PeerGalaxy Original Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring over 187,600+ monthly offerings of FREE telephone- and online-accessible peer support, recovery support, and wellness activities!  Plus 50+ warmlines, helplines, chatlines, and hotlines.  Plus workshops, webinars, job postings, resources, observances, special events, consumer input opportunities and more.

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

Click the Accessibility Button on the right side, halfway down in the middle, for enhanced viewing and/or access options!  Click the Translate Button in the lower left corner for language options. 

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If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

7

Calendar Event Sorting

At the top, the 24/7/365 SAMHSA Disaster Helpline and similar links.

Next, Bundled “All Day” Events

Some organizations (like 12 step recovery programs, AA, NA, AlAnon, etc.) have so many events happening throughout the day that they need to be in a bundled listing to spare endless scrolling.  Often there is a link to look up events by zip code and other criteria.

Lastly, Time-Specific Events

So you can see what’s happening in the next hours, time specific events are tagged and listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  There can be events and warmlines operating in different time zones, though we try to list all in Oregon’s Pacific Time Zone.

Page Advancement

The calendar displays ~50 listings per page.  To advance to next page with ~50 more listings, click the right arrow in the lower left corner of the calendar


Screenshot image of the page advancing arrows at the bottom of the calendar, lower left corner.
May
23
Thu
2024
0 – Helpline – SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline @ (800) 985-5990 (Multilingual) or (800) 846-8517 (TTY) – 24/7-Weekdays & Weekends
May 23 all-day

Excerpt(s) from link:

https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/disaster-distress-helpline

Disaster Distress Helpline

SAMHSA’s Disaster Distress Helpline provides 24/7, 365-day-a-year crisis counseling and support to people experiencing emotional distress related to natural or human-caused disasters.

The Disaster Distress Helpline, 1-800-985-5990, is a 24/7, 365-day-a-year, national hotline dedicated to providing immediate crisis counseling for people who are experiencing emotional distress related to any natural or human-caused disaster. This toll-free, multilingual, and confidential crisis support service is available to all residents in the United States and its territories. Stress, anxiety, and other depression-like symptoms are common reactions after a disaster. Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746 to connect with a trained crisis counselor.

Who Should Contact the Disaster Distress Helpline?

This crisis support service is for anyone experiencing emotional distress related to disasters such as:

The Disaster Distress Helpline also answers calls and texts related to infectious disease outbreaks, such as the Ebola outbreak, incidents of community unrest, and other traumatic events.

The impact of crises may affect people in different ways. Learn how to recognize the warning signs and risk factors for emotional distress related to natural and human-caused disasters.

The Disaster Distress Helpline is open to everyone. This includes survivors of disasters; loved ones of victims; first responders; rescue, recovery, and relief workers; clergy; and parents and caregivers. You may call for yourself or on behalf of someone else.

Call or Text

From the United States and its territories, call 1-800-985-5990 to connect with a trained crisis counselor, 24/7. Spanish-speakers can call the hotline and press “2” for 24/7 bilingual support.

Callers to the hotline can also connect with counselors in over 100 other languages via 3rd-party interpretation services; to connect with a counselor in your primary language, simply indicate your preferred language to the responding counselor and she/he will connect to a live interpreter (interpretation in less commonly-spoken languages may require calling back at an appointed time). Learn more and download information about the Disaster Distress Helpline in 30 of the most commonly-spoken languages in the U.S.

To connect with a live DDH crisis counselor 24/7 via SMS, from the 50 states text “TalkWithUs” for English or “Hablanos” for Spanish to 66746. Spanish-speakers from Puerto Rico can text “Hablanos” to 1-787-339-2663.

Texting is subscription-based and only involves a few steps:

  1. Enroll in the service by texting TalkWithUs or Hablanos exactly as written. It’s important to do this before sending your first text message because otherwise the enrollment may fail, and you will not be able to speak with a counselor, or you may accidentally subscribe to another service.
  2. Look for confirmation that your subscription was successful. You will receive a Success! message if it was.
  3. To unsubscribe, text Stop or Unsubscribe to 66746 (or 1-787-339-2663 from Puerto Rico) at any time. For help, text Help to 66746 (or 1-787-339-2663 from Puerto Rico).

Standard text and data message rates will apply when texting from mobile phones. International text and data rates may apply from within U.S. territories and free association nations. SAMHSA will not sell your phone numbers to other parties.

The Disaster Distress Helpline’s TTY number 1-800-846-8517 is available 24/7 to Deaf and hard of hearing individuals, who can also utilize the texting options or their preferred Relay service (including 7-1-1) to connect with the main DDH hotline 1-800-985-5990, 24/7.

DDH Online Peer Support Communities

In an effort to broaden our reach to disaster survivors and emergency responders, the Disaster Distress Helpline has developed online peer support communities through Facebook Groups for those who have experienced a natural or human-caused disaster. These online communities offer opportunities for survivors and responders to connect with others who have experienced similar events, share accurate information and trusted resources, and help one another continue to heal from the effects of a traumatic event.

What Does it Offer?

The purpose of DDH Online Peer Support Communities is to create enhanced opportunities for survivors and responders of disaster to come together for mutual aid and emotional support.

DDH Online Peer Support Communities Also Include:

Trained Peer Supporters

DDH Online Peer Support includes trained peer supporters who assist with group moderation and vetting resources. In addition to community forums, our goal is also to create purposeful discussions lead by peer supporters with specific themes and relevant topics. While each survivor and responder’s experiences are unique, being with peers who have had a similar experience can promote connection, offer new ways of coping, and build a foundation of trust.

Peer support does not take the place of therapy or counseling. The opportunity to provide mutual aid and support to others who have faced similar challenges, when and where they need it, offers hope that healing and recovery is possible after a disaster.

Immediate Crisis Support

All DDH Online Peer Support Communities are monitored 24/7 by a designated DDH crisis center where crisis counselors are available to talk to members who may be in emotional distress and need crisis support. Members can talk to a counselor at any time of the day or night via Crisis Support Over Messenger (CSOM).

Available Communities

Survivors and Responders of the COVID-19 Pandemic 

DDH Online Peer Support Communities offer peer support for anyone who identifies as a survivor or responder of the COVID-19 pandemic. Both survivors and responders can come together for mutual aid, to share trusted resources, and to help one another continue to heal from the effects of a national pandemic. Survivors and responders may include but are not limited to, any healthcare workers, emergency responders, parents/caregivers, educators, individuals who have lost loved ones, people who are dealing with “Long-haul COVID”, those impacted by job loss or economic hardship during the pandemic, and anyone else who has been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. DDH-trained Peer Supporters are also available to listen and offer validation and encouragement. Additionally, they provide structured moderation within the community to engage members in meaningful discussions on relevant topics and offer timely and trusted resources. To join our Facebook group dedicated to Survivors and Responders of the COVID-19 Pandemic, click here.

Survivors of Mass Violence

DDH Online Peer Support Communities offer peer support for survivors of mass violence in the United States including mass shootings, terrorist attacks, or other large-scale community violence. Survivors and loved ones who have experienced mass violence can connect with one another and provide emotional support in the aftermath of a mass violence incident, including how to cope with activating events and memorials, self-care strategies, and challenges with daily living. DDH-trained Peer Supporters are available to listen to members, and offer validation and encouragement. They also provide structured moderation to engage members in meaningful discussions on relevant topics and provide timely and trusted resources. If you are a survivor or the loved one of a survivor of mass violence and need support, please join our Facebook group by requesting to be a member here.

Other Inquiries

If you’re not in immediate need of crisis counseling support and would like to contact us for other reasons, send an email. Contact us for:

  • Technical problems. If you encountered a technical problem while trying to contact the Disaster Distress Helpline, please include your name and preferred contact information in your email if you wish to receive a reply.
  • Provider inquiries. Providers with specific inquiries about technical assistance and support, requests for materials, and exploring collaborations are encouraged to send an email.
  • Feedback. To provide feedback about your experience reaching out to the Disaster Distress Helpline, send an email describing your experience and SAMHSA will look into the matter. Please include your name and preferred contact information if you wish to receive a reply.
  • Social media inquiries. Email us with questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline’s use of social media.
  • All media inquiries. Members of the media with questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline are encouraged to call the SAMHSA Media Services Team at 1-240-276-2130.

Our staff appreciate hearing from people about their experiences. SAMHSA takes feedback about our services, whether it is positive or negative, very seriously.

SAMHSA also encourages public promotion of the Disaster Distress Helpline. Anyone can use the Disaster Distress Helpline logo and telephone number on their website and link to the Disaster Distress Helpline’s materials and social media properties.

Call 211 for information about disaster-related evacuations, shelters, food and clothing distribution, volunteer opportunities, and other resources and referrals. Or visit the national 211 Call Center Search website to find the 211 information and referral center nearest you.

Last Updated: 11/11/2019

Deaf/Hard of Hearing & Spanish

Deaf/Hard of Hearing

Spanish Speakers

Twitter Tweets:

Facebook

Follow the Disaster Distress Helpline on Facebook.

0 – Hotline – DH – DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends
May 23 all-day
0 - Hotline - DH - DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) - 24/7 - Weekdays and Weekends

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

04 – Resources – BROR – Bridges Oregon – Hard of Hearing – Resources
May 23 all-day
04 - Resources - BROR - Bridges Oregon - Hard of Hearing  - Resources

 

Bridges Oregon

Hard of Hearing

RESOURCES

Bridges Oregon, Inc. is a nonprofit organization serving Oregonians who are Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing or face other communication barriers. It is in our mission to facilitate equity and inclusiveness and to provide a bridge to opportunities through advocacy, education and communication.

Advocacy

  • Victims’ Rights Pocket Cards (link)
  • Civil Rights Fact Sheet (link)

American Sign Language (ASL)

  • Portland Community College ASL Studies (link)
  • Sign Class (link)
  • Western Oregon University ASL Studies (link)

Children

  • Position Statement on Improving Child Protection Services for Families with Deaf Individuals (link)
  • Position Statement on Quality Foster Care Services Continuum for Deaf Children (link)
  • Position Statement on Mental Health Services for Deaf Children (link)
  • Protecting the Rights of Parents and Prospective Parents with Disabilities: Technical Assistance for State and Local Child Welfare Agencies and Court (link)

Community

  • Abolition and Disability Justice’s Guiding Principles (link)
  • Community-Based Needs Assessment (CNA) of Oregon’s Deaf and Hard of Hearing Communities: Final Report as of December 30, 2016 (link)
  • Hands and Voices of Oregon (link)
  • How many Deaf and Hard of Hearing people live in Oregon by counties (link)
  • Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (link)
  • Quota in Central Oregon (link)
  • Research & Resource Center with Deaf* community (RRCD) at Western Oregon University (link)

Crime Safety

  • Accessibility and Digital Security (link)
  • Know Your Rights ASL: Interacting with the Police (link)

Deaf-owned Businesses in Oregon

  • A5 Interpreting (link)
  • Clackamas River Growlers (link)
  • Camp Taloali (link)
  • Cymaspace (link)
  • Jennifer Jo Deily Fine Art (link)
  • King’s Hookah Lounge (link)
  • Looslea Holsteins Dairy Farm (link)
  • Pah! Restaurant (link)
  • PILEA Play (link)
  • Sign Class (link)
  • Tactile Communications (link)
  • Tim Baker’s Lawn Care (link)

DeafBlind

  • American Association of the DeafBlind (link)
  • DeafBlind Kids (link)
  • DeafBlind Interpreting: National Training & Resource Center (link)
  • Helen Keller National Center Region 10: Northwest (link)
  • Oregon Commission for the Blind (link)
  • Oregon DeafBlind Project (link)
  • National Center on DeafBlind (link)
  • Protactile Communications (link)
  • Protactile Language Interpreting: National Education Program (link)
  • For more information, please refer to the “Telecommunication” subgroup below.

Deaf with additional disabilities

  • Cerebral Palsy and Deaf Organization (link)
  • Oregon Deaf Autism (link)

Education

  • House Bill 3183 Toolkit: A Resource for Special Education Providers Regarding the Relevant Services and Placement Options for a Child Who Is Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing. August 2022. (link)
  • Language Assessment for American Sign Language (link)
  • Oregon Department of Education’s Kindergarten Ready Assessment (KRA) on Deaf and Hard of Hearing children
  • Report of 2017 House Bill 3412: Task Force on Assessments of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (referred as LEAD-K) (link)

Emergency Preparedness

  • Checklist for Emergency Responder: Ensuring Language Access and Effective Communication During Response and Recovery (link)

Hard of Hearing

  • Help to pay for Hearing Aids (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Oregon (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Lane County (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Linn and Benton (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Portland Chapter (link)

Health

  • ADA National Network: Healthcare and Face Coverings: Reducing Communication Barriers for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Patients (link)
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): Informational Videos in ASL (link)

Housing

  • Oregon ASL Realtors (link)

Hotlines

  • Aging and Disability Resource Connection of Oregon (link)
  • ASL COVID-19 Hotline (link)
  • National Deaf Domestic Violence Hotline (link)
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (link)
  • Oregon Hate Crimes and Bias Hotline (link)

Interpreters

  • File a complaint on a Healthcare Interpreter with Oregon Health Authority (link)
  • File a complaint on a certified or qualified interpreter with the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (link)
  • List of Deaf Interpreters in Oregon by Research and Resource Center with Deaf* community (RRCD) at Western Oregon University. (link)
  • List of ASL Interpreter Agencies in Oregon (link)
  • Portland Community College Interpreting Training program (link)
  • Search for certified or qualified Oregon Healthcare Interpreter (link)
  • Report a Patient Safety Issue in Medical settings e.g., an interpreter agency sends non-qualified interpreter to the appointment (link)
  • Search for certified or qualified Sign Language interpreters with the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (link)
  • Western Oregon University Online Interpreting Training program (link)

Late-Deafened

  • Association of Late-Deafened Adults (link)

Law

  • Oregon’s own version of ADA law (ORS 659a)

Law Enforcement

  • Deaf/Hard of Hearing Communication Card with Police (visor cardwallet card)
  • Community Proposal Directive for Law Enforcement Agencies (link)
  • Pullover Pal (link)
  • Oregon Legislative Update: Governor SIGNED on 5/6/2021! Proposed bill to provide “that the registered owner may request that registration cards issued for vehicles include that owner, or person operating vehicle, may be deaf or hard of hearing.” (link)

Lawsuits in Oregon (current & past)

  • Kristina Boswell v. State of Oregon, U.S.D.C. Case No. 3:22-cv-00502-MO (link)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc (2022)
  • Viewpoint to pay $225,000 to deaf job applicant Indi Matthews for employment discrimination (2022)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc: Deaf Inmate’s Disability Bias Claim (2020)
  • Disability Rights Oregon filed lawsuit on behalf of protesters with disabilities (2020)
  • Deaf prisoners: Oregon should use only certified interpreters, groups say (2019)
  • Springfield to pay $450,000 to deaf man injured by police officer (2019)
  • Ludwig v. State of Oregon: Employment Discrimination (2018)
  • DOJ sues Pacific Northwest on behalf of Oregon Veteran with Hearing Loss (2017)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc: Clackamas County Jail failed to provide ASL interpreter service for medical treatment (2017)
  • Oregon University Settles Lawsuit over Service Dog (2014)
  • Deaf inmate gets $150,000 settlement from Oregon after claiming assigned jobs were discriminatory (2014)
  • Wolfe v. City of Portland: Police did not provided ASL interpreter in response to 9-1-1 call (2012)
  • Oregon v. Mason: Portland Police did not provide ASL interpreter to translate the Miranda Warnings (1981)

*Please let us know if we missed any current or past lawsuits pertaining to deaf, deafblind, or hard of hearing Oregonians.

Legislative Bills (2023 Legislative Session)

  • Legislative Session is Closed.

