PeerGalaxy

Oregon's Peer Support Directory

PeerGalaxy Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring over 82,000 monthly offerings of FREE telephone- and online-accessible peer support, recovery support + wellness activities!

Over 30+ warmlines plus webinars, workshops, job postings, special events, consumer input opportunities and more.

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

Click the Accessibility Button on the right side, halfway down in the middle, for enhanced viewing and/or access options!  Click the Translate Button in the lower left corner for language options. 

Your use of this site is subject to the Privacy Policy, Terms and Conditions of Use.  Reminder: Fees or charges may be charged by your carrier for sending or receiving SMS text messaging, phone, or data.

If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

How Events are Sorted:

First, at the top of the list: Disaster Hotline & Oregon Safe + Strong Helpline.

Next in the list: Bundled “All Day” Events for organizations with events happening at multiple times throughout the day and/or in many formats or locations; these are bundled into a single listing to prevent endless scrolling.  Usually these offer a lookup by zip code or other criteria. 

Lastly, Time-Specific Events listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  Warmlines and places east of Oregon’s time zone tend to start earlier (e.g. 4am in Oregon is 7am in New York).

Dec
3
Sat
0 – Hotline – SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline @ 1-800-985-5990 (Multilingual),1-800-846-8517 (TTY) – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free
Dec 3 all-day
0 - Hotline - SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline @ 1-800-985-5990 (Multilingual),1-800-846-8517 (TTY) - 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free

Excerpt(s) from link:

https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/disaster-distress-helpline

Disaster Distress Helpline

SAMHSA’s Disaster Distress Helpline provides 24/7, 365-day-a-year crisis counseling and support to people experiencing emotional distress related to natural or human-caused disasters.

The Disaster Distress Helpline, 1-800-985-5990, is a 24/7, 365-day-a-year, national hotline dedicated to providing immediate crisis counseling for people who are experiencing emotional distress related to any natural or human-caused disaster. This toll-free, multilingual, and confidential crisis support service is available to all residents in the United States and its territories. Stress, anxiety, and other depression-like symptoms are common reactions after a disaster. Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746 to connect with a trained crisis counselor.

Counseling Services

The Disaster Distress Helpline puts people in need of counseling on the path to recovery. Our staff members provide counseling and support before, during, and after disasters and refer people to local disaster-related resources for follow-up care and support. Since its launch in February 2012, the Disaster Distress Helpline has provided counseling and support in response to disasters such as Hurricane Sandy, the Boston Marathon bombing, and the Ebola outbreak.

The Disaster Distress Helpline is staffed by trained counselors from a network of crisis call centers located across the United States. These counselors provide:

  • Crisis counseling for people in emotional distress related to any natural or human-caused disaster
  • Information on how to recognize distress and its effects on individuals and families
  • Tips for healthy coping
  • Referrals to local crisis call centers for additional follow-up care and support

When you call or text, crisis counselors will listen to what’s on your mind with patience and without judgment. There is no need to give any identifying information when you contact the Disaster Distress Helpline. The counselor may ask you for some basic information at the end of the call, but these questions are optional and are intended to help SAMHSA keep track of the types of calls it receives.

Who Should Contact the Disaster Distress Helpline?

This crisis support service is for anyone experiencing emotional distress related to disasters such as:

The Disaster Distress Helpline also answers calls and texts related to infectious disease outbreaks, such as the Ebola outbreak, incidents of community unrest, and other traumatic events.

The impact of crises may affect people in different ways. Learn how to recognize the warning signs and risk factors for emotional distress related to natural and human-caused disasters.

The Disaster Distress Helpline is open to everyone. This includes survivors of disasters; loved ones of victims; first responders; rescue, recovery, and relief workers; clergy; and parents and caregivers. You may call for yourself or on behalf of someone else.

Call or Text

From the United States and its territories, call 1-800-985-5990 to connect with a trained crisis counselor, 24/7. Spanish-speakers can call the hotline and press “2” for 24/7 bilingual support.

Callers to the hotline can also connect with counselors in over 100 other languages via 3rd-party interpretation services; to connect with a counselor in your primary language, simply indicate your preferred language to the responding counselor and she/he will connect to a live interpreter (interpretation in less commonly-spoken languages may require calling back at an appointed time). Learn more and download information about the Disaster Distress Helpline in 30 of the most commonly-spoken languages in the U.S.

To connect with a live DDH crisis counselor 24/7 via SMS, from the 50 states text “TalkWithUs” for English or “Hablanos” for Spanish to 66746. Spanish-speakers from Puerto Rico can text “Hablanos” to 1-787-339-2663.

Texting is subscription-based and only involves a few steps:

  1. Enroll in the service by texting TalkWithUs or Hablanos exactly as written. It’s important to do this before sending your first text message because otherwise the enrollment may fail, and you will not be able to speak with a counselor, or you may accidentally subscribe to another service.
  2. Look for confirmation that your subscription was successful. You will receive a Success! message if it was.
  3. To unsubscribe, text Stop or Unsubscribe to 66746 (or 1-787-339-2663 from Puerto Rico) at any time. For help, text Help to 66746 (or 1-787-339-2663 from Puerto Rico).

Standard text and data message rates will apply when texting from mobile phones. International text and data rates may apply from within U.S. territories and free association nations. SAMHSA will not sell your phone numbers to other parties.

The Disaster Distress Helpline’s TTY number 1-800-846-8517 is available 24/7 to Deaf and hard of hearing individuals, who can also utilize the texting options or their preferred Relay service (including 7-1-1) to connect with the main DDH hotline 1-800-985-5990, 24/7.

Other Inquiries

If you’re not in immediate need of crisis counseling support and would like to contact us for other reasons, send an email. Contact us for:

  • Technical problems. If you encountered a technical problem while trying to contact the Disaster Distress Helpline, please include your name and preferred contact information in your email if you wish to receive a reply.
  • Provider inquiries. Providers with specific inquiries about technical assistance and support, requests for materials, and exploring collaborations are encouraged to send an email.
  • Feedback. To provide feedback about your experience reaching out to the Disaster Distress Helpline, send an email describing your experience and SAMHSA will look into the matter. Please include your name and preferred contact information if you wish to receive a reply.
  • Social media inquiries. Email us with questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline’s use of social media.
  • All media inquiries. Members of the media with questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline are encouraged to call the SAMHSA Media Services Team at 1-240-276-2130.

Our staff appreciate hearing from people about their experiences. SAMHSA takes feedback about our services, whether it is positive or negative, very seriously.

SAMHSA also encourages public promotion of the Disaster Distress Helpline. Anyone can use the Disaster Distress Helpline logo and telephone number on their website and link to the Disaster Distress Helpline’s materials and social media properties.

Call 211 for information about disaster-related evacuations, shelters, food and clothing distribution, volunteer opportunities, and other resources and referrals. Or visit the national 211 Call Center Search website to find the 211 information and referral center nearest you.

Last Updated: 11/11/2019

Deaf/Hard of Hearing & Spanish

Deaf/Hard of Hearing

Spanish Speakers

Twitter Tweets:

Facebook

Follow the Disaster Distress Helpline on Facebook.

0 – SAMHSA – Distress Helpline Videophone for American Sign Language Users – 24/7 weekdays and weeknends @ 1-800-985-5990, Toll Free @ phone
Dec 3 all-day
Disaster Distress Helpline Videophone for American Sign Language Users
Find answers to the most frequently asked questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline Videophone for American Sign Language Users.

The Disaster Distress Helpline (DDH) is a 24/7, year-round, confidential, multi-lingual crisis counseling and emotional support resource for survivors, responders, and anyone in the U.S./territories struggling with distress or other mental health concerns related to any natural or human-caused disaster. Calls and texts to 1-800-985-5990 are answered by trained counselors from a network of independently operated crisis centers located across the country. https://www.samhsa.gov/ddh

 

Video: Why a DDH VP for ASL users? (1 minute, 30 seconds)

While most people impacted by disaster will be able to bounce back fairly quickly with help from their support networks, others may experience significant emotional distress or other mental health concerns that can impede recovery. Deaf and hard of hearing people may be especially at risk for disaster-related distress. Barriers to accessibility for mental healthcare, emergency preparedness, and disaster relief services are just a few distress risk factors that Deaf/HoH people face throughout the disaster cycle.

