddit

Reddit is an online platform with different subreddits for just about anything you can imagine, including grief. The Grief Support group has over 15,000 active members, and it’s a place to share stories, ask questions, and seek advice.

Reading through the stories and questions of others is an integral part of the grieving process. Learning from others who experienced the same things months or even years ago provides much-needed perspective and assistance in this time of mourning.

However, note this group is for any type of loss, though many members did lose their spouse or significant other.

2. Widowers on Reddit

Another Reddit group that deals with grief, specifically for those who have lost a partner, is Widowers. As the group description states, Widowers is a place for anyone who has lost a companion to share and heal.

With over 5,000 active members, this is a community for coming to terms with powerful feelings and experiences. The moderator’s welcome message sums this group up in a few profound words. They write, “We are as varied as the whole world. Except in our grief. In that, we are united and virtually universal.”

3. Cancer Care Bereavement Group

For those who have lost a spouse or partner to cancer, Cancer Care’s support group is here to help. This is a free, 15-week online support group intended for those who lost a spouse within the past 18 months. An oncology social worker leads the group, ensuring that every user experiences real growth.

Losing a spouse to cancer often feels different than losing a spouse in another way. It comes with unique feelings and methods of coping. Finding others to process this with makes a world of a difference.

4. Soaring Spirits

Soaring Spirits is a secular organization that helps people heal throughout the grieving process. They offer members of the community all the tools they need to get started on their path towards a new life. With both online and in-person opportunities, this is a great resource.

Soaring Spirits has a number of grief programs. From an online forum to a widowed pen pal group, there are a lot of ways to get the help you need. There is no need to be a paying member to use these services.

5. National Widowers Organization

The National Widowers Organization is a way to learn more about how men, in particular, deal with the loss of a partner. With specialized support groups for men, this organization helps men to adjust to a new life without their partner.

All resources are free, and you can even find local meetups with others struggling with life after the loss of a partner. Men often suffer many things alone, but this doesn’t have to be one of them.

6. Open to Hope

Open to Hope is a nonprofit that connects people to stories of grief, loss, and survival. While this isn’t a way to talk to others one-on-one, listening to and reading stories similar to your own is often a form of support in itself.

Join the 2 million listeners by following the podcast or read through Open to Hope’s articles. With over 100,000 active readers and 530 unique authors, this is the place to find understanding.

7. Widows Connection

Widows Connection is a place for women to get the peer-to-peer support they need after losing a spouse. This is something that affects women of all stages of life. Managing these new life changes, whether they include financial or family challenges, is never easy.

Widows Connection includes more than just emotional support. It also has legal, financial, and other practice advice specifically for widowed women. The annual fee costs $40, and it includes access to the full range of support resources.

8. The Sisterhood of Widows

Finally, the Sisterhood of Widows is another great support community for women experiencing the loss of a partner. The goal of this Sisterhood is to help women create a new life after the death of a loved one. It’s a way to connect with others to gain insight into your own grief and loneliness.

The Sisterhood of Widows has several Facebook groups specifically for women. There’s no fee to join. As long as you’re ready to start your path to recovery, the Sisterhood is waiting.

5 Tips for Finding an In-Person Support Group

While an online community is a great way to begin your own emotional healing, it is also beneficial to find in-person support. You might be surprised by just how many groups are available in your area. Here are some tips for finding the right group near you.

Start with the list above

Your first step is to use the list of online groups above. Many of these include an in-person group search feature. The larger, national organizations are often facilitating in-person meetings, especially around larger cities.

Ask local organizations

If you don’t have any luck with the organizations above, think local. In-person grief support groups are typically held at:

  • Libraries
  • Community centers
  • Senior centers
  • Churchs

Search online for places and organizations near you to see what they offer. You might also need to call and ask yourself. Don’t feel uncomfortable about asking — it’s common to ask about emotional support groups. They’re more common than you think.

Browse Meetup.com

Meetup is an online platform for connecting with others with similar interests. It’s not just used for fun activities and hangouts. Many widow groups post on Meetup to arrange local events, support groups, and more. Search your local area to see what’s near you.

Search “widow support group + your city” 

Don’t underestimate the power of a simple Google search. By searching your city name and “widow support group” or “grief support group,” you might find just what you’re looking for. It’s also effective to search for these events on social media as well.

Create your own group

Finally, if you don’t find what you’re looking for, why not start your own group? You don’t have to face these feelings alone. More likely than not, there are others locally who are dealing with a similar type of loss.

They might be waiting for an opportunity to connect with others in the same situation. Reach out to local community centers, churches, and organizations to start your own support group.

Find Peace in Connecting with Others

Dealing with the death of a loved one is never easy. It’s especially challenging when this loved one was a partner or spouse. While books on grief and other resources make sense of those feelings, this is only one side of the story.

Sometimes the best growth happens when you have the opportunity to share your experience with others and feel heard by those who “get it.” A support group is a perfect way to find the right listening ear and to grow your own perspective. Learn from each other and grieve together.

For more help with the loss of a loved one, review our guides for handling the first death anniversary as well as what to say on a death anniversary.

VA – VisionAware – Support Groups and Other Resources For the Blind and Visually Impaired @ Online Event Register Online
Jan 26 all-day

 

 

support group sitting around table

Importance of Joining a Support Group

If you’ve been diagnosed with an eye condition, have a family member who has, or have become a caregiver, joining a support group may be the most important thing you’ll ever do. Whether online or in your local community, such groups offer the opportunity to talk to others; share common concerns, frustrations, and stories; and find solutions to your vision-related difficulties. For more information on support groups, you can read Support Groups and the Adjustment Process.

Check out Finding Support Groups for more information including links to directory listings of support groups.

Support Group Resources and Supportive Communities Meeting Virtually

  • The APH Directory of Services allows you to find local support groups as well as organizations that offer counseling and adjustment services, low vision services, mobility training, and vocational rehabilitation.
  • ILVSG TeleSupport – This support group is designed for older adults with low vision who may not have access to the internet or other in-person groups. It is a monthly meeting offered over the phone and there are no fees or obligations. It is designed for low vision seniors anywhere in the U.S. who have no access to the Internet or cannot attend a live support group. Learn more at: MD Support — TeleSupport or call toll-free at 1-888-866-6148 to get started!

