PeerGalaxy Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring over 82,000 monthly offerings of FREE telephone- and online-accessible peer support, recovery support + wellness activities!

Over 30+ warmlines plus webinars, workshops, job postings, special events, consumer input opportunities and more.

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

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If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

How Events are Sorted:

First, at the top of the list: Disaster Hotline & Oregon Safe + Strong Helpline.

Next in the list: Bundled “All Day” Events for organizations with events happening at multiple times throughout the day and/or in many formats or locations; these are bundled into a single listing to prevent endless scrolling.  Usually these offer a lookup by zip code or other criteria. 

Lastly, Time-Specific Events listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  Warmlines and places east of Oregon’s time zone tend to start earlier (e.g. 4am in Oregon is 7am in New York).

Oct
5
Wed
04 – Resources – For Families and Children Facing Tragic Events – Racial Stress – Racism – Hate Crimes
Oct 5 all-day

 

Resources for Families and Children Facing Tragic Events

Racial Stress – Racism – Hate Crimes

 

Childrens Mental Health Network

Helpful Resources to Address the Mass Shooting in Uvalde, Texas
Many thanks to Michelle Zabel, MSS, Assistant Dean, and Director, The Institute for Innovation and Implementation, for compiling this list of resources in response to the horrific mass shooting in Texas earlier this week.

Helping Young People Cope With Mental Health Challenges
Vox Media’s NowThis is linking arms with Ken Burns and PBS to share an upcoming documentary titled “Hiding in Plain Sight: Youth Mental Illness.” Scenes from the forthcoming film will be shared across NowThis social platforms throughout Mental Health Awareness Month in May. NowThis will host a live TikTok conversation about the topic, as well. The goal, Burns said, is “to get this material out to young people around the country.” The film itself will debut at the end of June on PBS.

Uplift by Youth Era: Teaching Youth Peer Support Skills
More than 500 youth signed up for the most recent Uplift event! Studied by the University of Oxford and co-designed with young adults, Uplift by Youth Era is the future of peer support. Empower a young person in your life to be who they need, and apply to join the next Uplift training in June!

Randolph “Randy” Muck September 14, 1955 to April 21, 2021 in Memoriam
On the first anniversary of his death, several of us who knew and worked with Randy write this tribute to remember and honor his impact on so many people. Randy provided much-needed leadership from within the federal government to develop and disseminate evidence-based substance use treatments designed for adolescents and their families. He was successful because he had a rare ability to connect with all the groups important to improving adolescent treatment: provider organizations, schools, juvenile justice, counselors, federal agency decision-makers, researchers, private foundations, and most importantly—adolescents and their families. He saw how these groups could align their different interests and collaborate. This, in turn, helped youth, families, and systems of care in ways that continue to have an impact.

HHS Awards Nearly $25 Million to Expand Access to School-Based Health Services
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), through the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), recently announced nearly $25 million will be made available to improve and strengthen access to school-based health services in communities across the country. Awards will support local partnerships between schools and health centers to provide children and youth with the comprehensive physical and mental health care they need.

Investing in Prevention Makes Good Financial Sense
Primary prevention—including screening and intervention before negative health outcomes occur—is relatively inexpensive. The higher-risk behaviors it is designed to reduce are so costly to the healthcare system that it is staggeringly wasteful not to make sure that screening and treatment referrals are readily implemented and faithfully reimbursed by insurers and that interventions are convenient for parents and their children.

PAX Good Behavior Game
Speaking of prevention…
The PAX Good Behavior Game is an evidence-based universal preventive intervention applied by teachers in the classroom. This evidence-based practice consists of research-based strategies with origins in behavioral science, neuroscience, and cultural wisdom that operate together to improve children’s self-regulation. Teachers implement these strategies as part of their daily routines in carrying out tasks such as getting students’ attention, selecting students for tasks, transitioning from one task to the next, working as part of a team, limiting problematic behavior, and reinforcing pro-social behavior.

HHS Launches New Maternal Mental Health Hotline
The Maternal Mental Health Hotline is a new, confidential, toll-free hotline for expecting and new moms experiencing mental health challenges. Those who contact the hotline can receive a range of support, including brief interventions from trained culturally and trauma-informed counselors and referrals to both community-based and telehealth providers as needed. Callers also will receive evidence-based information and referrals to support groups and other community resources.

Six Things You Need To Know About Music and Health
A growing body of research suggests that listening to or performing music affects the brain in ways that may help promote health and manage disease symptoms. More justification for the plethora of music videos posted in Friday Update!

Know Your Rights: Parity for Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Benefits
This brochure gives an overview of the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008. It lists some common limits placed on mental health and substance use disorder benefits and services.

Going Digital: Behavioral Health Tech
Aaahhhh!!! Less than 20 days!!! Well? Have you registered for the 2022 Going Digital: Behavioral Health Tech summit on June 8-9th yet? Can’t make it? Wondering if you can access all of the sessions with our hundreds of speakers after June 8-9th? YES, but ONLY if you register in advance. So, you should probably get on that.

Building a More Equitable Juvenile Justice System for Everyone
Racial inequities regarding the policing of children, and the subsequent disparities in their treatment within the juvenile justice system, have been problems in this country for far too long. It is encouraging that many states and counties are not only recognizing these issues but are taking action. The CSG Justice Center is committed to providing research-driven, data-informed solutions to our partners to continue building safer and stronger communities for everyone, especially our youth.

Disruptions to School and Home Life Among High School Students During the COVID-19 Pandemic — Adolescent Behaviors and Experiences Survey, United States, January–June 2021
Young people have experienced disruptions to school and home life since the COVID-19 pandemic began in March 2020. From January to June 2021, CDC conducted the Adolescent Behaviors and Experiences Survey (ABES), an online survey of a probability-based, nationally representative sample of U.S. public- and private-school students in grades 9–12. ABES data were used to estimate the prevalence of disruptions and adverse experiences during the pandemic, including parental and personal job loss, homelessness, hunger, emotional or physical abuse by a parent or other adult at home, receipt of telemedicine, and difficulty completing schoolwork. Prevalence estimates are presented for all students by sex, race and ethnicity, grade, sexual identity, and difficulty completing schoolwork.

CDC Survey Finds the Pandemic Had a Big Impact on Teens’ Mental Health
According to a survey published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than four in 10 teens report feeling “persistently sad or hopeless” during the COVID-19 pandemic. Girls were twice as likely to experience mental health troubles compared to boys. And LGBTQ students were hit the hardest. The CDC’s findings were gathered from online surveys from a sample of 7,700 US students during the first six months of 2021.

New Initiative to Define Policy Recommendations for Embedding Equity into 988
The Kennedy-Satcher Center for Mental Health Equity & Beacon Health Options are joining forces to create and develop an equitable crisis response for the future of behavioral health service delivery ahead of the July 2022 launch of 988.

State Policymakers Can Support Equitable School-based Telemental Health Services
This brief presents five ways state policymakers can support equitable school-based telemental health services, with recommendations based on relevant policy context, existing research, and—in some cases—feedback from interviews with five TMH providers who testified to on-the-ground experience with these interventions.

 

University of MaryLand School of Social Work Institue for Innovation and Implimentation logo

SAMHSA Resources

 

General Resources
For Parents & Caregivers
For Providers

 

Daniel Tiger

Helping Children with Tragic Events in the News

In times of community or world-wide crisis, it’s easy to assume that young children don’t know what’s going on. But one thing’s for sure — children are very sensitive to how their parents feel. They’re keenly aware of the expressions on their parents’ faces and the tone of their voices. Children can sense when their parents are really worried, whether they’re watching the news or talking about it with others. No matter what children know about a “crisis,” it’s especially scary for children to realize that their parents are scared.

Some Scary, Confusing Images

The way that news is presented on television can be quite confusing for a young child. The same video segment may be shown over and over again through the day, as if each showing was a different event. Someone who has died turns up alive and then dies again and again. Children often become very anxious since they don’t understand much about videotape replays, closeups, and camera angles. Any televised danger seems close to home to them because the tragic scenes are taking place on the TV set in their own living room. Children can’t tell the difference between what’s close and what’s far away, what’s real and what’s pretend, or what’s new and what’s re-run.

The younger the children are, the more likely they are to be interested in scenes of close-up faces, particularly if the people are expressing some strong feelings. When there’s tragic news, the images on TV are most often much too graphic and disturbing for young children.

“Who will take care of me?”

In times of crisis, children want to know, “Who will take care of me?” They’re dependent on adults for their survival and security. They’re naturally self-centered. They need to hear very clearly that their parents are doing all they can to take care of them and to keep them safe. They also need to hear that people in the government and other grown-ups they don’t even know are working hard to keep them safe, too.

Helping Children Feel More Secure

Play is one of the important ways young children have of dealing with their concerns. Of course, playing about violent news can be scary and sometimes unsafe, so adults need to be nearby to help redirect that kind of play into nurturing themes, such as a hospital for the wounded or a pretend meal for emergency workers.

When children are scared and anxious, they might become more dependent, clingy, and afraid to go to bed at night. Whining, aggressive behavior, or toilet “accidents” may be their way of asking for more comfort from the important adults in their lives. Little by little, as the adults around them become more confident, hopeful and secure, our children probably will, too.

Turn Off the TV

When there’s something tragic in the news, many parents get concerned about what and how to tell their children. It’s even harder than usual if we’re struggling with our own powerful feelings about what has happened. Adults are sometimes surprised that their own reactions to a televised crisis are so strong, but great loss and devastation in the news often reawaken our own earlier losses and fears – even some we think we might have “forgotten”

It’s easy to allow ourselves to get drawn into watching televised news of a crisis for hours and hours; however, exposing ourselves to so many tragedies can make us feel hopeless, insecure, and even depressed. We help our children and ourselves if we’re able to limit our own television viewing. Our children need us to spend time with them – away from the frightening images on the screen.

Talking and Listening

Even if we wanted to, it would be impossible to give our children all the reasons for such things as war, terrorists, abuse, murders, major fires, hurricanes, and earthquakes. If they ask questions, our best answer may be to ask them, “What do you think happened?” If the answer is “I don’t know,” then the simplest reply might be something like, “I’m sad about the news, and I’m worried. But I love you, and I’m here to care for you.”

If we don’t let children know it’s okay to feel sad and scared, they may think something is wrong with them when they do feel that way. They certainly don’t need to hear all the details of what’s making us sad or scared, but if we can help them accept their own feelings as natural and normal, their feelings will be much more manageable for them.

Angry feelings are part of being human, especially when we feel powerless. One of the most important messages we can give our children is, “It’s okay to be angry, but it’s not okay to hurt ourselves or others.” Besides giving children the right to their anger, we can help them find constructive things to do with their feelings. This way, we’ll be giving them useful tools that will serve them all their life, and help them to become the worlds’ future peacemakers — the world’s future “helpers.”

Helpful Hints

  • Do your best to keep the television off, or at least limit how much your child sees of any news event.
  • Try to keep yourself calm. Your presence can help your child feel more secure.
  • Give your child extra comfort and physical affection, like hugs or snuggling up together with a favorite book. Physical comfort goes a long way towards providing inner security. That closeness can nourish you, too.
  • Try to keep regular routines as normal as possible. Children and adults count on their familiar pattern of everyday life.
  • Plan something that you and your child enjoy doing together, like taking a walk, going on a picnic, having some quiet time, or doing something silly. It can help to know there are simple things in life that can help us feel better, in good times and in bad.
  • Even if children don’t mention what they’ve seen or heard in the news, it can help to ask what they think has happened. If parents don’t bring up the subject, children can be left with their misinterpretations. You may be really surprised at how much your child has heard from others.
  • Focus attention on the helpers, like the police, firemen, doctors, nurses, paramedics, and volunteers. It’s reassuring to know there are many caring people who are doing all they can to help others in this world.
  • Let your child know if you’re making a donation, going to a town meeting, writing a letter or e-mail of support, or taking some other action. It can help children to know that adults take many different active roles and that we don’t give in to helplessness in times of worldwide crisis.

 

 

What do we tell our children? How do we reassure them of their own safety?
At The Dougy Center in Portland, Oregon, we’ve provided grief support groups for children, teens, young adults and their parents or adult caregivers since 1982.

Based on our experience, here are some things for adults to keep in mind as you struggle with how to talk with children following tragic events, such as natural disasters, plane crashes, or school shootings.

1. Don’t project your fears onto your children. They take their cues from the adults around them.
You can’t hear the news about children being murdered or communities devastated by natural disasters without thinking about how you’d feel if it happened to your family, friends, or hometown. The outpouring of care and empathy for the families who lost loved ones will be powerful, and…we all know it could have been our friends, our child, our family and community members who died or were injured.

Identifying with the senselessness and randomness makes us all feel more vulnerable. But we should remember that children don’t always see things the same way that adults do, and it won’t be helpful to them for us to fall apart. They need to see that we care, that we feel terrible about this tragedy, and that we will do everything we can to keep them safe. They will take their cues from our behavior.

It’s okay to show emotion. We can model for children that feeling sad, scared, and upset is normal after tragedies. But we don’t want to overwhelm them with our emotions, or put them in the position of having to ‘parent,’ or take care of, the adults around them. Make sure you also model taking care of yourself, by sharing with trusted and supportive adult friends, eating (and drinking) healthfully.

2. Try to limit their access to the recurring news and exposure to the tragedy over and over.
Over-exposure to the graphic and emotional news can be overwhelming for children and can cause unnecessary anxiety and fear. Some children who repeatedly watched the footage of planes crashing into the towers on 9/11 thought it was happening again and again. Some children (and some adults) may have difficulty getting graphic scenes and images out of their minds. Too much exposure can fuel their fear, so don’t let them sit and watch the news over and over. Better yet, set the example of not doing so yourself as well.