In addition, the vast majority of crisis hotlines are set up to accommodate hearing, not Deaf/HoH, callers. While video Relay connections can offer 3rd-party interpretation between ASL users and hearing counselors, the responding counselor still may not fully understand the needs or be able to communicate effectively via the interpreter, especially if the caller is in crisis. While crisis chat and text services can seem like a sufficient alternative to hearing hotlines, Deaf people might understandably assume that responding chat/text counselors may not understand their needs as Deaf individuals, and therefore may be resistant in accessing these options.

 

Video: Who can access the DDH VP? (1 minute)

The DDH VP is intended for American Sign Language users, regardless of fluency level or whether they are fully Deaf or hard of hearing. The common denominator is that ASL is the language being used between the caller & counselor. Callers who cannot communicate at all in ASL should not use the DDH VP. These callers should call or text the DDH 1-800-985-5990 via their standard phone device.

Video: Who answers DDH VP calls? (1 minute)

The national Disaster Distress Helpline is a network of independently operated crisis centers located across the United States. DeafLEAD is the not-for-profit crisis center that staffs and responds to DDH VP calls, 24/7/365. DeafLEAD’s mission is to “provide individuals who are Deaf and hard of hearing with comprehensive, unified and continuous support by enhancing socio-emotional development, effective communication and leadership through education.” Learn more about DeafLEAD

 

Video: Why a DDH VP for ASL users? (1 minute, 30 seconds)

While most people impacted by disaster will be able to bounce back fairly quickly with help from their support networks, others may experience significant emotional distress or other mental health concerns that can impede recovery. Deaf and hard of hearing people may be especially at risk for disaster-related distress. Barriers to accessibility for mental healthcare, emergency preparedness, and disaster relief services are just a few distress risk factors that Deaf/HoH people face throughout the disaster cycle.

In addition, the vast majority of crisis hotlines are set up to accommodate hearing, not Deaf/HoH, callers. While video Relay connections can offer 3rd-party interpretation between ASL users and hearing counselors, the responding counselor still may not fully understand the needs or be able to communicate effectively via the interpreter, especially if the caller is in crisis. While crisis chat and text services can seem like a sufficient alternative to hearing hotlines, Deaf people might understandably assume that responding chat/text counselors may not understand their needs as Deaf individuals, and therefore may be resistant in accessing these options.

Video: Who can access the DDH VP? (1 minute)

The DDH VP is intended for American Sign Language users, regardless of fluency level or whether they are fully Deaf or hard of hearing. The common denominator is that ASL is the language being used between the caller & counselor. Callers who cannot communicate at all in ASL should not use the DDH VP. These callers should call or text the DDH 1-800-985-5990 via their standard phone device.

Video: What happens if no one answers? (1 minute)

Sometimes callers to the Disaster Distress Helpline Videophone (“DDH VP”) may not get through on the first try because of high call volume, or might get disconnected because of poor WiFi or cellphone service, etc. If you experience any technical difficulties when connecting to the DDH VP, first try calling or connecting again. Sometimes it may take 1 or 2 attempts to get through. If you’re attempting to connect through the “ASL Now Link” at the DDH website, and you are not able to get through, you can try connecting from a different browser for the 2nd attempt (for example, if the first time you tried was through Google Chrome, for the 2nd attempt, try Microsoft Edge or Mozilla Firefox). If for whatever reason you’re still not able to get through and you’re wanting to connect with the DDH as quickly as possible, you can also try texting to 1-800-985-5990; your text will likely be answered by a hearing DDH crisis worker, and they are still trained to support anyone experiencing distress or other mental health concerns.

 

Video: Who funds and operates the DDH? (1 minute)

The DDH is funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA; a division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) and is administered by the nonprofit Vibrant Emotional Health; Vibrant also administers the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-TALK) for SAMHSA, of which the DDH is a sub-network. Learn more about SAMHSA and Vibrant

01 – Chatline – Text HELP to 741741 to Connect with a Crisis Counselor for Crisis / Depression – Anytime 24/7/365 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Text Messaging
Dec 3 all-day

CHATLINE

FREE Text Messaging to Connect with a Crisis Counselor for Depression / Crisis, etc.

Anytime 24/7/365 Weekdays and Weekends

Text HELP to 741741  

An alternative way to connect is through Facebook Messenger at this link: https://www.messenger.com/t/204427966369963/?messaging_source=source%3Apages%3Amessage_shortlink

You aren’t alone – support is out there! 

How you feel NOW may not last Forever.

Connecting with someone who cares and listens can make a difference and can help us get through our most difficult moments.

Whether it’s friends, family, or community – Everyone needs Somebody to lean on!

NOTE: Wait time can vary.  Usually a response comes pretty quickly in under 5 minutes.  Sometimes the wait can be 5 to 15 minutes or longer if there is a disaster or other reason.

 

Who are the Crisis Counselors? They are trained volunteers who—with the support of full-time Crisis Text Line staff—use active listening, collaborative problem solving, and safety planning to help texters in their moment of crisis.

Crisis doesn’t just mean suicide; it’s any painful emotion for which you need support. 

This service is for short term needs and is not a substitute for a friend or professional therapist.

For more information, check out the Frequently Asked Questions at this link: https://www.crisistextline.org/about-us/faq/ 

crisis text line banner

01 – Helpline – CBL – Call Blackline – Voice and Text Support for the Black, Black LGBTQ+, Brown, Native and Muslim Community – (800) 604-5841 @ Call/Text
Dec 3 all-day

Call toll-free anytime 24/7

(800) 604-5841

BlackLine® provides a space for peer support, counseling, witnessing and affirming the lived experiences to folxs who are most impacted by systematic oppression with an LGBTQ+ Black Femme Lens.

Call BlackLine® prioritizes BIPOC
(Black, Indigenous and People of Color).

By us for us.

 

01 – Helpline – DEQH DESI LGBTQ+ Helpline for South Asians – 24/7 Form or 5-7pm PST Phone on Thursdays and Sundays @ Phone or Email Form
Dec 3 all-day

 

Desi LGBTQ+ Helpline for ​South Asians

100% confidential support for South Asian lesbian, gay, bi, queer, Trans, Non-BINARY, questioning individuals in the United States

What is DeQH?

  • We are trained South Asian LGBQ/TGNB+ peer support volunteers
  • Call or write us with questions, concerns, struggles, and hopes
  • ​It’s always free — and 100% confidential

DeQH can help with…

  • questions on gender, identity, coming out
  • dealing with family, culture, or faith
  • trying to find community in your area
  • advice for a friend or family member
  • listening as you work through things

(1) Write to us anytime 24/7 online email form

Fill out our online contact form. You’ll hear back from a trained volunteer within a week.

Write to us now!

(2) Or call us by phone on Thursdays and/or Sundays 5-7pm evening nights

Trained volunteers are available to talk between:

  • Thursdays, 8-10 PM Eastern (5-7 PM Pacific)
  • Sundays, 8-10 PM Eastern (5-7 PM Pacific)

Call us at 908-367-3374 to talk.

(If you leave a message at any other time, we can call you back if requested.)

LGBQ/TGNB+? We serve individuals who are lesbian, gay, bisexual,  queer, questioning, intersex, transgender, gender non-binary, genderqueer, pansexual, kothi, hijra, and beyond.
South Asian? We serve people of South Asian heritage, including Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Burma, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Tibet, as well as from South Asian communities in diaspora, such as Fiji and the Caribbean.
01 – Helpline – ODOJ – Oregon Department of Justice – Sanctuary Promise Hotline at 1-844-924-STAY (1-844-924-7829) – En Espanol 1-844-6-AMPARO (1-844-626-7276)
Dec 3 all-day

 

Promise Response Hotline

Talk to Us

Whether it happened to you or to someone else, we can all help track sanctuary promise violations.

Everyone has the right to live safely in Oregon.  Oregon’s sanctuary laws promise safety, human rights, and dignity for all. If you or someone you know was targeted in violation of Oregon’s Sanctuary Promise laws, please call 1-844-924-STAY/1-844-6-AMPARO or report online at SanctuaryPromise.Oregon.gov or PromesaSantuario.Oregon.gov. On the Oregon Department of Justice’s Sanctuary Promise hotline, you can report a suspected violation, receive support, and be connected to resources. The Oregon Department of Justice may open an investigation into the violation.