Legislative Bills (passed)

  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2994 Modifies requirements for health insurance coverage of hearing-related items and services. (link).
  • 2023 Regular Session. Senate Bill (SB) 569 Requires closed-captioned television receivers in public areas within places of public accommodation to display closed captioning unless exception applies. (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. Senate Bill (SB) 685 Modifies the definition of “Communication Facilitator” (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2696 Authorizes Health Licensing Office to issue sign language interpreter licenses to qualified applicants. (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2669 Bill of Rights for Deaf, DeafBlind, and Hard of Hearing Children relating to Education. (link
  • 2021 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2498. “Provides that the registered owner may request that registration cards issued for vehicles include that owner, or person operating vehicle, may be Deaf or Hard of Hearing.” (link)
  • 2021 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3183. “Requires parents of child who is deaf or deafblind or who is hard of hearing to be provided information about relevant services and placements offered by school district, education service district, regional programs and Oregon School for the Deaf whenever individualized family service plan or individualized education program is developed, revised or reviewed.” (link)
  • 2019 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3205. “Expands Telecommunication Devices Access Program to include provision of communication facilitator.” (link)
  • 2017 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3412. “Establishes Task Force on Assessments of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.” (link)

Medical

  • Oregon Health Authority COVID-19 ASL Video (link)
  • Oregon Health Authority’s Deaf/Hard of Hearing Preferred Language Card (link)
  • Oregon Health Authority’s FAQ Regarding Providing Interpreter Services to Individuals who are Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing or Individuals with Limited English Proficiency in Medical Settings (link)
  • Report a Patient Safety Issue in Medical settings e.g., no accommodation provided (link)

Mental Health

  • List of ASL Therapists in Oregon (PDF)

Safety

  • Text to 9-1-1 (link)
  • Get A Smoke Alarm by American Red Cross (link)
  • Statewide Area: Smoke Alarms for Oregonians (link)
  • Portland Area: Smoke Alarms for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Portlanders (link)
  • Bend Area: Smoke Alarms for Oregonians who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (link)

Self-Advocate

  • Civil Rights for Individuals and Advocates (link)

Seniors

  • Avamere Chestnut Lane Assisted Living for the Deaf and DeafBlind, Gresham (link)

Sister Services

  • Northwest Human Services Connection: for the Deaf, DeafBlind, & Hard of Hearing (link)

Support Groups

  • ASL access NA, AL-ANON, NAR-ANON, and AA 12-Steps Program Virtual Support Groups (link)
  • Portland Deaf Access Committee of Alcoholics Anonymous (link)

Telecommunications and Internet

  • Affordable Connectivity Program (ACP) (link)
  • DeafBlind MMX Videophone (link)
  • Free iPad, iPhone, and other equipment for Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing (link)
  • ICanConnect – Oregon (link)
  • Oregon Lifeline (link)
  • Oregon Statewide Assistive Technology Program (link)

Video Access

  • Oregon Department of Human Services’ Frequently Asked Questions in ASL (link)
  • Video Remote Interpreting (VRI) Card (link)

*Deaf – Bridges Oregon has adopted with minor adaptations, the definition of ‘Deaf’ that is used by the National Deaf Center (NDC). Bridges Oregon is using the term deaf in an all-inclusive manner, to include people who may identify as D/deaf, DeafBlind, deaf-blind, deaf with additional disabilities, hard of hearing, late-deafened, and/or persons with unilateral/bilateral hearing loss. Bridges Oregon recognizes that for many individuals, identity is fluid and can change over time or with setting. Bridges Oregon has chosen to use one term, Deaf, with the goal of recognizing experiences that are shared by all members of our diverse communities while also honoring all of our differences. Source: https://www.nationaldeafcenter.org/defining-deaf

May
24
Fri
2024
0 – Helpline – SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline @ (800) 985-5990 (Multilingual) or (800) 846-8517 (TTY) – 24/7-Weekdays & Weekends
May 24 all-day

Excerpt(s) from link:

https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/disaster-distress-helpline

Disaster Distress Helpline

SAMHSA’s Disaster Distress Helpline provides 24/7, 365-day-a-year crisis counseling and support to people experiencing emotional distress related to natural or human-caused disasters.

The Disaster Distress Helpline, 1-800-985-5990, is a 24/7, 365-day-a-year, national hotline dedicated to providing immediate crisis counseling for people who are experiencing emotional distress related to any natural or human-caused disaster. This toll-free, multilingual, and confidential crisis support service is available to all residents in the United States and its territories. Stress, anxiety, and other depression-like symptoms are common reactions after a disaster. Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746 to connect with a trained crisis counselor.

Who Should Contact the Disaster Distress Helpline?

This crisis support service is for anyone experiencing emotional distress related to disasters such as:

The Disaster Distress Helpline also answers calls and texts related to infectious disease outbreaks, such as the Ebola outbreak, incidents of community unrest, and other traumatic events.

The impact of crises may affect people in different ways. Learn how to recognize the warning signs and risk factors for emotional distress related to natural and human-caused disasters.

The Disaster Distress Helpline is open to everyone. This includes survivors of disasters; loved ones of victims; first responders; rescue, recovery, and relief workers; clergy; and parents and caregivers. You may call for yourself or on behalf of someone else.

Call or Text

From the United States and its territories, call 1-800-985-5990 to connect with a trained crisis counselor, 24/7. Spanish-speakers can call the hotline and press “2” for 24/7 bilingual support.

Callers to the hotline can also connect with counselors in over 100 other languages via 3rd-party interpretation services; to connect with a counselor in your primary language, simply indicate your preferred language to the responding counselor and she/he will connect to a live interpreter (interpretation in less commonly-spoken languages may require calling back at an appointed time). Learn more and download information about the Disaster Distress Helpline in 30 of the most commonly-spoken languages in the U.S.

To connect with a live DDH crisis counselor 24/7 via SMS, from the 50 states text “TalkWithUs” for English or “Hablanos” for Spanish to 66746. Spanish-speakers from Puerto Rico can text “Hablanos” to 1-787-339-2663.

Texting is subscription-based and only involves a few steps:

  1. Enroll in the service by texting TalkWithUs or Hablanos exactly as written. It’s important to do this before sending your first text message because otherwise the enrollment may fail, and you will not be able to speak with a counselor, or you may accidentally subscribe to another service.
  2. Look for confirmation that your subscription was successful. You will receive a Success! message if it was.
  3. To unsubscribe, text Stop or Unsubscribe to 66746 (or 1-787-339-2663 from Puerto Rico) at any time. For help, text Help to 66746 (or 1-787-339-2663 from Puerto Rico).

Standard text and data message rates will apply when texting from mobile phones. International text and data rates may apply from within U.S. territories and free association nations. SAMHSA will not sell your phone numbers to other parties.

The Disaster Distress Helpline’s TTY number 1-800-846-8517 is available 24/7 to Deaf and hard of hearing individuals, who can also utilize the texting options or their preferred Relay service (including 7-1-1) to connect with the main DDH hotline 1-800-985-5990, 24/7.

DDH Online Peer Support Communities

In an effort to broaden our reach to disaster survivors and emergency responders, the Disaster Distress Helpline has developed online peer support communities through Facebook Groups for those who have experienced a natural or human-caused disaster. These online communities offer opportunities for survivors and responders to connect with others who have experienced similar events, share accurate information and trusted resources, and help one another continue to heal from the effects of a traumatic event.

What Does it Offer?

The purpose of DDH Online Peer Support Communities is to create enhanced opportunities for survivors and responders of disaster to come together for mutual aid and emotional support.

DDH Online Peer Support Communities Also Include:

Trained Peer Supporters

DDH Online Peer Support includes trained peer supporters who assist with group moderation and vetting resources. In addition to community forums, our goal is also to create purposeful discussions lead by peer supporters with specific themes and relevant topics. While each survivor and responder’s experiences are unique, being with peers who have had a similar experience can promote connection, offer new ways of coping, and build a foundation of trust.

Peer support does not take the place of therapy or counseling. The opportunity to provide mutual aid and support to others who have faced similar challenges, when and where they need it, offers hope that healing and recovery is possible after a disaster.

Immediate Crisis Support

All DDH Online Peer Support Communities are monitored 24/7 by a designated DDH crisis center where crisis counselors are available to talk to members who may be in emotional distress and need crisis support. Members can talk to a counselor at any time of the day or night via Crisis Support Over Messenger (CSOM).

Available Communities

Survivors and Responders of the COVID-19 Pandemic 

DDH Online Peer Support Communities offer peer support for anyone who identifies as a survivor or responder of the COVID-19 pandemic. Both survivors and responders can come together for mutual aid, to share trusted resources, and to help one another continue to heal from the effects of a national pandemic. Survivors and responders may include but are not limited to, any healthcare workers, emergency responders, parents/caregivers, educators, individuals who have lost loved ones, people who are dealing with “Long-haul COVID”, those impacted by job loss or economic hardship during the pandemic, and anyone else who has been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. DDH-trained Peer Supporters are also available to listen and offer validation and encouragement. Additionally, they provide structured moderation within the community to engage members in meaningful discussions on relevant topics and offer timely and trusted resources. To join our Facebook group dedicated to Survivors and Responders of the COVID-19 Pandemic, click here.

Survivors of Mass Violence

DDH Online Peer Support Communities offer peer support for survivors of mass violence in the United States including mass shootings, terrorist attacks, or other large-scale community violence. Survivors and loved ones who have experienced mass violence can connect with one another and provide emotional support in the aftermath of a mass violence incident, including how to cope with activating events and memorials, self-care strategies, and challenges with daily living. DDH-trained Peer Supporters are available to listen to members, and offer validation and encouragement. They also provide structured moderation to engage members in meaningful discussions on relevant topics and provide timely and trusted resources. If you are a survivor or the loved one of a survivor of mass violence and need support, please join our Facebook group by requesting to be a member here.

Other Inquiries

If you’re not in immediate need of crisis counseling support and would like to contact us for other reasons, send an email. Contact us for:

  • Technical problems. If you encountered a technical problem while trying to contact the Disaster Distress Helpline, please include your name and preferred contact information in your email if you wish to receive a reply.
  • Provider inquiries. Providers with specific inquiries about technical assistance and support, requests for materials, and exploring collaborations are encouraged to send an email.
  • Feedback. To provide feedback about your experience reaching out to the Disaster Distress Helpline, send an email describing your experience and SAMHSA will look into the matter. Please include your name and preferred contact information if you wish to receive a reply.
  • Social media inquiries. Email us with questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline’s use of social media.
  • All media inquiries. Members of the media with questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline are encouraged to call the SAMHSA Media Services Team at 1-240-276-2130.

Our staff appreciate hearing from people about their experiences. SAMHSA takes feedback about our services, whether it is positive or negative, very seriously.

SAMHSA also encourages public promotion of the Disaster Distress Helpline. Anyone can use the Disaster Distress Helpline logo and telephone number on their website and link to the Disaster Distress Helpline’s materials and social media properties.

Call 211 for information about disaster-related evacuations, shelters, food and clothing distribution, volunteer opportunities, and other resources and referrals. Or visit the national 211 Call Center Search website to find the 211 information and referral center nearest you.

Last Updated: 11/11/2019

Deaf/Hard of Hearing & Spanish

Deaf/Hard of Hearing

Spanish Speakers

Twitter Tweets:

Facebook

Follow the Disaster Distress Helpline on Facebook.

0 – Hotline – DH – DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends
May 24 all-day
0 - Hotline - DH - DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) - 24/7 - Weekdays and Weekends

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

04 – Resources – BROR – Bridges Oregon – Hard of Hearing – Resources
May 24 all-day
04 - Resources - BROR - Bridges Oregon - Hard of Hearing  - Resources

 

Bridges Oregon

Hard of Hearing

RESOURCES

Bridges Oregon, Inc. is a nonprofit organization serving Oregonians who are Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing or face other communication barriers. It is in our mission to facilitate equity and inclusiveness and to provide a bridge to opportunities through advocacy, education and communication.

Advocacy

  • Victims’ Rights Pocket Cards (link)
  • Civil Rights Fact Sheet (link)

American Sign Language (ASL)

  • Portland Community College ASL Studies (link)
  • Sign Class (link)
  • Western Oregon University ASL Studies (link)

Children

  • Position Statement on Improving Child Protection Services for Families with Deaf Individuals (link)
  • Position Statement on Quality Foster Care Services Continuum for Deaf Children (link)
  • Position Statement on Mental Health Services for Deaf Children (link)
  • Protecting the Rights of Parents and Prospective Parents with Disabilities: Technical Assistance for State and Local Child Welfare Agencies and Court (link)

Community

  • Abolition and Disability Justice’s Guiding Principles (link)
  • Community-Based Needs Assessment (CNA) of Oregon’s Deaf and Hard of Hearing Communities: Final Report as of December 30, 2016 (link)
  • Hands and Voices of Oregon (link)
  • How many Deaf and Hard of Hearing people live in Oregon by counties (link)
  • Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (link)
  • Quota in Central Oregon (link)
  • Research & Resource Center with Deaf* community (RRCD) at Western Oregon University (link)

Crime Safety

  • Accessibility and Digital Security (link)
  • Know Your Rights ASL: Interacting with the Police (link)

Deaf-owned Businesses in Oregon

  • A5 Interpreting (link)
  • Clackamas River Growlers (link)
  • Camp Taloali (link)
  • Cymaspace (link)
  • Jennifer Jo Deily Fine Art (link)
  • King’s Hookah Lounge (link)
  • Looslea Holsteins Dairy Farm (link)
  • Pah! Restaurant (link)
  • PILEA Play (link)
  • Sign Class (link)
  • Tactile Communications (link)
  • Tim Baker’s Lawn Care (link)

DeafBlind

  • American Association of the DeafBlind (link)
  • DeafBlind Kids (link)
  • DeafBlind Interpreting: National Training & Resource Center (link)
  • Helen Keller National Center Region 10: Northwest (link)
  • Oregon Commission for the Blind (link)
  • Oregon DeafBlind Project (link)
  • National Center on DeafBlind (link)
  • Protactile Communications (link)
  • Protactile Language Interpreting: National Education Program (link)
  • For more information, please refer to the “Telecommunication” subgroup below.