3. Understand that you can’t completely shield them from what happened.
It would be next to impossible to hide these events from children, as much as we wish we could. You might be able to shield your own child in your home, for example, by not turning on (or owning) a television, but you can’t protect your children from hearing about it from other kids. The fact is, they will hear about it, so although they don’t “need” to know about it, pretending we can shield them is magical thinking.

That said, you don’t need to give them more information than they can handle, or more than they’re asking for. A simple, “Did they talk about what happened in _____ today at school?” would be a good starter. They need to know that you’re not trying to hide the truth from them, that you’re open to talking about it, but that you’re also not forcing them to do so.

4. Model truth-telling and build trust with your children by letting them hear things, even hard things, from you directly.
Eight days after the 9/11 attacks, I was meeting in small groups with pre-school workers in New York City, talking about how to respond to the young children in their care about the events. A man asked to speak to me privately after one of the trainings, and asked for my advice around his 7-year-old daughter. For the last week, since September 12th, she had been having stomach aches and difficulty sleeping. He said it was not tied to the events of 9/11 because, “We don’t have a television.” As his story unfolded it was evident that he did not want to have to explain to his child why people would do such horrible things, a normal dilemma that we face as parents and adults. This child was experiencing physical reactions, as it turned out, not primarily because of her reaction to the events of 9/11, but because she was unable to share her fears and concerns and questions in her own home, faced with her parents’ denial.

Here are some principles to keep in mind as you talk with children:

1. There is no one typical reaction one can or should expect from children.
Their responses will vary all over the ‘emotional’ map, from seeming disinterest to nightmares, eating issues, and anxiety. How any specific child will respond will depend on their age, previous experience with death and loss, and their personality style. Fearful children will tend to worry; quiet children may keep their feelings to themselves; those who want to appear unfazed may exhibit a sense of bravado or lack of caring. Of course, children directly affected – those who had a family member die; those who witnessed the tragedy; those who had friends die – will tend to have longer-term reactions and needs. Watch for changes in behavior, or concerning trends. While it would be normal to have heightened anxiety and sleeplessness, any concerning behavior or troubling symptoms should be taken seriously, and if warranted, professional help sought.

2. Many children will have an increased sense of fear about their safety.
Understandably. So will many adults. After a shooting at an Oregon mall in December 2012, the news outlets were filled with people who said they’d never take their children there again. Others said they’d return as soon as it opened in order to support the stores and employees who had experienced the traumatic events, and whose livelihoods were going to suffer as a result of the several day closure. Some runners in the Boston Marathon vowed to return; others said they would never do so again.

While we can’t guarantee to our children that nothing bad will ever happen to them, we can provide assurance that these events are relatively rare, and that we will do everything we can to keep them safe. Children may have many questions about the events, particularly about natural disasters. Answer their questions with language that fits their developmental stage. It’s okay if you don’t know the answer to a question. If it’s a question that might have an answer, offer to look up more information. You can also ask children what they think the answer is as they often have thoughts and ideas they want to share with you. In the case of natural disasters, if your child is fearful of something like that happening in your community, talk with them about the safety plan that you have in place for your family and home. You can also look into what community safety measures are in place and whatever elements are relevant with your children. Many children will be reassured knowing that there are specific, tangible things they and your family can do if something occurs. Some examples include, picking a meeting place, keeping flashlights in every bedroom, talking about where you will keep emergency water and food.

3. Children want, need, and deserve the truth.
In over 30 years of providing grief support to thousands of children and teens at The Dougy Center for Grieving Children & Families, we have never heard a child say, “I’m glad I was lied to.” Many, however, struggle with anger and lack of trust toward parents or other adults who lied to them. When we don’t tell the truth, they learn that we cannot be trusted. As difficult as it can be at times, and as horrendous as the truth may be, children want, need, and deserve the truth. Being able to talk openly and honestly with your children about tragic events and other losses, creates a foundation of trust, enabling them to come to you in the future with their questions, fears, and concerns.

 

How race-related stress affects you and your relationship with your child

What effect does racism have on your health and well-being?

Not only does racism impact you as a parent, it can also impact how you interact with your children. Experiences of racism build on each other and can chip away at your emotional, physical and spiritual resources as a parent, contributing to race-related stress. Race-related stress can make it hard to have the space needed to take care of yourself as a parent, which reduces the emotional space you need to adequately take care of your children.

 

Physical effects

Physical Effects

Physical Effects can include increased hypertension, illness and risky behaviors such as substance use.

 

Emotional effects

Emotional Effects

Emotional effects can include depression, anxiety, anger, irritability and aggression.

 

Spiritual effects

Spiritual Effects

Spiritual effects can include a decreased sense of purpose, lack of connection with the larger community, isolation from larger social groups and reduced involvement in communal activities that you enjoy.

 

Potential reactions to racial stress or trauma

Insecure feelings

Insecure Feelings

Feelings of shame and lack of confidence due to feeling that a situation cannot be changed.

Lack of trust

Lack of Trust

Feeling detached or a lack of trust for others due to experiencing multiple losses or letdowns. This can make it very difficult to seek out help and to identify potential safe sources of support.

Triggers

Triggers

Reminders of the event, such as particular people or situations, can also trigger strong emotional or physical responses (e.g., crying or rapid heartbeat).

Emotions

Difficulty Controlling Emotions

Difficulty controlling emotional responses (going from “zero to one hundred”) can occur as the body helps you adapt to potentially unsafe situations, making you feel constantly on “alert.”

The body’s response to the experience of racism can make accessing resources to cope with the situation difficult. Race-related stress is unique in that it threatens psychological resources that are needed to cope and fulfill basic needs such as financial support, housing, access to jobs, etc.

When your body is in stress mode, it is geared up to help you and your child survive, which sometimes leads to impulsive decisions. If you live in a chronic state of stress related to racism, you can start to engage in survival coping. Survival coping can help you to deal with very hard or potentially life-threatening situations. However, if you continue to exist in this mode long-term, it can make it difficult to enjoy being in the moment with your child and can reduce your ability to feel safe and in control.

 

What impact can racial stress have on your parenting?

Experiencing race-related stress can also impact the quality of parenting relationships in the following ways:

Impostor syndrome

When you are exposed to racism repeatedly, you often start doubting yourself and can feel like you are an imposter in dominant culture settings or in settings where you feel as though you do not belong. Your inner thoughts might sound something like: “Am I being judged?” “Am I worthy?” “I got lucky.” “I only got this because I am Black.”

Being overly alert (hypervigilance)

Experiencing racial stress can make you more aware of potential dangers and negative experiences that can occur. This, in turn, can make the experience of parenting even more stressful. When you interact with your children, you can sometimes be reminded of negative race-related experiences that you had when you were a child. This reminder can amp up emotional responses, or hyperarousal, making it hard for you to “keep your cool” and be open to flexible problem solving.

“Helicopter parenting” (monitoring in fear)

These experiences of racism and unwarranted blame or lack of acceptance can make you want to protect your children so much, that you don’t allow them to explore in the way that they need to. You may shelter them from failures, which everyone needs to experience in order to learn how to manage everyday life. You may tend to be overly cautious or suspicious. Examples can include not allowing your children to have sleepovers or go to the park, even with your supervision.

Difficulty regulating emotions

  • When your past influences your emotional state, it can affect your emotional responses to both big and minor stressors with children, such as when they misbehave. This, in turn, can lead to being overprotective or overuse of physical discipline, as a means of survival.
  • For children, having parents who can keep perspective (stay cool) when children are upset, or misbehaving is very important. Likewise, it is important to stay calm when disciplining a child, otherwise discipline may go overboard. Both of these things can be hard if you are having difficulty controlling your emotions.

Avoidance

  • Avoiding situations that are related to racism can be a needed strategy to survive; such as instances that may involve violence or threat to yourself or your family. Sometimes you may avoid reminders of past experiences due to the pain or discomfort they cause.
  • If you find yourself avoiding strong feelings or situations with your child that bring up painful memories, it may make it hard to show affection and support for your child. It may even make it difficult to know how to provide emotional support for your child during times of stress. For instance, if your child brings up their own experience of oppression or an event in their life reminds you of something from your own childhood.

Mistrusting others

  • Racism can lead to distrust or mistrust of other communities. Internalized racism is when you begin to accept negative messages about your own abilities and inherent worth by the dominant group in society.
  • When you use society’s norms to judge yourself, you can feel depressed, unworthy and just not good enough. You are taught in many ways to take these feelings and paint them onto another group.
  • Intra and interracial violence, contention among disenfranchised communities or color, and the way the media conveys information about people of color, contribute to this.
  • This kind of coping can make you more vulnerable to racism, because on some level you may believe in racial hierarchy and difference when you belittle other groups. And when you show your children that it is right to discriminate against certain other groups, you make them more vulnerable to discrimination that they face.

Minimizing racism

  • Racism is overwhelming, as is the history of violence. You are sometimes taught that accepting this and minimizing racism is the only thing you can do. But when you ignore racism, and accept powerlessness, you encourage your kids to internalize racism. This can lead to increased levels of depression, anxiety and externalizing behaviors (e.g., engaging in risky behaviors, such as alcohol or substance use).
  • When you believe that you should be able to handle and manage it all without a break or without asking for help, you are at increased risk for health problems and can miss important cues about your well-being and safety.

Self-blame

Experiencing chronically unfair and dangerous discriminatory practices due to race can lead to feelings of low worth. For parents, this can also lead to a questioning of your parenting choices and abilities.

Unbalanced Racial and Ethnic Socialization (RES)

Unbalanced messaging or communication about race and ethnicity occurs when you only promote messages of mistrust, preparation for bias, or only give racial pride messages to your children.

 

Strategies to deal with racial stress and practice self-care.

So, what can you do to mitigate racial stress?

As parents, it is important to develop positive identities and share your cultural identities with your children. Positive cultural identity and advocacy are protective factors against racism, which can help to reduce and prevent racial stress.

There are many other ways to cope with stress and everyone has different preferences. Reducing stress can also allow you to model healthy coping strategies for your child. Here are some suggestions you can try.

You are not the only person dealing with race-related stress and connecting with other people with similar experiences and feelings can help you to successfully navigate racism.

  • Talk with family and trusted friends specifically about racialized events that have occurred and how to handle them
  • Start or join a group with others who may have had similar experiences and similar interests, like a book club that reads books by Black authors, or spend time with other African American parents who have the same concerns you do about how your children are treated at the school.
  • Seek out activities that you can do with your friends or family (e.g., exercising, cooking, watching a family show or movie together, etc.)

 

Legislation
Much of the debate today is around gun control. Below are links to two bills currently pending in Congress.

HR 1446 Enhanced Background Check Act of 2021

HR 8 Bipartisan Background Checks Act of 2021

 

 

AM – All Month – Eating and/or Body Image Struggles – Resources for Peer Support, Recovery & Wellness
Oct 5 all-day
Eating Problems 
Body Image Struggles, Wellness, Support
A 12-step recovery program

https://www.foodaddicts.org/

Food addiction can take many forms. Symptoms include obesity, under eating, and bulimia. People often think of the term “eating disorders” when describing the disease of food addiction. Food addicts are obsessed with food, body size, and weight. We spend our days thinking about when and what we are going to eat or not eat. Binging, purging, and dieting are a way of life. The bottom line is that we can’t stop thinking about eating. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) offers relief from the symptoms of eating disorders and guidance on living in recovery.


ANAD – National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders
https://anad.org/get-help/
ANAD is committed to providing free, peer support services to anyone struggling with an eating disorder Our free, eating disorders Helpline is available for treatment referrals, support and encouragement, and general questions about eating disorders.
Call the Helpline // 888.375.7767
Support Group // Find a Support Group
Peer Mentors // Request a Mentor
 
Treatment // Search our national directory
Our Helpline is available Monday-Friday, 9am-9pm CST. We will return messages left outside these hours.
NEDA – National Eating Disorders Association
NEDA: External link  list of virtual support groups for different time zones offered by multiple organizations dedicated to eating disorder recovery across the United States.
CONTACT THE NEDA HELPLINE
  1. Online chat

    Online Chat

    Monday—Thursday 9am—9pm ET

    Friday 9am—5pm ET

  1. Call NEDA's eating disorders helpline

    Call

    (800) 931-2237

    Monday—Thursday 11am—9pm ET

    Friday 11am—5pm ET

    Translation services are available on the phone.

  1. Call NEDA's eating disorders helpline

    Text

    (800) 931-2237

    Pilot hours: Monday—Thursday 3pm—6pm ET

https://eatingdisorderfoundation.org/get-help/support-groups/

Eating Disorder Foundation Support Groups, Eating Disorder Foundation: External link  list of recurring virtual support groups for people recovering from eating disorders, as well as family members and friends who are supporting someone through recovery.

https://www.feast-ed.org/around-the-dinner-table-forum/

Around the Dinner Table Forum, FEAST: External link  online community of parents of eating disorder patients around the world.  [note, I would say parents/caregivers of family members or persons experiencing eating struggles or struggling with eating, not patients!]

https://www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk/sanctuary

The Sanctuary, Beat Eating Disorders: External link  information about an online chat room for U.K. residents recovering from an eating disorder.

https://rockrecoveryed.org/coffee-conversations-for-moms/

Coffee and Conversations for Moms, Rock Recovery: External link  monthly virtual support group for mothers who are recovering from an eating disorder.

https://centerfordiscovery.com/groups/

Free Eating Disorder and Mental Health Support Groups, Center for Discovery Eating Disorder Treatment: External link  free platform for peer-based support groups for anyone who has been affected by an eating disorder or seeking mental health support.