 

Sanctuary Promise Response Hotline

1-844-924-STAY (1-844-924-7829)
Spanish Direct Line: 1-844-626-AMPARO (1-844-626-7276)

Operators are standing by
9am to 5pm Pacific time, Monday – Friday.

Interpreters in over 240 languages.

After hours? Leave a message and we’ll return your call.

We accept all Relay Calls.

 

Since 1987, Oregon has officially been a sanctuary state that supports immigrant and refugee communities by prioritizing human rights, dignity, and safety.

The Sanctuary Promise Act », signed into law on July 19, 2021, strengthens the existing state sanctuary laws. It restricts the collection and prohibits sharing of information related to a person’s national origin, immigration, or citizenship status. Oregon state and local public resources and personnel, including state and local government offices and law enforcement agencies, are prohibited from being used for immigration enforcement.

If you suspect a violation of Oregon’s sanctuary laws, we want to hear from you.  Suspected violations can be reported through this online portal (available in 8 languages by using the language menu in the upper righthand corner of this screen) or the Sanctuary Promise Hotline at 1-844-924-STAY (1-844-924-7829). Call us in any language.  We have a direct access Spanish language website at PromesaSantuario.Oregon.gov with a Spanish direct dial hotline at 1-844-6-AMPARO (1-844-626-7276).

To report ICE activity in the community, contact Portland Immigrant Rights Coalition, PIRC » at 1-888-622-1510.

Examples of violations to Oregon Sanctuary Promise Laws include:

  • Investigation or interrogation by police for immigration enforcement purposes;
  • Most inquiries, storing, or sharing of information about national origin, immigration, or citizenship status by police or state or local government;
  • Civil arrest without a judicial warrant/order from a court facility;
  • Arrests by federal immigration of a person on their way to or from court or while at court;
  • Police collaboration with federal authorities for immigration enforcement purposes;
  • Denial of services, benefits, or privileges to a person in jail or on probation/parole based on immigration status;
  • Police establishing coordinated traffic stops or traffic perimeters to enforce federal immigration laws; or
  • State or local government or police failing to document or report requests from a federal immigration agency relating to immigration enforcement;

 

Report a Sanctuary Promise Violation

Information About The Victim/Targeted Person

Note: The targeted person’s identity will not be shared publicly by ODOJ, but will be used and shared with the state/local government agency during the course of any investigation ODOJ opens. It will not be shared with federal immigration agencies or otherwise be shared to assist with immigration enforcement. If a specific person was not targeted in the violation, you can simply put “general public” as first and last names.

Use This Link to Report A Violation of the Sanctuary Promise Violation

 

01 – Helpline – SHNHL – StrongHearts – StrongHearts Native Helpline – (844)-7NATIVE (762-8483) – Chat – 24/7 @ Hotline
Dec 3 all-day

StrongHearts Logo

Domestic and Sexual Violence Is Never Okay

StrongHearts Native Helpline 1-844-7NATIVE (762-8483) is a 24/7 safe, confidential and anonymous domestic, dating and sexual violence helpline for Native Americans and Alaska Natives, offering culturally-appropriate support and advocacy.

 

Our Services

StrongHearts Native Helpline (1-844-762-8483) is a 24/7 confidential and anonymous culturally-appropriate domestic, dating and sexual violence helpline for Native Americans. StrongHearts advocates offer the following services at no cost:

  • Peer support and advocacy
  • Information and education about domestic violence and sexual violence
  • Personalized safety planning
  • Crisis intervention
  • Referrals to Native-centered domestic violence and sexual violence service providers
  • Basic information about health options
  • Support finding a local health facility or crisis center that is trained to care for survivors of sexual assault and offers services like sexual assault forensic exams
  • General information about jurisdiction and legal advocacy referrals

 

01 – Helpline – SSH – Safe + Strong Helpline for Behavioral, Mental and Emotional Health Support – Interpreters Available @ 1-800-923-4357 (HELP) – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free
Dec 3 all-day
01 - Helpline - SSH - Safe + Strong Helpline for Behavioral, Mental and Emotional Health Support - Interpreters Available @ 1-800-923-4357 (HELP) - 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

04 – BEAM – Black Emotional and Mental Health Collective – Girl Did You Know? – Mental Health Support Services You Can Reach Out To!
Dec 3 all-day
04 Resource – Veterans Support Groups, Resources, Education and Advocacy
Dec 3 all-day

USE THIS LINK TO OPEN THE VA WELCOME KIT

Print out your VA Welcome Kit

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned.

Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy, so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

 

LOCATE SERVICES IN OREGON

Veteran Resource Navigator

The Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs (ODVA) has a comprehensive online resource guide (VETERAN RESOURCE NAVIGATOR) available to assist veterans in finding the benefits that are most useful to their unique circumstances at this time.

Use the link below for the Veteran Resource Navigator

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

Veteran Services by County

Click on the link blow for interactive map  access resources in your county in Oregon.

Other Resources Available to Veterans and Military Service Members

DD214 & Military Records Request:

https://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records

Veteran Resource Navigator site by ODVA:

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

(Oregon)Military Help Line:  

Call 888-457-4838

VA Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255:

Press 1.VA Confidential crisis chat at net or text to 838255 

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD:

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/

Defining Discharge Status:

https://militarybenefits.info/character-of-discharge/#:~:text=There%20are%206%20types%20of,DD%20214%20must%20have%20a

How to apply for a discharge status upgrade:

https://www.va.gov/discharge-upgrade-instructions/

Oregon Supportive Services for Vets & Families (Housing):

https://caporegon.org/what-we-do/ssvf/

Clackamas County VSO’s (Veteran Service Officers):

https://www.clackamas.us/socialservices/veterans.html

Portland VA Clinic that can help with homelessness & medical care:

https://www.portland.va.gov/locations/crrc.asp

Portland VA Mental Health Clinic:

https://www.portland.va.gov/services/mentalhealth.asp

Veterans Crisis Line/ Suicide Prevention:

https://www.veteranscrisisline.net/

If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance,

please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.

Contact ODVA Headquarters

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs
700 Summer St NE
Salem, OR 97301

Web: https://www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/default.aspx

Phone: (800) 692-9666 or (503) 373-2085

Fax: (503) 373-2392

Email:orvetsbenefits@odva.state.or.us

 

 

 

 

Web Resources

Oregon Health Plan – Enrollment Page

https://www.oregon.gov/oha/hsd/ohp/pages/apply.aspx

 

SAMHSA Treatment Locator

https://findtreatment.gov/

VA National Center on PTSD

 PTSD Treatment Decision Aid

 Educational Materials

  Mobile Apps

  Whiteboard Videos

  Consultation Program

 

VA Healthcare – Community Care network

https://www.va.gov/COMMUNITYCARE/providers/Community_Care_Network.asp

 

VA’s Center for Women Veterans (CWV)

https://www.va.gov/womenvet/

Minority Veterans of America

https://www.minorityvets.org/

 

Vet Centers:

Central Oregon Vet Center

Eugene Vet Center

Grants Pass Vet Center

Portland Vet Center

Salem Vet Center

 Community Based Outpatient Clinics:

Bend CBOC

Morrow County VA Telehealth Clinic (Boardman OR)

Brookings VA Clinic

Wallowa County VA Telehealth Clinic (Enterprise OR)

Eugene Health Care Center

Eugene VA Downtown Clinic

Fairview Clinic

Grants Pass West VA CBOC

Hillsboro CBOC

Klamath Falls CBOC

La Grande CBOC

Lincoln City Clinic

North Bend VA Clinic

Community Resource and Referral Center (CRRC)

Salem CBOC

North Coast CBOC

 

Additional Resources By Phone:

Veterans Crisis Line: 800-273-8255, Press 1

Women Veterans Hotline: 855-829-663

Vet Center Call Center: 877-WAR-VETS (927-8387)

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Caregiver Support Line: 855-260-3274