Deaf with additional disabilities

  • Cerebral Palsy and Deaf Organization (link)
  • Oregon Deaf Autism (link)

Education

  • House Bill 3183 Toolkit: A Resource for Special Education Providers Regarding the Relevant Services and Placement Options for a Child Who Is Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing. August 2022. (link)
  • Language Assessment for American Sign Language (link)
  • Oregon Department of Education’s Kindergarten Ready Assessment (KRA) on Deaf and Hard of Hearing children
  • Report of 2017 House Bill 3412: Task Force on Assessments of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (referred as LEAD-K) (link)

Emergency Preparedness

  • Checklist for Emergency Responder: Ensuring Language Access and Effective Communication During Response and Recovery (link)

Hard of Hearing

  • Help to pay for Hearing Aids (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Oregon (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Lane County (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Linn and Benton (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Portland Chapter (link)

Health

  • ADA National Network: Healthcare and Face Coverings: Reducing Communication Barriers for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Patients (link)
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): Informational Videos in ASL (link)

Housing

  • Oregon ASL Realtors (link)

Hotlines

  • Aging and Disability Resource Connection of Oregon (link)
  • ASL COVID-19 Hotline (link)
  • National Deaf Domestic Violence Hotline (link)
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (link)
  • Oregon Hate Crimes and Bias Hotline (link)

Interpreters

  • File a complaint on a Healthcare Interpreter with Oregon Health Authority (link)
  • File a complaint on a certified or qualified interpreter with the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (link)
  • List of Deaf Interpreters in Oregon by Research and Resource Center with Deaf* community (RRCD) at Western Oregon University. (link)
  • List of ASL Interpreter Agencies in Oregon (link)
  • Portland Community College Interpreting Training program (link)
  • Search for certified or qualified Oregon Healthcare Interpreter (link)
  • Report a Patient Safety Issue in Medical settings e.g., an interpreter agency sends non-qualified interpreter to the appointment (link)
  • Search for certified or qualified Sign Language interpreters with the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (link)
  • Western Oregon University Online Interpreting Training program (link)

Late-Deafened

  • Association of Late-Deafened Adults (link)

Law

  • Oregon’s own version of ADA law (ORS 659a)

Law Enforcement

  • Deaf/Hard of Hearing Communication Card with Police (visor cardwallet card)
  • Community Proposal Directive for Law Enforcement Agencies (link)
  • Pullover Pal (link)
  • Oregon Legislative Update: Governor SIGNED on 5/6/2021! Proposed bill to provide “that the registered owner may request that registration cards issued for vehicles include that owner, or person operating vehicle, may be deaf or hard of hearing.” (link)

Lawsuits in Oregon (current & past)

  • Kristina Boswell v. State of Oregon, U.S.D.C. Case No. 3:22-cv-00502-MO (link)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc (2022)
  • Viewpoint to pay $225,000 to deaf job applicant Indi Matthews for employment discrimination (2022)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc: Deaf Inmate’s Disability Bias Claim (2020)
  • Disability Rights Oregon filed lawsuit on behalf of protesters with disabilities (2020)
  • Deaf prisoners: Oregon should use only certified interpreters, groups say (2019)
  • Springfield to pay $450,000 to deaf man injured by police officer (2019)
  • Ludwig v. State of Oregon: Employment Discrimination (2018)
  • DOJ sues Pacific Northwest on behalf of Oregon Veteran with Hearing Loss (2017)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc: Clackamas County Jail failed to provide ASL interpreter service for medical treatment (2017)
  • Oregon University Settles Lawsuit over Service Dog (2014)
  • Deaf inmate gets $150,000 settlement from Oregon after claiming assigned jobs were discriminatory (2014)
  • Wolfe v. City of Portland: Police did not provided ASL interpreter in response to 9-1-1 call (2012)
  • Oregon v. Mason: Portland Police did not provide ASL interpreter to translate the Miranda Warnings (1981)

*Please let us know if we missed any current or past lawsuits pertaining to deaf, deafblind, or hard of hearing Oregonians.

Legislative Bills (2023 Legislative Session)

  • Legislative Session is Closed.

Legislative Bills (passed)

  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2994 Modifies requirements for health insurance coverage of hearing-related items and services. (link).
  • 2023 Regular Session. Senate Bill (SB) 569 Requires closed-captioned television receivers in public areas within places of public accommodation to display closed captioning unless exception applies. (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. Senate Bill (SB) 685 Modifies the definition of “Communication Facilitator” (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2696 Authorizes Health Licensing Office to issue sign language interpreter licenses to qualified applicants. (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2669 Bill of Rights for Deaf, DeafBlind, and Hard of Hearing Children relating to Education. (link
  • 2021 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2498. “Provides that the registered owner may request that registration cards issued for vehicles include that owner, or person operating vehicle, may be Deaf or Hard of Hearing.” (link)
  • 2021 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3183. “Requires parents of child who is deaf or deafblind or who is hard of hearing to be provided information about relevant services and placements offered by school district, education service district, regional programs and Oregon School for the Deaf whenever individualized family service plan or individualized education program is developed, revised or reviewed.” (link)
  • 2019 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3205. “Expands Telecommunication Devices Access Program to include provision of communication facilitator.” (link)
  • 2017 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3412. “Establishes Task Force on Assessments of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.” (link)

Medical

  • Oregon Health Authority COVID-19 ASL Video (link)
  • Oregon Health Authority’s Deaf/Hard of Hearing Preferred Language Card (link)
  • Oregon Health Authority’s FAQ Regarding Providing Interpreter Services to Individuals who are Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing or Individuals with Limited English Proficiency in Medical Settings (link)
  • Report a Patient Safety Issue in Medical settings e.g., no accommodation provided (link)

Mental Health

  • List of ASL Therapists in Oregon (PDF)

Safety

  • Text to 9-1-1 (link)
  • Get A Smoke Alarm by American Red Cross (link)
  • Statewide Area: Smoke Alarms for Oregonians (link)
  • Portland Area: Smoke Alarms for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Portlanders (link)
  • Bend Area: Smoke Alarms for Oregonians who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (link)

Self-Advocate

  • Civil Rights for Individuals and Advocates (link)

Seniors

  • Avamere Chestnut Lane Assisted Living for the Deaf and DeafBlind, Gresham (link)

Sister Services

  • Northwest Human Services Connection: for the Deaf, DeafBlind, & Hard of Hearing (link)

Support Groups

  • ASL access NA, AL-ANON, NAR-ANON, and AA 12-Steps Program Virtual Support Groups (link)
  • Portland Deaf Access Committee of Alcoholics Anonymous (link)

Telecommunications and Internet

  • Affordable Connectivity Program (ACP) (link)
  • DeafBlind MMX Videophone (link)
  • Free iPad, iPhone, and other equipment for Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing (link)
  • ICanConnect – Oregon (link)
  • Oregon Lifeline (link)
  • Oregon Statewide Assistive Technology Program (link)

Video Access

  • Oregon Department of Human Services’ Frequently Asked Questions in ASL (link)
  • Video Remote Interpreting (VRI) Card (link)

*Deaf – Bridges Oregon has adopted with minor adaptations, the definition of ‘Deaf’ that is used by the National Deaf Center (NDC). Bridges Oregon is using the term deaf in an all-inclusive manner, to include people who may identify as D/deaf, DeafBlind, deaf-blind, deaf with additional disabilities, hard of hearing, late-deafened, and/or persons with unilateral/bilateral hearing loss. Bridges Oregon recognizes that for many individuals, identity is fluid and can change over time or with setting. Bridges Oregon has chosen to use one term, Deaf, with the goal of recognizing experiences that are shared by all members of our diverse communities while also honoring all of our differences. Source: https://www.nationaldeafcenter.org/defining-deaf

May
25
Sat
2024
0 – Helpline – SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline @ (800) 985-5990 (Multilingual) or (800) 846-8517 (TTY) – 24/7-Weekdays & Weekends
May 25 all-day

Excerpt(s) from link:

https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/disaster-distress-helpline

Disaster Distress Helpline

SAMHSA’s Disaster Distress Helpline provides 24/7, 365-day-a-year crisis counseling and support to people experiencing emotional distress related to natural or human-caused disasters.

The Disaster Distress Helpline, 1-800-985-5990, is a 24/7, 365-day-a-year, national hotline dedicated to providing immediate crisis counseling for people who are experiencing emotional distress related to any natural or human-caused disaster. This toll-free, multilingual, and confidential crisis support service is available to all residents in the United States and its territories. Stress, anxiety, and other depression-like symptoms are common reactions after a disaster. Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746 to connect with a trained crisis counselor.

Who Should Contact the Disaster Distress Helpline?

This crisis support service is for anyone experiencing emotional distress related to disasters such as:

The Disaster Distress Helpline also answers calls and texts related to infectious disease outbreaks, such as the Ebola outbreak, incidents of community unrest, and other traumatic events.

The impact of crises may affect people in different ways. Learn how to recognize the warning signs and risk factors for emotional distress related to natural and human-caused disasters.

The Disaster Distress Helpline is open to everyone. This includes survivors of disasters; loved ones of victims; first responders; rescue, recovery, and relief workers; clergy; and parents and caregivers. You may call for yourself or on behalf of someone else.

Call or Text

From the United States and its territories, call 1-800-985-5990 to connect with a trained crisis counselor, 24/7. Spanish-speakers can call the hotline and press “2” for 24/7 bilingual support.

Callers to the hotline can also connect with counselors in over 100 other languages via 3rd-party interpretation services; to connect with a counselor in your primary language, simply indicate your preferred language to the responding counselor and she/he will connect to a live interpreter (interpretation in less commonly-spoken languages may require calling back at an appointed time). Learn more and download information about the Disaster Distress Helpline in 30 of the most commonly-spoken languages in the U.S.

To connect with a live DDH crisis counselor 24/7 via SMS, from the 50 states text “TalkWithUs” for English or “Hablanos” for Spanish to 66746. Spanish-speakers from Puerto Rico can text “Hablanos” to 1-787-339-2663.

Texting is subscription-based and only involves a few steps:

  1. Enroll in the service by texting TalkWithUs or Hablanos exactly as written. It’s important to do this before sending your first text message because otherwise the enrollment may fail, and you will not be able to speak with a counselor, or you may accidentally subscribe to another service.
  2. Look for confirmation that your subscription was successful. You will receive a Success! message if it was.
  3. To unsubscribe, text Stop or Unsubscribe to 66746 (or 1-787-339-2663 from Puerto Rico) at any time. For help, text Help to 66746 (or 1-787-339-2663 from Puerto Rico).

Standard text and data message rates will apply when texting from mobile phones. International text and data rates may apply from within U.S. territories and free association nations. SAMHSA will not sell your phone numbers to other parties.

The Disaster Distress Helpline’s TTY number 1-800-846-8517 is available 24/7 to Deaf and hard of hearing individuals, who can also utilize the texting options or their preferred Relay service (including 7-1-1) to connect with the main DDH hotline 1-800-985-5990, 24/7.

DDH Online Peer Support Communities

In an effort to broaden our reach to disaster survivors and emergency responders, the Disaster Distress Helpline has developed online peer support communities through Facebook Groups for those who have experienced a natural or human-caused disaster. These online communities offer opportunities for survivors and responders to connect with others who have experienced similar events, share accurate information and trusted resources, and help one another continue to heal from the effects of a traumatic event.

What Does it Offer?

The purpose of DDH Online Peer Support Communities is to create enhanced opportunities for survivors and responders of disaster to come together for mutual aid and emotional support.

DDH Online Peer Support Communities Also Include:

Trained Peer Supporters

DDH Online Peer Support includes trained peer supporters who assist with group moderation and vetting resources. In addition to community forums, our goal is also to create purposeful discussions lead by peer supporters with specific themes and relevant topics. While each survivor and responder’s experiences are unique, being with peers who have had a similar experience can promote connection, offer new ways of coping, and build a foundation of trust.

Peer support does not take the place of therapy or counseling. The opportunity to provide mutual aid and support to others who have faced similar challenges, when and where they need it, offers hope that healing and recovery is possible after a disaster.

Immediate Crisis Support

All DDH Online Peer Support Communities are monitored 24/7 by a designated DDH crisis center where crisis counselors are available to talk to members who may be in emotional distress and need crisis support. Members can talk to a counselor at any time of the day or night via Crisis Support Over Messenger (CSOM).

Available Communities

Survivors and Responders of the COVID-19 Pandemic 

DDH Online Peer Support Communities offer peer support for anyone who identifies as a survivor or responder of the COVID-19 pandemic. Both survivors and responders can come together for mutual aid, to share trusted resources, and to help one another continue to heal from the effects of a national pandemic. Survivors and responders may include but are not limited to, any healthcare workers, emergency responders, parents/caregivers, educators, individuals who have lost loved ones, people who are dealing with “Long-haul COVID”, those impacted by job loss or economic hardship during the pandemic, and anyone else who has been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. DDH-trained Peer Supporters are also available to listen and offer validation and encouragement. Additionally, they provide structured moderation within the community to engage members in meaningful discussions on relevant topics and offer timely and trusted resources. To join our Facebook group dedicated to Survivors and Responders of the COVID-19 Pandemic, click here.

Survivors of Mass Violence

DDH Online Peer Support Communities offer peer support for survivors of mass violence in the United States including mass shootings, terrorist attacks, or other large-scale community violence. Survivors and loved ones who have experienced mass violence can connect with one another and provide emotional support in the aftermath of a mass violence incident, including how to cope with activating events and memorials, self-care strategies, and challenges with daily living. DDH-trained Peer Supporters are available to listen to members, and offer validation and encouragement. They also provide structured moderation to engage members in meaningful discussions on relevant topics and provide timely and trusted resources. If you are a survivor or the loved one of a survivor of mass violence and need support, please join our Facebook group by requesting to be a member here.

Other Inquiries

If you’re not in immediate need of crisis counseling support and would like to contact us for other reasons, send an email. Contact us for:

  • Technical problems. If you encountered a technical problem while trying to contact the Disaster Distress Helpline, please include your name and preferred contact information in your email if you wish to receive a reply.
  • Provider inquiries. Providers with specific inquiries about technical assistance and support, requests for materials, and exploring collaborations are encouraged to send an email.
  • Feedback. To provide feedback about your experience reaching out to the Disaster Distress Helpline, send an email describing your experience and SAMHSA will look into the matter. Please include your name and preferred contact information if you wish to receive a reply.
  • Social media inquiries. Email us with questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline’s use of social media.
  • All media inquiries. Members of the media with questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline are encouraged to call the SAMHSA Media Services Team at 1-240-276-2130.

Our staff appreciate hearing from people about their experiences. SAMHSA takes feedback about our services, whether it is positive or negative, very seriously.

SAMHSA also encourages public promotion of the Disaster Distress Helpline. Anyone can use the Disaster Distress Helpline logo and telephone number on their website and link to the Disaster Distress Helpline’s materials and social media properties.

Call 211 for information about disaster-related evacuations, shelters, food and clothing distribution, volunteer opportunities, and other resources and referrals. Or visit the national 211 Call Center Search website to find the 211 information and referral center nearest you.

Last Updated: 11/11/2019

Deaf/Hard of Hearing & Spanish

Deaf/Hard of Hearing

Spanish Speakers

Twitter Tweets:

Facebook

Follow the Disaster Distress Helpline on Facebook.

0 – Hotline – DH – DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends
May 25 all-day
0 - Hotline - DH - DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) - 24/7 - Weekdays and Weekends

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

04 – Resources – BROR – Bridges Oregon – Hard of Hearing – Resources
May 25 all-day
04 - Resources - BROR - Bridges Oregon - Hard of Hearing  - Resources

 

Bridges Oregon

Hard of Hearing

RESOURCES

Bridges Oregon, Inc. is a nonprofit organization serving Oregonians who are Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing or face other communication barriers. It is in our mission to facilitate equity and inclusiveness and to provide a bridge to opportunities through advocacy, education and communication.

Advocacy

  • Victims’ Rights Pocket Cards (link)
  • Civil Rights Fact Sheet (link)

American Sign Language (ASL)

  • Portland Community College ASL Studies (link)
  • Sign Class (link)
  • Western Oregon University ASL Studies (link)

Children

  • Position Statement on Improving Child Protection Services for Families with Deaf Individuals (link)
  • Position Statement on Quality Foster Care Services Continuum for Deaf Children (link)
  • Position Statement on Mental Health Services for Deaf Children (link)
  • Protecting the Rights of Parents and Prospective Parents with Disabilities: Technical Assistance for State and Local Child Welfare Agencies and Court (link)

Community

  • Abolition and Disability Justice’s Guiding Principles (link)
  • Community-Based Needs Assessment (CNA) of Oregon’s Deaf and Hard of Hearing Communities: Final Report as of December 30, 2016 (link)
  • Hands and Voices of Oregon (link)
  • How many Deaf and Hard of Hearing people live in Oregon by counties (link)
  • Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (link)
  • Quota in Central Oregon (link)
  • Research & Resource Center with Deaf* community (RRCD) at Western Oregon University (link)

Crime Safety

  • Accessibility and Digital Security (link)
  • Know Your Rights ASL: Interacting with the Police (link)

Deaf-owned Businesses in Oregon

  • A5 Interpreting (link)
  • Clackamas River Growlers (link)
  • Camp Taloali (link)
  • Cymaspace (link)
  • Jennifer Jo Deily Fine Art (link)
  • King’s Hookah Lounge (link)
  • Looslea Holsteins Dairy Farm (link)
  • Pah! Restaurant (link)
  • PILEA Play (link)
  • Sign Class (link)
  • Tactile Communications (link)
  • Tim Baker’s Lawn Care (link)

DeafBlind

  • American Association of the DeafBlind (link)
  • DeafBlind Kids (link)
  • DeafBlind Interpreting: National Training & Resource Center (link)
  • Helen Keller National Center Region 10: Northwest (link)
  • Oregon Commission for the Blind (link)
  • Oregon DeafBlind Project (link)
  • National Center on DeafBlind (link)
  • Protactile Communications (link)
  • Protactile Language Interpreting: National Education Program (link)
  • For more information, please refer to the “Telecommunication” subgroup below.