ARFID (Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder) / Duke University

  Support Group NameDuke ARFID Parent Education Group
  Contact Name Chantal Gil
Meeting Location  Virtual through our community website. Members must first sign up for a free membership to our website, and then they can register for a group. (https://eatingdisorders.dukehealth.org/)

Pro-Recovery Support Group, Monday Evenings

7:00 PM EST /4:00 PM PST

Pro-Recovery Support Group, Saturday Mornings

11:00 AM EST/ 8:00 AM PST

Pro-Recovery support groups are open to individuals, ages 18+, who are  experiencing and/or are on the journey to recovery from an eating disorder.

Register here.

Family and Friends Group, Wednesday Evenings

7:00 PM EST /4:00 PM PST

https://18percent.org

18percent is a free online community based off Slack, where one can receive peer to peer support. 18percent has channels on various mental health issues, one of which is eating disorders. They offer free, 24/7 eating disorder support in a moderated environment. For more information, click the link below and sign up.

Click Here to Learn More

The main aim of EDRC is to increase awareness and understanding of eating disorders for the public and for health professionals; to promote early diagnosis, effective treatment, and recovery; and to advocate for mental health parity legislation and effective insurance coverage. We collaborate with other organizations such as National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) in our effort to bring the needed attention to eating disorders.

The Lotus Collaborative: Online Eating Disorder Recovery Support Group

This group is for anyone struggling with an eating disorder to get recovery support as well as to practice giving recovery support to others. While this is not a therapy group, it is a supportive virtual environment in which to meet others working towards recovery, build relationships, gain insight, and practice recovery skills. ​Everyone working towards eating disorder recovery is welcome.

Where: This group will take place via Zoom Room Meetings (Phone app or web browser). Sign up at https://www.thelotuscollaborative.com/online-eating-disorder-recovery-support-group.html

When: Every Sunday, 1pm – 2:30pm

Contact: email: info@thelotuscollaborative.com or set up a consultation: https://www.thelotuscollaborative.com/contact-us.html

The Lotus Collaborative: Online Supporters Group

The Lotus Collaborative hosts a free online support group for the friends and family members supporting a loved one through eating disorder recovery. This group is a space for family members and friends to get support, ask questions and connect with others in the supporting role.

Where: This group will take place via Zoom Room Meetings (Phone app or web browser). Sign up at https://www.thelotuscollaborative.com/online-supporters-group.html

When: ​Every Thursday, 6pm – 7pm PST

Contact: email: info@thelotuscollaborative.com or set up a consultation: https://www.thelotuscollaborative.com/contact-us.html

AM – All Month – Hispanic Heritage Month – AFSP – American Foundation for Suicide Prevention – An Introduction to Suicide Prevention For Latinx and Hispanic Communities – Resources
Oct 5 all-day

 

 

 

Hispanic Heritage Month

AFSP – American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

An Introduction to Suicide Prevention For Latinx and Hispanic Communities – Resources

¡Feliz mes de la herencia hispana! Today, September 15, marks the start of National Hispanic Heritage Month, in which we celebrate the histories, cultures and contributions of Latinx and Hispanic people in the United States including Puerto Rico. It is also an opportunity to reflect on the progress we’ve made to advance mental health for Latinx and Hispanic communities.

One of those ways is through partnerships. It is our privilege to be partnering with the National Latino Behavioral Health Association (NLBHA) and others for the 2022 National Latino Behavioral Health Conference taking place September 15 and 16, featuring remarks from AFSP’s Chief Medical Officer Dr. Christine Yu-Moutier, and Vice President of Public Relations María de los Ángeles Corral.

Another way in which we are making inroads is through new programming. We are thrilled to announce that this October, in collaboration with NLBHA, we will be launching Talk Saves Lives™ (TSL): An Introduction to Suicide Prevention for Latinx and Hispanic Communities, a much-needed and vital new resource for mental health and suicide awareness education for communities of Latinx and Hispanic heritage. The presentation will be available in English and Spanish, in person and virtually.

Join us this month as we shine a light on mental health resources for Latinx and Hispanic communities, as well as the stories and perspectives of individuals who have reflected on their cultural background and how it can impact their experiences with mental health through our Real Stories blog over the years. You can find those resources, stories, social shareables and more here. Another great resource is our website! It can be translated into Spanish by clicking on the “Accessibility” top right button, then “Choose language,” then “Spanish.”

National Hispanic Heritage Month is a time to celebrate and support Latinx and Hispanic communities.

We encourage you to share the resources above, this month and beyond.

 

FIND RESOURCES

 

AM – All Month – National Hispanic Heritage Month 2022 – Resources – Cultural Events, History, Veterans, Housing, Education
Oct 5 all-day

 

Hispanic Heritage Month 2022

RESOURCES

 

History and Culture

Hispanic Heritage Month Family Festival

Friday, September 16, and Saturday, September 17

 

Each year, people across the United States observe National Hispanic Heritage Month from September 15 to October 15 by celebrating and reflecting on the histories, cultures, and contributions of Americans with ancestry from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. While Hispanic Heritage Month is only 30 days, the museum’s curators, researchers, and educators work with communities across the country to document and share Latino histories every day of the year.

As part of the museum’s commitment to sharing Hispanic and Latino history, the museum has updated its Latino History topic page, where you can find even more exhibitions, programs, museum collections, and resources that reflect the richness and diversity of Latino history in the United States.

Our mission as a national public history institution is not only to tell complex stories but also to use history to empower people to create a just, compassionate, and equitable future. In an increasingly divided country, it is more important than ever to learn about and stand in solidarity with Latino communities.

Cada año las personas en Estados Unidos observan el mes de la herencia hispana desde el 15 de septiembre al 15 de octubre celebrando y reflexionando sobre la historia, cultura y contribuciones de las personas que rastrean sus orígenes a España, Méjico, el Caribe, y América Central y Sur. Aunque el mes conste de solo 30 días, los/las curadores/as, educadores/as, investigadores/as trabajan con comunidades a lo largo de todo el país para documentar y compartir las historias de Latinos/as cada día del año.

Como parte del compromiso del museo de compartir y diseminar estas historias, el museo ha actualizado su página Latino History topic page, en la cual pueden encontrar exhibiciones, colecciones, programas y recursos educativos que reflejan la rica , diversa y complicada historia de las comunidades Latinas en los Estados Unidos.

Nuestra misión como entidad de historia publica no es solo compartir historias complejas sino que apuntamos a utilizar la historia como herramienta de empoderamiento de  las personas para crear un futuro con equidad y compasión. Frente a un país tan dividido, es más importante que nunca aprender acerca de las comunidades Latinas y brindar solidaridad.

The National Museum of the American Latino recently debuted the Molina Family Latino Gallery, located within the National Museum of American History, the Smithsonian’s first gallery dedicated to the Latino experience. The inaugural exhibition ¡Presente! A Latino History of the United States illuminates U.S. Latinos’ historical and cultural legacies.

Two days of public events will kick off Hispanic Heritage Month in celebration of the gallery’s opening and commemorate 25 years of Latinidad at the Smithsonian. The program will include an evening dance party on Friday, September 16, and a Latino Heritage family day and cooking demonstration (details below) on Saturday, September 17, at the National Museum of American History. For more information, go to latino.si.edu.

Objects Out of Storage

Celebrating 25 years of Latinidad with the National Museum of American History Collections
Saturday, September 17; 11:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.
1 West

Curators with knowledge and expertise about the rich diversity of Latino history will engage in informal conversations with visitors while telling stories related to artifacts in the museum collections. Guests will have a unique opportunity to ask questions about the objects, the stories, and how they came to be part of the national collections.

Batter Up! Demonstration with Juan Baret

Saturday, September 17; 11:30 a.m.
Southwest Mall Terrace

Juan Baret’s passion for baseball spans his entire life, from his childhood in the Dominican Republic, to cheering for the Yankees when he migrated to the Bronx as a young man, to his time in the U.S. military. Join Baret as he channels his love of the game into the craftsmanship of bats. This program is in conjunction with the exhibition, ¡Pleibol! In the Barrios and the Big Leagues / En los barrios y las grandes ligas which is currently on display until January 2023 at the National Museum of American History and will travel across the country through 2025 with the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Services.

Cooking Up History

Celebrating Comida Chingona & the Low-Rider Lifestyle
Saturday, September 17; noon–1:00 p.m.
Coulter Plaza, 1 West 

The National Museum of American History continues its popular series of live cooking demonstrations for Hispanic Heritage Month. Guest Chef Silvana Salido Esparza made her mark on the U.S. food scene with the comida chingona, or “badass food,” that she serves at her Phoenix-based restaurant, Barrio Café. She draws inspiration from her Mexican heritage with the restaurant’s offerings, which honor her family’s 800-year-old gastronomic legacy with a twist. Chef Esparza is not only passionate about putting her own spin on Mexican food, but also about cars, specifically lowriders. Chef Esparza will explain the lowrider tradition during this cooking demonstration and conversation and the food culture connected to the lowrider lifestyle in Phoenix. Chef Esparza will prepare a dish illuminating Mayan barbecue, providing insights into this important, but often overlooked, culinary tradition. Visitors are encouraged to view Dave’s Dream, a lowrider from Chimayo, New Mexico.

This program is produced in collaboration with the National Museum of the American Latino.

A Conversation with Linda Alvarado

Saturday, September 17; 2:00–3:00 p.m.
Coulter Plaza, 1 West 

Dr. Margaret Salazar-Porzio, curator of the Smithsonian’s ¡Pleibol! In the Barrios and the Big Leagues / En los barrios y las grandes ligas exhibition, will interview Linda Alvarado, owner of the Colorado Rockies, about her life and career. In 1991, Alvarado became the first Latino owner—male or female—of a Major League Baseball franchise. She is a nationally recognized speaker who extends her passion for breaking barriers to motivating and encouraging young Latinas and women of all ages to achieve their dreams.

Dr. Salazar will sign copies of her book following the onstage conversation.

¡Pleibol! In the Barrios and the Big Leagues /  En los barrios y las grandes ligas is currently on display until January 2023 at the National Museum of American History and will travel across the country through 2025 with the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Services.

Selected Exhibitions

Dave’s Dream, Lowrider, 1992

Ongoing
First Floor, Center 

“Dave’s Dream” is a modified 1969 Ford LTD known as a “lowrider” and named for David Jaramillo of Chimayo, New Mexico who began customizing this car in the 1970s. After his death, Jaramillo’s family and local artisans completed the modifications that he had planned, and the car often won “first” or “best in show” in area competitions. Lowriding is a family and community activity with parades, trophies, and other events celebrating cars and paying homage to their power and beauty. Artistic paint schemes and custom upholstery make each lowrider unique and culturally significant. Hydraulic lifts enable lowriders to hop, making them seem alive and animated.

¡Pleibol! In the Barrios and the Big Leagues / En los barrios y las grandes ligas

Red silhouette of baseball player with "Pleibol"Ongoing; closes January 2023
2 East

This bilingual exhibition takes audiences on a journey into the heart of American baseball to understand how generations of Latinas/os have helped make the game what it is today. For nearly a century, baseball has been a social and cultural force in Latino communities across the United States. From hometown baseball teams to the Major Leagues, the exhibit shows how the game can bring people together and how Latino players have made a huge impact on the sport. Explore the ¡Pleibol! exhibition online.

Many Voices, One Nation

Ongoing
2 West

How did we become US? Many Voices, One Nation explores how the many voices of people in America have shaped our nation. The exhibition explores many Latino stories, including the Indigenous peoples of Spanish New Mexico and the Pueblo Revolt; the incorporation of Mexican California; the U.S. acquisition of Puerto Rico; Mexican neighborhoods in Chicago and Los Angeles; immigration and the southwest borderlands; and Cuban migration.

¡Presente! A Latino History of the United States

Molina Family Latino Gallery
1 East

The inaugural exhibition by the Smithsonian’s newest museum—the National Museum of the American Latino—introduces visitors to key concepts, moments and biographies that illuminate U.S. Latinos’ historical and cultural legacies. Hosted at the National Museum of American History, also the largest object lender to the exhibition, the 4,500 square foot gallery is an interactive space where multigenerational and cross-cultural visitors can celebrate and learn about Latino history and culture year-round. Learn more about ¡Presente! online.

Educational Resources

“The Resplendent Quetzal Bird”

History Time video 

How do people earn money? What is money made of? Elementary school students can practice their “See, Think, Wonder” routine by observing the resplendent Quetzal bird, whose long tail feathers were used as money in Central America. Watch the video.

Becoming US

Becoming US is a suite of resources for educators to present more accurate and inclusive immigration and migration narratives. There are five units organized by a theme, each with three case studies for in depth learning. Within the theme of Borderlands, we have resources on the Mexican American War. Nested in the theme of Belonging is a case study on Mexican Repatriation, and within Policy is a case study about DACA. The case studies include standards of learning, key questions and terms, primary sources, and teacher- and student-facing documents.

History Explorer

For more Latino History materials to use in the classroom, please visit our Hispanic Heritage Month themed landing page on History Explorer, the museum’s home for K-12 resources.

Exhibitions

Eagle statuette, around 1850
Many Voices, One Nation
People playing a baseball game
Pleibol! In the Barrios and the Big Leagues / En los barrios y las grandes ligas
American Enterprise
American Enterprise
Illustration of girls in school
Girlhood (It’s complicated)

See more exhibitions

From Our Blog

Graduation cap, gown, rainbow-colored stole, and costume wings in the pattern of Monarch butterfly wings. The top of the cap is decorated with flowers and has a message, "I am one of those people Mexico sent."