Lines for Life Military Help Line:  Call 1-888-457-4838

Senior Loneliness Line:  Call 503-200-1633

The Trevor Project:  866-488-7386

PEER SUPPORT AND PEER TRAINING

USE THIS LINK TO APPLY

Online BIPOC Veteran Peer Support Specialist Training – April 2022

NAMI Multnomah is pleased to offer this Oregon Health Authority (OHA) approved Peer Support Specialist Training (PSST) for adults in Mental Health recovery. In collaboration with Cultivating a New Life LLC, we will offer the Warriors in Recovery: Forging an Alliance of Peers, Peer Support Specialist Training, 𝙨𝙥𝙚𝙘𝙞𝙛𝙞𝙘 𝙩𝙤 𝙑𝙚𝙩𝙚𝙧𝙖𝙣𝙨 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙈𝙞𝙡𝙞𝙩𝙖𝙧𝙮 𝙎𝙚𝙧𝙫𝙞𝙘𝙚 𝙈𝙚𝙢𝙗𝙚𝙧𝙨 𝙞𝙙𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙞𝙛𝙮𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙖𝙨 𝘽𝙡𝙖𝙘𝙠, 𝙄𝙣𝙙𝙞𝙜𝙚𝙣𝙤𝙪𝙨 𝙤𝙧 𝙖𝙨 𝙖 𝙥𝙚𝙧𝙨𝙤𝙣 𝙤𝙛 𝙘𝙤𝙡𝙤𝙧 (𝘽𝙄𝙋𝙊𝘾).

Warriors in Recovery: Forging an Alliance of Peers represents 44 hours of comprehensive training designed to inform and empower individuals wishing to work as peers for veterans within peer-delivered services, assisting individuals past or presently affected by mental health services, mental health system survival, addiction(s), co-occurring disorder(s), and traumatic experience(s), as they re-enter the community utilizing naturally occurring support.

The core elements of this program include wellness coping skills and WRAP training (Wellness Recovery Action Plan), all from a social justice framework with an emphasis on trauma-informed care, cultural humility model and narrative approaches. Through a narrative approach, participants will recognize the power of the stories that they tell themselves, and how to reconstruct their life narrative according to person-centered principles that will assist them in reducing the influence of problems in their lives.

Individuals who complete the 44-hour PSST training are eligible to become Oregon State Certified Peer Support Specialists for adult mental health under the Traditional Health Worker (THW) program. The training consists of 44 online classroom hours and a written exam.

This training is offered at no cost to Veterans and Active/Past Military Service Members who live, work, or volunteer in the state of Oregon.

𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗮𝗽𝗽𝗹𝗶𝗰𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗽𝗲𝗿𝗶𝗼𝗱 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝘁𝗿𝗮𝗶𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘄𝗶𝗹𝗹 𝗰𝗹𝗼𝘀𝗲 𝗮𝘁 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗲𝗻𝗱 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗱𝗮𝘆 𝗦𝘂𝗻𝗱𝗮𝘆, 𝗙𝗲𝗯𝗿𝘂𝗮𝗿𝘆 𝟮𝟴𝘁𝗵, 𝟮𝟬𝟮𝟮.

𝗧𝗿𝗮𝗶𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗥𝗲𝗾𝘂𝗶𝗿𝗲𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁𝘀

1. 𝗬𝗼𝘂 𝗺𝘂𝘀𝘁 𝗶𝗱𝗲𝗻𝘁𝗶𝗳𝘆 𝗮𝘀 𝗮 𝗽𝗲𝗲𝗿 which is defined as a self-identified person currently or formerly receiving mental health services. (𝗣𝗟𝗘𝗔𝗦𝗘 𝗡𝗢𝗧𝗘: If you do not self-identify as a peer, you will not be eligible for this training. If you identify as a family member, please go to OHA’s website to find certified Family Support Specialist Trainings in Oregon.)

2. 𝗙𝗼𝗿 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝘀𝗽𝗲𝗰𝗶𝗳𝗶𝗰 𝘁𝗿𝗮𝗶𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗴, 𝘆𝗼𝘂 𝗺𝘂𝘀𝘁:

-be a Veteran or active/past Military Service Member

-identify as Black, Indigenous or a person of color

-be at least 18 years of age

-live, work, and/or volunteer in Oregon

-not be listed on the Medicaid provider exclusion list

-have the ability to attend the entirety of the 44-hour/6 session training ONLINE

𝙏𝙧𝙖𝙞𝙣𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝘿𝙖𝙩𝙚𝙨 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙏𝙞𝙢𝙚𝙨:

-Friday, April 8th, 3:00pm-7:00pm

-Saturday, April 9th, 9:00am-5:00pm

-Sunday, April 10th, 9:00am-5:00pm

-Friday, April 22nd, 9:00am-5:00pm

-Saturday, April 23rd, 9:00am-5:00pm

-Sunday, April 24th, 9:00am-5:00pm

*𝙏𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙚 𝙖𝙧𝙚 1-𝙝𝙤𝙪𝙧 𝙡𝙪𝙣𝙘𝙝 𝙗𝙧𝙚𝙖𝙠𝙨 𝙤𝙛𝙛𝙚𝙧𝙚𝙙 𝙤𝙣 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙡𝙤𝙣𝙜𝙚𝙧 𝙙𝙖𝙮𝙨 𝙤𝙛 𝙩𝙧𝙖𝙞𝙣𝙞𝙣𝙜*

𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗮𝗽𝗽𝗹𝗶𝗰𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗽𝗲𝗿𝗶𝗼𝗱 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝘁𝗿𝗮𝗶𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘄𝗶𝗹𝗹 𝗰𝗹𝗼𝘀𝗲 𝗮𝘁 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗲𝗻𝗱 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗱𝗮𝘆 𝗦𝘂𝗻𝗱𝗮𝘆, 𝗙𝗲𝗯𝗿𝘂𝗮𝗿𝘆 𝟮𝟴𝘁𝗵, 𝟮𝟬𝟮𝟮. 𝗔𝗽𝗽𝗹𝗶𝗰𝗮𝗻𝘁𝘀 𝘄𝗶𝗹𝗹 𝗯𝗲 𝗻𝗼𝘁𝗶𝗳𝗶𝗲𝗱 𝗼𝗳 𝗱𝗲𝗰𝗶𝘀𝗶𝗼𝗻𝘀 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘁𝗿𝗮𝗶𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗯𝘆 𝗲𝗺𝗮𝗶𝗹 𝗯𝘆 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗲𝗻𝗱 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘄𝗲𝗲𝗸 𝗼𝗳 𝗠𝗮𝗿𝗰𝗵 𝟳𝘁𝗵, 𝟮𝟬𝟮𝟮.

Apply Here: BIPOC Veteran & Military Service Member PSST Application

PUBLICATIONS

Psychosocial Interventions for Older Adults With Serious Mental Illness

The guide provides considerations and strategies for interdisciplinary teams, peer specialists, clinicians, registered nurses, behavioral health organizations, and policymakers in understanding, selecting, and implementing evidence-based interventions that support older adults with serious mental illness.

Publication ID
PEP21-06-05-001
Publication Date
November 2021

Download your VA Welcome Kit

You are welcome to share this guide with friends or family members who need help with their benefits too. You can print out copies for yourself and others:

Download our guides to VA benefits and services

For Veterans

For family members

Apply for survivor benefits (PDF)

 

 

Opportunities for Engagement

  What:  Warriors in Recovery:  Forging an Alliance of Peers

Host/Coordinating Organization: NAMI Multnomah

Dates:  November 4th through 6th and 18th through 20th

Additional Information:  An OHA-approved Peer Support Specialist Training for adults in mental health recovery. This training is offered at no cost to participants and is open to Veterans across Oregon.  To apply online, please click here.  Applications are due by September 18, 2022

 

What:  Veteran Volunteer Program – flyer attached

Host/Coordinating Organization:  Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs (ODVA)

Additional Information:  Join the ODVA in implementing the new veteran volunteer program to ensure very Oregon veteran is connected to the benefits they have earned.  For additional information, or to sign up, please review the attached flyer or reach out to Mark Newell, ODVA Veteran Volunteer Coordinator by calling 503.373.2057, emailing veteranvolunteer@odva.state.or.us, or visiting the ODVA volunteer website by clicking here.