 

  • The Friendship Line – The Institute on Aging established this toll-free line for older adults who may be depressed, lonely, disabled, or in crisis.  It is both a crisis “hotline” and a ‘warmline” for emotional support. Trained volunteers answer the calls and make calls. The Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including: providing emotional support, elder abuse reporting, well-being checks, grief support through assistance and reassurance, active suicide intervention, information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities. Volunteers will also call people on a regular basis to help monitor their  physical and mental health concerns. This service can improve the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Reach out today and call 1-800-971-0016. To learn more, visit Senior Intervention Hotline for Crisis Support Services.

 

  • Social Call – This Covia program connects adults 60 and older to new friends on the phone or video calls. Volunteers are “matched” to participants with the goal of building friendships through weekly calls.  This free service is a great way to socialize and make connections when you can’t get out in your community. Go to: Social Call | Covia Corporate or call 1-877-797-7299 to get started. 

 

  • Covia Well Connected and Well Connected Espanol– This program, previously known as Senior Center without Walls, offers enrichment, community, fun, support and learning groups for older adults who may be homebound. All groups meet over the phone and/or on-line and are free. They offer support groups specifically for the visually impaired. It is a rich and supportive community and there is something for everyone! Visit their website to check out the catalog of offerings and learn how it all works. Call 1-877-797-7299 to register and get started.  

 

  • Mather Telephone Topics – Join Telephone Topics to learn about a variety of topics: wellness, music, sports, history. Participate in live discussions and enjoy live performances from home. All you do is call the phone number or log on to the Zoom meeting. Participation is FREE and open to everyone, anywhere! Learn more at: Aging Well Discussions and Programs | Telephone Topics (mather.com)  Then click on “Download Schedule” and choose an option that interests you. If you have questions about Telephone Topics, call 1-888-600-2560.

 

  • Eye2Eye is a free phone-based peer support program which offers emotional support, assessment, information, and referrals to people who are blind or visually impaired and their families. It helps people cope with the challenges of adjusting to vision loss, using trained peer support specialists who are also blind or visually impaired. They serve people in more than twenty states.
  • The American Council of the Blind (ACB) has a list of helpful resources for people with vision loss and their families. It also has a national directory of affiliates in each state. Seniors can find information through the ACB affiliate Alliance on Aging and Vision Loss.

 

 

 

 

  • Vision Exchange is an online resource for support group leaders who facilitate support groups for adults with vision loss. The purpose is to exchange ideas, information, and community resources to help adults with low vision be more independent

 

  • The Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) was the first community-based nonprofit organization in the country to address the needs of families and friends providing long-term care at home. FCA now offers programs at national, state, and local levels to support and sustain caregivers, and has an online family support group.

 

 

Phone emotional peer support line for blind persons

Rutgers has launched the nation’s first peer support helpline for the legally blind and their families.

Eye2Eye – 833-932-3931 (83-EYE2EYE-1) – is staffed 24/7 by peer support specialists who are legally blind and understand the challenges callers face.

The program, which is funded by a grant from the Lavelle Fund for the Blind, serves residents in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. The helpline assists people with vision impairments and blindness to work through some of the practical and emotional challenges associated with losing vision. Services include peer support, clinical assessment and referrals to resources for help with mental health, employment and technology. The program also offers callers resilience training to promote wellness, strength and self-care.

Recent studies show that one-third of people with vision loss suffer from depression and anxiety. This risk has gone largely unaddressed in the medical community, which has focused more on the practical problems faced by the visually impaired, such as finding employment and navigating everyday tasks, said Steven Silverstein, a clinical psychologist and vision researcher who co-directs the program with Cherie Castellano, the National Peer Support Call Center program director at  Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care.

The Eye2Eye peers all have different forms of visual impairments, and these began at different times during their lives. This allows for a ‘cultural connection’ between callers with a wide range of vision problems and life concerns, and our peer counselors.”

Steven Silverstein, clinical psychologist and vision researcher

Jan
27
Thu
CAKE – 8 Best Support Groups for People Who Lost a Spouse or Partner @ online register for details
Jan 27 all-day

 

 8 Best Online Support Groups for Someone Who Lost a Partner

Coping with the aftermath of a huge loss like this is often lonely. Despite being surrounded by loved ones, it’s hard to feel heard and understood. Leaning on those who have experienced the same grief as you is an effective way to find comfort.

Because we can’t always find this support in person, the internet is a great way to connect with others. There are a number of online support groups specifically for grief and loss.

When searching for that perfect space in cyberspace, look for key indicators of a healthy, active community. Follow these tips below:

  • Effective moderation – Some online communities are unorganized. This isn’t ideal when dealing with strong emotions and real experiences. Make sure your online support group has a strong group of moderators to keep discussions under control.
  • Active posts – You don’t want to find yourself in a digital ghost town. Unfortunately, not all support groups last forever. Look for recent posts to ensure your voice will be heard.
  • Helpful discussion – Not all groups are helpful. Make sure you feel safe and comfortable in the digital support landscape.

Luckily, we’ve done the hard work for you. Below, you’ll find our top suggestions for online support groups ideal for anyone who has suffered the death of a partner.

1. Grief Support on Reddit

Reddit is an online platform with different subreddits for just about anything you can imagine, including grief. The Grief Support group has over 15,000 active members, and it’s a place to share stories, ask questions, and seek advice.

Reading through the stories and questions of others is an integral part of the grieving process. Learning from others who experienced the same things months or even years ago provides much-needed perspective and assistance in this time of mourning.

However, note this group is for any type of loss, though many members did lose their spouse or significant other.

2. Widowers on Reddit

Another Reddit group that deals with grief, specifically for those who have lost a partner, is Widowers. As the group description states, Widowers is a place for anyone who has lost a companion to share and heal.

With over 5,000 active members, this is a community for coming to terms with powerful feelings and experiences. The moderator’s welcome message sums this group up in a few profound words. They write, “We are as varied as the whole world. Except in our grief. In that, we are united and virtually universal.”

3. Cancer Care Bereavement Group

For those who have lost a spouse or partner to cancer, Cancer Care’s support group is here to help. This is a free, 15-week online support group intended for those who lost a spouse within the past 18 months. An oncology social worker leads the group, ensuring that every user experiences real growth.

Losing a spouse to cancer often feels different than losing a spouse in another way. It comes with unique feelings and methods of coping. Finding others to process this with makes a world of a difference.