To explore the history of  Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), the museum’s Undocumented Organizing Collecting Initiative reached out to three undocumented organizers to share their reflections from inside the movement.

 

Gordo comic strip. Uncle Mio (wearing a suit and carrying a box of chocolates bouquet of flowers) talks to his nephew, who explains the qualities of different types of flowers. Behind the two figures appear precise, scientific diagrams of flowers.
According to Gus Arriola, creator of the comic strip Gordo, “my main goal was to maintain a positive awareness of Mexico through all the years, every day, without being political. When I started [in 1941], words like ‘burrito’ were unknown in the United States.”

See more blog posts

 

Rescources for Hispanic Veterans

ODVA Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15 through Oct. 15), the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs will be sharing stories from the state’s and nation’s military and cultural history, including profiling individual Hispanic American veterans and family members.

There are an estimated 560,000 Hispanic Americans living in Oregon today — and more than 60 million — across the United States. They represent a rich and diverse cultural heritage — as well as a proud history of service in our nation’s military — dating to some of our earliest conflicts.

Spanish-American War

April-December 1898

Col. Theodore Roosevelt and the “Rough Riders.”

Several thousand Hispanic volunteers, mostly from the southwest, fought with distinction in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War in 1898. Capt. Maximiliano Luna and others comprised a portion of the famous 1st U.S. Volunteer Cavalry — better known as “The Rough Riders” — which fought in Cuba under the command of Col. Theodore Roosevelt, who had resigned his position as assistant secretary of the Navy to join the volunteer cavalry.

The Rough Riders saw action at Las Guásimas, a village three miles north of Siboney on the way to Santiago and became the stuff of legend for their courage during the Battle of San Juan Hill. Sgt. George Armijo, another Rough Rider, later became a member of Congress and served on the school board and city council in his hometown of Santa Fe, New Mexico.

World War I

1914-1918

In May 1917, two months after legislation granting United States citizenship to individuals born in Puerto Rico was signed into law, and one month after the United States entered World War I, a unit of volunteer soldiers was transferred to the Panama Canal Zone.

Another Act of Congress was passed in 1917 to obtain needed manpower for the war effort, and the Hispanic community was eager to serve its country. They included both native-born service members, mostly of Mexican descent, and new immigrants from Latin America, Mexico and Spain. In June 1920, the unit was redesignated as the 65th Infantry Regiment and served as the U.S. military’s last segregated unit.

Hispanic soldiers like Nicholas Lucero and Marcelino Serna served with great distinction and were among the most decorated service members from WWI. Lucero received the French Croix de Guerre (roughly the equivalent of the U.S. Bronze or Silver Star) during World War I for destroying two German machine gun nests and maintaining constant fire for three hours, while Serna became the first Hispanic to be awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, the second-highest military decoration of the U.S. Armed Forces.

While serving in the Meuse-Argonne offensive, Serna also destroyed a German machine gun nest that had killed a dozen American soldiers. Even though his helmet was hit twice by bullets, Serna was able to get close enough to throw four grenades into the nest — leading to the surrender of the remaining combatants.

The courageous actions that earned Serna the Service Cross occurred on Sept. 12, 1918, when he shot and wounded a German sniper, then followed the wounded soldier to a trench. Singlehanded, he threw three grenades into the trench, which resulted in the death of 26 enemy soldiers and the capture of 24.

World War II

1939-1945

The Arizona National Guard’s 158th Infantry Regiment, better known as the “Bushmasters.”

In January 1943, 13 months after the attack on Pearl Harbor that marked the entry of the United States into World War II, the 65th Infantry Regiment again deployed to the Panama Canal Zone before being redirected overseas.

Despite relatively limited combat service in World War II, the regiment suffered casualties defending against enemy attacks, with one Distinguished Service Cross, two Silver Stars, two Bronze Stars and 90 Purple Hearts being credited to the unit.

In total, approximately 500,000 Hispanic service members served in the U.S. Armed Forces during WWII, including the Arizona National Guard’s 158th Infantry Regiment, the “Bushmasters” — which Gen. Douglas MacArthur declared “one of the greatest fighting combat teams ever deployed for battle.” The regiment was composed of many Hispanic Soldiers.

The Bushmasters’ motto was “Cuidado” — Spanish for “Take Care” — and comprised mainly of soldiers of Mexican American descent and North American Indian descent from 20 tribes. The regiment became one of the few to complete the trail from Australia to Japan, fighting day after day in critical battles to open the Visayan passages for Allied shipping in the Pacific.

The merciless campaign lasted two months in terrain laced with tank traps, wires, mines and bamboo thickets.

A total of six Hispanic Americans were flying aces in World War II and the Korean War. Approximately 200 Puerto Rican women served in the Women’s Army Corps and served in the critical role of Code Talkers to avoid enemy intelligence.

Korean War

1950-1953

When the Korean War broke out, Hispanic Americans again answered the call to duty as they, their brothers, cousins, and friends had done in World War II. Many of them became members of the 65th Infantry Regiment, which was still an all-Hispanic unit and fought in every major campaign of the war.

The 65th was nicknamed “The Borinqueneers,” a term originating from the Borinquen — one of the native Taino names for the island of Puerto Rico. Many members of the 65th were direct descendants of that tribe.

Fighting as a segregated unit from 1950 to 1952, the regiment participated in some of the fiercest battles of the war, and its toughness, courage and loyalty earned the admiration of many, including Brig. Gen. William W. Harris, who later called the unit’s members “the best damn soldiers that I had ever seen.”

Vietnam War

1959-1973

More than 80,000 Hispanic-Americans served with distinction in the Vietnam War, from the Battle for Hue City to the Siege of Khe Sanh. Among them were 1st Sgt. Maximo Yabes, the  only known Hispanic American Medal of Honor recipient with a link to Oregon.

In February 1967, Yabes’ company was assigned to provide security for a team of Army engineers who had been tasked with creating a clear zone of land between Cu Chu, a small hamlet northwest of Saigon, and a plantation to keep enemy snipers from using the thick jungle as cover.

1st Sgt. Maximo Yabes.

Yabes moved into the bunker and covered several of his troops, using his own body as a shield. Despite being struck painfully numerous times by grenade fragments, Yabes moved to another bunker and fired on the enemy with a grenade launcher he retrieved from a fallen comrade — singlehandedly halting the enemy’s advance.

Yabes went on to assist two fallen soldiers to a safe area where they could receive medical aid before seeing an enemy machine gun within the perimeter that threatened the whole company. Alone and undefended, Yabes charged across open ground toward the enemy machine gun, killing the entire crew and destroying the weapon before being mortally wounded himself.

He was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor, the United States’ highest military decoration, which was credited to Colorado, where Yabes and his family were residing at the time. A memorial was also built to honor Yabes in his original hometown of Oakridge.

On March 18, 2014, President Barack Obama presented 24 service members of Jewish or Hispanic American descent with the Medal of Honor in one of the largest Medal of Honor ceremonies in history.

Each of these soldiers’ bravery had been previously recognized by the award of the Distinguished Service Cross, the nation’s second highest award; that award was upgraded to the Medal of Honor upon further Congressional review.

Gulf War-Modern Era

1990-Present

Approximately 20,000 Hispanic servicemen and women participated in Operation Desert Shield and Operation Desert Storm in 1990 and 1991. According to Defense Manpower Data Center statistics, Hispanics comprised 4.2 percent of the Army representation in the Persian Gulf theater during the war.

And, during the most recent wars and campaigns in the Middle East, thousands of men and women of Hispanic heritage answered the call to serve in the Global War on Terror, Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, and they continue to place their boots on the ground in more than 120 countries around the world.

Now representing more than 16% of the nation’s active-duty military, the Hispanic community continues its selfless sacrifice in bringing freedom to people in other countries, making major sacrifices, and risking their lives to bring justice to those who commit or plan evil against the United States and lay a foundation for a sustainable peace.

Whether their heritage can be traced to Spain, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Mexico, or one of dozens of other Spanish-speaking countries or cultures, Hispanic Americans have, time and time again, answered the call to duty, defending America with unwavering valor and honor.

 

Mental Health, Health, Housing, Education

Social determinants of health (SDOH) are the conditions in the environments where people are born, live, learn, work, play, worship, and age that affect a wide range of health, functioning, and quality-of-life outcomes and risks. Many SDOH have a major impact on the health, well-being, and quality of life of Hispanic/Latino communities, such as:

  • Safe housing, transportation, and neighborhoods
  • Racism, discrimination, and violence
  • Education, job opportunities, and income
  • Language barriers and literacy skills

SDOH also contribute to wide health disparities and inequities. For example, people who don’t have access to grocery stores with healthy foods are less likely to have good nutrition, which can raise their risk of health conditions like heart disease, diabetes, and obesity.

Use this page to learn more about the SDOH affecting Hispanic/Latino communities and to find helpful resources from OMH’s partners to share with your communities, patients, and organizations.

Visit Health People 2030 to learn more about SDOH, learn about federal efforts to address SDOH, and explore research related to SDOH.

Visit the CDC’s website to find tools for putting SDOH in action.

 

Economic Stability

Economic stability refers to a person’s ability to find and maintain a steady income, as well as earn enough money to afford things that help them live a healthy lifestyle. Being a homeowner, working in a safe environment, having access to affordable childcare, and having financial savings can help increase economic stability. When a person is economically stable, they can afford steady housing, healthy food, and health care.

According to a 2020 report from the Joint Economic Committee, there are an estimated 29 million Hispanics in the U.S. workforce, making up 18 percent of all workers. The unemployment rate for Hispanic Americans is higher than overall unemployment rates but has been dropping steadily. Latinos are more likely to hold jobs in industries that have above-average risks of injury and exposure to harmful chemicals, such as construction, agriculture, and hospitality.

Hispanics in the U.S. tend to have lower-paying jobs than non-Hispanics. In 2018, the median income for Hispanic households was nearly $20,000 less than the median income for non-Hispanic white households. The pay gap is even larger for Hispanic women.

Despite lower wages and less financial capital, Hispanics are more likely than any other group to become new entrepreneurs. As of 2017, experts believe there are at least four million Hispanic-owned businesses in the U.S., contributing over $700 billion annually to the American economy.

Want to learn more about how economic stability impact Hispanic and Latino communities? Browse a short collection of free, related resources in the OMH Knowledge Center online catalog.

Federal Resources

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) Money Smart: Money Smart offers a Spanish-language financial education program to help individuals improve their financial health. The website is also available in Spanish.

MyMoney.gov: A one-stop shop for federal financial literacy and education programs, grants, and other information. The website is also available in Spanish.

Money and Taxes (USAGov): Learn about taxes, money the government may owe you, investing, credit help, and more. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

Government Benefits, Grants, and Loans (USAGov): Learn about government programs providing financial help to individuals and organizations. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

Jobs and Unemployment (USAGov): Find out how and where to look for a new job or career, get help if you are unemployed, and more. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

Small Business (USAGov): Learn the steps to start a small business, get financing help from the government, and more. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

MyCreditUnion.gov (National Credit Union Administration): MyCreditUnion.gov and its financial literacy microsite Pocket Cents provide a list of saving options for college as well as information on other financial services provided by credit unions. The website is also available in Spanish.

Non-Federal Resources

Social Determinants Factors that Influence your Health – Income: An infographic developed by The Nation’s Health explaining how income can influence well-being and life expectancy.

The Community Action Poverty Simulation (Missouri Community Action Network): A simulation activity that seeks to raise awareness about the complexities of poverty experienced. This resource offers information about the simulation sessions, which last 2 to 4 hours, in addition to how to purchase the simulation materials.

SUMA Wealth: The leading financial technology company devoted to increasing prosperity, opportunity, and financial inclusion for young U.S. Latinos. The website is also available in Spanish.

SUMA Academy: A wealth-building digital platform that aims to help young Latinos with personal finance through creating culturally relevant, easy-to-digest material.

 

Education Access and Quality

Research shows that the more education a person has, the more likely they are to live a healthy lifestyle. Children are more likely to be academically successful when they have access to high-quality education and safe school environments free of violence and bullying. Individuals are more likely to have higher paying jobs if they have a high school diploma, and even more so with a college degree.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of Hispanic students enrolled in schools, colleges, and universities has increased substantially between 1996 and 2016, growing from 8.8 million to 17.9 million students. This trend applies to all levels of education, ranging from nursery school to higher education institutions.

College enrollment has more than tripled for Hispanics in the United States. Compared to other racial/ethnic groups, a larger percentage of Hispanic college students (over 40 percent) attend two-year colleges rather than four-year colleges.

According to the Pew Research Center, education levels for recently arrived Latino immigrants (defined as living in the United States for five years or less) are high as well. In 2018, the percentage of recently arrived Hispanic immigrants who completed high school was 67 percent, while in 1990, this number was 38 percent.

Despite these positive trends, the percentage of young adult Hispanics who have not completed high school and are not enrolled in school is higher than non-Hispanics. Hispanics aged 25 – 34 also have the lowest percentage of graduate school enrollment compared to white, Black, and Asian Americans.

Want to learn more about how education access and quality impact Hispanic and Latino communities? Browse a short collection of free, related resources in the OMH Knowledge Center online catalog.

National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy (HHS)

National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy (HHS): A national action plan that envisions a restructuring of the ways we create and disseminate all types of health information to ensure that all children graduate with health literacy skills that will help them live healthier throughout their lifespan.