Deaf with additional disabilities

  • Cerebral Palsy and Deaf Organization (link)
  • Oregon Deaf Autism (link)

Education

  • House Bill 3183 Toolkit: A Resource for Special Education Providers Regarding the Relevant Services and Placement Options for a Child Who Is Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing. August 2022. (link)
  • Language Assessment for American Sign Language (link)
  • Oregon Department of Education’s Kindergarten Ready Assessment (KRA) on Deaf and Hard of Hearing children
  • Report of 2017 House Bill 3412: Task Force on Assessments of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (referred as LEAD-K) (link)

Emergency Preparedness

  • Checklist for Emergency Responder: Ensuring Language Access and Effective Communication During Response and Recovery (link)

Hard of Hearing

  • Help to pay for Hearing Aids (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Oregon (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Lane County (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Linn and Benton (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Portland Chapter (link)

Health

  • ADA National Network: Healthcare and Face Coverings: Reducing Communication Barriers for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Patients (link)
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): Informational Videos in ASL (link)

Housing

  • Oregon ASL Realtors (link)

Hotlines

  • Aging and Disability Resource Connection of Oregon (link)
  • ASL COVID-19 Hotline (link)
  • National Deaf Domestic Violence Hotline (link)
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (link)
  • Oregon Hate Crimes and Bias Hotline (link)

Interpreters

  • File a complaint on a Healthcare Interpreter with Oregon Health Authority (link)
  • File a complaint on a certified or qualified interpreter with the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (link)
  • List of Deaf Interpreters in Oregon by Research and Resource Center with Deaf* community (RRCD) at Western Oregon University. (link)
  • List of ASL Interpreter Agencies in Oregon (link)
  • Portland Community College Interpreting Training program (link)
  • Search for certified or qualified Oregon Healthcare Interpreter (link)
  • Report a Patient Safety Issue in Medical settings e.g., an interpreter agency sends non-qualified interpreter to the appointment (link)
  • Search for certified or qualified Sign Language interpreters with the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (link)
  • Western Oregon University Online Interpreting Training program (link)

Late-Deafened

  • Association of Late-Deafened Adults (link)

Law

  • Oregon’s own version of ADA law (ORS 659a)

Law Enforcement

  • Deaf/Hard of Hearing Communication Card with Police (visor cardwallet card)
  • Community Proposal Directive for Law Enforcement Agencies (link)
  • Pullover Pal (link)
  • Oregon Legislative Update: Governor SIGNED on 5/6/2021! Proposed bill to provide “that the registered owner may request that registration cards issued for vehicles include that owner, or person operating vehicle, may be deaf or hard of hearing.” (link)

Lawsuits in Oregon (current & past)

  • Kristina Boswell v. State of Oregon, U.S.D.C. Case No. 3:22-cv-00502-MO (link)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc (2022)
  • Viewpoint to pay $225,000 to deaf job applicant Indi Matthews for employment discrimination (2022)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc: Deaf Inmate’s Disability Bias Claim (2020)
  • Disability Rights Oregon filed lawsuit on behalf of protesters with disabilities (2020)
  • Deaf prisoners: Oregon should use only certified interpreters, groups say (2019)
  • Springfield to pay $450,000 to deaf man injured by police officer (2019)
  • Ludwig v. State of Oregon: Employment Discrimination (2018)
  • DOJ sues Pacific Northwest on behalf of Oregon Veteran with Hearing Loss (2017)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc: Clackamas County Jail failed to provide ASL interpreter service for medical treatment (2017)
  • Oregon University Settles Lawsuit over Service Dog (2014)
  • Deaf inmate gets $150,000 settlement from Oregon after claiming assigned jobs were discriminatory (2014)
  • Wolfe v. City of Portland: Police did not provided ASL interpreter in response to 9-1-1 call (2012)
  • Oregon v. Mason: Portland Police did not provide ASL interpreter to translate the Miranda Warnings (1981)

*Please let us know if we missed any current or past lawsuits pertaining to deaf, deafblind, or hard of hearing Oregonians.

Legislative Bills (2023 Legislative Session)

  • Legislative Session is Closed.

Legislative Bills (passed)

  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2994 Modifies requirements for health insurance coverage of hearing-related items and services. (link).
  • 2023 Regular Session. Senate Bill (SB) 569 Requires closed-captioned television receivers in public areas within places of public accommodation to display closed captioning unless exception applies. (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. Senate Bill (SB) 685 Modifies the definition of “Communication Facilitator” (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2696 Authorizes Health Licensing Office to issue sign language interpreter licenses to qualified applicants. (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2669 Bill of Rights for Deaf, DeafBlind, and Hard of Hearing Children relating to Education. (link
  • 2021 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2498. “Provides that the registered owner may request that registration cards issued for vehicles include that owner, or person operating vehicle, may be Deaf or Hard of Hearing.” (link)
  • 2021 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3183. “Requires parents of child who is deaf or deafblind or who is hard of hearing to be provided information about relevant services and placements offered by school district, education service district, regional programs and Oregon School for the Deaf whenever individualized family service plan or individualized education program is developed, revised or reviewed.” (link)
  • 2019 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3205. “Expands Telecommunication Devices Access Program to include provision of communication facilitator.” (link)
  • 2017 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3412. “Establishes Task Force on Assessments of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.” (link)

Medical

  • Oregon Health Authority COVID-19 ASL Video (link)
  • Oregon Health Authority’s Deaf/Hard of Hearing Preferred Language Card (link)
  • Oregon Health Authority’s FAQ Regarding Providing Interpreter Services to Individuals who are Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing or Individuals with Limited English Proficiency in Medical Settings (link)
  • Report a Patient Safety Issue in Medical settings e.g., no accommodation provided (link)

Mental Health

  • List of ASL Therapists in Oregon (PDF)

Safety

  • Text to 9-1-1 (link)
  • Get A Smoke Alarm by American Red Cross (link)
  • Statewide Area: Smoke Alarms for Oregonians (link)
  • Portland Area: Smoke Alarms for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Portlanders (link)
  • Bend Area: Smoke Alarms for Oregonians who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (link)

Self-Advocate

  • Civil Rights for Individuals and Advocates (link)

Seniors

  • Avamere Chestnut Lane Assisted Living for the Deaf and DeafBlind, Gresham (link)

Sister Services

  • Northwest Human Services Connection: for the Deaf, DeafBlind, & Hard of Hearing (link)

Support Groups

  • ASL access NA, AL-ANON, NAR-ANON, and AA 12-Steps Program Virtual Support Groups (link)
  • Portland Deaf Access Committee of Alcoholics Anonymous (link)

Telecommunications and Internet

  • Affordable Connectivity Program (ACP) (link)
  • DeafBlind MMX Videophone (link)
  • Free iPad, iPhone, and other equipment for Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing (link)
  • ICanConnect – Oregon (link)
  • Oregon Lifeline (link)
  • Oregon Statewide Assistive Technology Program (link)

Video Access

  • Oregon Department of Human Services’ Frequently Asked Questions in ASL (link)
  • Video Remote Interpreting (VRI) Card (link)

*Deaf – Bridges Oregon has adopted with minor adaptations, the definition of ‘Deaf’ that is used by the National Deaf Center (NDC). Bridges Oregon is using the term deaf in an all-inclusive manner, to include people who may identify as D/deaf, DeafBlind, deaf-blind, deaf with additional disabilities, hard of hearing, late-deafened, and/or persons with unilateral/bilateral hearing loss. Bridges Oregon recognizes that for many individuals, identity is fluid and can change over time or with setting. Bridges Oregon has chosen to use one term, Deaf, with the goal of recognizing experiences that are shared by all members of our diverse communities while also honoring all of our differences. Source: https://www.nationaldeafcenter.org/defining-deaf

May
26
Sun
2024
0 – Helpline – SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline @ (800) 985-5990 (Multilingual) or (800) 846-8517 (TTY) – 24/7-Weekdays & Weekends
May 26 all-day

Excerpt(s) from link:

https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/disaster-distress-helpline

Disaster Distress Helpline

SAMHSA’s Disaster Distress Helpline provides 24/7, 365-day-a-year crisis counseling and support to people experiencing emotional distress related to natural or human-caused disasters.

The Disaster Distress Helpline, 1-800-985-5990, is a 24/7, 365-day-a-year, national hotline dedicated to providing immediate crisis counseling for people who are experiencing emotional distress related to any natural or human-caused disaster. This toll-free, multilingual, and confidential crisis support service is available to all residents in the United States and its territories. Stress, anxiety, and other depression-like symptoms are common reactions after a disaster. Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746 to connect with a trained crisis counselor.

Who Should Contact the Disaster Distress Helpline?

This crisis support service is for anyone experiencing emotional distress related to disasters such as:

The Disaster Distress Helpline also answers calls and texts related to infectious disease outbreaks, such as the Ebola outbreak, incidents of community unrest, and other traumatic events.

The impact of crises may affect people in different ways. Learn how to recognize the warning signs and risk factors for emotional distress related to natural and human-caused disasters.

The Disaster Distress Helpline is open to everyone. This includes survivors of disasters; loved ones of victims; first responders; rescue, recovery, and relief workers; clergy; and parents and caregivers. You may call for yourself or on behalf of someone else.

Call or Text

From the United States and its territories, call 1-800-985-5990 to connect with a trained crisis counselor, 24/7. Spanish-speakers can call the hotline and press “2” for 24/7 bilingual support.

Callers to the hotline can also connect with counselors in over 100 other languages via 3rd-party interpretation services; to connect with a counselor in your primary language, simply indicate your preferred language to the responding counselor and she/he will connect to a live interpreter (interpretation in less commonly-spoken languages may require calling back at an appointed time). Learn more and download information about the Disaster Distress Helpline in 30 of the most commonly-spoken languages in the U.S.

To connect with a live DDH crisis counselor 24/7 via SMS, from the 50 states text “TalkWithUs” for English or “Hablanos” for Spanish to 66746. Spanish-speakers from Puerto Rico can text “Hablanos” to 1-787-339-2663.

Texting is subscription-based and only involves a few steps:

  1. Enroll in the service by texting TalkWithUs or Hablanos exactly as written. It’s important to do this before sending your first text message because otherwise the enrollment may fail, and you will not be able to speak with a counselor, or you may accidentally subscribe to another service.
  2. Look for confirmation that your subscription was successful. You will receive a Success! message if it was.
  3. To unsubscribe, text Stop or Unsubscribe to 66746 (or 1-787-339-2663 from Puerto Rico) at any time. For help, text Help to 66746 (or 1-787-339-2663 from Puerto Rico).

Standard text and data message rates will apply when texting from mobile phones. International text and data rates may apply from within U.S. territories and free association nations. SAMHSA will not sell your phone numbers to other parties.

The Disaster Distress Helpline’s TTY number 1-800-846-8517 is available 24/7 to Deaf and hard of hearing individuals, who can also utilize the texting options or their preferred Relay service (including 7-1-1) to connect with the main DDH hotline 1-800-985-5990, 24/7.

DDH Online Peer Support Communities

In an effort to broaden our reach to disaster survivors and emergency responders, the Disaster Distress Helpline has developed online peer support communities through Facebook Groups for those who have experienced a natural or human-caused disaster. These online communities offer opportunities for survivors and responders to connect with others who have experienced similar events, share accurate information and trusted resources, and help one another continue to heal from the effects of a traumatic event.

What Does it Offer?

The purpose of DDH Online Peer Support Communities is to create enhanced opportunities for survivors and responders of disaster to come together for mutual aid and emotional support.

DDH Online Peer Support Communities Also Include:

Trained Peer Supporters

DDH Online Peer Support includes trained peer supporters who assist with group moderation and vetting resources. In addition to community forums, our goal is also to create purposeful discussions lead by peer supporters with specific themes and relevant topics. While each survivor and responder’s experiences are unique, being with peers who have had a similar experience can promote connection, offer new ways of coping, and build a foundation of trust.

Peer support does not take the place of therapy or counseling. The opportunity to provide mutual aid and support to others who have faced similar challenges, when and where they need it, offers hope that healing and recovery is possible after a disaster.

Immediate Crisis Support

All DDH Online Peer Support Communities are monitored 24/7 by a designated DDH crisis center where crisis counselors are available to talk to members who may be in emotional distress and need crisis support. Members can talk to a counselor at any time of the day or night via Crisis Support Over Messenger (CSOM).

Available Communities

Survivors and Responders of the COVID-19 Pandemic 

DDH Online Peer Support Communities offer peer support for anyone who identifies as a survivor or responder of the COVID-19 pandemic. Both survivors and responders can come together for mutual aid, to share trusted resources, and to help one another continue to heal from the effects of a national pandemic. Survivors and responders may include but are not limited to, any healthcare workers, emergency responders, parents/caregivers, educators, individuals who have lost loved ones, people who are dealing with “Long-haul COVID”, those impacted by job loss or economic hardship during the pandemic, and anyone else who has been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. DDH-trained Peer Supporters are also available to listen and offer validation and encouragement. Additionally, they provide structured moderation within the community to engage members in meaningful discussions on relevant topics and offer timely and trusted resources. To join our Facebook group dedicated to Survivors and Responders of the COVID-19 Pandemic, click here.

Survivors of Mass Violence

DDH Online Peer Support Communities offer peer support for survivors of mass violence in the United States including mass shootings, terrorist attacks, or other large-scale community violence. Survivors and loved ones who have experienced mass violence can connect with one another and provide emotional support in the aftermath of a mass violence incident, including how to cope with activating events and memorials, self-care strategies, and challenges with daily living. DDH-trained Peer Supporters are available to listen to members, and offer validation and encouragement. They also provide structured moderation to engage members in meaningful discussions on relevant topics and provide timely and trusted resources. If you are a survivor or the loved one of a survivor of mass violence and need support, please join our Facebook group by requesting to be a member here.

Other Inquiries

If you’re not in immediate need of crisis counseling support and would like to contact us for other reasons, send an email. Contact us for:

  • Technical problems. If you encountered a technical problem while trying to contact the Disaster Distress Helpline, please include your name and preferred contact information in your email if you wish to receive a reply.
  • Provider inquiries. Providers with specific inquiries about technical assistance and support, requests for materials, and exploring collaborations are encouraged to send an email.
  • Feedback. To provide feedback about your experience reaching out to the Disaster Distress Helpline, send an email describing your experience and SAMHSA will look into the matter. Please include your name and preferred contact information if you wish to receive a reply.
  • Social media inquiries. Email us with questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline’s use of social media.
  • All media inquiries. Members of the media with questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline are encouraged to call the SAMHSA Media Services Team at 1-240-276-2130.

Our staff appreciate hearing from people about their experiences. SAMHSA takes feedback about our services, whether it is positive or negative, very seriously.

SAMHSA also encourages public promotion of the Disaster Distress Helpline. Anyone can use the Disaster Distress Helpline logo and telephone number on their website and link to the Disaster Distress Helpline’s materials and social media properties.

Call 211 for information about disaster-related evacuations, shelters, food and clothing distribution, volunteer opportunities, and other resources and referrals. Or visit the national 211 Call Center Search website to find the 211 information and referral center nearest you.

Last Updated: 11/11/2019

Deaf/Hard of Hearing & Spanish

Deaf/Hard of Hearing

Spanish Speakers

Twitter Tweets:

Facebook

Follow the Disaster Distress Helpline on Facebook.