4. Soaring Spirits

Soaring Spirits is a secular organization that helps people heal throughout the grieving process. They offer members of the community all the tools they need to get started on their path towards a new life. With both online and in-person opportunities, this is a great resource.

Soaring Spirits has a number of grief programs. From an online forum to a widowed pen pal group, there are a lot of ways to get the help you need. There is no need to be a paying member to use these services.

5. National Widowers Organization

The National Widowers Organization is a way to learn more about how men, in particular, deal with the loss of a partner. With specialized support groups for men, this organization helps men to adjust to a new life without their partner.

All resources are free, and you can even find local meetups with others struggling with life after the loss of a partner. Men often suffer many things alone, but this doesn’t have to be one of them.

6. Open to Hope

Open to Hope is a nonprofit that connects people to stories of grief, loss, and survival. While this isn’t a way to talk to others one-on-one, listening to and reading stories similar to your own is often a form of support in itself.

Join the 2 million listeners by following the podcast or read through Open to Hope’s articles. With over 100,000 active readers and 530 unique authors, this is the place to find understanding.

7. Widows Connection

Widows Connection is a place for women to get the peer-to-peer support they need after losing a spouse. This is something that affects women of all stages of life. Managing these new life changes, whether they include financial or family challenges, is never easy.

Widows Connection includes more than just emotional support. It also has legal, financial, and other practice advice specifically for widowed women. The annual fee costs $40, and it includes access to the full range of support resources.

8. The Sisterhood of Widows

Finally, the Sisterhood of Widows is another great support community for women experiencing the loss of a partner. The goal of this Sisterhood is to help women create a new life after the death of a loved one. It’s a way to connect with others to gain insight into your own grief and loneliness.

The Sisterhood of Widows has several Facebook groups specifically for women. There’s no fee to join. As long as you’re ready to start your path to recovery, the Sisterhood is waiting.

5 Tips for Finding an In-Person Support Group

While an online community is a great way to begin your own emotional healing, it is also beneficial to find in-person support. You might be surprised by just how many groups are available in your area. Here are some tips for finding the right group near you.

Start with the list above

Your first step is to use the list of online groups above. Many of these include an in-person group search feature. The larger, national organizations are often facilitating in-person meetings, especially around larger cities.

Ask local organizations

If you don’t have any luck with the organizations above, think local. In-person grief support groups are typically held at:

  • Libraries
  • Community centers
  • Senior centers
  • Churchs

Search online for places and organizations near you to see what they offer. You might also need to call and ask yourself. Don’t feel uncomfortable about asking — it’s common to ask about emotional support groups. They’re more common than you think.

Browse Meetup.com

Meetup is an online platform for connecting with others with similar interests. It’s not just used for fun activities and hangouts. Many widow groups post on Meetup to arrange local events, support groups, and more. Search your local area to see what’s near you.

Search “widow support group + your city” 

Don’t underestimate the power of a simple Google search. By searching your city name and “widow support group” or “grief support group,” you might find just what you’re looking for. It’s also effective to search for these events on social media as well.

Create your own group

Finally, if you don’t find what you’re looking for, why not start your own group? You don’t have to face these feelings alone. More likely than not, there are others locally who are dealing with a similar type of loss.

They might be waiting for an opportunity to connect with others in the same situation. Reach out to local community centers, churches, and organizations to start your own support group.

Find Peace in Connecting with Others

Dealing with the death of a loved one is never easy. It’s especially challenging when this loved one was a partner or spouse. While books on grief and other resources make sense of those feelings, this is only one side of the story.

Sometimes the best growth happens when you have the opportunity to share your experience with others and feel heard by those who “get it.” A support group is a perfect way to find the right listening ear and to grow your own perspective. Learn from each other and grieve together.

For more help with the loss of a loved one, review our guides for handling the first death anniversary as well as what to say on a death anniversary.

VA – VisionAware – Support Groups and Other Resources For the Blind and Visually Impaired @ Online Event Register Online
Jan 27 all-day

 

 

support group sitting around table

Importance of Joining a Support Group

If you’ve been diagnosed with an eye condition, have a family member who has, or have become a caregiver, joining a support group may be the most important thing you’ll ever do. Whether online or in your local community, such groups offer the opportunity to talk to others; share common concerns, frustrations, and stories; and find solutions to your vision-related difficulties. For more information on support groups, you can read Support Groups and the Adjustment Process.

Check out Finding Support Groups for more information including links to directory listings of support groups.

Support Group Resources and Supportive Communities Meeting Virtually

  • The APH Directory of Services allows you to find local support groups as well as organizations that offer counseling and adjustment services, low vision services, mobility training, and vocational rehabilitation.
  • ILVSG TeleSupport – This support group is designed for older adults with low vision who may not have access to the internet or other in-person groups. It is a monthly meeting offered over the phone and there are no fees or obligations. It is designed for low vision seniors anywhere in the U.S. who have no access to the Internet or cannot attend a live support group. Learn more at: MD Support — TeleSupport or call toll-free at 1-888-866-6148 to get started!

 

  • The Friendship Line – The Institute on Aging established this toll-free line for older adults who may be depressed, lonely, disabled, or in crisis.  It is both a crisis “hotline” and a ‘warmline” for emotional support. Trained volunteers answer the calls and make calls. The Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including: providing emotional support, elder abuse reporting, well-being checks, grief support through assistance and reassurance, active suicide intervention, information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities. Volunteers will also call people on a regular basis to help monitor their  physical and mental health concerns. This service can improve the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Reach out today and call 1-800-971-0016. To learn more, visit Senior Intervention Hotline for Crisis Support Services.

 

  • Social Call – This Covia program connects adults 60 and older to new friends on the phone or video calls. Volunteers are “matched” to participants with the goal of building friendships through weekly calls.  This free service is a great way to socialize and make connections when you can’t get out in your community. Go to: Social Call | Covia Corporate or call 1-877-797-7299 to get started. 

 

  • Covia Well Connected and Well Connected Espanol– This program, previously known as Senior Center without Walls, offers enrichment, community, fun, support and learning groups for older adults who may be homebound. All groups meet over the phone and/or on-line and are free. They offer support groups specifically for the visually impaired. It is a rich and supportive community and there is something for everyone! Visit their website to check out the catalog of offerings and learn how it all works. Call 1-877-797-7299 to register and get started.  