White House Initiative on Advancing Educational Equity, Excellence and Economic Opportunity for Hispanics

White House Initiative on Advancing Educational Equity, Excellence and Economic Opportunity for Hispanics: Originally established in 1990, the White House Initiative on Advancing Educational Equity, Excellence and Economic Opportunity for Hispanics was re-established in 2021 through executive order by President Joe Biden. The Initiative’s scope was expanded to advance educational equity and economic opportunity for Latino and Hispanic students, families, and communities.

Education (USAGov): Find government information on education, including primary, secondary, and higher education. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

College Scorecard (U.S. Department of Education): This online tool was designed with direct input from students, families, and their advisers to provide the clearest, most accessible, and reliable national data on college cost, graduation, debt, and post-college earnings.

Federal Student Aid (U.S. Department of Education): They provide more than $125 billion in federal grants, work-study, and loans for students attending career schools, community colleges, and colleges or universities. Their information center helps students complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and provides the public with free information about their programs. The website can be converted into Spanish.

Non-Federal Resources

Social Determinant Factors that Influence your Health – Education: An infographic created by The Nation’s Health about the connection between education and healthier people.

Health Care Access and Quality

Being able to access and use high-quality health care services is a critical part of preventing disease and keeping people healthy. There are many reasons why people cannot access or use health care services: language barriers, lack of transportation, health care costs, inability to find childcare, inability to take off time from work, and discrimination when receiving health care can all factor into a person’s ability or willingness to use health care services.

Health care access and utilization vary widely in the U.S. Hispanic population. Factors include age, country of birth, English language fluency, and length of residency in the U.S. Hispanics aged 65 and older are more likely than younger Hispanics to have a primary care provider and are more likely to have seen a provider in the past 12 months.

The percentage of Hispanic Americans with health insurance has risen over the past decade. However, this group is still more likely than any other racial/ethnic group in the U.S. to be uninsured.

Language barriers influence health care utilization as well. Approximately 46 percent of Hispanic American adults say they have a close family member or friend who requires interpretation services or a Spanish-speaking health care provider, and 50 percent of Hispanic Americans say it is difficult to understand the process of getting medical care and have had negative experiences receiving health care.

Want to learn more about how health care access and quality impact Hispanic and Latino communities? Browse a short collection of free, related resources in the OMH Knowledge Center online catalog.

Federal Resources

QuestionBuilder App: The HHS Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) QuestionBuilder app helps patients and caregivers prepare for medical appointments and maximize visit time. Also available in Spanish.

All of Us Research Program (National Institutes of Health): The NIH All of Us Research Program is a platform for conducting research whose goal is to create diverse databases of health information, which will allow researchers to understand and address health disparities in underrepresented populations. Also available in Spanish.

From Coverage to Care: A Roadmap to Better Care and a Healthier You: This roadmap explains what health coverage is and how to use it to get primary care and preventive services so that you and your family live long, healthy lives. Available in Spanish and multiple other languages.

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Consumer Resources in English and Spanish. Resources are also available in multiple other languages.

Health (USAGov): Find health resources from the government. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

 

Non-Federal Resources
)

Therapy for Latinx: A database of therapists who either identify as Latinx or have worked closely with Latinx communities and understand their needs. The website is available in English and Spanish and offers other helpful tools and resources.

Mental Health America: Has Spanish-language tools and resources regarding mental health for Latinos, along with articles and ways to get help.

NAMI Compartiendo Esperanza: A helpful tool that includes a three-part video series to increase mental health awareness in Latino communities.

 

Neighborhood and Built Environment

Safe neighborhoods allow people to live healthier and happier lives. Racial and ethnic minority populations are more likely to live in areas where there is violence, water and air pollution, exposure to toxic substances, a lack of trees and green spaces, loud noise, and a lack of access to healthy foods. All these factors can directly or indirectly impact a person’s health.

A 2019 report from the Joint Economic Committee states that 94 percent of Latinos currently live in urban areas, but this is changing. States with historically low Hispanic populations, such as North and South Dakota, are experiencing fast increases in Hispanic residents.

Hispanic Americans are far more likely than non-Hispanic white Americans to be concerned about environmental issues. According to a Pew Research Center survey, 71 percent of Hispanic adults state climate change has affected their community, compared to 54 percent of non-Hispanic adults. This percentage is even higher for foreign-born Hispanics.

According to Yale Climate Connections, an initiative of the Yale Center for Environmental Communication, several research teams have found that Hispanics are often disproportionately affected by environmental factors. Many predominantly Latino neighborhoods have a higher risk of flooding, drought, and air pollution. These neighborhoods often have fewer green spaces, which are known to lower temperatures during extreme heat.

Want to learn more about how neighborhoods and built environments impact Hispanic and Latino communities? Browse a short collection of free, related resources in the OMH Knowledge Center online catalog.

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD): HUD offers housing counseling to help consumers make informed housing decisions. HUD works with organizations, such as UnidosUS, to develop and support Latino homeownership programs in various states. The website can be converted into Spanish.

Housing (USAGov): Get information and services to help find and keep a home. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

Housing and the Latino community (UnidosUS)

Social Determinant Factors that Influence your Health – Housing: An infographic created by The Nation’s Health addressing where and how people live, can influence how healthy they are and how well they live.

COVID-19 Informational Guide for Public Housing Residents – Know the Basics of Seeking Care: A bilingual tool developed by the National Center for Health in Public Housing to provide general information on how public housing residents can seek care for COVID-19 testing services provided by health centers near public housing agencies and how the Public Charge rule does not apply for these services. Also available in Spanish.

Resources Related to Coronavirus and Rural Housing (Housing Assistant Council): This webpage presents a list of COVID-19-related resources that pertain to housing. Although the webpage title explicitly refers to rural housing, it links to resources that typically pertain to housing in general that would be relevant to readers interested in housing in both rural and non-rural areas.

The EveryONE Project: Neighborhood Navigator (American Academy of Family Physicians): Allows users to search by zip code for resources and programs in their neighborhood to address their patients’ social determinants of health (SDOH). Provides information on food, housing, goods, transportation, health, care, education, employment, and more. The tool can be converted into Spanish and other languages.

Health Equity Report Card (Salud America!): The Health Equity Report Card generates local housing, transit, healthcare, and other data so you can drive the healthy change your community needs most.

School Food Pantry Action Pack (Salud America!): A free guide to help school personnel talk to decision-makers, work through logistics, and start a School Food Pantry to help hungry students and reduce local food insecurity.

Social and Community Context

Social and community support can greatly improve a person’s health and well-being. Positive, healthy relationships and community engagement can buffer disruptive environmental factors, especially for children and young adults. Disruptive factors can include incarceration, deportation, discrimination, bullying, and violence. When these disruptive and stressful factors are present, a person’s overall stress level (often called “allostatic load”) can directly influence their mental and physical health.

Discrimination and deportation remain key sources of stress for many Hispanic Americans. A Pew Research Center survey found that23 percent of Hispanic Americans were criticized for speaking Spanish in public, and 20 percent were called offensive names in the past year. Research also shows that over 39 percent of Hispanic Americans worry that they or an individual close to them could be deported. In 2019, 80 percent of Hispanics living in the U.S. were citizens. This is an increase from 74 percent in 2010.

According to Voto Latino, a growing number of Hispanic Americans are exercising their voting rights. Experts believe over 16 million Latinos voted in 2020, an increase of nearly 40 percent since 2016. Around 12 million Latinos are eligible to vote but are not registered.

Want to learn more about how social and community context impact Hispanic and Latino communities? Browse a short collection of free, related resources in the OMH Knowledge Center online catalog.

Promoting Health Equity: A Resource to Help Communities Address Social Determinants of Health: A workbook developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for public health practitioners and partners interested in addressing social determinants of health in order to promote health and achieve health equity.

Voting and Elections (USAGov): Find answers to common questions about voting in the United States. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

 

Non-Federal Resources

Anti-Racist Farmers Market Toolkit (The Farmers Market Coalition): The toolkit was developed by a group of Black food systems leaders and market managers to help put anti-racism concepts into practice within farmers markets. The aim is to improve market experiences for Black, Latino, and other people of color.

The Latino Victory Fund: an organization dedicated to building political power in the Latino community so that the voices and values of Latinos are reflected at every level of government and in the policies that drive our country forward.

Voto Latino: a pioneering civic media organization seeking to transform America by recognizing Latinos’ innate leadership. Their work focuses on building a pipeline meant to serve and empower our community, consisting of three parts: civic engagement, issue advocacy, and leadership development. The website is also available in Spanish.

GreenLatinos: an active community of Latino/a/x leaders, emboldened by the power and wisdom of our culture, united to demand equity and dismantle racism, resourced to win our environmental, conservation, and climate justice battles, and driven to secure our political, economic, cultural, and environmental liberation. The website is also available in Spanish.

Office of Minority Health

Get in touch

AM – All Month – Sexual Assault Action Month – Domestic/sexual violence materials, resources, and actions happening across Oregon
Oct 5 all-day
AM - All Month - Sexual Assault Action Month - Domestic/sexual violence materials, resources, and actions happening across Oregon

 

Sexual Assault Action Month

 

Domestic/sexual violence materials, resources, and actions happening across Oregon

Oregon State Proclamation of Sexual Assault Action Month from the Office of Governor Brown

Presidential Proclamation of Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month

VALOR 2022 SAAM Toolkit
“ValorUS (VALOR) leads with prevention of sexual violence. For 2022 Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM), we have released this free toolkit to empower you to lead your own community. With the theme of “Collective Action for Equity,” these resources support you to spread the message of prevention of sexual violence.”
Download in English and Spanish here

Caja De Herramientas Yo Soy SAAM 2022– A collection of 39 original and curated resources for bililngual advocates from ALAS members and allies

Reclaim/Reclama 2022 – SARC’s annual art magazine, highlighting the art of those who have been impacted by sexual violence, will be shared digitally this year at sarcoregon.org and on social media (Facebook and Instagram) through the month of April at @sarcoregon.

Events

Domestic Violence for Mental Health Providers

The first three sessions, Understanding, Screening for, and Intervening in Domestic Violence is available right now to view on demand, the recording of our fourth session will be on our YouTube channel Thursday April 21st.

Open House and Art Gallery at the Family Justice Center 

Take a tour of the Family Justice Center in Washington County (FJC) and meet the other organizations co-located at FJC supporting folks who have experienced violence. View art created by people impacted by violence, collected through the Sexual Assault Resource Center’s Reclaim/Reclama Magazine. Join us on April 24th, 2022 from 2:00 pm to 5:00 pm at 735 SW 158th Ave Suite 100 Beaverton, OR 97006. Reading of the Proclamations and some speaking from survivors of violence will start at 4:00 pm. This event is free and open to the public!

Yo Soy SAAM Webinarios offered by Alianza Latina en contra la Agresión Sexual

Talking Healthy Relationships: A Conversation Guide for Parents & Caregivers

Victim Rights Law Center When Rape Results in Pregnancy: The intersection of Rape and Abortion    

Virtual April 27th at 3pm PST

Hosted by the Victim Rights Law Center (VRLC), “When Rape Results in Pregnancy: The Intersection of Sexual Violence and Abortion,” will examine the intersection of abortion laws and rape and bring together a diversity of speakers in the medical, legal, legislative, and academic fields. Listen to experts share their insights on this complex issue, and learn how you can support survivors who become pregnant resulting from an assault.  100% of proceeds will go towards supporting survivors of rape and sexual assault. Visit our website to learn more about our panelists and the event.

Ask an Expert Series Webinar: Male Victims and Human Trafficking

April 28th at 3pm EST (12pm PST)

What services and support are needed for men and boys who are victims of human trafficking? How are these services different from their female counterparts? Ensuring equity and inclusion of services for all victims of human trafficking means addressing the needs of male victims. Join three national experts for this discussion on male victims’ experiences with sex and labor trafficking. Panelists will share their insight on needed services, how to talk about human trafficking and develop outreach materials in ways that are inclusive of males, and where to find additional resources on this topic.

Events

Rose Haven Open House Event

Virtual Mental Health First Aid

Tuesday April 26th at 9am PST

Offered by Lines for Life, mental Health First Aid (MHFA) teaches people to identify, understand, and respond to signs and symptoms of mental health and substance use challenges.

Register here

Exploring the Incidence and Impact of Economic Abuse Among Teens

Tuesday, April 26th at 11am PST

Offered by Futures Without Violence. Despite the potential lifetime impacts, economic abuse has been long overlooked among teen dating partnerships. Knowing what is at stake, Futures Without Violence in partnership with The Allstate Foundation and University of Pittsburgh Medical Center surveyed nearly 3,000 teens to explore how economic abuse – from disrupting education to interfering with employment to financial control – shows up in their relationships. The findings are eye-opening.

Register here

Interrupting Anti-Blackness Workshop

Tuesday, April 26th & Wednesday, April 27th at 2:30pm PST

This two-part workshop series with Washington Nonprofits is a case study centered workshop for Community leaders, Accountants, Front line workers, Middle Management Professionals, Executive Directors, Nonprofit Professionals, Educators, Board Members and co-conspirators who are committed to deepening their understanding of why Black liberation practices are crucial in interrupting anti-Black racism, macroaggressions, and white supremacist systems. This webinar will not be recorded.

Learn more here

Ask an Expert Series Webinar: Male Victims and Human Trafficking

Thursday, April 28th at 12pm PST
What services and support are needed for men and boys who are victims of human trafficking? How are these services different from their female counterparts? Ensuring equity and inclusion of services for all victims of human trafficking means addressing the needs of male victims. Join three national experts for this discussion on male victims’ experiences with sex and labor trafficking. Panelists will share their insight on needed services, how to talk about human trafficking and develop outreach materials in ways that are inclusive of males, and where to find additional resources on this topic.