0 – Hotline – DH – DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends
May 26 all-day
0 - Hotline - DH - DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) - 24/7 - Weekdays and Weekends

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

04 – Resources – BROR – Bridges Oregon – Hard of Hearing – Resources
May 26 all-day
04 - Resources - BROR - Bridges Oregon - Hard of Hearing  - Resources

 

Bridges Oregon

Hard of Hearing

RESOURCES

Bridges Oregon, Inc. is a nonprofit organization serving Oregonians who are Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing or face other communication barriers. It is in our mission to facilitate equity and inclusiveness and to provide a bridge to opportunities through advocacy, education and communication.

Advocacy

  • Victims’ Rights Pocket Cards (link)
  • Civil Rights Fact Sheet (link)

American Sign Language (ASL)

  • Portland Community College ASL Studies (link)
  • Sign Class (link)
  • Western Oregon University ASL Studies (link)

Children

  • Position Statement on Improving Child Protection Services for Families with Deaf Individuals (link)
  • Position Statement on Quality Foster Care Services Continuum for Deaf Children (link)
  • Position Statement on Mental Health Services for Deaf Children (link)
  • Protecting the Rights of Parents and Prospective Parents with Disabilities: Technical Assistance for State and Local Child Welfare Agencies and Court (link)

Community

  • Abolition and Disability Justice’s Guiding Principles (link)
  • Community-Based Needs Assessment (CNA) of Oregon’s Deaf and Hard of Hearing Communities: Final Report as of December 30, 2016 (link)
  • Hands and Voices of Oregon (link)
  • How many Deaf and Hard of Hearing people live in Oregon by counties (link)
  • Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (link)
  • Quota in Central Oregon (link)
  • Research & Resource Center with Deaf* community (RRCD) at Western Oregon University (link)

Crime Safety

  • Accessibility and Digital Security (link)
  • Know Your Rights ASL: Interacting with the Police (link)

Deaf-owned Businesses in Oregon

  • A5 Interpreting (link)
  • Clackamas River Growlers (link)
  • Camp Taloali (link)
  • Cymaspace (link)
  • Jennifer Jo Deily Fine Art (link)
  • King’s Hookah Lounge (link)
  • Looslea Holsteins Dairy Farm (link)
  • Pah! Restaurant (link)
  • PILEA Play (link)
  • Sign Class (link)
  • Tactile Communications (link)
  • Tim Baker’s Lawn Care (link)

DeafBlind

  • American Association of the DeafBlind (link)
  • DeafBlind Kids (link)
  • DeafBlind Interpreting: National Training & Resource Center (link)
  • Helen Keller National Center Region 10: Northwest (link)
  • Oregon Commission for the Blind (link)
  • Oregon DeafBlind Project (link)
  • National Center on DeafBlind (link)
  • Protactile Communications (link)
  • Protactile Language Interpreting: National Education Program (link)
  • For more information, please refer to the “Telecommunication” subgroup below.

Deaf with additional disabilities

  • Cerebral Palsy and Deaf Organization (link)
  • Oregon Deaf Autism (link)

Education

  • House Bill 3183 Toolkit: A Resource for Special Education Providers Regarding the Relevant Services and Placement Options for a Child Who Is Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing. August 2022. (link)
  • Language Assessment for American Sign Language (link)
  • Oregon Department of Education’s Kindergarten Ready Assessment (KRA) on Deaf and Hard of Hearing children
  • Report of 2017 House Bill 3412: Task Force on Assessments of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (referred as LEAD-K) (link)

Emergency Preparedness

  • Checklist for Emergency Responder: Ensuring Language Access and Effective Communication During Response and Recovery (link)

Hard of Hearing

  • Help to pay for Hearing Aids (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Oregon (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Lane County (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Linn and Benton (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Portland Chapter (link)

Health

  • ADA National Network: Healthcare and Face Coverings: Reducing Communication Barriers for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Patients (link)
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): Informational Videos in ASL (link)

Housing

  • Oregon ASL Realtors (link)

Hotlines

  • Aging and Disability Resource Connection of Oregon (link)
  • ASL COVID-19 Hotline (link)
  • National Deaf Domestic Violence Hotline (link)
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (link)
  • Oregon Hate Crimes and Bias Hotline (link)

Interpreters

  • File a complaint on a Healthcare Interpreter with Oregon Health Authority (link)
  • File a complaint on a certified or qualified interpreter with the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (link)
  • List of Deaf Interpreters in Oregon by Research and Resource Center with Deaf* community (RRCD) at Western Oregon University. (link)
  • List of ASL Interpreter Agencies in Oregon (link)
  • Portland Community College Interpreting Training program (link)
  • Search for certified or qualified Oregon Healthcare Interpreter (link)
  • Report a Patient Safety Issue in Medical settings e.g., an interpreter agency sends non-qualified interpreter to the appointment (link)
  • Search for certified or qualified Sign Language interpreters with the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (link)
  • Western Oregon University Online Interpreting Training program (link)

Late-Deafened

  • Association of Late-Deafened Adults (link)

Law

  • Oregon’s own version of ADA law (ORS 659a)

Law Enforcement

  • Deaf/Hard of Hearing Communication Card with Police (visor cardwallet card)
  • Community Proposal Directive for Law Enforcement Agencies (link)
  • Pullover Pal (link)
  • Oregon Legislative Update: Governor SIGNED on 5/6/2021! Proposed bill to provide “that the registered owner may request that registration cards issued for vehicles include that owner, or person operating vehicle, may be deaf or hard of hearing.” (link)

Lawsuits in Oregon (current & past)

  • Kristina Boswell v. State of Oregon, U.S.D.C. Case No. 3:22-cv-00502-MO (link)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc (2022)
  • Viewpoint to pay $225,000 to deaf job applicant Indi Matthews for employment discrimination (2022)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc: Deaf Inmate’s Disability Bias Claim (2020)
  • Disability Rights Oregon filed lawsuit on behalf of protesters with disabilities (2020)
  • Deaf prisoners: Oregon should use only certified interpreters, groups say (2019)
  • Springfield to pay $450,000 to deaf man injured by police officer (2019)
  • Ludwig v. State of Oregon: Employment Discrimination (2018)
  • DOJ sues Pacific Northwest on behalf of Oregon Veteran with Hearing Loss (2017)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc: Clackamas County Jail failed to provide ASL interpreter service for medical treatment (2017)
  • Oregon University Settles Lawsuit over Service Dog (2014)
  • Deaf inmate gets $150,000 settlement from Oregon after claiming assigned jobs were discriminatory (2014)
  • Wolfe v. City of Portland: Police did not provided ASL interpreter in response to 9-1-1 call (2012)
  • Oregon v. Mason: Portland Police did not provide ASL interpreter to translate the Miranda Warnings (1981)

*Please let us know if we missed any current or past lawsuits pertaining to deaf, deafblind, or hard of hearing Oregonians.

Legislative Bills (2023 Legislative Session)

  • Legislative Session is Closed.

Legislative Bills (passed)

  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2994 Modifies requirements for health insurance coverage of hearing-related items and services. (link).
  • 2023 Regular Session. Senate Bill (SB) 569 Requires closed-captioned television receivers in public areas within places of public accommodation to display closed captioning unless exception applies. (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. Senate Bill (SB) 685 Modifies the definition of “Communication Facilitator” (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2696 Authorizes Health Licensing Office to issue sign language interpreter licenses to qualified applicants. (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2669 Bill of Rights for Deaf, DeafBlind, and Hard of Hearing Children relating to Education. (link
  • 2021 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2498. “Provides that the registered owner may request that registration cards issued for vehicles include that owner, or person operating vehicle, may be Deaf or Hard of Hearing.” (link)
  • 2021 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3183. “Requires parents of child who is deaf or deafblind or who is hard of hearing to be provided information about relevant services and placements offered by school district, education service district, regional programs and Oregon School for the Deaf whenever individualized family service plan or individualized education program is developed, revised or reviewed.” (link)
  • 2019 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3205. “Expands Telecommunication Devices Access Program to include provision of communication facilitator.” (link)
  • 2017 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3412. “Establishes Task Force on Assessments of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.” (link)

Medical

  • Oregon Health Authority COVID-19 ASL Video (link)
  • Oregon Health Authority’s Deaf/Hard of Hearing Preferred Language Card (link)
  • Oregon Health Authority’s FAQ Regarding Providing Interpreter Services to Individuals who are Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing or Individuals with Limited English Proficiency in Medical Settings (link)
  • Report a Patient Safety Issue in Medical settings e.g., no accommodation provided (link)

Mental Health

  • List of ASL Therapists in Oregon (PDF)

Safety

  • Text to 9-1-1 (link)
  • Get A Smoke Alarm by American Red Cross (link)
  • Statewide Area: Smoke Alarms for Oregonians (link)
  • Portland Area: Smoke Alarms for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Portlanders (link)
  • Bend Area: Smoke Alarms for Oregonians who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (link)

Self-Advocate

  • Civil Rights for Individuals and Advocates (link)

Seniors

  • Avamere Chestnut Lane Assisted Living for the Deaf and DeafBlind, Gresham (link)

Sister Services

  • Northwest Human Services Connection: for the Deaf, DeafBlind, & Hard of Hearing (link)

Support Groups

  • ASL access NA, AL-ANON, NAR-ANON, and AA 12-Steps Program Virtual Support Groups (link)
  • Portland Deaf Access Committee of Alcoholics Anonymous (link)

Telecommunications and Internet

  • Affordable Connectivity Program (ACP) (link)
  • DeafBlind MMX Videophone (link)
  • Free iPad, iPhone, and other equipment for Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing (link)
  • ICanConnect – Oregon (link)
  • Oregon Lifeline (link)
  • Oregon Statewide Assistive Technology Program (link)

Video Access

  • Oregon Department of Human Services’ Frequently Asked Questions in ASL (link)
  • Video Remote Interpreting (VRI) Card (link)

*Deaf – Bridges Oregon has adopted with minor adaptations, the definition of ‘Deaf’ that is used by the National Deaf Center (NDC). Bridges Oregon is using the term deaf in an all-inclusive manner, to include people who may identify as D/deaf, DeafBlind, deaf-blind, deaf with additional disabilities, hard of hearing, late-deafened, and/or persons with unilateral/bilateral hearing loss. Bridges Oregon recognizes that for many individuals, identity is fluid and can change over time or with setting. Bridges Oregon has chosen to use one term, Deaf, with the goal of recognizing experiences that are shared by all members of our diverse communities while also honoring all of our differences. Source: https://www.nationaldeafcenter.org/defining-deaf

May
27
Mon
2024
0 – Helpline – SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline @ (800) 985-5990 (Multilingual) or (800) 846-8517 (TTY) – 24/7-Weekdays & Weekends
May 27 all-day

Excerpt(s) from link:

https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/disaster-distress-helpline

Disaster Distress Helpline

SAMHSA’s Disaster Distress Helpline provides 24/7, 365-day-a-year crisis counseling and support to people experiencing emotional distress related to natural or human-caused disasters.

The Disaster Distress Helpline, 1-800-985-5990, is a 24/7, 365-day-a-year, national hotline dedicated to providing immediate crisis counseling for people who are experiencing emotional distress related to any natural or human-caused disaster. This toll-free, multilingual, and confidential crisis support service is available to all residents in the United States and its territories. Stress, anxiety, and other depression-like symptoms are common reactions after a disaster. Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746 to connect with a trained crisis counselor.

Who Should Contact the Disaster Distress Helpline?

This crisis support service is for anyone experiencing emotional distress related to disasters such as:

The Disaster Distress Helpline also answers calls and texts related to infectious disease outbreaks, such as the Ebola outbreak, incidents of community unrest, and other traumatic events.

The impact of crises may affect people in different ways. Learn how to recognize the warning signs and risk factors for emotional distress related to natural and human-caused disasters.

The Disaster Distress Helpline is open to everyone. This includes survivors of disasters; loved ones of victims; first responders; rescue, recovery, and relief workers; clergy; and parents and caregivers. You may call for yourself or on behalf of someone else.

Call or Text

From the United States and its territories, call 1-800-985-5990 to connect with a trained crisis counselor, 24/7. Spanish-speakers can call the hotline and press “2” for 24/7 bilingual support.

Callers to the hotline can also connect with counselors in over 100 other languages via 3rd-party interpretation services; to connect with a counselor in your primary language, simply indicate your preferred language to the responding counselor and she/he will connect to a live interpreter (interpretation in less commonly-spoken languages may require calling back at an appointed time). Learn more and download information about the Disaster Distress Helpline in 30 of the most commonly-spoken languages in the U.S.

To connect with a live DDH crisis counselor 24/7 via SMS, from the 50 states text “TalkWithUs” for English or “Hablanos” for Spanish to 66746. Spanish-speakers from Puerto Rico can text “Hablanos” to 1-787-339-2663.

Texting is subscription-based and only involves a few steps:

  1. Enroll in the service by texting TalkWithUs or Hablanos exactly as written. It’s important to do this before sending your first text message because otherwise the enrollment may fail, and you will not be able to speak with a counselor, or you may accidentally subscribe to another service.
  2. Look for confirmation that your subscription was successful. You will receive a Success! message if it was.
  3. To unsubscribe, text Stop or Unsubscribe to 66746 (or 1-787-339-2663 from Puerto Rico) at any time. For help, text Help to 66746 (or 1-787-339-2663 from Puerto Rico).

Standard text and data message rates will apply when texting from mobile phones. International text and data rates may apply from within U.S. territories and free association nations. SAMHSA will not sell your phone numbers to other parties.

The Disaster Distress Helpline’s TTY number 1-800-846-8517 is available 24/7 to Deaf and hard of hearing individuals, who can also utilize the texting options or their preferred Relay service (including 7-1-1) to connect with the main DDH hotline 1-800-985-5990, 24/7.

DDH Online Peer Support Communities

In an effort to broaden our reach to disaster survivors and emergency responders, the Disaster Distress Helpline has developed online peer support communities through Facebook Groups for those who have experienced a natural or human-caused disaster. These online communities offer opportunities for survivors and responders to connect with others who have experienced similar events, share accurate information and trusted resources, and help one another continue to heal from the effects of a traumatic event.

What Does it Offer?

The purpose of DDH Online Peer Support Communities is to create enhanced opportunities for survivors and responders of disaster to come together for mutual aid and emotional support.

DDH Online Peer Support Communities Also Include:

Trained Peer Supporters

DDH Online Peer Support includes trained peer supporters who assist with group moderation and vetting resources. In addition to community forums, our goal is also to create purposeful discussions lead by peer supporters with specific themes and relevant topics. While each survivor and responder’s experiences are unique, being with peers who have had a similar experience can promote connection, offer new ways of coping, and build a foundation of trust.

Peer support does not take the place of therapy or counseling. The opportunity to provide mutual aid and support to others who have faced similar challenges, when and where they need it, offers hope that healing and recovery is possible after a disaster.

Immediate Crisis Support

All DDH Online Peer Support Communities are monitored 24/7 by a designated DDH crisis center where crisis counselors are available to talk to members who may be in emotional distress and need crisis support. Members can talk to a counselor at any time of the day or night via Crisis Support Over Messenger (CSOM).

Available Communities

Survivors and Responders of the COVID-19 Pandemic 

DDH Online Peer Support Communities offer peer support for anyone who identifies as a survivor or responder of the COVID-19 pandemic. Both survivors and responders can come together for mutual aid, to share trusted resources, and to help one another continue to heal from the effects of a national pandemic. Survivors and responders may include but are not limited to, any healthcare workers, emergency responders, parents/caregivers, educators, individuals who have lost loved ones, people who are dealing with “Long-haul COVID”, those impacted by job loss or economic hardship during the pandemic, and anyone else who has been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. DDH-trained Peer Supporters are also available to listen and offer validation and encouragement. Additionally, they provide structured moderation within the community to engage members in meaningful discussions on relevant topics and offer timely and trusted resources. To join our Facebook group dedicated to Survivors and Responders of the COVID-19 Pandemic, click here.