 

What:  Free Veteran Peer Support – flyer attached

Host/Coordinating Organization:  NAMI Multnomah

Additional Information:  Did you know NAMI Multnomah offers FREE veteran peer support?  Veteran Peer Support Specialists are veterans who use their personal experiences with military culture, mental health challenges, and recovery to support and inspire hope in other veterans.  Check out the attached PDF to learn more how NAMI Multnomah’s Veteran Peer Support Specialists can assist you.  To get started or learn more, contact Dan at 971.303.2671 or dfriedrich@namimultnomah.org

 

What:  Opportunity to Join NAMI Multnomah Veteran Outreach Team (repeat from 7/19/22)  

Host/Coordinating Organization: NAMI Multnomah

Additional Information:  NAMI Multnomah is looking for veterans and family members interested in volunteering. Our primary need is for folks interested in joining our Veteran Outreach Team. These volunteers will participate in tabling events and/or presentations sharing NAMI resources with communities of Veterans, family members, and those who work with Veterans. These opportunities are primarily in-person, and require proof of vaccination against COVID-19. Please reach out to Alyssa at acarnes@namimultnomah.org if you have any questions or are interested in volunteering.

 

What:  Oregon Suicide Prevention Conference (repeat from 7/19/22)

Host/Coordinating Organization:  Lines for Life

Dates:  October 11 – 13, 2022, with pre-conference trainings held on October 10, 2022

Additional Information:   OSPC 2022 – Reconnecting to Hope: Growing Responsive Communities – focuses on rebuilding and growing connections between individuals, providers, local and state resources, advocates and prevention leaders. These connections strengthen networks of community support and create systems that can respond with compassion and care to address the unique needs of individuals – lifting Oregonians to reconnect to hope when they are struggling.  Update your calendar and stay tuned for our registration announcement!  Click here to access the OSPC website.

Funding & Scholarship Opportunities

 What:  RFGA #5487 Increasing Access to Veteran and Military Peer Support Specialist Training (repeat from 7/19/22) 

Funder:  Oregon Health Authority (OHA)

Additional Information:  OHA is pleased to announce this solicitation of applications for funding Peer Support Specialist trainings.  The intention is to make in-person Peer Support Specialist trainings more accessible to military veterans living in communities designated as Rural or Frontier by the Oregon Office of Rural Health.  OHA is calling for applications from organizations who are well-positioned to provide services to military veterans and have the capacity to grow the peer-delivered services workforce in their communities.  Applications are due by 10 p.m. Aug. 31, 2022.  Please visit the OHA Veterans and Military Behavioral Health website to access application documents.

 

What:  Peer Wellness Specialist Training Scholarship Application

Funder/Coordinating Organization:  Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and Mental Health & Addiction Association of Oregon (MHAAO)

Additional Information:  Scholarships for this training cohort are supported by OHA’s Office of Equity and Inclusion to increase training accessibility across the state.  This scholarship opportunity is meant for Oregon frontier and rural communities.   Completed applications will be reviewed on a first-come, first-serve basis.  Once you complete this application, you will receive a confirmation email that it has been submitted.  Please note that the training details and materials will be shared approximately 2-4 weeks prior to the training start date for the cohort for which you have applied.  If you have any specific questions, please reach out to Training Center Manger, Emily Nelson at enelson@mhaoforegon.org.  The role of a Peer Wellness Specialist is to provide peer support, encouragement, and assistance to address physical and mental health needs.  In order to do that, it is important that the Peer Wellness Specialist has a working knowledge of the various health care and wellness resources in their community and how to access these services and resources.  Click here to access the Peer Wellness Specialist Training Scholarship Application.

 

What:  Integrated Co-Occurring Disorders Start Up Funding

Funder:  Oregon Health Authority (OHA)

Additional Information:  OHA is getting ready to develop contracts for Integrated Co-Occurring Disorders (ICOD) start up funding.  Programs that can and/or want to specialize in working with veterans who experience co-occurring disorders can contact David Corse at David.Corse@dhsoha.state.or.us

 

 

 

 

05 – Warmline – 877-360-LGBT(5428) – National Resource Center on LGBTQ+ Aging – 24/7 @ Phone
Dec 3 all-day

SAGE National LGBTQ+ Elder Hotline

877-360-LGBT(5428)

Talk and be heard at the SAGE LGBTQ+ Elder Hotline. We connect LGBTQ+ older people who want to talk with friendly responders who are ready to listen. If you are an LGBTQ+ elder or care for one, call the free SAGE Hotline, toll-free, at 877-360-LGBT(5428). Hotline responders:

  • Are certified in crisis response
  • Offer support without judgment
  • Answer questions factually and confidentially
  • Provide information about community support resources such as healthcare, transportation, counseling, legal services, and emotional support programs

The SAGE LGBTQ+ Elder Hotline is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, in English and Spanish, with translation in 180 languages.

Members of our community are likely to live alone and feel isolated. Through our hotline, we can connect everyone with a phone to an LGBTQ+ responder who is friendly, knowledgeable, and ready to listen. The hotline is managed by our partner United Way Worldwide.

The National Resource Center on LGBTQ+ Aging is the country’s first and only technical assistance resource center focused on improving the quality of services and supports offered to lesbian, gay, bisexual and/or transgender older adults, their families and caregivers.

AM – All Month – Veterans Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255, Veterans and Military Families Resources and Information
Dec 3 all-day

CRISIS LINES AND WARMLINES

 

Veterans Crisis Line: 800-273-8255, Press 1

Women Veterans Hotline: 855-829-663

Vet Center Call Center: 877-WAR-VETS (927-8387)

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Caregiver Support Line: 855-260-3274

Lines for Life Military Help Line:  Call 1-888-457-4838

Senior Loneliness Line:  Call 503-200-1633

The Trevor Project:  866-488-7386

 

RESOURCES AND INFORMATION

Veteran Resource Navigator

The coronavirus pandemic has changed our world. But it has not changed Oregon’s commitment to those who served and fought for us.

This comprehensive online resource guide is meant to assist veterans from all walks of life in finding the benefits that are most useful to their unique circumstances at this time.

These benefits and resources are yours, earned through your faithful and honorable service to our nation; they are also an investment in the state of Oregon, because your success is our success.

Oregon veterans are a diverse community, but we are united in our shared service, and this has never been truer than it is today. We are all in this together, and we are not defeated. We will stand again, united.


If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance, please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.


Resources by Topic Area

COVID Economic Resources

Economic

Emergency aid, employment, disability, taxes, scams, veteran-owned businesses

COVID Housing and Food Resources

Housing and Food

Housing security and support, homelessness resources, food

COVID Education Resources

Education

Federal VA resources, Voc Rehab re-entry, GI Bill updates, apprenticeships info

COVID Resources

Other Resources

Resources for families, aging veterans, and Oregon OEM COVID-19 resources

COVID Health and Wellness Resources

Health and Wellness

Healthcare, mental health, medical transportation, crisis hotlines

COVID Agency Resources

Agency Resources

Changes and updates about ODVA’s programs and resources

 

LOCATE VETERANS SERVICES IN OREGON

 

Veteran Services by County

Click on the  map below to access resources in your county.

 

VETERANS SERVICES IN OREGON BY CATEGORY

Click on the Image Below to find services by category

 

COVID-19 ALERT – Due to COVID-19, many County Offices are limiting in-person services and are providing services by phone.

Please call your County Veteran Service Office before going in to confirm how they can best serve you during this time.

 

If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance,

please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.

Contact ODVA Headquarters

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs
700 Summer St NE
Salem, OR 97301

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned. Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy, so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

Print out your VA Welcome Kit

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned.

Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

Download your VA Welcome Kit

Feel free to share this guide with friends or family members who need help with their benefits too. You can print out copies for yourself and others:

Download our guides to VA benefits and services

For Veterans

For family members

 

Other Resources Available to Veterans and Military Service Members

DD214 & Military Records Request:

https://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records

Veteran Resource Navigator site by ODVA:

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

(Oregon)Military Help Line:  

Call 888-457-4838

VA Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255:

Press 1.VA Confidential crisis chat at net or text to 838255 

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD:

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/

Defining Discharge Status:

https://militarybenefits.info/character-of-discharge/#:~:text=There%20are%206%20types%20of,DD%20214%20must%20have%20a

How to apply for a discharge status upgrade:

https://www.va.gov/discharge-upgrade-instructions/

Oregon Supportive Services for Vets & Families (Housing):

https://caporegon.org/what-we-do/ssvf/

Clackamas County VSO’s (Veteran Service Officers):

https://www.clackamas.us/socialservices/veterans.html

Portland VA Clinic that can help with homelessness & medical care:

https://www.portland.va.gov/locations/crrc.asp

 

National Resource Directory (NRD)

https://nrd.gov/

The National Resource Directory (NRD) is a resource website that connects wounded warriors, Service Members, Veterans, their families, and caregivers to programs and services that support them. The NRD is hosted, managed, maintained, sustained and developed by the Defense Health Agency’s Recovery Coordination Program.

It provides access to services and resources at the national, state and local levels to support recovery, rehabilitation and community reintegration. Visitors can find information on a variety of topics that supply an abundance of vetted resources. For help finding resources on the site, visit the How to Use this site section of the NRD. Please see below for some of our major categories.

 

The National Recovery Directory is a partnership among the Departments of Defense, Labor, and Veterans Affairs. Information contained within the NRD is from federal, state, and local government agencies; Veteran and military service organizations; non-profit and community-based organizations; academic institutions and professional associations that provide assistance to wounded warriors and their families.

GLOSSARIES

Find definitions to commonly used terms in VA, DoD, DOL, and other federal government agencies.

NRD FACT SHEET

Get to know your NRD: why it was created, who operates it, and all the resources meant for you.

KEY CONTACTS

Find contacts in the Departments of Defense, Labor, and Veterans Affairs and Military Services.

 

 

 

 

Tue, January 25, 2022, 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM PST

ONLINE EVENT

Semper Fi & America’s Fund offers a Caregiver Support Program encompassing a variety of activities, education, support tools and resource connections designed to assist the spouses, parents, siblings, extended family members, or close friends who drop everything to care for a catastrophically wounded, critically ill or injured service member. The Caregiver Support Program provides different types of events to suit the busy schedules of our caregivers.

Join MVCN with special guest Karen Hetherington, Director of Case Management for the Semper Fi & America’s Fund, a non-profit that assists catastrophically wounded, ill and injured service members. Ms. Hetherington will share about Semper Fi & America’s Fund’s programs and answer questions.

Come learn how Semper Fi & America’s Fund can help you!

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

**Please SAVE your confirmation email as it contains information to join the Zoom group.** Check your spam or junk folder if you do not receive an email confirmation from Eventbrite.Find other peer support opportunities on our Caregiver Calendar on the MVCN website. https://www.redcross.org/caregiversVisit the safe and secure, caregiver-only Online Community available 24/7 for support. https://mvcn.force.com/login.

 

 

 

 

Dual Diagnosis Anonymous

 

 

“You protected us, now we support you!”

https://ddainc.org/dda-veterans-page/

DDA was founded by a highly decorated veteran, Corbett Monica. After serving in the Vietnam War, like other veterans, returning to home only find anguish, trauma, and remorse. After suffering from severe PTSD, OCD, survivors guilt, and addictions, Corbett found a way to transcend from destructive means with the inception of Dual Diagnosis Anonymous (DDA) providing hope and recovery through our peer support which is now his legacy.

Culturally responsive DDA’s Veterans meetings are intended to provide a safe venue to be open about depression, post-traumatic stress, alcohol and drug use, abuse, and addiction as well as serve as a resource for navigation of the telehealth system, It will encourage healthy solutions for adapting to the changing times. Specifically. the project will Improve access for Veterans and military service members to dual diagnosis services through the creation of on-line recovery support groups and on-line DDA meetings.

This project will serve Veterans throughout the state and is beginning outreach through Veterans publications, local newspapers, the VA, Veterans websites, list services, and anything else that will help identify Oregonians who can use the services.

 

More Ways to Connect

Join our Private Online Group

DDA Veterans Resource Group and Chatroom: www.facebook.com/groups/345810496697764

In Person Meetings

 

Wednesdays 5pm to 7pm

1520 Sherman Ave North Bend, OR 97459

Online Meetings

 

Tuesdays 12pm-1pm Pacific Time Zone

Join Zoom Meeting https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84398341923 Meeting ID: 843 9834 1923

By Phone

Give our Central Office a call at (503)-222-6484

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES AND LINKS

VA National Center on PTSD

                PTSD Treatment Decision Aid

                Educational Materials

                Mobile Apps

                Whiteboard Videos

                Consultation Program

 

VA Healthcare – Community Care network

Minority Veterans of America

https://www.minorityvets.org/

 

Vet Centers:

Central Oregon Vet Center

Eugene Vet Center

Grants Pass Vet Center

Portland Vet Center

Salem Vet Center

 

Community Based Outpatient Clinics:

Bend CBOC

Morrow County VA Telehealth Clinic (Boardman OR)

Brookings VA Clinic

Wallowa County VA Telehealth Clinic (Enterprise OR)

Eugene Health Care Center

Eugene VA Downtown Clinic

Fairview Clinic

Grants Pass West VA CBOC

Hillsboro CBOC

Klamath Falls CBOC

La Grande CBOC

Lincoln City Clinic

North Bend VA Clinic

Community Resource and Referral Center (CRRC)

Salem CBOC

North Coast CBOC

 

Military Children Resources

Military kids face unique psychological challenges related to military life. Compared to their non-military peers, military kids are many times more likely to move multiple times during their school careers and have a parent absent for long periods of time in potentially dangerous locations – factors that can greatly stress military kids’ mental health.

The Defense Health Agency maintains two online resources to support military children use the links povided below:

  • Military Kids Connect is an online community specifically for military children ages 6-17, and provides access to age-appropriate resources for military kids and also for parents, caregivers, and educators to help them understand and support military kids at home and in school.
  • Sesame Street for Military Families is a free, bilingual (English and Spanish) website where families can find information and multimedia resources on the topics of military deployments, multiple deployments, homecomings, injuries, grief, and self-expression.
AM – All Month – ODVA – Oregon Dept of Veterans Affairs – Veterans Resource number (1-800-698-2411) & Veteran Resource Listings
Dec 3 all-day

 

Veteran Resource Navigator

The Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs (ODVA) has a comprehensive online resource guide (VETERAN RESOURCE NAVIGATOR) available to assist veterans in finding the benefits that are most useful to their unique circumstances at this time.

 

Use the link below for the Veteran Resource Navigator

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx)

 

USE THIS LINK TO OPEN THE VA WELCOME KIT

Print out your VA Welcome Kit

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned.

Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy, so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

Download your VA Welcome Kit

You are welcome to share this guide with friends or family members who need help with their benefits too. You can print out copies for yourself and others:

Download our guides to VA benefits and services

For Veterans

For family members

Other Resources Available to Veterans and Military Service Members

DD214 & Military Records Request:

https://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records

Veteran Resource Navigator site by ODVA:

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

(Oregon)Military Help Line:  

Call 888-457-4838

VA Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255:

Press 1.VA Confidential crisis chat at net or text to 838255 

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD:

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/

Defining Discharge Status:

https://militarybenefits.info/character-of-discharge/#:~:text=There%20are%206%20types%20of,DD%20214%20must%20have%20a

How to apply for a discharge status upgrade:

https://www.va.gov/discharge-upgrade-instructions/

Oregon Supportive Services for Vets & Families (Housing):

https://caporegon.org/what-we-do/ssvf/

Clackamas County VSO’s (Veteran Service Officers):

https://www.clackamas.us/socialservices/veterans.html

Portland VA Clinic that can help with homelessness & medical care:

https://www.portland.va.gov/locations/crrc.asp

Portland VA Mental Health Clinic:

https://www.portland.va.gov/services/mentalhealth.asp

Veterans Crisis Line/ Suicide Prevention:

https://www.veteranscrisisline.net/

 

If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance,

please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.

 

Contact ODVA Headquarters

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs
700 Summer St NE
Salem, OR 97301

Web: https://www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/default.aspx

Phone: (800) 692-9666 or (503) 373-2085

Fax: (503) 373-2392

Email:orvetsbenefits@odva.state.or.us

AM – September is Suicide Prevention Month and National Recovery Month – Warmline – Resources
Dec 3 all-day

 

 

September is Suicide Prevention Month

and

National Recovery Month

This month, we share support and resources for suicide prevention and recovery from addiction.