Register here

NNEDV Advocacy Days 

June 7th- June 8th 
Trainings June 1st & 2nd

Register here

 

 

Opportunities and things to know about

 

Oregon DOJ launched Sanctuary Promise Hotline

Today, Oregon Department of Justice launches our Sanctuary Promise Hotline!  This program is designed to receive reports from and provide support to individuals and families targeted in violation of Oregon’s longstanding sanctuary laws.  Victims, witnesses, concerned community members, and whistleblowers can report violations to these laws, access culturally responsive support, and request a DOJ investigation into any violations of the laws.

Allstate Foundation Moving Ahead Grant Program

$1.5 Million in Funding for State Domestic Violence Coalitions Committed to Providing Financial Empowerment Services for Survivors
Over the past 16 years, The Allstate Foundation has invested more than $85 million to end relationship abuse. As part of this national effort, The Allstate Foundation is proud to continue the Moving Ahead Grant Program – a competitive grant program for U.S. state and territory domestic violence coalitions committed to the development, acceleration, and implementation of financial empowerment services for relationship abuse survivors.
This year, up to $1.5 million in Moving Ahead grants will support innovative financial empowerment programs that provide financial education services to survivors, through the implementation of The Allstate Foundation Moving Ahead Curriculum and asset-building activities in at least one of the following categories: job readiness and job training; survivor matched savings programs; micro-loans; credit building and/or repair; and micro-enterprise programs.
Eligible state and territory domestic violence coalitions are invited to apply. Grant applications will be accepted March 28 – April 25, 2022. Visit the Moving Ahead Grant Program landing page to learn more about the funding opportunity and requirements, and to register for an informational webinar.

Learn about The Allstate Foundation’s mission and our 70-year history of improving communities across the country.

NNEDV and GNWS launches Lila.Help

Advocates around the world have been discussing the need for a vetted global directory for many years and the pandemic has made the need for online resources even more clear. As a founding member of the GNWS, NNEDV has worked with the Global Network of Women’s Shelters to bring together advocates from across the globe. Since Lila.Help was conceptualized in 2019, NNEDV has partnered in its development and worked closely with other regional and national networks to bring Lila.help to fruition. This directory is a great step toward ensuring survivors around the world are connected to help, including having NNEDV’s resources.

Learn more here

OVW Grants Solicitation Announcements

Check out some of these opportunities for OVW funding

Grants.gov Deadline: April 19
JustGrants Deadline: April 21

Grants.gov Deadline: April 21
JustGrants Deadline: April 26

Grants.gov Deadline: April 26
JustGrants Deadline: April 28th

Recent Job Openings

Sexual Assault Support Services
(Eugene) 
Resiliency Skills Coordinator

Shelter from the Storm
(LaGrande)
Executive Director

OASIS
(Gold Beach)
Program Manager
Systemic Navigator (Co-Located Advocate)

YWCA
(Portland)
Resident Services

Helping Hands Against Violence
(Hood River) 
Outreach Coordinator

Raphael House
(Portland) 
Primary Advocate (Bilingual)
View all available Raphael House positions

NAYA
(Portland)
Domestic Violence Advocate
Click here to view all available NAYA positions

Clackamas Women’s Services
(Clackamas) 
Case Manager
Latina Counselor

Sexual Assault Task Force 
(Keizer)
Executive Director

Portland Community College
(Cascade)
Criminal Justice Faculty Instructor

Self Enhancement Inc.
(Portland)
Domestic Violence Advocate
Domestic Violence Program Manager

Familias En Acción
(Portland + Salem Metro)
HIV/STI Program Coordinator

University of Oregon
(Eugene)
Staff Attorney, DV Clinic

Douglas County Task Force
(Douglas County) 
Family Violence Coordinator

Ohio Domestic Violence Network
(Ohio)
Administrative Coordinator

California Partnership to End Domestic Violence
(California)
Director of Prevention Strategies
Spanish Language Interpreter/Translator Specialist
Lead Spanish Language Interpreter/ Translator Specialist

Futures without Violence
(San Francisco, CA) 
Program Specialist- Health and Workplace

Utah Domestic Violence Coalition
(Utah)
Communications and Engagement Specialist

Violence Free Minnesota
(Minnesota) 
Technology Justice Project Program Manager

Illinois Coalition Against Domestic Violence
(Illinois)
Administrative Assistant
Director of Fatality Review/ Fatality Review Coordinator
Strategic Partnerships Coordinator
Fiscal Technical Assistance Coordinator

North Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence
(North Carolina) 
Finance Director

NNEDV
(Washington D.C.)
Capacity Technical Assistance (CTA) Coordinator
Vice President of External Affairs
Transitional Housing and Positively Safe Coordinator

Is your organization hiring? Attach the job listing document in an email to Rowan@ocadsv.org to be sent along our listservs and to be in the next digest!

Submit Job Posting!

 

Our Work Groups and Caucuses

Advocates! Did you know that we have work groups and caucuses for you to connect with other advocates and get support for struggles you may be experiencing?

Click here to get involved!

AM – All Month – TQC -The Q Center – Virtual, Diverse Support Groups for People in the LGBTQ+ Community @ Online Regerster for Details
Oct 5 all-day

Sponsor Logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The Q Center: Out of Portland OR, Continues To Offer Several Virtual, Diverse Support Groups for People in the LGBTQ+ Community:

As the largest LGBTQ+ community center in the Pacific Northwest, Q Center proudly serves the LGBTQ2SIA+ communities of Portland Metro and Southwest Washington. Our drop-in and event space on North Mississippi Avenue is a frequent first stop for new arrivals in Portland, and for longtime residents who are newly out or questioning their sexual or gender identity.

Q Center also serves as an information hub for friends, partners, community, and family members of LGBTQ2SIA+ individuals. We pride ourselves on our collaborative approach and seek out ways to share resources with other nonprofits and public institutions locally and statewide.

 

To learn about the many groups offered by the Q Center, here is the link to their calendar page: https://www.pdxqcenter.org/calendar.

To register for any of these groups please either email info@pdxqcenter.org, or call 503-234-7837.  

AM – September is Suicide Prevention Month and National Recovery Month – Warmline – Resources
Oct 5 all-day

 

 

September is Suicide Prevention Month

and

National Recovery Month

This month, we share support and resources for suicide prevention and recovery from addiction.

SUICIDE PREVENTION MONTH

Every September, we strive to bring attention to suicide awareness and prevention. Suicide continues to be a leading cause of death in the United States; over 45,00 individuals lost their lives to suicide last year. Suicide rates across all populations have held consistently high since 2016, peaking in 2018. Some people report feeling that the topic of suicide is uncomfortable to talk about. Often after a suicide has occurred, loved ones and friends acknowledge that they thought something was wrong or saw signs they were concerned about but did not know what to do or felt uncomfortable saying or doing anything. Breaking that isolation and that discomfort can save lives, and we encourage engaging with the community around this, in events such as this education and discussion webinar on September 6 run by Mental Health America on identification and prevention of youth suicide.

Below is a list of organizations that contain helpful information and resources. Links provide signs to look for, tips on how best to support someone who could be at risk, as well as information on what to do in such a crisis. We continue to feel it is vital to share resources for immediate safety and long-term support, both for those suffering from suicidal thoughts and their families:

 


NATIONAL RECOVERY MONTH

Chronic alcohol use and drug use impact physical health and mental health, significantly reducing quality of life and shortening life spans.  Chronic addiction continues to be an ongoing national crisis, despite strong efforts in combating the disorder through expanded treatment access. Deaths due to addiction have increased, as well as a 59% increase in reports of alcohol abuse in 2020. There is some good news, overdose rates such as those caused by misuse of methadone have decreased, but we have a long way to go.

Isolation, boredom, frustration, and anxiety all contribute to increased substance use as an escape, as highlighted in this article. Recovery is a lengthy process and a lifetime of challenges for those who are successful in quitting drugs and alcohol. If you are struggling with a dependence on substances and feel like you cannot stop, or are watching someone you love or care about struggle with drugs or alcohol, we want you to know there is help, hope, and support. We wanted to highlight a list of major peer and professional support services that offer both in-person and remote connections, as well as other resources.

As always, please reach out to us here at the City of Boston Employee Assistance Program for immediate support and assistance. Have a safe and warm September.

 

CGAA – Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous – Support Meetings, Support Chat for Family and Friends, Resources – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online Via ZOOM
Oct 5 all-day

 

Who We Are

Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous is a fellowship of people who support each other in recovering from the problems resulting from excessive game playing. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop video gaming, which is completely up to you. CGAA has no dues or fees. Our groups share their collective experience and the principles that helped them, but CGAA has no experts, hierarchy, or required beliefs. We have etiquette and traditions, but no strict rules.
If you are struggling with compulsive gaming, leave your contact info at 970-364-3497 and a CGAA member will call you back
Or email us at helpline@cgaa.info
For other issues, contact us at support@cgaa.info

 

ZOOM MEETINGS

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 
ZOOM MEETING

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 

Gamers Find A Local Support Group

Use the link below to get more information about local groups and a notification when a local meeting is started. Due to the COVID pandemic, most meetings are currently held in an outdoor setting or online.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LOCAL GROUP FINDER TOOL

 

CONTACT GROUPS IN OREGON BY LOCATION

 

 

SUPPORT FOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS

What Can I Do?

Video gaming is a common pastime. To many people, it is surprising that it can become a serious addiction, that is, an activity that is engaged in compulsively, without control or concern for consequences.

Video gaming addiction is a very serious problem that is harmful to everyone it touches. Since everyone involved suffers from it, everyone involved needs some help. Here are some important things to know.

First, no one is responsible for someone else’s compulsive gaming. As the Al-Anon slogan goes, “I didn’t cause it, I can’t control it, and I can’t cure it.”

You didn’t cause it.

Some people partly blame themselves for the dysfunctional behavior of their family members, particularly with addicts who are very quick to shift responsibility off themselves and blame others. Perhaps you played games with your loved one, purchased games, or encouraged it, thinking it was a harmless leisure activity. Maybe you’ve been involved in some conflict and wonder if that has driven him or her to hide away in gaming. But no one is responsible for another person’s behavior or mental disorders.

You can’t control it.

You may have already tried to talk to your friend or family member. Perhaps you have bargained with them, or given ultimatums. You have tried to help them see what damage they are doing to themselves and others. And none of it has worked. This is baffling to you. Why don’t they seem to understand or care? Why can’t they see what is obvious to you? This is actually a symptom of the disease of addiction, one that destines efforts for control to failure.

You can’t cure it.

We all would like to believe that we have the ability to help those we love. We often think that if we can just get the right information, figure out the right thing to say or do, perhaps change something about ourselves, we can fix the problem. People should be able to solve their own problems. Why can’t we do that with this one? There is a simple reason. There is no cure for addiction. It requires treatment. The recovery process is long and difficult. And there is only one person who can start that process, the one who is gaming compulsively. There are things you can do. Here are some suggestions that you may want to consider, that other family members and friends have found helpful.

Get information.

The literature of recovery fellowships for family and friends of addicts (such as Al-Anon) has much helpful guidance, some of which is available online as well. There are people who have been in situations very similar to yours, who have learned much from them, and who are willing to share the lessons learned, their experience, strength and hope. We hope you avail yourself of such resources.

Detach with love.

Putting energy into arguing with someone who is playing compulsively will not help either of you. Your loved one has a serious problem that you are powerless to control or cure, and that they will not get help until they want it. As much as you love someone, you cannot force this process on another person.

Stop enabling.

Paradoxically, at the same time people are arguing with, bargaining with or shaming a compulsive gamer, they are often (perhaps without realizing it) supporting the addiction in many ways. Anything that shields an addict from the consequences of his or her behavior is enabling, and can include such basic things as providing food, shelter, money, companionship, housekeeping, and covering for employment and legal difficulties. Helping a compulsive gamer keep up an appearance of normalcy is helping him or her continue in the destructive behavior. While you cannot change him or her, you can make changes for yourself. You can shift your energy away from enabling behaviors and toward meeting your own needs.

Take care of yourself.

Whether or not your loved one ever stops gaming, you deserve to have a healthy and happy life. Once you have accepted that you are powerless over their gaming behavior, you can begin to focus on what you can do for yourself, to accomplish your own goals. With the help of others who have been where you are, you can learn to set healthy boundaries and stick to them.

Join our WhatsApp Chat Site for Family and Friends!

Game-Anon

WhatsApp Group Invite

Visit whatsapp.com/dl on your mobile phone to install.

By installing WhatsApp, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

 

Chat Using A Macintosh

 

Mac OS X 10.10 and higher. WhatsApp must be installed on your phone.

By clicking the Download button, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

DOWNLOAD FOR MAC OS X

Download for Windows 8 and higher (64-bit)
Download for Windows 8 and higher (32-bit)

 

 


Things To Do Instead of Gaming

One of the things we were trying to do with our gaming was meet some basic needs. If we do not meet those needs in normal healthy ways, we will suffer much stronger urges to game again. Some basic needs to cover are social needs, self expression, creativity, a sense of challenge and accomplishment, stress relief, a sense of purpose and meaning, and a sense of safety through control and predictability.

Here are some ideas for activities that will help meet these needs, reduce cravings, help with recovery from addiction, and fill some of the hours freed from compulsive gaming.

Please don’t let the length of this list overwhelm you. The idea is not to start ten new things and try to change everything all at once. We seek small bits of progress, not perfection. A good place to start is to put first things first. What need is currently most important? What’s right in front of me? What opportunity has come my way recently? If we take steps of small improvement with one or two areas each day, we are moving in the right direction.