Survivors of Mass Violence

DDH Online Peer Support Communities offer peer support for survivors of mass violence in the United States including mass shootings, terrorist attacks, or other large-scale community violence. Survivors and loved ones who have experienced mass violence can connect with one another and provide emotional support in the aftermath of a mass violence incident, including how to cope with activating events and memorials, self-care strategies, and challenges with daily living. DDH-trained Peer Supporters are available to listen to members, and offer validation and encouragement. They also provide structured moderation to engage members in meaningful discussions on relevant topics and provide timely and trusted resources. If you are a survivor or the loved one of a survivor of mass violence and need support, please join our Facebook group by requesting to be a member here.

Other Inquiries

If you’re not in immediate need of crisis counseling support and would like to contact us for other reasons, send an email. Contact us for:

  • Technical problems. If you encountered a technical problem while trying to contact the Disaster Distress Helpline, please include your name and preferred contact information in your email if you wish to receive a reply.
  • Provider inquiries. Providers with specific inquiries about technical assistance and support, requests for materials, and exploring collaborations are encouraged to send an email.
  • Feedback. To provide feedback about your experience reaching out to the Disaster Distress Helpline, send an email describing your experience and SAMHSA will look into the matter. Please include your name and preferred contact information if you wish to receive a reply.
  • Social media inquiries. Email us with questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline’s use of social media.
  • All media inquiries. Members of the media with questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline are encouraged to call the SAMHSA Media Services Team at 1-240-276-2130.

Our staff appreciate hearing from people about their experiences. SAMHSA takes feedback about our services, whether it is positive or negative, very seriously.

SAMHSA also encourages public promotion of the Disaster Distress Helpline. Anyone can use the Disaster Distress Helpline logo and telephone number on their website and link to the Disaster Distress Helpline’s materials and social media properties.

Call 211 for information about disaster-related evacuations, shelters, food and clothing distribution, volunteer opportunities, and other resources and referrals. Or visit the national 211 Call Center Search website to find the 211 information and referral center nearest you.

Last Updated: 11/11/2019

Deaf/Hard of Hearing & Spanish

Deaf/Hard of Hearing

Spanish Speakers

Twitter Tweets:

Facebook

Follow the Disaster Distress Helpline on Facebook.

0 – Hotline – DH – DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends
May 27 all-day
0 - Hotline - DH - DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) - 24/7 - Weekdays and Weekends

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

04 – Resources – BROR – Bridges Oregon – Hard of Hearing – Resources
May 27 all-day
04 - Resources - BROR - Bridges Oregon - Hard of Hearing  - Resources

 

Bridges Oregon

Hard of Hearing

RESOURCES

Bridges Oregon, Inc. is a nonprofit organization serving Oregonians who are Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing or face other communication barriers. It is in our mission to facilitate equity and inclusiveness and to provide a bridge to opportunities through advocacy, education and communication.

Advocacy

  • Victims’ Rights Pocket Cards (link)
  • Civil Rights Fact Sheet (link)

American Sign Language (ASL)

  • Portland Community College ASL Studies (link)
  • Sign Class (link)
  • Western Oregon University ASL Studies (link)

Children

  • Position Statement on Improving Child Protection Services for Families with Deaf Individuals (link)
  • Position Statement on Quality Foster Care Services Continuum for Deaf Children (link)
  • Position Statement on Mental Health Services for Deaf Children (link)
  • Protecting the Rights of Parents and Prospective Parents with Disabilities: Technical Assistance for State and Local Child Welfare Agencies and Court (link)

Community

  • Abolition and Disability Justice’s Guiding Principles (link)
  • Community-Based Needs Assessment (CNA) of Oregon’s Deaf and Hard of Hearing Communities: Final Report as of December 30, 2016 (link)
  • Hands and Voices of Oregon (link)
  • How many Deaf and Hard of Hearing people live in Oregon by counties (link)
  • Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (link)
  • Quota in Central Oregon (link)
  • Research & Resource Center with Deaf* community (RRCD) at Western Oregon University (link)

Crime Safety

  • Accessibility and Digital Security (link)
  • Know Your Rights ASL: Interacting with the Police (link)

Deaf-owned Businesses in Oregon

  • A5 Interpreting (link)
  • Clackamas River Growlers (link)
  • Camp Taloali (link)
  • Cymaspace (link)
  • Jennifer Jo Deily Fine Art (link)
  • King’s Hookah Lounge (link)
  • Looslea Holsteins Dairy Farm (link)
  • Pah! Restaurant (link)
  • PILEA Play (link)
  • Sign Class (link)
  • Tactile Communications (link)
  • Tim Baker’s Lawn Care (link)

DeafBlind

  • American Association of the DeafBlind (link)
  • DeafBlind Kids (link)
  • DeafBlind Interpreting: National Training & Resource Center (link)
  • Helen Keller National Center Region 10: Northwest (link)
  • Oregon Commission for the Blind (link)
  • Oregon DeafBlind Project (link)
  • National Center on DeafBlind (link)
  • Protactile Communications (link)
  • Protactile Language Interpreting: National Education Program (link)
  • For more information, please refer to the “Telecommunication” subgroup below.

Deaf with additional disabilities

  • Cerebral Palsy and Deaf Organization (link)
  • Oregon Deaf Autism (link)

Education

  • House Bill 3183 Toolkit: A Resource for Special Education Providers Regarding the Relevant Services and Placement Options for a Child Who Is Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing. August 2022. (link)
  • Language Assessment for American Sign Language (link)
  • Oregon Department of Education’s Kindergarten Ready Assessment (KRA) on Deaf and Hard of Hearing children
  • Report of 2017 House Bill 3412: Task Force on Assessments of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (referred as LEAD-K) (link)

Emergency Preparedness

  • Checklist for Emergency Responder: Ensuring Language Access and Effective Communication During Response and Recovery (link)

Hard of Hearing

  • Help to pay for Hearing Aids (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Oregon (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Lane County (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Linn and Benton (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Portland Chapter (link)

Health

  • ADA National Network: Healthcare and Face Coverings: Reducing Communication Barriers for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Patients (link)
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): Informational Videos in ASL (link)

Housing

  • Oregon ASL Realtors (link)

Hotlines

  • Aging and Disability Resource Connection of Oregon (link)
  • ASL COVID-19 Hotline (link)
  • National Deaf Domestic Violence Hotline (link)
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (link)
  • Oregon Hate Crimes and Bias Hotline (link)

Interpreters

  • File a complaint on a Healthcare Interpreter with Oregon Health Authority (link)
  • File a complaint on a certified or qualified interpreter with the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (link)
  • List of Deaf Interpreters in Oregon by Research and Resource Center with Deaf* community (RRCD) at Western Oregon University. (link)
  • List of ASL Interpreter Agencies in Oregon (link)
  • Portland Community College Interpreting Training program (link)
  • Search for certified or qualified Oregon Healthcare Interpreter (link)
  • Report a Patient Safety Issue in Medical settings e.g., an interpreter agency sends non-qualified interpreter to the appointment (link)
  • Search for certified or qualified Sign Language interpreters with the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (link)
  • Western Oregon University Online Interpreting Training program (link)

Late-Deafened

  • Association of Late-Deafened Adults (link)

Law

  • Oregon’s own version of ADA law (ORS 659a)

Law Enforcement

  • Deaf/Hard of Hearing Communication Card with Police (visor cardwallet card)
  • Community Proposal Directive for Law Enforcement Agencies (link)
  • Pullover Pal (link)
  • Oregon Legislative Update: Governor SIGNED on 5/6/2021! Proposed bill to provide “that the registered owner may request that registration cards issued for vehicles include that owner, or person operating vehicle, may be deaf or hard of hearing.” (link)

Lawsuits in Oregon (current & past)

  • Kristina Boswell v. State of Oregon, U.S.D.C. Case No. 3:22-cv-00502-MO (link)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc (2022)
  • Viewpoint to pay $225,000 to deaf job applicant Indi Matthews for employment discrimination (2022)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc: Deaf Inmate’s Disability Bias Claim (2020)
  • Disability Rights Oregon filed lawsuit on behalf of protesters with disabilities (2020)
  • Deaf prisoners: Oregon should use only certified interpreters, groups say (2019)
  • Springfield to pay $450,000 to deaf man injured by police officer (2019)
  • Ludwig v. State of Oregon: Employment Discrimination (2018)
  • DOJ sues Pacific Northwest on behalf of Oregon Veteran with Hearing Loss (2017)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc: Clackamas County Jail failed to provide ASL interpreter service for medical treatment (2017)
  • Oregon University Settles Lawsuit over Service Dog (2014)
  • Deaf inmate gets $150,000 settlement from Oregon after claiming assigned jobs were discriminatory (2014)
  • Wolfe v. City of Portland: Police did not provided ASL interpreter in response to 9-1-1 call (2012)
  • Oregon v. Mason: Portland Police did not provide ASL interpreter to translate the Miranda Warnings (1981)

*Please let us know if we missed any current or past lawsuits pertaining to deaf, deafblind, or hard of hearing Oregonians.

Legislative Bills (2023 Legislative Session)

  • Legislative Session is Closed.

Legislative Bills (passed)

  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2994 Modifies requirements for health insurance coverage of hearing-related items and services. (link).
  • 2023 Regular Session. Senate Bill (SB) 569 Requires closed-captioned television receivers in public areas within places of public accommodation to display closed captioning unless exception applies. (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. Senate Bill (SB) 685 Modifies the definition of “Communication Facilitator” (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2696 Authorizes Health Licensing Office to issue sign language interpreter licenses to qualified applicants. (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2669 Bill of Rights for Deaf, DeafBlind, and Hard of Hearing Children relating to Education. (link
  • 2021 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2498. “Provides that the registered owner may request that registration cards issued for vehicles include that owner, or person operating vehicle, may be Deaf or Hard of Hearing.” (link)
  • 2021 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3183. “Requires parents of child who is deaf or deafblind or who is hard of hearing to be provided information about relevant services and placements offered by school district, education service district, regional programs and Oregon School for the Deaf whenever individualized family service plan or individualized education program is developed, revised or reviewed.” (link)
  • 2019 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3205. “Expands Telecommunication Devices Access Program to include provision of communication facilitator.” (link)
  • 2017 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3412. “Establishes Task Force on Assessments of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.” (link)

Medical

  • Oregon Health Authority COVID-19 ASL Video (link)
  • Oregon Health Authority’s Deaf/Hard of Hearing Preferred Language Card (link)
  • Oregon Health Authority’s FAQ Regarding Providing Interpreter Services to Individuals who are Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing or Individuals with Limited English Proficiency in Medical Settings (link)
  • Report a Patient Safety Issue in Medical settings e.g., no accommodation provided (link)

Mental Health

  • List of ASL Therapists in Oregon (PDF)

Safety

  • Text to 9-1-1 (link)
  • Get A Smoke Alarm by American Red Cross (link)
  • Statewide Area: Smoke Alarms for Oregonians (link)
  • Portland Area: Smoke Alarms for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Portlanders (link)
  • Bend Area: Smoke Alarms for Oregonians who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (link)

Self-Advocate

  • Civil Rights for Individuals and Advocates (link)

Seniors

  • Avamere Chestnut Lane Assisted Living for the Deaf and DeafBlind, Gresham (link)

Sister Services

  • Northwest Human Services Connection: for the Deaf, DeafBlind, & Hard of Hearing (link)

Support Groups

  • ASL access NA, AL-ANON, NAR-ANON, and AA 12-Steps Program Virtual Support Groups (link)
  • Portland Deaf Access Committee of Alcoholics Anonymous (link)

Telecommunications and Internet

  • Affordable Connectivity Program (ACP) (link)
  • DeafBlind MMX Videophone (link)
  • Free iPad, iPhone, and other equipment for Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing (link)
  • ICanConnect – Oregon (link)
  • Oregon Lifeline (link)
  • Oregon Statewide Assistive Technology Program (link)

Video Access

  • Oregon Department of Human Services’ Frequently Asked Questions in ASL (link)
  • Video Remote Interpreting (VRI) Card (link)

*Deaf – Bridges Oregon has adopted with minor adaptations, the definition of ‘Deaf’ that is used by the National Deaf Center (NDC). Bridges Oregon is using the term deaf in an all-inclusive manner, to include people who may identify as D/deaf, DeafBlind, deaf-blind, deaf with additional disabilities, hard of hearing, late-deafened, and/or persons with unilateral/bilateral hearing loss. Bridges Oregon recognizes that for many individuals, identity is fluid and can change over time or with setting. Bridges Oregon has chosen to use one term, Deaf, with the goal of recognizing experiences that are shared by all members of our diverse communities while also honoring all of our differences. Source: https://www.nationaldeafcenter.org/defining-deaf

May
28
Tue
2024
0 – Helpline – SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline @ (800) 985-5990 (Multilingual) or (800) 846-8517 (TTY) – 24/7-Weekdays & Weekends
May 28 all-day

Excerpt(s) from link:

https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/disaster-distress-helpline

Disaster Distress Helpline

SAMHSA’s Disaster Distress Helpline provides 24/7, 365-day-a-year crisis counseling and support to people experiencing emotional distress related to natural or human-caused disasters.

The Disaster Distress Helpline, 1-800-985-5990, is a 24/7, 365-day-a-year, national hotline dedicated to providing immediate crisis counseling for people who are experiencing emotional distress related to any natural or human-caused disaster. This toll-free, multilingual, and confidential crisis support service is available to all residents in the United States and its territories. Stress, anxiety, and other depression-like symptoms are common reactions after a disaster. Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746 to connect with a trained crisis counselor.

Who Should Contact the Disaster Distress Helpline?

This crisis support service is for anyone experiencing emotional distress related to disasters such as:

The Disaster Distress Helpline also answers calls and texts related to infectious disease outbreaks, such as the Ebola outbreak, incidents of community unrest, and other traumatic events.

The impact of crises may affect people in different ways. Learn how to recognize the warning signs and risk factors for emotional distress related to natural and human-caused disasters.

The Disaster Distress Helpline is open to everyone. This includes survivors of disasters; loved ones of victims; first responders; rescue, recovery, and relief workers; clergy; and parents and caregivers. You may call for yourself or on behalf of someone else.

Call or Text

From the United States and its territories, call 1-800-985-5990 to connect with a trained crisis counselor, 24/7. Spanish-speakers can call the hotline and press “2” for 24/7 bilingual support.

Callers to the hotline can also connect with counselors in over 100 other languages via 3rd-party interpretation services; to connect with a counselor in your primary language, simply indicate your preferred language to the responding counselor and she/he will connect to a live interpreter (interpretation in less commonly-spoken languages may require calling back at an appointed time). Learn more and download information about the Disaster Distress Helpline in 30 of the most commonly-spoken languages in the U.S.

To connect with a live DDH crisis counselor 24/7 via SMS, from the 50 states text “TalkWithUs” for English or “Hablanos” for Spanish to 66746. Spanish-speakers from Puerto Rico can text “Hablanos” to 1-787-339-2663.

Texting is subscription-based and only involves a few steps:

  1. Enroll in the service by texting TalkWithUs or Hablanos exactly as written. It’s important to do this before sending your first text message because otherwise the enrollment may fail, and you will not be able to speak with a counselor, or you may accidentally subscribe to another service.
  2. Look for confirmation that your subscription was successful. You will receive a Success! message if it was.
  3. To unsubscribe, text Stop or Unsubscribe to 66746 (or 1-787-339-2663 from Puerto Rico) at any time. For help, text Help to 66746 (or 1-787-339-2663 from Puerto Rico).

Standard text and data message rates will apply when texting from mobile phones. International text and data rates may apply from within U.S. territories and free association nations. SAMHSA will not sell your phone numbers to other parties.