 

  • Mather Telephone Topics – Join Telephone Topics to learn about a variety of topics: wellness, music, sports, history. Participate in live discussions and enjoy live performances from home. All you do is call the phone number or log on to the Zoom meeting. Participation is FREE and open to everyone, anywhere! Learn more at: Aging Well Discussions and Programs | Telephone Topics (mather.com)  Then click on “Download Schedule” and choose an option that interests you. If you have questions about Telephone Topics, call 1-888-600-2560.

 

  • Eye2Eye is a free phone-based peer support program which offers emotional support, assessment, information, and referrals to people who are blind or visually impaired and their families. It helps people cope with the challenges of adjusting to vision loss, using trained peer support specialists who are also blind or visually impaired. They serve people in more than twenty states.
  • The American Council of the Blind (ACB) has a list of helpful resources for people with vision loss and their families. It also has a national directory of affiliates in each state. Seniors can find information through the ACB affiliate Alliance on Aging and Vision Loss.

 

 

 

 

  • Vision Exchange is an online resource for support group leaders who facilitate support groups for adults with vision loss. The purpose is to exchange ideas, information, and community resources to help adults with low vision be more independent

 

  • The Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) was the first community-based nonprofit organization in the country to address the needs of families and friends providing long-term care at home. FCA now offers programs at national, state, and local levels to support and sustain caregivers, and has an online family support group.

 

 

Phone emotional peer support line for blind persons

Rutgers has launched the nation’s first peer support helpline for the legally blind and their families.

Eye2Eye – 833-932-3931 (83-EYE2EYE-1) – is staffed 24/7 by peer support specialists who are legally blind and understand the challenges callers face.

The program, which is funded by a grant from the Lavelle Fund for the Blind, serves residents in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. The helpline assists people with vision impairments and blindness to work through some of the practical and emotional challenges associated with losing vision. Services include peer support, clinical assessment and referrals to resources for help with mental health, employment and technology. The program also offers callers resilience training to promote wellness, strength and self-care.

Recent studies show that one-third of people with vision loss suffer from depression and anxiety. This risk has gone largely unaddressed in the medical community, which has focused more on the practical problems faced by the visually impaired, such as finding employment and navigating everyday tasks, said Steven Silverstein, a clinical psychologist and vision researcher who co-directs the program with Cherie Castellano, the National Peer Support Call Center program director at  Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care.

The Eye2Eye peers all have different forms of visual impairments, and these began at different times during their lives. This allows for a ‘cultural connection’ between callers with a wide range of vision problems and life concerns, and our peer counselors.”

Steven Silverstein, clinical psychologist and vision researcher

Jan
28
Fri
CAKE – 8 Best Support Groups for People Who Lost a Spouse or Partner @ online register for details
Jan 28 all-day

 

 8 Best Online Support Groups for Someone Who Lost a Partner

Coping with the aftermath of a huge loss like this is often lonely. Despite being surrounded by loved ones, it’s hard to feel heard and understood. Leaning on those who have experienced the same grief as you is an effective way to find comfort.

Because we can’t always find this support in person, the internet is a great way to connect with others. There are a number of online support groups specifically for grief and loss.

When searching for that perfect space in cyberspace, look for key indicators of a healthy, active community. Follow these tips below:

  • Effective moderation – Some online communities are unorganized. This isn’t ideal when dealing with strong emotions and real experiences. Make sure your online support group has a strong group of moderators to keep discussions under control.
  • Active posts – You don’t want to find yourself in a digital ghost town. Unfortunately, not all support groups last forever. Look for recent posts to ensure your voice will be heard.
  • Helpful discussion – Not all groups are helpful. Make sure you feel safe and comfortable in the digital support landscape.

Luckily, we’ve done the hard work for you. Below, you’ll find our top suggestions for online support groups ideal for anyone who has suffered the death of a partner.

1. Grief Support on Reddit

Reddit is an online platform with different subreddits for just about anything you can imagine, including grief. The Grief Support group has over 15,000 active members, and it’s a place to share stories, ask questions, and seek advice.

Reading through the stories and questions of others is an integral part of the grieving process. Learning from others who experienced the same things months or even years ago provides much-needed perspective and assistance in this time of mourning.

However, note this group is for any type of loss, though many members did lose their spouse or significant other.

2. Widowers on Reddit

Another Reddit group that deals with grief, specifically for those who have lost a partner, is Widowers. As the group description states, Widowers is a place for anyone who has lost a companion to share and heal.

With over 5,000 active members, this is a community for coming to terms with powerful feelings and experiences. The moderator’s welcome message sums this group up in a few profound words. They write, “We are as varied as the whole world. Except in our grief. In that, we are united and virtually universal.”

3. Cancer Care Bereavement Group

For those who have lost a spouse or partner to cancer, Cancer Care’s support group is here to help. This is a free, 15-week online support group intended for those who lost a spouse within the past 18 months. An oncology social worker leads the group, ensuring that every user experiences real growth.

Losing a spouse to cancer often feels different than losing a spouse in another way. It comes with unique feelings and methods of coping. Finding others to process this with makes a world of a difference.

4. Soaring Spirits

Soaring Spirits is a secular organization that helps people heal throughout the grieving process. They offer members of the community all the tools they need to get started on their path towards a new life. With both online and in-person opportunities, this is a great resource.

Soaring Spirits has a number of grief programs. From an online forum to a widowed pen pal group, there are a lot of ways to get the help you need. There is no need to be a paying member to use these services.

5. National Widowers Organization

The National Widowers Organization is a way to learn more about how men, in particular, deal with the loss of a partner. With specialized support groups for men, this organization helps men to adjust to a new life without their partner.

All resources are free, and you can even find local meetups with others struggling with life after the loss of a partner. Men often suffer many things alone, but this doesn’t have to be one of them.

6. Open to Hope

Open to Hope is a nonprofit that connects people to stories of grief, loss, and survival. While this isn’t a way to talk to others one-on-one, listening to and reading stories similar to your own is often a form of support in itself.

Join the 2 million listeners by following the podcast or read through Open to Hope’s articles. With over 100,000 active readers and 530 unique authors, this is the place to find understanding.

7. Widows Connection

Widows Connection is a place for women to get the peer-to-peer support they need after losing a spouse. This is something that affects women of all stages of life. Managing these new life changes, whether they include financial or family challenges, is never easy.