Stress Relief

  • Talking with a sponsor or recovery buddy, CGAA meetings, or step work
  • Getting outside for fresh air and sunlight by taking a walk or doing some outdoor work
  • Meditation, coloring, craft work, journaling, or reading

Sense of safety through freedom, control, and predictability

  • Goal setting
  • Counseling or psychotherapy
  • Home organization, renovation, or spring cleaning

Sense of purpose, meaning, and self-respect

  • Supporting and growing the larger CGAA fellowship through service work like helping run a meeting, starting a local meeting, doing outreach to professionals, or attending CGAA business meetings
  • Attending a spiritual group like meditation, yoga, spiritual retreat, or religious gathering
  • Doing volunteer work like teaching, helping others, animal care, or building community places
  • Caring for a pet, house plants, or garden

Social needs

  • Attending CGAA meetings, connecting outside of meetings, reaching out to newcomers, or calling someone
  • Joining a hobby group like theater, a hiking group, art workshop, book club, public speaking, board games or card game group
  • Hosting a fun event like board games night or karaoke
  • Playing team sports, taking up martial arts, or playing one-on-one sports
  • Going to fun events like concerts, dances, or events on meetup.com
  • Calling up, video conferencing, or visiting with friends, family, neighbors, or other communities

Self expression and creativity

  • Journaling, opening up to a CGAA sponsor, or sharing openly in a meeting
  • Art work like drawing, photography, sculpting, or creative writing
  • Performance art like theater, singing, playing music, or writing music

Sense of challenge and accomplishment

  • Working the steps with a sponsor
  • Crafts like woodworking, origami, knitting
  • Outdoor activities like gardening, geocaching, bird watching, star gazing, tracking, plant identification, survival skills, or boating
  • Learning something like a foreign language, dancing, magic tricks, mechanical repair, cooking, a musical instrument, or computer programming
  • Career goals like getting a new job, starting a business, enrolling in school, or taking classes

Reconnection to one’s body and whole self

  • Meditating on breath, sounds, or bodily sensations
  • Exercise like walking, hiking, swimming, cycling, yoga, jogging, going to a gym, or playing a sport

If you are in your first week or two off of games, it’s likely that few of these ideas will appeal to you. That’s normal. Until our minds and bodies have some time to heal, we have low interest, energy, and motivation. This list will probably not give you something that you can plug in place of video games and immediately throw yourself into with the same zeal. This list is meant to help us explore new ways of spending our time, meeting our needs, and connecting with people. Find a few that hold some appeal and try taking some small steps in their direction. If you can’t seem to think of anything fun to do except game, you can come back to this list, find the most appealing thing, and just take a couple of little steps in its direction.

Consider setting reminders for yourself or keeping a schedule of your time and new activities. It is important to appreciate the small victories of exercising willpower, regaining motivation, and socializing. It helps to discuss our progress and the challenges we experience with a CGAA sponsor, recovery buddy, personal counselor, or therapist.

Rediscovering What is Fun

It is normal to think that nothing but gaming sounds fun. For most of us, our years of compulsive gaming warped and narrowed our idea of fun. As small children, it meant almost anything new or interesting or social or even mildly rewarding. Years of pulling the dopamine lever with video games changed our concept of fun to require instant gratification, frequent rewards, clear and constant progress, excitement, intense visuals, control, and/or predictability.

Part of recovery is letting our concept of fun expand back outward to a wide world of possible new challenges and experiences, many of which are calm and subtle compared to video games. It takes time to overcome withdrawals and heal from the damage, but the change does happen if we abstain from all gaming long term and focus on new pursuits and improving our lives. This list has many activities that do not meet the old, narrow, warped idea of “fun,” but those of us who persist at exploring them do find many to be gratifying and enjoyable.

Take, for example, a hike up a mountain. To a group of hikers excited to venture into the wilderness with friends and see wildlife and panoramic views from on high, all while getting a great workout, it’s a ton of fun. To someone who is uninterested in hiking, out of shape, and focused on every little unpleasant aspect of it, it’s a torturous death march. It is exactly the same hike in either case. The difference is in the attitude and conditioning.

The same is true with every item of these lists. Whether or not an activity sounds fun or torturous depends entirely upon attitude and conditioning. Every one of them has the potential to be gratifying and enjoyable if we adopt a positive attitude, try to have fun, and persist at it, especially when we involve friends and like-minded people.

HLAAOR – Hearing Loss Association of America/Oregon – Meetings and Resources @ Online Register for Details
Oct 5 all-day

 

 

Hearing Loss Association of America/Oregon Meetings and Resources, 2021

HLAA of Portland meets the third Saturday each month (except June, July, and August) 10 am, in the Wistar Morris Conference Room in the Main Hospital Building on the Legacy Good Samaritan Campus, 1015 NW 22nd Ave. (at Marshall), Portland, 97210. Contact Mark Foster, president; email: hlaportland@gmail.com. Write P.O. Box 2112, Portland, OR 97208-2112; http://www.hlaa-or.org/portlandchapter.html.

HLAA of Lane County meets quarterly: second Thursday in March, June, Sept., and Dec., at 7 p.m. at the Hilyard Community Center, 2580 Hilyard St., Eugene. Right now we are scheduled to meet in person June 10 unless COVID-19 infections mandate otherwise.

Mail: P.O. Box 22501, Eugene, OR 97402. Clark Anderson; email: clarkoa@msn.com

HLAA of Linn and Benton counties meets the last Wednesday each month (except June, July, & Dec.) at 6:30 p.m. at the Reimar Building, next to Albany General Hospital, 1085 6th Ave. SW, Albany, OR 97321. Contact: John Hood-Fysh, email: jhoodfysh@gmail.com; 541/220-8541 (cell – call or text), 818 Broadalbin St. SW, Albany, OR 97321.

Note: HLAA of Douglas County no longer meets the requirements for a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. Reinstatement may occur, but right now, this group meets as a support group. Contacts: Vincent Portulano, president, email: HLAADC@outlook. com; or Ann Havens, secretary, 541/673-3119. Check with them for location for meetings and time.

NATIONAL HLAA EVENT CALENDARS

HLAA Calendar

https://www.hearingloss.org/programs-events/calendar/

HLAA Leaders Calendar

https://hlaagroups.hearingloss.org/g/HLAALeaders/calendar

HLAA Subgroups

https://hlaagroups.hearingloss.org/g/HLAALeaders/subgroups

HLAA Virtual Meetings / Captioned Recordings

https://www.hearingloss.org/hearing-help/communities/hlaa-national-virtual-meetings/

 

MORE RESOURCES

Hands and Voices
https://www.handsandvoicesor.org

Supports families and children who are deaf and hard of hearing, by connecting parents, mentorship, educational advocacy, community development and support programs. Collaborates with professionals to support families.

FACT Oregon
https://www.factoregon.org/

Supports, empowers and advocates for families who experience disability.

Family to Family Health Information Center
Oregon Family-to-Family Health Information Center | OHSU

Supports families and caregivers of children with special health needs to navigate the healthcare system. Many resources on the website.

AG Bell Oregon 
https://www.agbell.org/Connect/Oregon-Chapter

  • Facebook page – AG Bell Oreoon
  • Instagram – aobelloreoon

Local chapter of a national organization. The focus is to promote listening and spoken language education, advocate for accessibility, educational services, and health-related rights, and create connections and memories together.

Oregon Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) Program

https://www.oreown ov/oha/PDH/HeaIthvP eooleFamilies/Babies/HeaIthScreenino/He arinqscreenino/Paoes/index asox

For Providers: Information on EHDI Reporting, forms, protocols, facilities, OVERS Hearing Screening Module, 1-3-6 Newborn Hearing Screening Checklist For Parents: Information on hearing screening (what it involves and why it’s important), follow-up (what happens if a newborn doesn’t pass a screening), Early Intervention/Family Services, Guide By Your Side (a Hands & Voices program that matches trained parent guides with families who have recently found out their child has a hearing loss), and other resources for families

American Cochlear Implant Alliance

https://www.acialliance.org/

Facebook page

Twitter

Contains information about research, awareness, and advocacy around cochlear implants. Information about hearing loss and cochlear implants in general.

Oregon Association for Deaf
https://oad1921.org/

Advocates for the rights of people who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing in Oregon. The website contains articles, meeting and conference information, and youth opportunities.

Hearing Loss Association of America – Oregon State Association 
https://www.hlaa-or.org/about-us.html

Education, Information and Advocacy.

Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI)
https://www.cdc.oov/ncbddd/hearinqloss/e hdi-programs.html

Information about EHDI programs Information for families including:

     • Questions You May Want to Ask Your Child’s Audiologist

     • Just in Time for Pediatric Primary Care Providers

FACEBOOK EVENTS

ASL Social Chat:

EVERY SUNDAY @ 12:00noon to 2:00 pm

VANCOUVER MALL – Food Court [2nd floor]

Host by: Gary Holden

ASL Social Chat:

Host by: Gary Holden

PORTLAND OPEN-CAPTIONED MOVIES:

(See FB page for MORE information)

Order Tickets online @ bagdadmovies.com

Host by: Isaac Stone Dick

ASL NIGHT GAMES (announcing soon)

Every Second Saturday evening

ASL Game Night page for more information.

Host by: Stephen RodBjorn

World Deaf Timberfest

Camp Taloali

Contact for information: Andrea Albers

Pacific Northwest Deaf Golf Association (PNWDGA) and Portland Metro Deaf Golf Association (FB Page).

(See FB Page for MORE information)

Host by: Craig Marineau

Northwest Deaf Traveling League (NWDTL)

(Deaf/HOH Bowling Club)

Contact: Melody Kitty McDaniel and Andrea Albers

NW Deaf Poker Tournaments

Announcement in Jan/Feb 2022 !!!

Host by: James Forncrook

CYMASPACE: Announcement SOON

Host by: Myles de Bastion

Deaf Massage Therapist (see link below)

www.openhandhealth.com/book-now

Host by: Clara Bella Storry Parnell

(Email: clara@openhandhealth.com)

ASL Coffee Podcast – see announcements on regular posting:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/334857136618534/user/100069324005062/

ASL Coffee Chats @ 3pm on Fridays at Hidden Creek Community Center in Hillsboro

To find a Deaf ASL tutor or mentor, see ASL TUTORS AND MENTORS FB page.

Bridges in Oregon

https://www.facebook.com/BridgesOregon

Source: https://www.facebook.com/groups/portlandaslevents/

AG Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
AG Bell is another convenient resource for those seeking in-person hearing loss support groups, with 
41 active chapters across the United States and Puerto Rico. Specifically designed to support children with hearing loss and their families, AG Bell hosts everything from social events to informational sessions for individuals and families impacted by hearing loss; connect with your nearest chapter to learn more. You can also join the AG Bell Facebook group to connect with fellow members online.

DeafandHoH Forum

DeafandHoH is a website featuring hearing loss news, a discussion forum, resources for financial aid and other services, search directories for audiologists, hearing care facilities, speech-language pathologists, and more. The topics covered on the site include living with hearing loss, caring for a family member or friend with hearing loss, American Sign Language, and hearing loss products. You can also join open chat nights on select Wednesdays from 6pm-7pm PST / 9pm-10pm EST to enjoy live interaction!

 

CALL TO ACTION FOR PEER SUPPORT

https://www.nasmhpd.org/sites/default/files/Assessment-5_Deaf-and-Hard-of-Hearing-Peer-Support.pdf

https://www.transformation-center.org/home/community/deaf-and-hard-of-hearing-recovery-project/

https://www.nasmhpd.org/sites/default/files/BeingSeen.pdf

https://www.hearinglikeme.com/why-we-need-deaf-peer-support-in-our-communities/

https://nsuworks.nova.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1018&context=jadara

12-Step online for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Sounds of Sobriety (SOS):  This online email group was formed to help us who have a hearing loss (deaf, deafened, or hard of hearing) to find a place to recover from alcoholism. For many of us, face-to-face AA meetings no longer work. All members of AA, or those who think they may have a problem with alcohol, are welcome.    SOS_online_group-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Deaf Grateful:  This is a real-time open discussion meeting on Saturday at 4 pm (EST) for deaf & HOH people who have a desire to stop drinking. Meeting uses videoconferencing software (easily downloaded) that requires a high speed internet connection and a webcam. Our communication mode is ASL only (no audio). http://doda.omnijoin.com

Perspectives of people who are deaf and hard of hearing on mental health, recovery, and peer support

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23149648/

Is Telemental Health Services a Viable Alternative to Traditional Psychotherapy for Deaf Individuals?

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27260308/

https://www.arundellodge.org/omhc/telemental-health-for-deaf-and-hard-of-hearing/

Deaf Centric Approach / Peer Support Program

https://www.minnpost.com/mental-health-addiction/2016/01/alison-aubrecht-peer-support-program-takes-deaf-centric-approach-men/

Human Trafficking – Crisis Line – Trafficking Survivors – Resources – Articles – Peer Support
Oct 5 all-day
Human Trafficking - Crisis Line - Trafficking Survivors - Resources - Articles - Peer Support

 

 

Human Trafficking

Crisis Line – Trafficking Survivors – Resources – Articles – Peer Support

National Human Trafficking Resource Center

The National Human Trafficking Resource Center (NHTRC) is a national, toll-free hotline available to answer calls from anywhere in the country, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, every day of the year.