The Disaster Distress Helpline’s TTY number 1-800-846-8517 is available 24/7 to Deaf and hard of hearing individuals, who can also utilize the texting options or their preferred Relay service (including 7-1-1) to connect with the main DDH hotline 1-800-985-5990, 24/7.

DDH Online Peer Support Communities

In an effort to broaden our reach to disaster survivors and emergency responders, the Disaster Distress Helpline has developed online peer support communities through Facebook Groups for those who have experienced a natural or human-caused disaster. These online communities offer opportunities for survivors and responders to connect with others who have experienced similar events, share accurate information and trusted resources, and help one another continue to heal from the effects of a traumatic event.

What Does it Offer?

The purpose of DDH Online Peer Support Communities is to create enhanced opportunities for survivors and responders of disaster to come together for mutual aid and emotional support.

DDH Online Peer Support Communities Also Include:

Trained Peer Supporters

DDH Online Peer Support includes trained peer supporters who assist with group moderation and vetting resources. In addition to community forums, our goal is also to create purposeful discussions lead by peer supporters with specific themes and relevant topics. While each survivor and responder’s experiences are unique, being with peers who have had a similar experience can promote connection, offer new ways of coping, and build a foundation of trust.

Peer support does not take the place of therapy or counseling. The opportunity to provide mutual aid and support to others who have faced similar challenges, when and where they need it, offers hope that healing and recovery is possible after a disaster.

Immediate Crisis Support

All DDH Online Peer Support Communities are monitored 24/7 by a designated DDH crisis center where crisis counselors are available to talk to members who may be in emotional distress and need crisis support. Members can talk to a counselor at any time of the day or night via Crisis Support Over Messenger (CSOM).

Available Communities

Survivors and Responders of the COVID-19 Pandemic 

DDH Online Peer Support Communities offer peer support for anyone who identifies as a survivor or responder of the COVID-19 pandemic. Both survivors and responders can come together for mutual aid, to share trusted resources, and to help one another continue to heal from the effects of a national pandemic. Survivors and responders may include but are not limited to, any healthcare workers, emergency responders, parents/caregivers, educators, individuals who have lost loved ones, people who are dealing with “Long-haul COVID”, those impacted by job loss or economic hardship during the pandemic, and anyone else who has been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. DDH-trained Peer Supporters are also available to listen and offer validation and encouragement. Additionally, they provide structured moderation within the community to engage members in meaningful discussions on relevant topics and offer timely and trusted resources. To join our Facebook group dedicated to Survivors and Responders of the COVID-19 Pandemic, click here.

Survivors of Mass Violence

DDH Online Peer Support Communities offer peer support for survivors of mass violence in the United States including mass shootings, terrorist attacks, or other large-scale community violence. Survivors and loved ones who have experienced mass violence can connect with one another and provide emotional support in the aftermath of a mass violence incident, including how to cope with activating events and memorials, self-care strategies, and challenges with daily living. DDH-trained Peer Supporters are available to listen to members, and offer validation and encouragement. They also provide structured moderation to engage members in meaningful discussions on relevant topics and provide timely and trusted resources. If you are a survivor or the loved one of a survivor of mass violence and need support, please join our Facebook group by requesting to be a member here.

Other Inquiries

If you’re not in immediate need of crisis counseling support and would like to contact us for other reasons, send an email. Contact us for:

  • Technical problems. If you encountered a technical problem while trying to contact the Disaster Distress Helpline, please include your name and preferred contact information in your email if you wish to receive a reply.
  • Provider inquiries. Providers with specific inquiries about technical assistance and support, requests for materials, and exploring collaborations are encouraged to send an email.
  • Feedback. To provide feedback about your experience reaching out to the Disaster Distress Helpline, send an email describing your experience and SAMHSA will look into the matter. Please include your name and preferred contact information if you wish to receive a reply.
  • Social media inquiries. Email us with questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline’s use of social media.
  • All media inquiries. Members of the media with questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline are encouraged to call the SAMHSA Media Services Team at 1-240-276-2130.

Our staff appreciate hearing from people about their experiences. SAMHSA takes feedback about our services, whether it is positive or negative, very seriously.

SAMHSA also encourages public promotion of the Disaster Distress Helpline. Anyone can use the Disaster Distress Helpline logo and telephone number on their website and link to the Disaster Distress Helpline’s materials and social media properties.

Call 211 for information about disaster-related evacuations, shelters, food and clothing distribution, volunteer opportunities, and other resources and referrals. Or visit the national 211 Call Center Search website to find the 211 information and referral center nearest you.

Last Updated: 11/11/2019

Deaf/Hard of Hearing & Spanish

Deaf/Hard of Hearing

Spanish Speakers

Twitter Tweets:

Facebook

Follow the Disaster Distress Helpline on Facebook.

0 – Hotline – DH – DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends
May 28 all-day
0 - Hotline - DH - DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) - 24/7 - Weekdays and Weekends

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

04 – Resources – BROR – Bridges Oregon – Hard of Hearing – Resources
May 28 all-day
04 - Resources - BROR - Bridges Oregon - Hard of Hearing  - Resources

 

Bridges Oregon

Hard of Hearing

RESOURCES

Bridges Oregon, Inc. is a nonprofit organization serving Oregonians who are Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing or face other communication barriers. It is in our mission to facilitate equity and inclusiveness and to provide a bridge to opportunities through advocacy, education and communication.

Advocacy

  • Victims’ Rights Pocket Cards (link)
  • Civil Rights Fact Sheet (link)

American Sign Language (ASL)

  • Portland Community College ASL Studies (link)
  • Sign Class (link)
  • Western Oregon University ASL Studies (link)

Children

  • Position Statement on Improving Child Protection Services for Families with Deaf Individuals (link)
  • Position Statement on Quality Foster Care Services Continuum for Deaf Children (link)
  • Position Statement on Mental Health Services for Deaf Children (link)
  • Protecting the Rights of Parents and Prospective Parents with Disabilities: Technical Assistance for State and Local Child Welfare Agencies and Court (link)

Community

  • Abolition and Disability Justice’s Guiding Principles (link)
  • Community-Based Needs Assessment (CNA) of Oregon’s Deaf and Hard of Hearing Communities: Final Report as of December 30, 2016 (link)
  • Hands and Voices of Oregon (link)
  • How many Deaf and Hard of Hearing people live in Oregon by counties (link)
  • Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (link)
  • Quota in Central Oregon (link)
  • Research & Resource Center with Deaf* community (RRCD) at Western Oregon University (link)

Crime Safety

  • Accessibility and Digital Security (link)
  • Know Your Rights ASL: Interacting with the Police (link)

Deaf-owned Businesses in Oregon

  • A5 Interpreting (link)
  • Clackamas River Growlers (link)
  • Camp Taloali (link)
  • Cymaspace (link)
  • Jennifer Jo Deily Fine Art (link)
  • King’s Hookah Lounge (link)
  • Looslea Holsteins Dairy Farm (link)
  • Pah! Restaurant (link)
  • PILEA Play (link)
  • Sign Class (link)
  • Tactile Communications (link)
  • Tim Baker’s Lawn Care (link)

DeafBlind

  • American Association of the DeafBlind (link)
  • DeafBlind Kids (link)
  • DeafBlind Interpreting: National Training & Resource Center (link)
  • Helen Keller National Center Region 10: Northwest (link)
  • Oregon Commission for the Blind (link)
  • Oregon DeafBlind Project (link)
  • National Center on DeafBlind (link)
  • Protactile Communications (link)
  • Protactile Language Interpreting: National Education Program (link)
  • For more information, please refer to the “Telecommunication” subgroup below.

Deaf with additional disabilities

  • Cerebral Palsy and Deaf Organization (link)
  • Oregon Deaf Autism (link)

Education

  • House Bill 3183 Toolkit: A Resource for Special Education Providers Regarding the Relevant Services and Placement Options for a Child Who Is Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing. August 2022. (link)
  • Language Assessment for American Sign Language (link)
  • Oregon Department of Education’s Kindergarten Ready Assessment (KRA) on Deaf and Hard of Hearing children
  • Report of 2017 House Bill 3412: Task Force on Assessments of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (referred as LEAD-K) (link)

Emergency Preparedness

  • Checklist for Emergency Responder: Ensuring Language Access and Effective Communication During Response and Recovery (link)

Hard of Hearing

  • Help to pay for Hearing Aids (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Oregon (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Lane County (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Linn and Benton (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Portland Chapter (link)

Health

  • ADA National Network: Healthcare and Face Coverings: Reducing Communication Barriers for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Patients (link)
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): Informational Videos in ASL (link)

Housing

  • Oregon ASL Realtors (link)

Hotlines

  • Aging and Disability Resource Connection of Oregon (link)
  • ASL COVID-19 Hotline (link)
  • National Deaf Domestic Violence Hotline (link)
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (link)
  • Oregon Hate Crimes and Bias Hotline (link)

Interpreters

  • File a complaint on a Healthcare Interpreter with Oregon Health Authority (link)
  • File a complaint on a certified or qualified interpreter with the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (link)
  • List of Deaf Interpreters in Oregon by Research and Resource Center with Deaf* community (RRCD) at Western Oregon University. (link)
  • List of ASL Interpreter Agencies in Oregon (link)
  • Portland Community College Interpreting Training program (link)
  • Search for certified or qualified Oregon Healthcare Interpreter (link)
  • Report a Patient Safety Issue in Medical settings e.g., an interpreter agency sends non-qualified interpreter to the appointment (link)
  • Search for certified or qualified Sign Language interpreters with the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (link)
  • Western Oregon University Online Interpreting Training program (link)

Late-Deafened

  • Association of Late-Deafened Adults (link)

Law

  • Oregon’s own version of ADA law (ORS 659a)

Law Enforcement

  • Deaf/Hard of Hearing Communication Card with Police (visor cardwallet card)
  • Community Proposal Directive for Law Enforcement Agencies (link)
  • Pullover Pal (link)
  • Oregon Legislative Update: Governor SIGNED on 5/6/2021! Proposed bill to provide “that the registered owner may request that registration cards issued for vehicles include that owner, or person operating vehicle, may be deaf or hard of hearing.” (link)

Lawsuits in Oregon (current & past)

  • Kristina Boswell v. State of Oregon, U.S.D.C. Case No. 3:22-cv-00502-MO (link)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc (2022)
  • Viewpoint to pay $225,000 to deaf job applicant Indi Matthews for employment discrimination (2022)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc: Deaf Inmate’s Disability Bias Claim (2020)
  • Disability Rights Oregon filed lawsuit on behalf of protesters with disabilities (2020)
  • Deaf prisoners: Oregon should use only certified interpreters, groups say (2019)
  • Springfield to pay $450,000 to deaf man injured by police officer (2019)
  • Ludwig v. State of Oregon: Employment Discrimination (2018)
  • DOJ sues Pacific Northwest on behalf of Oregon Veteran with Hearing Loss (2017)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc: Clackamas County Jail failed to provide ASL interpreter service for medical treatment (2017)
  • Oregon University Settles Lawsuit over Service Dog (2014)
  • Deaf inmate gets $150,000 settlement from Oregon after claiming assigned jobs were discriminatory (2014)
  • Wolfe v. City of Portland: Police did not provided ASL interpreter in response to 9-1-1 call (2012)
  • Oregon v. Mason: Portland Police did not provide ASL interpreter to translate the Miranda Warnings (1981)

*Please let us know if we missed any current or past lawsuits pertaining to deaf, deafblind, or hard of hearing Oregonians.

Legislative Bills (2023 Legislative Session)

  • Legislative Session is Closed.

Legislative Bills (passed)

  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2994 Modifies requirements for health insurance coverage of hearing-related items and services. (link).
  • 2023 Regular Session. Senate Bill (SB) 569 Requires closed-captioned television receivers in public areas within places of public accommodation to display closed captioning unless exception applies. (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. Senate Bill (SB) 685 Modifies the definition of “Communication Facilitator” (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2696 Authorizes Health Licensing Office to issue sign language interpreter licenses to qualified applicants. (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2669 Bill of Rights for Deaf, DeafBlind, and Hard of Hearing Children relating to Education. (link
  • 2021 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2498. “Provides that the registered owner may request that registration cards issued for vehicles include that owner, or person operating vehicle, may be Deaf or Hard of Hearing.” (link)
  • 2021 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3183. “Requires parents of child who is deaf or deafblind or who is hard of hearing to be provided information about relevant services and placements offered by school district, education service district, regional programs and Oregon School for the Deaf whenever individualized family service plan or individualized education program is developed, revised or reviewed.” (link)
  • 2019 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3205. “Expands Telecommunication Devices Access Program to include provision of communication facilitator.” (link)
  • 2017 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3412. “Establishes Task Force on Assessments of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.” (link)

Medical

  • Oregon Health Authority COVID-19 ASL Video (link)
  • Oregon Health Authority’s Deaf/Hard of Hearing Preferred Language Card (link)
  • Oregon Health Authority’s FAQ Regarding Providing Interpreter Services to Individuals who are Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing or Individuals with Limited English Proficiency in Medical Settings (link)
  • Report a Patient Safety Issue in Medical settings e.g., no accommodation provided (link)

Mental Health

  • List of ASL Therapists in Oregon (PDF)

Safety

  • Text to 9-1-1 (link)
  • Get A Smoke Alarm by American Red Cross (link)
  • Statewide Area: Smoke Alarms for Oregonians (link)
  • Portland Area: Smoke Alarms for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Portlanders (link)
  • Bend Area: Smoke Alarms for Oregonians who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (link)

Self-Advocate

  • Civil Rights for Individuals and Advocates (link)

Seniors

  • Avamere Chestnut Lane Assisted Living for the Deaf and DeafBlind, Gresham (link)

Sister Services

  • Northwest Human Services Connection: for the Deaf, DeafBlind, & Hard of Hearing (link)

Support Groups

  • ASL access NA, AL-ANON, NAR-ANON, and AA 12-Steps Program Virtual Support Groups (link)
  • Portland Deaf Access Committee of Alcoholics Anonymous (link)

Telecommunications and Internet

  • Affordable Connectivity Program (ACP) (link)
  • DeafBlind MMX Videophone (link)
  • Free iPad, iPhone, and other equipment for Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing (link)
  • ICanConnect – Oregon (link)
  • Oregon Lifeline (link)
  • Oregon Statewide Assistive Technology Program (link)

Video Access

  • Oregon Department of Human Services’ Frequently Asked Questions in ASL (link)
  • Video Remote Interpreting (VRI) Card (link)

*Deaf – Bridges Oregon has adopted with minor adaptations, the definition of ‘Deaf’ that is used by the National Deaf Center (NDC). Bridges Oregon is using the term deaf in an all-inclusive manner, to include people who may identify as D/deaf, DeafBlind, deaf-blind, deaf with additional disabilities, hard of hearing, late-deafened, and/or persons with unilateral/bilateral hearing loss. Bridges Oregon recognizes that for many individuals, identity is fluid and can change over time or with setting. Bridges Oregon has chosen to use one term, Deaf, with the goal of recognizing experiences that are shared by all members of our diverse communities while also honoring all of our differences. Source: https://www.nationaldeafcenter.org/defining-deaf

May
29
Wed
2024
0 – Helpline – SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline @ (800) 985-5990 (Multilingual) or (800) 846-8517 (TTY) – 24/7-Weekdays & Weekends
May 29 all-day

Excerpt(s) from link:

https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/disaster-distress-helpline

Disaster Distress Helpline

SAMHSA’s Disaster Distress Helpline provides 24/7, 365-day-a-year crisis counseling and support to people experiencing emotional distress related to natural or human-caused disasters.

The Disaster Distress Helpline, 1-800-985-5990, is a 24/7, 365-day-a-year, national hotline dedicated to providing immediate crisis counseling for people who are experiencing emotional distress related to any natural or human-caused disaster. This toll-free, multilingual, and confidential crisis support service is available to all residents in the United States and its territories. Stress, anxiety, and other depression-like symptoms are common reactions after a disaster. Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746 to connect with a trained crisis counselor.