Widows Connection includes more than just emotional support. It also has legal, financial, and other practice advice specifically for widowed women. The annual fee costs $40, and it includes access to the full range of support resources.

8. The Sisterhood of Widows

Finally, the Sisterhood of Widows is another great support community for women experiencing the loss of a partner. The goal of this Sisterhood is to help women create a new life after the death of a loved one. It’s a way to connect with others to gain insight into your own grief and loneliness.

The Sisterhood of Widows has several Facebook groups specifically for women. There’s no fee to join. As long as you’re ready to start your path to recovery, the Sisterhood is waiting.

5 Tips for Finding an In-Person Support Group

While an online community is a great way to begin your own emotional healing, it is also beneficial to find in-person support. You might be surprised by just how many groups are available in your area. Here are some tips for finding the right group near you.

Start with the list above

Your first step is to use the list of online groups above. Many of these include an in-person group search feature. The larger, national organizations are often facilitating in-person meetings, especially around larger cities.

Ask local organizations

If you don’t have any luck with the organizations above, think local. In-person grief support groups are typically held at:

  • Libraries
  • Community centers
  • Senior centers
  • Churchs

Search online for places and organizations near you to see what they offer. You might also need to call and ask yourself. Don’t feel uncomfortable about asking — it’s common to ask about emotional support groups. They’re more common than you think.

Browse Meetup.com

Meetup is an online platform for connecting with others with similar interests. It’s not just used for fun activities and hangouts. Many widow groups post on Meetup to arrange local events, support groups, and more. Search your local area to see what’s near you.

Search “widow support group + your city” 

Don’t underestimate the power of a simple Google search. By searching your city name and “widow support group” or “grief support group,” you might find just what you’re looking for. It’s also effective to search for these events on social media as well.

Create your own group

Finally, if you don’t find what you’re looking for, why not start your own group? You don’t have to face these feelings alone. More likely than not, there are others locally who are dealing with a similar type of loss.

They might be waiting for an opportunity to connect with others in the same situation. Reach out to local community centers, churches, and organizations to start your own support group.

Find Peace in Connecting with Others

Dealing with the death of a loved one is never easy. It’s especially challenging when this loved one was a partner or spouse. While books on grief and other resources make sense of those feelings, this is only one side of the story.

Sometimes the best growth happens when you have the opportunity to share your experience with others and feel heard by those who “get it.” A support group is a perfect way to find the right listening ear and to grow your own perspective. Learn from each other and grieve together.

For more help with the loss of a loved one, review our guides for handling the first death anniversary as well as what to say on a death anniversary.

VA – VisionAware – Support Groups and Other Resources For the Blind and Visually Impaired @ Online Event Register Online
Jan 28 all-day

 

 

support group sitting around table

Importance of Joining a Support Group

If you’ve been diagnosed with an eye condition, have a family member who has, or have become a caregiver, joining a support group may be the most important thing you’ll ever do. Whether online or in your local community, such groups offer the opportunity to talk to others; share common concerns, frustrations, and stories; and find solutions to your vision-related difficulties. For more information on support groups, you can read Support Groups and the Adjustment Process.

Check out Finding Support Groups for more information including links to directory listings of support groups.

Support Group Resources and Supportive Communities Meeting Virtually

  • The APH Directory of Services allows you to find local support groups as well as organizations that offer counseling and adjustment services, low vision services, mobility training, and vocational rehabilitation.
  • ILVSG TeleSupport – This support group is designed for older adults with low vision who may not have access to the internet or other in-person groups. It is a monthly meeting offered over the phone and there are no fees or obligations. It is designed for low vision seniors anywhere in the U.S. who have no access to the Internet or cannot attend a live support group. Learn more at: MD Support — TeleSupport or call toll-free at 1-888-866-6148 to get started!

 

  • The Friendship Line – The Institute on Aging established this toll-free line for older adults who may be depressed, lonely, disabled, or in crisis.  It is both a crisis “hotline” and a ‘warmline” for emotional support. Trained volunteers answer the calls and make calls. The Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including: providing emotional support, elder abuse reporting, well-being checks, grief support through assistance and reassurance, active suicide intervention, information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities. Volunteers will also call people on a regular basis to help monitor their  physical and mental health concerns. This service can improve the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Reach out today and call 1-800-971-0016. To learn more, visit Senior Intervention Hotline for Crisis Support Services.

 

  • Social Call – This Covia program connects adults 60 and older to new friends on the phone or video calls. Volunteers are “matched” to participants with the goal of building friendships through weekly calls.  This free service is a great way to socialize and make connections when you can’t get out in your community. Go to: Social Call | Covia Corporate or call 1-877-797-7299 to get started. 

 

  • Covia Well Connected and Well Connected Espanol– This program, previously known as Senior Center without Walls, offers enrichment, community, fun, support and learning groups for older adults who may be homebound. All groups meet over the phone and/or on-line and are free. They offer support groups specifically for the visually impaired. It is a rich and supportive community and there is something for everyone! Visit their website to check out the catalog of offerings and learn how it all works. Call 1-877-797-7299 to register and get started.  

 

  • Mather Telephone Topics – Join Telephone Topics to learn about a variety of topics: wellness, music, sports, history. Participate in live discussions and enjoy live performances from home. All you do is call the phone number or log on to the Zoom meeting. Participation is FREE and open to everyone, anywhere! Learn more at: Aging Well Discussions and Programs | Telephone Topics (mather.com)  Then click on “Download Schedule” and choose an option that interests you. If you have questions about Telephone Topics, call 1-888-600-2560.

 

  • Eye2Eye is a free phone-based peer support program which offers emotional support, assessment, information, and referrals to people who are blind or visually impaired and their families. It helps people cope with the challenges of adjusting to vision loss, using trained peer support specialists who are also blind or visually impaired. They serve people in more than twenty states.
  • The American Council of the Blind (ACB) has a list of helpful resources for people with vision loss and their families. It also has a national directory of affiliates in each state. Seniors can find information through the ACB affiliate Alliance on Aging and Vision Loss.

 

 

 

 

  • Vision Exchange is an online resource for support group leaders who facilitate support groups for adults with vision loss. The purpose is to exchange ideas, information, and community resources to help adults with low vision be more independent

 

  • The Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) was the first community-based nonprofit organization in the country to address the needs of families and friends providing long-term care at home. FCA now offers programs at national, state, and local levels to support and sustain caregivers, and has an online family support group.