SUICIDE PREVENTION MONTH

Every September, we strive to bring attention to suicide awareness and prevention. Suicide continues to be a leading cause of death in the United States; over 45,00 individuals lost their lives to suicide last year. Suicide rates across all populations have held consistently high since 2016, peaking in 2018. Some people report feeling that the topic of suicide is uncomfortable to talk about. Often after a suicide has occurred, loved ones and friends acknowledge that they thought something was wrong or saw signs they were concerned about but did not know what to do or felt uncomfortable saying or doing anything. Breaking that isolation and that discomfort can save lives, and we encourage engaging with the community around this, in events such as this education and discussion webinar on September 6 run by Mental Health America on identification and prevention of youth suicide.

Below is a list of organizations that contain helpful information and resources. Links provide signs to look for, tips on how best to support someone who could be at risk, as well as information on what to do in such a crisis. We continue to feel it is vital to share resources for immediate safety and long-term support, both for those suffering from suicidal thoughts and their families:

 


NATIONAL RECOVERY MONTH

Chronic alcohol use and drug use impact physical health and mental health, significantly reducing quality of life and shortening life spans.  Chronic addiction continues to be an ongoing national crisis, despite strong efforts in combating the disorder through expanded treatment access. Deaths due to addiction have increased, as well as a 59% increase in reports of alcohol abuse in 2020. There is some good news, overdose rates such as those caused by misuse of methadone have decreased, but we have a long way to go.

Isolation, boredom, frustration, and anxiety all contribute to increased substance use as an escape, as highlighted in this article. Recovery is a lengthy process and a lifetime of challenges for those who are successful in quitting drugs and alcohol. If you are struggling with a dependence on substances and feel like you cannot stop, or are watching someone you love or care about struggle with drugs or alcohol, we want you to know there is help, hope, and support. We wanted to highlight a list of major peer and professional support services that offer both in-person and remote connections, as well as other resources.

As always, please reach out to us here at the City of Boston Employee Assistance Program for immediate support and assistance. Have a safe and warm September.

 

AM – September is Suicide Prevention Month and National Recovery Month – Warmline – Resources
Dec 3 all-day

 

 

September is Suicide Prevention Month

and

National Recovery Month

This month, we share support and resources for suicide prevention and recovery from addiction.

SUICIDE PREVENTION MONTH

Every September, we strive to bring attention to suicide awareness and prevention. Suicide continues to be a leading cause of death in the United States; over 45,00 individuals lost their lives to suicide last year. Suicide rates across all populations have held consistently high since 2016, peaking in 2018. Some people report feeling that the topic of suicide is uncomfortable to talk about. Often after a suicide has occurred, loved ones and friends acknowledge that they thought something was wrong or saw signs they were concerned about but did not know what to do or felt uncomfortable saying or doing anything. Breaking that isolation and that discomfort can save lives, and we encourage engaging with the community around this, in events such as this education and discussion webinar on September 6 run by Mental Health America on identification and prevention of youth suicide.

Below is a list of organizations that contain helpful information and resources. Links provide signs to look for, tips on how best to support someone who could be at risk, as well as information on what to do in such a crisis. We continue to feel it is vital to share resources for immediate safety and long-term support, both for those suffering from suicidal thoughts and their families:

 


NATIONAL RECOVERY MONTH

Chronic alcohol use and drug use impact physical health and mental health, significantly reducing quality of life and shortening life spans.  Chronic addiction continues to be an ongoing national crisis, despite strong efforts in combating the disorder through expanded treatment access. Deaths due to addiction have increased, as well as a 59% increase in reports of alcohol abuse in 2020. There is some good news, overdose rates such as those caused by misuse of methadone have decreased, but we have a long way to go.

Isolation, boredom, frustration, and anxiety all contribute to increased substance use as an escape, as highlighted in this article. Recovery is a lengthy process and a lifetime of challenges for those who are successful in quitting drugs and alcohol. If you are struggling with a dependence on substances and feel like you cannot stop, or are watching someone you love or care about struggle with drugs or alcohol, we want you to know there is help, hope, and support. We wanted to highlight a list of major peer and professional support services that offer both in-person and remote connections, as well as other resources.

As always, please reach out to us here at the City of Boston Employee Assistance Program for immediate support and assistance. Have a safe and warm September.

 

Frame – FREE Online Recorded Workshops by Frame – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online
Dec 3 all-day

Visit link: tryframe.com

WHAT IF I’M JUST NOT READY TO TRY THERAPY?

That’s OK. The L.A.-based mental health startup Frame hosts digital workshops, led by licensed therapists, “for people who aren’t ready to try therapy,” said the company’s CEO Kendall Bird.

“It’s a way for people around the country — and specifically in Los Angeles — to get a sense of what therapy could be like for them, to have a better understanding of what you can talk about in therapy and also to learn that there are really different styles of therapists,” she said.

For people not ready or wanting to seek counseling with a therapist just yet, but who could use some information on common topics Frame offers FREE anonymous, online recorded workshops led by licensed therapists from the Frame network, designed to leave you with tangible tools for real life. Tune in when and where it works for you, as a supplement to your in-person sessions, or as a convenient way to explore specific topics and learn about what gets talked about in therapy.

Frame workshops:

https://portal-client.tryframe.com/workshops

Topics include but are not limited to:

For now, linking up directly with a therapist or counselor through Frame may only available for California residents, but you can add your name to a waiting list.  If you have insurance, you may want to contact them regarding providers in the network.  If you do not have insurance, you may want to explore community based services and/or faith based services that may offer Free or Sliding Scale services.  Or you may want to explore other self-help options online.
Warmline – AKV – A Kind Voice – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Dec 3 all-day

 

 

 

 

A Kind Voice Warmline

Call in Line

Note, we needed to pause the call in line, currently calls are scheduled via the Finding A Kind Voice page. The new process follows the concept shared below. The goal is to bring back the 800 number once we can afford the proper safeguards to assure the line is always used for the intended purpose.

 

If you’re experiencing a crisis, here are some places to reach out to:

Hotline Number Link/Purpose
1-800-SUICIDE (784-2433) The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, A 24/7 hotline for callers in the United States
1−800−799−SAFE (7233) The National Domestic Violence Hotline
1-800-656-HOPE (4673) National Sexual Assault Hotline
1-800-RUNAWAY (786-2929) National Runaway Switchboard, hotline and live chat for runaway, homeless, and at-risk youth
800-273-TALK (8255) US Veterans Crisis Hotline

 

 

 

 

 

Support groups and professional counseling services:

Group/Service Link/Purpose
Warm Lines Find a Warm Line in your area – Warm lines are a staffed by people in recovery themselves. Peer operators are trained to attentively listen, offer compassion and assist callers in connecting with their own internal strengths and direction.
The Friendship Line The Friendship Line is both a crisis intervention center and a “warm” line for routine, even daily, phone calls that provide emotional support, medication reminders and well-being check-ins.
Alcoholics Anonymous Find a chapter in your area
Professional Counselors Find a professional counselor in your area

 

Connecting in person:
If you’d like to connect with people you share a common interest with, Meet-up.com offers events such as book discussions, hiking, playing board games and much more.

 

A Kind Voice Website:

http://www.akindvoice.org/

 

Facebook Social Media Page:

https://www.facebook.com/AKindVoice/

 

Video by Founder in 2012:

https://youtu.be/tcN-dqz6DZM

 

More videos and radio shows to enjoy!

https://akindvoice.org/ourstory/

 

Library of On Demand Radio Shows

https://www.blogtalkradio.com/akindvoice

 

Program Links:
A Kind Voice on Music
A Kind Voice on Books
A Kind Voice on Movies
A Kind Voice on Sports
A Kind Voice on Good News
A Kind Voice on Big Ideas and Philosophy
A Kind Voice on Employment, Opportunity and Innovation
Your Kind Voice

Warmline – GA – Gamblers Anonymous and more – (855) 222-5542 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Dec 3 all-day

 

GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from a gambling problem.