Who Should Contact the Disaster Distress Helpline?

This crisis support service is for anyone experiencing emotional distress related to disasters such as:

The Disaster Distress Helpline also answers calls and texts related to infectious disease outbreaks, such as the Ebola outbreak, incidents of community unrest, and other traumatic events.

The impact of crises may affect people in different ways. Learn how to recognize the warning signs and risk factors for emotional distress related to natural and human-caused disasters.

The Disaster Distress Helpline is open to everyone. This includes survivors of disasters; loved ones of victims; first responders; rescue, recovery, and relief workers; clergy; and parents and caregivers. You may call for yourself or on behalf of someone else.

Call or Text

From the United States and its territories, call 1-800-985-5990 to connect with a trained crisis counselor, 24/7. Spanish-speakers can call the hotline and press “2” for 24/7 bilingual support.

Callers to the hotline can also connect with counselors in over 100 other languages via 3rd-party interpretation services; to connect with a counselor in your primary language, simply indicate your preferred language to the responding counselor and she/he will connect to a live interpreter (interpretation in less commonly-spoken languages may require calling back at an appointed time). Learn more and download information about the Disaster Distress Helpline in 30 of the most commonly-spoken languages in the U.S.

To connect with a live DDH crisis counselor 24/7 via SMS, from the 50 states text “TalkWithUs” for English or “Hablanos” for Spanish to 66746. Spanish-speakers from Puerto Rico can text “Hablanos” to 1-787-339-2663.

Texting is subscription-based and only involves a few steps:

  1. Enroll in the service by texting TalkWithUs or Hablanos exactly as written. It’s important to do this before sending your first text message because otherwise the enrollment may fail, and you will not be able to speak with a counselor, or you may accidentally subscribe to another service.
  2. Look for confirmation that your subscription was successful. You will receive a Success! message if it was.
  3. To unsubscribe, text Stop or Unsubscribe to 66746 (or 1-787-339-2663 from Puerto Rico) at any time. For help, text Help to 66746 (or 1-787-339-2663 from Puerto Rico).

Standard text and data message rates will apply when texting from mobile phones. International text and data rates may apply from within U.S. territories and free association nations. SAMHSA will not sell your phone numbers to other parties.

The Disaster Distress Helpline’s TTY number 1-800-846-8517 is available 24/7 to Deaf and hard of hearing individuals, who can also utilize the texting options or their preferred Relay service (including 7-1-1) to connect with the main DDH hotline 1-800-985-5990, 24/7.

DDH Online Peer Support Communities

In an effort to broaden our reach to disaster survivors and emergency responders, the Disaster Distress Helpline has developed online peer support communities through Facebook Groups for those who have experienced a natural or human-caused disaster. These online communities offer opportunities for survivors and responders to connect with others who have experienced similar events, share accurate information and trusted resources, and help one another continue to heal from the effects of a traumatic event.

What Does it Offer?

The purpose of DDH Online Peer Support Communities is to create enhanced opportunities for survivors and responders of disaster to come together for mutual aid and emotional support.

DDH Online Peer Support Communities Also Include:

Trained Peer Supporters

DDH Online Peer Support includes trained peer supporters who assist with group moderation and vetting resources. In addition to community forums, our goal is also to create purposeful discussions lead by peer supporters with specific themes and relevant topics. While each survivor and responder’s experiences are unique, being with peers who have had a similar experience can promote connection, offer new ways of coping, and build a foundation of trust.

Peer support does not take the place of therapy or counseling. The opportunity to provide mutual aid and support to others who have faced similar challenges, when and where they need it, offers hope that healing and recovery is possible after a disaster.

Immediate Crisis Support

All DDH Online Peer Support Communities are monitored 24/7 by a designated DDH crisis center where crisis counselors are available to talk to members who may be in emotional distress and need crisis support. Members can talk to a counselor at any time of the day or night via Crisis Support Over Messenger (CSOM).

Available Communities

Survivors and Responders of the COVID-19 Pandemic 

DDH Online Peer Support Communities offer peer support for anyone who identifies as a survivor or responder of the COVID-19 pandemic. Both survivors and responders can come together for mutual aid, to share trusted resources, and to help one another continue to heal from the effects of a national pandemic. Survivors and responders may include but are not limited to, any healthcare workers, emergency responders, parents/caregivers, educators, individuals who have lost loved ones, people who are dealing with “Long-haul COVID”, those impacted by job loss or economic hardship during the pandemic, and anyone else who has been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. DDH-trained Peer Supporters are also available to listen and offer validation and encouragement. Additionally, they provide structured moderation within the community to engage members in meaningful discussions on relevant topics and offer timely and trusted resources. To join our Facebook group dedicated to Survivors and Responders of the COVID-19 Pandemic, click here.

Survivors of Mass Violence

DDH Online Peer Support Communities offer peer support for survivors of mass violence in the United States including mass shootings, terrorist attacks, or other large-scale community violence. Survivors and loved ones who have experienced mass violence can connect with one another and provide emotional support in the aftermath of a mass violence incident, including how to cope with activating events and memorials, self-care strategies, and challenges with daily living. DDH-trained Peer Supporters are available to listen to members, and offer validation and encouragement. They also provide structured moderation to engage members in meaningful discussions on relevant topics and provide timely and trusted resources. If you are a survivor or the loved one of a survivor of mass violence and need support, please join our Facebook group by requesting to be a member here.

Other Inquiries

If you’re not in immediate need of crisis counseling support and would like to contact us for other reasons, send an email. Contact us for:

  • Technical problems. If you encountered a technical problem while trying to contact the Disaster Distress Helpline, please include your name and preferred contact information in your email if you wish to receive a reply.
  • Provider inquiries. Providers with specific inquiries about technical assistance and support, requests for materials, and exploring collaborations are encouraged to send an email.
  • Feedback. To provide feedback about your experience reaching out to the Disaster Distress Helpline, send an email describing your experience and SAMHSA will look into the matter. Please include your name and preferred contact information if you wish to receive a reply.
  • Social media inquiries. Email us with questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline’s use of social media.
  • All media inquiries. Members of the media with questions about the Disaster Distress Helpline are encouraged to call the SAMHSA Media Services Team at 1-240-276-2130.

Our staff appreciate hearing from people about their experiences. SAMHSA takes feedback about our services, whether it is positive or negative, very seriously.

SAMHSA also encourages public promotion of the Disaster Distress Helpline. Anyone can use the Disaster Distress Helpline logo and telephone number on their website and link to the Disaster Distress Helpline’s materials and social media properties.

Call 211 for information about disaster-related evacuations, shelters, food and clothing distribution, volunteer opportunities, and other resources and referrals. Or visit the national 211 Call Center Search website to find the 211 information and referral center nearest you.

Last Updated: 11/11/2019

Deaf/Hard of Hearing & Spanish

Deaf/Hard of Hearing

Spanish Speakers

Twitter Tweets:

Facebook

Follow the Disaster Distress Helpline on Facebook.

0 – Hotline – DH – DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends
May 29 all-day
0 - Hotline - DH - DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) - 24/7 - Weekdays and Weekends

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

04 – Resources – BROR – Bridges Oregon – Hard of Hearing – Resources
May 29 all-day
04 - Resources - BROR - Bridges Oregon - Hard of Hearing  - Resources

 

Bridges Oregon

Hard of Hearing

RESOURCES

Bridges Oregon, Inc. is a nonprofit organization serving Oregonians who are Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing or face other communication barriers. It is in our mission to facilitate equity and inclusiveness and to provide a bridge to opportunities through advocacy, education and communication.

Advocacy

  • Victims’ Rights Pocket Cards (link)
  • Civil Rights Fact Sheet (link)

American Sign Language (ASL)

  • Portland Community College ASL Studies (link)
  • Sign Class (link)
  • Western Oregon University ASL Studies (link)

Children

  • Position Statement on Improving Child Protection Services for Families with Deaf Individuals (link)
  • Position Statement on Quality Foster Care Services Continuum for Deaf Children (link)
  • Position Statement on Mental Health Services for Deaf Children (link)
  • Protecting the Rights of Parents and Prospective Parents with Disabilities: Technical Assistance for State and Local Child Welfare Agencies and Court (link)

Community

  • Abolition and Disability Justice’s Guiding Principles (link)
  • Community-Based Needs Assessment (CNA) of Oregon’s Deaf and Hard of Hearing Communities: Final Report as of December 30, 2016 (link)
  • Hands and Voices of Oregon (link)
  • How many Deaf and Hard of Hearing people live in Oregon by counties (link)
  • Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (link)
  • Quota in Central Oregon (link)
  • Research & Resource Center with Deaf* community (RRCD) at Western Oregon University (link)

Crime Safety

  • Accessibility and Digital Security (link)
  • Know Your Rights ASL: Interacting with the Police (link)

Deaf-owned Businesses in Oregon

  • A5 Interpreting (link)
  • Clackamas River Growlers (link)
  • Camp Taloali (link)
  • Cymaspace (link)
  • Jennifer Jo Deily Fine Art (link)
  • King’s Hookah Lounge (link)
  • Looslea Holsteins Dairy Farm (link)
  • Pah! Restaurant (link)
  • PILEA Play (link)
  • Sign Class (link)
  • Tactile Communications (link)
  • Tim Baker’s Lawn Care (link)

DeafBlind

  • American Association of the DeafBlind (link)
  • DeafBlind Kids (link)
  • DeafBlind Interpreting: National Training & Resource Center (link)
  • Helen Keller National Center Region 10: Northwest (link)
  • Oregon Commission for the Blind (link)
  • Oregon DeafBlind Project (link)
  • National Center on DeafBlind (link)
  • Protactile Communications (link)
  • Protactile Language Interpreting: National Education Program (link)
  • For more information, please refer to the “Telecommunication” subgroup below.

Deaf with additional disabilities

  • Cerebral Palsy and Deaf Organization (link)
  • Oregon Deaf Autism (link)

Education

  • House Bill 3183 Toolkit: A Resource for Special Education Providers Regarding the Relevant Services and Placement Options for a Child Who Is Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of Hearing. August 2022. (link)
  • Language Assessment for American Sign Language (link)
  • Oregon Department of Education’s Kindergarten Ready Assessment (KRA) on Deaf and Hard of Hearing children
  • Report of 2017 House Bill 3412: Task Force on Assessments of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (referred as LEAD-K) (link)

Emergency Preparedness

  • Checklist for Emergency Responder: Ensuring Language Access and Effective Communication During Response and Recovery (link)

Hard of Hearing

  • Help to pay for Hearing Aids (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Oregon (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Lane County (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Linn and Benton (link)
  • Hearing Loss Association of Portland Chapter (link)

Health

  • ADA National Network: Healthcare and Face Coverings: Reducing Communication Barriers for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Patients (link)
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): Informational Videos in ASL (link)

Housing

  • Oregon ASL Realtors (link)

Hotlines

  • Aging and Disability Resource Connection of Oregon (link)
  • ASL COVID-19 Hotline (link)
  • National Deaf Domestic Violence Hotline (link)
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (link)
  • Oregon Hate Crimes and Bias Hotline (link)

Interpreters

  • File a complaint on a Healthcare Interpreter with Oregon Health Authority (link)
  • File a complaint on a certified or qualified interpreter with the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (link)
  • List of Deaf Interpreters in Oregon by Research and Resource Center with Deaf* community (RRCD) at Western Oregon University. (link)
  • List of ASL Interpreter Agencies in Oregon (link)
  • Portland Community College Interpreting Training program (link)
  • Search for certified or qualified Oregon Healthcare Interpreter (link)
  • Report a Patient Safety Issue in Medical settings e.g., an interpreter agency sends non-qualified interpreter to the appointment (link)
  • Search for certified or qualified Sign Language interpreters with the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (link)
  • Western Oregon University Online Interpreting Training program (link)

Late-Deafened

  • Association of Late-Deafened Adults (link)

Law

  • Oregon’s own version of ADA law (ORS 659a)

Law Enforcement

  • Deaf/Hard of Hearing Communication Card with Police (visor cardwallet card)
  • Community Proposal Directive for Law Enforcement Agencies (link)
  • Pullover Pal (link)
  • Oregon Legislative Update: Governor SIGNED on 5/6/2021! Proposed bill to provide “that the registered owner may request that registration cards issued for vehicles include that owner, or person operating vehicle, may be deaf or hard of hearing.” (link)

Lawsuits in Oregon (current & past)

  • Kristina Boswell v. State of Oregon, U.S.D.C. Case No. 3:22-cv-00502-MO (link)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc (2022)
  • Viewpoint to pay $225,000 to deaf job applicant Indi Matthews for employment discrimination (2022)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc: Deaf Inmate’s Disability Bias Claim (2020)
  • Disability Rights Oregon filed lawsuit on behalf of protesters with disabilities (2020)
  • Deaf prisoners: Oregon should use only certified interpreters, groups say (2019)
  • Springfield to pay $450,000 to deaf man injured by police officer (2019)
  • Ludwig v. State of Oregon: Employment Discrimination (2018)
  • DOJ sues Pacific Northwest on behalf of Oregon Veteran with Hearing Loss (2017)
  • Abraham v. Corizon Health, Inc: Clackamas County Jail failed to provide ASL interpreter service for medical treatment (2017)
  • Oregon University Settles Lawsuit over Service Dog (2014)
  • Deaf inmate gets $150,000 settlement from Oregon after claiming assigned jobs were discriminatory (2014)
  • Wolfe v. City of Portland: Police did not provided ASL interpreter in response to 9-1-1 call (2012)
  • Oregon v. Mason: Portland Police did not provide ASL interpreter to translate the Miranda Warnings (1981)

*Please let us know if we missed any current or past lawsuits pertaining to deaf, deafblind, or hard of hearing Oregonians.

Legislative Bills (2023 Legislative Session)

  • Legislative Session is Closed.

Legislative Bills (passed)

  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2994 Modifies requirements for health insurance coverage of hearing-related items and services. (link).
  • 2023 Regular Session. Senate Bill (SB) 569 Requires closed-captioned television receivers in public areas within places of public accommodation to display closed captioning unless exception applies. (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. Senate Bill (SB) 685 Modifies the definition of “Communication Facilitator” (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2696 Authorizes Health Licensing Office to issue sign language interpreter licenses to qualified applicants. (link)
  • 2023 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2669 Bill of Rights for Deaf, DeafBlind, and Hard of Hearing Children relating to Education. (link
  • 2021 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 2498. “Provides that the registered owner may request that registration cards issued for vehicles include that owner, or person operating vehicle, may be Deaf or Hard of Hearing.” (link)
  • 2021 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3183. “Requires parents of child who is deaf or deafblind or who is hard of hearing to be provided information about relevant services and placements offered by school district, education service district, regional programs and Oregon School for the Deaf whenever individualized family service plan or individualized education program is developed, revised or reviewed.” (link)
  • 2019 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3205. “Expands Telecommunication Devices Access Program to include provision of communication facilitator.” (link)
  • 2017 Regular Session. House Bill (HB) 3412. “Establishes Task Force on Assessments of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.” (link)

Medical

  • Oregon Health Authority COVID-19 ASL Video (link)
  • Oregon Health Authority’s Deaf/Hard of Hearing Preferred Language Card (link)
  • Oregon Health Authority’s FAQ Regarding Providing Interpreter Services to Individuals who are Deaf, DeafBlind, Hard of Hearing or Individuals with Limited English Proficiency in Medical Settings (link)
  • Report a Patient Safety Issue in Medical settings e.g., no accommodation provided (link)

Mental Health

  • List of ASL Therapists in Oregon (PDF)

Safety

  • Text to 9-1-1 (link)
  • Get A Smoke Alarm by American Red Cross (link)
  • Statewide Area: Smoke Alarms for Oregonians (