 

 

Phone emotional peer support line for blind persons

Rutgers has launched the nation’s first peer support helpline for the legally blind and their families.

Eye2Eye – 833-932-3931 (83-EYE2EYE-1) – is staffed 24/7 by peer support specialists who are legally blind and understand the challenges callers face.

The program, which is funded by a grant from the Lavelle Fund for the Blind, serves residents in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. The helpline assists people with vision impairments and blindness to work through some of the practical and emotional challenges associated with losing vision. Services include peer support, clinical assessment and referrals to resources for help with mental health, employment and technology. The program also offers callers resilience training to promote wellness, strength and self-care.

Recent studies show that one-third of people with vision loss suffer from depression and anxiety. This risk has gone largely unaddressed in the medical community, which has focused more on the practical problems faced by the visually impaired, such as finding employment and navigating everyday tasks, said Steven Silverstein, a clinical psychologist and vision researcher who co-directs the program with Cherie Castellano, the National Peer Support Call Center program director at  Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care.

The Eye2Eye peers all have different forms of visual impairments, and these began at different times during their lives. This allows for a ‘cultural connection’ between callers with a wide range of vision problems and life concerns, and our peer counselors.”

Steven Silverstein, clinical psychologist and vision researcher

Jan
29
Sat
CAKE – 8 Best Support Groups for People Who Lost a Spouse or Partner @ online register for details
Jan 29 all-day

 

 8 Best Online Support Groups for Someone Who Lost a Partner

Coping with the aftermath of a huge loss like this is often lonely. Despite being surrounded by loved ones, it’s hard to feel heard and understood. Leaning on those who have experienced the same grief as you is an effective way to find comfort.

Because we can’t always find this support in person, the internet is a great way to connect with others. There are a number of online support groups specifically for grief and loss.

When searching for that perfect space in cyberspace, look for key indicators of a healthy, active community. Follow these tips below:

  • Effective moderation – Some online communities are unorganized. This isn’t ideal when dealing with strong emotions and real experiences. Make sure your online support group has a strong group of moderators to keep discussions under control.
  • Active posts – You don’t want to find yourself in a digital ghost town. Unfortunately, not all support groups last forever. Look for recent posts to ensure your voice will be heard.
  • Helpful discussion – Not all groups are helpful. Make sure you feel safe and comfortable in the digital support landscape.

Luckily, we’ve done the hard work for you. Below, you’ll find our top suggestions for online support groups ideal for anyone who has suffered the death of a partner.

1. Grief Support on Reddit

Reddit is an online platform with different subreddits for just about anything you can imagine, including grief. The Grief Support group has over 15,000 active members, and it’s a place to share stories, ask questions, and seek advice.

Reading through the stories and questions of others is an integral part of the grieving process. Learning from others who experienced the same things months or even years ago provides much-needed perspective and assistance in this time of mourning.

However, note this group is for any type of loss, though many members did lose their spouse or significant other.

2. Widowers on Reddit

Another Reddit group that deals with grief, specifically for those who have lost a partner, is Widowers. As the group description states, Widowers is a place for anyone who has lost a companion to share and heal.

With over 5,000 active members, this is a community for coming to terms with powerful feelings and experiences. The moderator’s welcome message sums this group up in a few profound words. They write, “We are as varied as the whole world. Except in our grief. In that, we are united and virtually universal.”

3. Cancer Care Bereavement Group

For those who have lost a spouse or partner to cancer, Cancer Care’s support group is here to help. This is a free, 15-week online support group intended for those who lost a spouse within the past 18 months. An oncology social worker leads the group, ensuring that every user experiences real growth.

Losing a spouse to cancer often feels different than losing a spouse in another way. It comes with unique feelings and methods of coping. Finding others to process this with makes a world of a difference.

4. Soaring Spirits

Soaring Spirits is a secular organization that helps people heal throughout the grieving process. They offer members of the community all the tools they need to get started on their path towards a new life. With both online and in-person opportunities, this is a great resource.

Soaring Spirits has a number of grief programs. From an online forum to a widowed pen pal group, there are a lot of ways to get the help you need. There is no need to be a paying member to use these services.

5. National Widowers Organization

The National Widowers Organization is a way to learn more about how men, in particular, deal with the loss of a partner. With specialized support groups for men, this organization helps men to adjust to a new life without their partner.

All resources are free, and you can even find local meetups with others struggling with life after the loss of a partner. Men often suffer many things alone, but this doesn’t have to be one of them.

6. Open to Hope

Open to Hope is a nonprofit that connects people to stories of grief, loss, and survival. While this isn’t a way to talk to others one-on-one, listening to and reading stories similar to your own is often a form of support in itself.

Join the 2 million listeners by following the podcast or read through Open to Hope’s articles. With over 100,000 active readers and 530 unique authors, this is the place to find understanding.

7. Widows Connection

Widows Connection is a place for women to get the peer-to-peer support they need after losing a spouse. This is something that affects women of all stages of life. Managing these new life changes, whether they include financial or family challenges, is never easy.

Widows Connection includes more than just emotional support. It also has legal, financial, and other practice advice specifically for widowed women. The annual fee costs $40, and it includes access to the full range of support resources.

8. The Sisterhood of Widows

Finally, the Sisterhood of Widows is another great support community for women experiencing the loss of a partner. The goal of this Sisterhood is to help women create a new life after the death of a loved one. It’s a way to connect with others to gain insight into your own grief and loneliness.

The Sisterhood of Widows has several Facebook groups specifically for women. There’s no fee to join. As long as you’re ready to start your path to recovery, the Sisterhood is waiting.

5 Tips for Finding an In-Person Support Group

While an online community is a great way to begin your own emotional healing, it is also beneficial to find in-person support. You might be surprised by just how many groups are available in your area. Here are some tips for finding the right group near you.

Start with the list above

Your first step is to use the list of online groups above. Many of these include an in-person group search feature. The larger, national organizations are often facilitating in-person meetings, especially around larger cities.

Ask local organizations

If you don’t have any luck with the organizations above, think local. In-person grief support groups are typically held at:

  • Libraries
  • Community centers
  • Senior centers
  • Churchs

Search online for places and organizations near you to see what they offer. You might also need to call and ask yourself. Don’t feel uncomfortable about asking — it’s common to ask about emotional support groups. They’re more common than you think.