The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop gambling.

There are no dues or fees for Gamblers Anonymous membership; we are self-supporting through our own contributions. Gamblers Anonymous is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization or institution; does not wish to engage in any controversy; neither endorses nor opposes any cause. Our primary purpose is to stop gambling and to help other compulsive gamblers do the same.”

From the Gamblers Anonymous Website:

Types of Meetings

Closed Meeting:
Only those with a gambling problem, or those who think they may have a gambling problem, and have a desire to stop gambling, may attend and participate.

Modified Closed Meeting:
Same as a “Closed Meeting” but the members would vote to include certain groups such as health professionals, guests attending with first time members, and persons with other addictions in need of a meeting

Open Meeting:
Spouses, family, and friends of the gambler are welcome
to attend and observe the meeting.

Chat:
https://m2.icarol.com/ConsumerRegistration.aspx?org=66046&pid=454&cc=en-US

Gamblers Anonymous:
http://www.gamblersanonymous.org/ga/locations/zip/table/0/na/na/na/21401/50?#gmap-nodemap-gmap0

National GA Telephone Meetings
Day and Time
Call-in Number and Meeting Code
Contact Email

Sunday 6pm PT
1-712-770-5338 code 836083 #
Sunday9pmHelp@gmail.com

Monday 6pm PT
1-712-770-4925 code 554671 #
Monday9pmHelp@gmail.com

Tuesday 6pm PT
1-712-770-4943 code 253824 #
Tuesday9pmHelp@gmail.com

Wednesday 6pm PT
1-712-770-4160 code 611704 #
Wednesday9pmHelp@gmail.com

Thursday 6pm PT
1-712-770-4981 code 872853 #
Thursday9pmHelp@gmail.com

Friday Noon PT
1-712-770-4979 code 703758 #
Friday3pmHelp@gmail.com (TBD)

Friday 6pm PT
1-712-770-4996 code 595094 #
Friday9pmHelp@gmail.com

Saturday 6pm PT
1-712-770-5335 code 491301 #
Saturday9pmHelp@gmail.com

Gamblers Anonymous 12-Steps Virtual Online Support Groups in California:

https://gasteps.org/virtual-meeting-directory

Gamblers Anonymous Support Groups in Oregon:
http://www.gamblersanonymous.org/ga/locations/state/table/OR/na/na/na/na/10?#gmap-nodemap-gmap0

Gamblers Anonymous Hotlines Website:
http://www.gamblersanonymous.org/ga/hotlines

Oregon Toll-Free Hotline Number:
1-855-2CALLGA (855-222-5542)

Gam-Anon for Family and Friends Website:
http://www.gam-anon.org/
http://www.gamblersanonymous.org/ga/content/gam-anon-help-family-friends

Warmline – GPR – Gainesville Peer Respite – (352) 278-0529 – Weekdays and Weekends
Dec 3 all-day

 

logo

Gainesville Peer Respite, Inc.

Peer-Supported Warmline

Call (352) 278-0529

Accepting nationwide calls on a peer-supported warmline

(Overnight respite stays are provided to Alachua County residents only)

You can always reach us by calling our warmline at (352) 559-4559.

A warm-line offers callers an opportunity to speak confidentially with a peer specialist about current struggles.  Warmlines are not hotlines in that a warmline may not be answered right away, but if you leave us a voicemail, we will return your call as soon as we can.

 

Warmline – IOA – Institute on Aging – The Friendship Line – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Dec 3 all-day

THE FRIENDSHIP LINE

24 Hour Telephone Hotline/Warmline

800-971-0016

We support individuals who find connecting within the community challenging

The Institute on Aging’s 24-hour toll-free Friendship Line is the only accredited crisis line in the country for people aged 60 years and older, and adults living with disabilities. We also make on-going outreach calls to lonely older adults. While there are other organizations that respond to the needs of people who may be contemplating suicide, none provides the type of services that IOA’s Friendship Line offers to respond to the public health problem of suicide among the elderly. Knowing that older people do not contact traditional suicide prevention centers on a regular basis even if they are considering suicide, we created the only program nationwide that reaches out to lonely, depressed, isolated, frail and/or suicidal older adults. Our trained volunteers specialize in offering a caring ear and having a friendly conversation with depressed older adults.

The Friendship Line is both a crisis intervention hotline and a warmline for non-emergency emotional support calls. Founded in 1973 by Dr. Patrick Arbore, Director of IOA’s Center for Elderly Suicide Prevention, and accredited by the American Association of Suicidology, Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including:

  • Providing emotional support
  • Elder abuse reporting
  • Well-being checks
  • Grief support through assistance and reassurance
  • Active suicide intervention
  • Information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities

In addition to receiving incoming calls, Friendship Line also offers outreach to eligible callers. We connect with people on a regular basis, and help monitor their physical and mental health concerns. The call-out services act as an intervention to prevent suicide in the long term by improving the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Any aging adult or person living with disabilities, who suffers from depression, loneliness, isolation, anxiousness, or may be thinking about death or suicide, can benefit from completely confidential phone calls with Friendship Line volunteers. Sometimes the road to happiness begins by simply saying hello to someone who cares.

Warmline – LFL – Lines for Life – Military Helpline – Phone – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Dec 3 all-day

 

 

The Military Helpline serves 24-hours a day

CALL:  (888) 457-4838 (24/7/365)

TEXT:  MIL1 to 839863 (8am-11pm PST daily)

The Military Helpline, available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, provides compassionate, confidential crisis intervention and referral among the military community.

The line is answered by a highly trained staff and a dedicated team of volunteer crisis workers, many of whom have a military background. All possess a strong understanding of the serious issues that can impact service members, veterans and their families, including the loss of a job, family strife, home foreclosure, post-traumatic stress, and other medical and health care concerns.

The Military Helpline has your back. (888) 457-4838

Download informational material about the Military Helpline:

– Informational Packet (5 pages/922K)
– Flyer (691K)

The Military Helpline is a service of Lines for Life, a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to preventing substance abuse and suicide.

Administrative Office
5100 SW Macadam Avenue, Suite 400
Portland, OR 97239
info@LinesForLife.org
p 503.244.5211 or 800.282.7035

Warmline – MHAW – Association for Mental Health and Wellness – Healing Connections Peer Support – Weekdays @ Phone
Dec 3 all-day
Healing Connections Guiding Principles and Core Values shared below
PEER SUPPORT LINE
631-471-7242 ext. 1217
Monday – Friday 9am -5pm (EST)
if you reach our voicemail we are on the other line,
please leave us a message
and
PEER SUPPORT GROUP
Monday – Friday 12pm – 1:30pm (EST)
please register for Support Group, updates, and information:
Healing Connections Peer Support Group
available online or by phone:
At the time of meeting, access our online Peer Support Group by
On our website:
Access by http://mhaw.org/programs/online-peer-support-groups/ and clicking on: “Click here to join the online support group.” at the time of the meeting
You may be prompted to download the “Zoom” app the first time you log in. You will have the option of using the audio from your device/computer, or from a telephone.
You may also call in to join this meeting by phone:
1 929 205 6099
Meeting ID: 350 838 4591
or
Find your local number: https://zoom.us/u/ab49ZfkmGG
If our group is full, or if one is late
they may not gain access.
For one-to-one telephone mutual support:
PEER SUPPORT LINE
Monday – Friday 9am – 5pm
631-471-7242 ext. 1217
if you reach our voicemail, we are on the other line
please leave us a message and we will return your call
Questions or Reflections:

 

Warmline – MHAW – Association for Mental Health and Wellness – Healing Connections Peer Support Line – (631) 471-7242 ext 1217 – Weekdays – 6am-2pm (PST) @ Phone
Dec 3 all-day
Warmline – OCNY – Otsego County New York Warmline – (800) 377-3281 – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Dec 3 all-day
Warmline - OCNY - Otsego County New York Warmline - (800) 377-3281 - Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone

 

Otsego County New York Regional Warm Line

The local telephone number is: 607 433-0661 and our 800 number is: 1 800 377-3281

Our hours of operation are: Monday through Friday from 4:30 pm to 10:30 pm Saturday and Sunday from Noon to 10:30 pm

Warmline – Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Dec 3 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

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