Browse Meetup.com

Meetup is an online platform for connecting with others with similar interests. It’s not just used for fun activities and hangouts. Many widow groups post on Meetup to arrange local events, support groups, and more. Search your local area to see what’s near you.

Search “widow support group + your city” 

Don’t underestimate the power of a simple Google search. By searching your city name and “widow support group” or “grief support group,” you might find just what you’re looking for. It’s also effective to search for these events on social media as well.

Create your own group

Finally, if you don’t find what you’re looking for, why not start your own group? You don’t have to face these feelings alone. More likely than not, there are others locally who are dealing with a similar type of loss.

They might be waiting for an opportunity to connect with others in the same situation. Reach out to local community centers, churches, and organizations to start your own support group.

Find Peace in Connecting with Others

Dealing with the death of a loved one is never easy. It’s especially challenging when this loved one was a partner or spouse. While books on grief and other resources make sense of those feelings, this is only one side of the story.

Sometimes the best growth happens when you have the opportunity to share your experience with others and feel heard by those who “get it.” A support group is a perfect way to find the right listening ear and to grow your own perspective. Learn from each other and grieve together.

For more help with the loss of a loved one, review our guides for handling the first death anniversary as well as what to say on a death anniversary.

VA – VisionAware – Support Groups and Other Resources For the Blind and Visually Impaired @ Online Event Register Online
Jan 29 all-day

 

 

support group sitting around table

Importance of Joining a Support Group

If you’ve been diagnosed with an eye condition, have a family member who has, or have become a caregiver, joining a support group may be the most important thing you’ll ever do. Whether online or in your local community, such groups offer the opportunity to talk to others; share common concerns, frustrations, and stories; and find solutions to your vision-related difficulties. For more information on support groups, you can read Support Groups and the Adjustment Process.

Check out Finding Support Groups for more information including links to directory listings of support groups.

Support Group Resources and Supportive Communities Meeting Virtually

  • The APH Directory of Services allows you to find local support groups as well as organizations that offer counseling and adjustment services, low vision services, mobility training, and vocational rehabilitation.
  • ILVSG TeleSupport – This support group is designed for older adults with low vision who may not have access to the internet or other in-person groups. It is a monthly meeting offered over the phone and there are no fees or obligations. It is designed for low vision seniors anywhere in the U.S. who have no access to the Internet or cannot attend a live support group. Learn more at: MD Support — TeleSupport or call toll-free at 1-888-866-6148 to get started!

 

  • The Friendship Line – The Institute on Aging established this toll-free line for older adults who may be depressed, lonely, disabled, or in crisis.  It is both a crisis “hotline” and a ‘warmline” for emotional support. Trained volunteers answer the calls and make calls. The Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including: providing emotional support, elder abuse reporting, well-being checks, grief support through assistance and reassurance, active suicide intervention, information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities. Volunteers will also call people on a regular basis to help monitor their  physical and mental health concerns. This service can improve the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Reach out today and call 1-800-971-0016. To learn more, visit Senior Intervention Hotline for Crisis Support Services.

 

  • Social Call – This Covia program connects adults 60 and older to new friends on the phone or video calls. Volunteers are “matched” to participants with the goal of building friendships through weekly calls.  This free service is a great way to socialize and make connections when you can’t get out in your community. Go to: Social Call | Covia Corporate or call 1-877-797-7299 to get started. 

 

  • Covia Well Connected and Well Connected Espanol– This program, previously known as Senior Center without Walls, offers enrichment, community, fun, support and learning groups for older adults who may be homebound. All groups meet over the phone and/or on-line and are free. They offer support groups specifically for the visually impaired. It is a rich and supportive community and there is something for everyone! Visit their website to check out the catalog of offerings and learn how it all works. Call 1-877-797-7299 to register and get started.  

 

  • Mather Telephone Topics – Join Telephone Topics to learn about a variety of topics: wellness, music, sports, history. Participate in live discussions and enjoy live performances from home. All you do is call the phone number or log on to the Zoom meeting. Participation is FREE and open to everyone, anywhere! Learn more at: Aging Well Discussions and Programs | Telephone Topics (mather.com)  Then click on “Download Schedule” and choose an option that interests you. If you have questions about Telephone Topics, call 1-888-600-2560.

 

  • Eye2Eye is a free phone-based peer support program which offers emotional support, assessment, information, and referrals to people who are blind or visually impaired and their families. It helps people cope with the challenges of adjusting to vision loss, using trained peer support specialists who are also blind or visually impaired. They serve people in more than twenty states.
  • The American Council of the Blind (ACB) has a list of helpful resources for people with vision loss and their families. It also has a national directory of affiliates in each state. Seniors can find information through the ACB affiliate Alliance on Aging and Vision Loss.

 

 

 

 

  • Vision Exchange is an online resource for support group leaders who facilitate support groups for adults with vision loss. The purpose is to exchange ideas, information, and community resources to help adults with low vision be more independent

 

  • The Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) was the first community-based nonprofit organization in the country to address the needs of families and friends providing long-term care at home. FCA now offers programs at national, state, and local levels to support and sustain caregivers, and has an online family support group.

 

 

Phone emotional peer support line for blind persons

Rutgers has launched the nation’s first peer support helpline for the legally blind and their families.

Eye2Eye – 833-932-3931 (83-EYE2EYE-1) – is staffed 24/7 by peer support specialists who are legally blind and understand the challenges callers face.

The program, which is funded by a grant from the Lavelle Fund for the Blind, serves residents in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. The helpline assists people with vision impairments and blindness to work through some of the practical and emotional challenges associated with losing vision. Services include peer support, clinical assessment and referrals to resources for help with mental health, employment and technology. The program also offers callers resilience training to promote wellness, strength and self-care.

Recent studies show that one-third of people with vision loss suffer from depression and anxiety. This risk has gone largely unaddressed in the medical community, which has focused more on the practical problems faced by the visually impaired, such as finding employment and navigating everyday tasks, said Steven Silverstein, a clinical psychologist and vision researcher who co-directs the program with Cherie Castellano, the National Peer Support Call Center program director at  Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care.

The Eye2Eye peers all have different forms of visual impairments, and these began at different times during their lives. This allows for a ‘cultural connection’ between callers with a wide range of vision problems and life concerns, and our peer counselors.”

Steven Silverstein, clinical psychologist and vision researcher

Jan
30
Sun
CAKE – 8 Best Support Groups for People Who Lost a Spouse or Partner @ online register for details
Jan 30 all-day

 

 8 Best Online Support Groups for Someone Who Lost a Partner

Coping with the aftermath of a huge loss like this is often lonely. Despite being surrounded by loved ones, it’s hard to feel heard and understood. Leaning on those who have experienced the same grief as you is an effective way to find comfort.

Because we can’t always find this support in person, the internet is a great way to connect with others. There are a number of online support groups specifically for grief and loss.

When searching for that perfect space in cyberspace, look for key indicators of a healthy, active community. Follow these tips below:

  • Effective moderation – Some online communities are unorganized. This isn’t ideal when dealing with strong emotions and real experiences. Make sure your online support group has a strong group of moderators to keep discussions under control.
  • Active posts – You don’t want to find yourself in a digital ghost town. Unfortunately, not all support groups last forever. Look for recent posts to ensure your voice will be heard.
  • Helpful discussion – Not all groups are helpful. Make sure you feel safe and comfortable in the digital support landscape.

Luckily, we’ve done the hard work for you. Below, you’ll find our top suggestions for online support groups ideal for anyone who has suffered the death of a partner.

1. Grief Support on Reddit

Reddit is an online platform with different subreddits for just about anything you can imagine, including grief. The Grief Support group has over 15,000 active members, and it’s a place to share stories, ask questions, and seek advice.

Reading through the stories and questions of others is an integral part of the grieving process. Learning from others who experienced the same things months or even years ago provides much-needed perspective and assistance in this time of mourning.

However, note this group is for any type of loss, though many members did lose their spouse or significant other.

2. Widowers on Reddit

Another Reddit group that deals with grief, specifically for those who have lost a partner, is Widowers. As the group description states, Widowers is a place for anyone who has lost a companion to share and heal.

With over 5,000 active members, this is a community for coming to terms with powerful feelings and experiences. The moderator’s welcome message sums this group up in a few profound words. They write, “We are as varied as the whole world. Except in our grief. In that, we are united and virtually universal.”

3. Cancer Care Bereavement Group

For those who have lost a spouse or partner to cancer, Cancer Care’s support group is here to help. This is a free, 15-week online support group intended for those who lost a spouse within the past 18 months. An oncology social worker leads the group, ensuring that every user experiences real growth.

Losing a spouse to cancer often feels different than losing a spouse in another way. It comes with unique feelings and methods of coping. Finding others to process this with makes a world of a difference.

4. Soaring Spirits

Soaring Spirits is a secular organization that helps people heal throughout the grieving process. They offer members of the community all the tools they need to get started on their path towards a new life. With both online and in-person opportunities, this is a great resource.

Soaring Spirits has a number of grief programs. From an online forum to a widowed pen pal group, there are a lot of ways to get the help you need. There is no need to be a paying member to use these services.

5. National Widowers Organization

The National Widowers Organization is a way to learn more about how men, in particular, deal with the loss of a partner. With specialized support groups for men, this organization helps men to adjust to a new life without their partner.

All resources are free, and you can even find local meetups with others struggling with life after the loss of a partner. Men often suffer many things alone, but this doesn’t have to be one of them.

6. Open to Hope

Open to Hope is a nonprofit that connects people to stories of grief, loss, and survival. While this isn’t a way to talk to others one-on-one, listening to and reading stories similar to your own is often a form of support in itself.

Join the 2 million listeners by following the podcast or read through Open to Hope’s articles. With over 100,000 active readers and 530 unique authors, this is the place to find understanding.

7. Widows Connection

Widows Connection is a place for women to get the peer-to-peer support they need after losing a spouse. This is something that affects women of all stages of life. Managing these new life changes, whether they include financial or family challenges, is never easy.

Widows Connection includes more than just emotional support. It also has legal, financial, and other practice advice specifically for widowed women. The annual fee costs $40, and it includes access to the full range of support resources.

8. The Sisterhood of Widows

Finally, the Sisterhood of Widows is another great support community for women experiencing the loss of a partner. The goal of this Sisterhood is to help women create a new life after the death of a loved one. It’s a way to connect with others to gain insight into your own grief and loneliness.

The Sisterhood of Widows has several Facebook groups specifically for women. There’s no fee to join. As long as you’re ready to start your path to recovery, the Sisterhood is waiting.

5 Tips for Finding an In-Person Support Group

While an online community is a great way to begin your own emotional healing, it is also beneficial to find in-person support. You might be surprised by just how many groups are available in your area. Here are some tips for finding the right group near you.

Start with the list above

Your first step is to use the list of online groups above. Many of these include an in-person group search feature. The larger, national organizations are often facilitating in-person meetings, especially around larger cities.

Ask local organizations

If you don’t have any luck with the organizations above, think local. In-person grief support groups are typically held at:

  • Libraries
  • Community centers
  • Senior centers
  • Churchs

Search online for places and organizations near you to see what they offer. You might also need to call and ask yourself. Don’t feel uncomfortable about asking — it’s common to ask about emotional support groups. They’re more common than you think.

Browse Meetup.com

Meetup is an online platform for connecting with others with similar interests. It’s not just used for fun activities and hangouts. Many widow groups post on Meetup to arrange local events, support groups, and more. Search your local area to see what’s near you.

Search “widow support group + your city” 

Don’t underestimate the power of a simple Google search. By searching your city name and “widow support group” or “grief support group,” you might find just what you’re looking for. It’s also effective to search for these events on social media as well.

Create your own group

Finally, if you don’t find what you’re looking for, why not start your own group? You don’t have to face these feelings alone. More likely than not, there are others locally who are dealing with a similar type of loss.

They might be waiting for an opportunity to connect with others in the same situation. Reach out to local community centers, churches, and organizations to start your own support group.

Find Peace in Connecting with Others

Dealing with the death of a loved one is never easy. It’s especially challenging when this loved one was a partner or spouse. While books on grief and other resources make sense of those feelings, this is only one side of the story.

Sometimes the best growth happens when you have the opportunity to share your experience with others and feel heard by those who “get it.” A support group is a perfect way to find the right listening ear and to grow your own perspective. Learn from each other and grieve together.

For more help with the loss of a loved one, review our guides for handling the first death anniversary as well as what to say on a death anniversary.