Toll Free Phone:

1-888-373-7888

Text:

“Help” or “Info” to 233733 (BeFree)

Live chat:

Referral directory:

National Survivor Network has Peer to Peer Mentors: https://nationalsurvivornetwork.org/membership/

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Sex Trafficking Prevention and Intervention Organizations

Call to Safety Line (Portland, Oregon)

Phone: 503.235.5333

Toll Free: 888-235-5333

Multnomah County Resources andHotline for victims / survivors:

OREGON RESOURCE LIST (PDF) for Survivors

Rebecca Bender (Grants Pass, OR)

Resources Page

REBECCA BENDER IS CEO OF THE REBECCA BENDER INITIATIVE AND FOUNDER OF ELEVATE ACADEMY

Rebecca is a thought leader, advocate, and consultant who equips individuals and organizations to identify and fight human trafficking in their own back yards. She was appointed to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, regularly testifies as an expert witness in court, and has trained over 100,000 professionals, including FBI, Homeland Security, regional law enforcement and medical personnel. She works closely with the Oregon Department of Justice and is a leading voice in the fight against trafficking nationally.

The U.S. INSTITUTE AGAINST HUMAN TRAFFICKING LAUNCHED

PROJECT: REACH OUT

TO REACH AND PROVIDE SERVICES TO HUMAN TRAFFICKING VICTIMS.

Project REACH

Phone: (617) 232–1303 ex. 211

Fax: (617) 232-1280

Email: ehopper@jri.org

http://www.traumacenter.org/clients/reach_svcs.php

General Scope: Project REACH provides consultation and brief mental health services to trafficking victims throughout the United States. Project REACH provides case consultation to local health providers regarding individuals who have been trafficked, offering expertise on trauma and mental health to local providers.
UPDATE: The Trauma Center at JRI has closed. In 2017 Dr. Bessel van der Kolk was terminated due to allegations of creating a hostile environment that allowed the then ED to engage in abusive practices.

FREE Training Video (Signup Required / eCourse) Utilizing Telehealth in Identifying and Resourcing Trafficking Victims

https://www.telementalhealthtraining.com/utilizing-telehealth-in-identifying-and-resourcing-trafficking-victims

US National Office for Victims of Crime

Upcoming events at:

https://ovc.ojp.gov/events

On-demand events at:

https://ovc.ojp.gov/events/on-demand-events

PREVENTING RETRAUMATIZATION: A MACRO SOCIAL WORK APPROACH

https://www.socialworker.com/feature-articles/practice/preventing-retraumatization-a-macro-social-work-approach-to-trauma-informed-practices-policies/

PEER-TO-PEER SUPPORT TOOLKIT DEVELOPMENT FOR SURVIVORS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING:A WORK IN PROGRESS

https://fspeel.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Peer-to-Peer_Support_Toolkit_for_HT_Survivors-Work_in_Progress_June2020.pdf

National Human Trafficking Training & Technical Assistance Center Publications

Peer Support Groups Exploratory Brief

https://nhttac.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/2021-03/Peer%20Support%20Groups%20Exploratory%20Brief%20508c.pdf

 

CONDUCTING SEEKING SAFETY PEER LED PROGRAM WITH INDIVIDUALS WHO EXPERIENCE HUMAN TRAFFICKING AND SUD

https://nhttac.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/2021-09/NHTTAC%20Peer%202%20Peer%20Factsheet_508-Ready%20for%20Website.pdf

Peer-Led Support Groups: Overview of the Empirical Research and Implications for Individuals Who Have Experienced Trafficking and Substance Use Disorder (Overview, Peer Support Outcomes, etc.)

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5ee517995ce62276749898ed/t/608ac0a5899f45278fb958f0/1619706022880/NHTTAC+Peer+Support+Lit+Review_FINAL+resubmission_3.12.21.pdf

 

Toolkit for Building Survivor-Informed Organizations (February 2018)

https://nhttac.acf.hhs.gov/resources/toolkit-building-survivor-informed-organizations

 

Survivor-Informed Practice: Definition, Best Practices, and Recommendations (October 2017)

https://nhttac.acf.hhs.gov/resources/survivor-informed-practice-definition-best-practices-and-recommendations-october-2017

Survivor-Informed Practice: Self-Guided Assessment Tool (October 2017)
Human Trafficking Task Force eGuide: Using a Trauma Informed Approach
A WAY OUT – 23 ONLINE PEER SUPPORT GROUPS FOR SURVIVORS OF DV / SEXUAL ASSAULT

HOPE FOR JUSTICE

Spot the signs – several flyers:
Report a concern:
To report a concern of human trafficking or modern slavery
Call (615) 356-0946 on Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm CST
For general information:
USA
HOPE FOR JUSTICE
P.O. Box 280365
Nashville, TN 37228
(+1) 615-356-0946
Office Hours:
Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm (Central Time)
Visit this link for more information and resources:
Upcoming events including a business lunch and learn, a conference and more:
Spot the signs (further details at this link):
[POTENTIAL] INDICATORS OF MODERN SLAVERY & HUMAN TRAFFICKING
  • Houses or flats with too many people, all picked up or dropped off at the same time

  • People who seem scared, confused or have untreated injuries

  • Few or no documents, or someone else in control of their documents / passport

  • No control over their own post/mail, no phone or phone held by someone else

  • Low or no pay

  • One person speaking on behalf of many others, who may avoid eye contact or conversation

  • Lights on at workplaces at strange times – are people living there?

  • Feel they are in debt to someone

  • Limited freedom of movement and dependency on others

  • Fear of police/authorities

  • Fear of a trafficker, believing their life or families’ lives are at risk if they escape or complain

  • Anxious and unwilling to tell others about their situation

  • Poor health, malnutrition or untreated dental conditions

  • Bruising; signs of other physical or psychological trauma including anxiety, confusion, memory loss

  • Less often, someone believing they are being controlled through witchcraft

Note: Those affected are unlikely to self-identify as a ‘victim’ and may not realize or accept they are being controlled

L4L – Lines For Life – Oregon Suicide Prevention Conference 2022 – Oct 11 – Oct 13
Oct 5 all-day

 

 

Lines for Life, in partnership with Oregon Health Authority and a group of dedicated community leaders, invites you to join us as we explore and amplify the life-saving prevention work happening throughout our region in communities large and small, urban, rural and remote.

When:

October 11-13, 2022 (pre-conference trainings held on October 10th)

Where:

Ashland Hills Hotel & Convention Center in Ashland, Oregon

Cost:

Registration costs $250 – Scholarships are available

We invite leaders, practitioners, and loss and attempt survivors from all communities and sectors striving for suicide prevention to join us at our 2022 conference.

LEARN MORE AND REGISTER NOW

 

Scholarships are available

The scholarship application deadline is September 12th, 2022, and will cover registration and lodging for the duration of the conference.

We will prioritize scholarship requests from individuals representing underserved communities, with lived experience and/or individuals not supported by an organization to attend.

The scholarship application deadline is September 12th, 2022, and will cover registration and lodging for the duration of the conference. 

 

 

 

C – TEC Youth Services – Clackamas Achievement Program – Assisting Youth with Education and Employment Goals – Accepting Referrals @ Online event regester for details
Oct 5 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

 

 

C-TEC Youth Services’ Clackamas Achievement Program supports youth ages 14-21 in and around Clackamas County who have not obtained a high school diploma or GED and have become disengaged from education during the COVID pandemic.

Services we offer include:

  • case management,
  • financial assistance,
  • support services,
  • system navigation,
  • and community referrals.

Initial contacts with youth focus on the safety, health, and well-being of the youth and family, with an emphasis on a caring interaction to support the student holistically.

Students will work with a  Youth Re engagement Advisor (YRA) who will stay in regular contact, providing appropriate referrals to community agencies, and helping to support the student with navigating school enrollment with their individual district, alternative, or GED program. The YRA will continue to support the youth by encouraging attendance, progress, and addressing any needs or barriers.

  • Support services such as tutors, transportation assistance, school supplies, equipment, etc. will be provided as appropriate.
  • Youth will be offered dual enrollment into other programs such as C-TEC’s Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) services to leverage additional funds and services. WIOA participants are eligible for ongoing services that include transition to college, opportunities for career exploration and hands-on career exposure, work readiness training, certifications and credentials, and paid work experience.
  • Clackamas Community College is partnering to provide education services such as high school credit recovery and GED preparation and testing, however, this can be arranged with Mt Hood Community College or Portland Community College for students that are closer to these institutions.
  • Their Workforce Development Department will provide opportunities for youth over 18 that are interested in job training programs or increasing their skills. Assistance with financial aid will be offered, as well as one-on-one support with navigating processes and systems at CCC.
  • Clackamas Workforce Partnership is partnering to provide workforce development activities such as career exploration opportunities and paid work experience, as well as coordination between school districts and workforce development entities.

The YRA will continue to follow up with students and families to offer resources and support to help ensure continued school participation and progress. This program will provide trauma informed services.

 

Clackamas Achievement Program FAQ

Who is eligible for CAP?

  1. Must meet the following eligibility criteria:
    1. Youth ages 14-21 who are defined as a “dropout” and not exempt from attending public school;
    2. Youth ages 14-21 who are not enrolled in school*, and have not earned a high school diploma or GED;
  2. Must be at least 14 years old and under 22 years old;
  3. Must not have completed their high school credential prior to enrollment.

*Students who started GED classes after Sep 1st, 2021, are still eligible to enroll in CAP services.

How do I refer a youth to CAP?

Complete the following referral form: https://forms.gle/g2upqfKkc2gPi98e7

-or-

Contact Carlos with youth’s name, DOB, and contact information

Carlos Benson Martinez

Youth Re engagement Advisor
CBensonMartinez@clackesd.k12.or.us
503-395-8240 (call or text)

How much does CAP cost?

CAP is 100% free for youth.

What expenses are paid for by CAP?

If a youth or family is unable to afford expenses associated with GED classes and testing, school supplies, etc. CAP can cover those costs or leverage funds from other resources in the community.

Can a youth be dual enrolled in CAP & WIOA services?

Yes, funds can be “braided” to address a variety of the youth’s needs. While CAP solely addresses education goals, WIOA services include employment exploration opportunities that can continue on after a youth finishes CAP.

What are a youth’s education options with CAP?

Youth can attend GED classes and testing at Clackamas Community College, Credit Recovery at Clackamas Community College, Adult High School Diploma at Clackamas Community College, or reengagement into classes at a youth’s home school district to pursue a diploma.

Can youth outside of Clackamas County apply for CAP?

Youth are eligible to receive CAP services if they live outside Clackamas County, as long as they live within a reasonable distance to receive the service from Clackamas County.

What happens after a youth finishes CAP?

If youth would like support exploring employment opportunities, they can be enrolled into C-TEC’s WIOA program to continue receiving services. You can learn more about WIOA services by visiting C-TEC’s website, c-tecyouthservices.org

 

Oct
6
Thu
04 – Resources – For Families and Children Facing Tragic Events – Racial Stress – Racism – Hate Crimes
Oct 6 all-day

 

Resources for Families and Children Facing Tragic Events

Racial Stress – Racism – Hate Crimes

 

Childrens Mental Health Network

Helpful Resources to Address the Mass Shooting in Uvalde, Texas
Many thanks to Michelle Zabel, MSS, Assistant Dean, and Director, The Institute for Innovation and Implementation, for compiling this list of resources in response to the horrific mass shooting in Texas earlier this week.

Helping Young People Cope With Mental Health Challenges
Vox Media’s NowThis is linking arms with Ken Burns and PBS to share an upcoming documentary titled “Hiding in Plain Sight: Youth Mental Illness.” Scenes from the forthcoming film will be shared across NowThis social platforms throughout Mental Health Awareness Month in May. NowThis will host a live TikTok conversation about the topic, as well. The goal, Burns said, is “to get this material out to young people around the country.” The film itself will debut at the end of June on PBS.

Uplift by Youth Era: Teaching Youth Peer Support Skills
More than 500 youth signed up for the most recent Uplift event! Studied by the University of Oxford and co-designed with young adults, Uplift by Youth Era is the future of peer support. Empower a young person in your life to be who they need, and apply to join the next Uplift training in June!

Randolph “Randy” Muck September 14, 1955 to April 21, 2021 in Memoriam
On the first anniversary of his death, several of us who knew and worked with Randy write this tribute to remember and honor his impact on so many people. Randy provided much-needed leadership from within the federal government to develop and disseminate evidence-based substance use treatments designed for adolescents and their families. He was successful because he had a rare ability to connect with all the groups important to improving adolescent treatment: provider organizations, schools, juvenile justice, counselors, federal agency decision-makers, researchers, private foundations, and most importantly—adolescents and their families. He saw how these groups could align their different interests and collaborate. This, in turn, helped youth, families, and systems of care in ways that continue to have an impact.

HHS Awards Nearly $25 Million to Expand Access to School-Based Health Services
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), through the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), recently announced nearly $25 million will be made available to improve and strengthen access to school-based health services in communities across the country. Awards will support local partnerships between schools and health centers to provide children and youth with the comprehensive physical and mental health care they need.

Investing in Prevention Makes Good Financial Sense
Primary prevention—including screening and intervention before negative health outcomes occur—is relatively inexpensive. The higher-risk behaviors it is designed to reduce are so costly to the healthcare system that it is staggeringly wasteful not to make sure that screening and treatment referrals are readily implemented and faithfully reimbursed by insurers and that interventions are convenient for parents and their children.

PAX Good Behavior Game
Speaking of prevention…
The PAX Good Behavior Game is an evidence-based universal preventive intervention applied by teachers in the classroom. This evidence-based practice consists of research-based strategies with origins in behavioral science, neuroscience, and cultural wisdom that operate together to improve children’s self-regulation. Teachers implement these strategies as part of their daily routines in carrying out tasks such as getting students’ attention, selecting students for tasks, transitioning from one task to the next, working as part of a team, limiting problematic behavior, and reinforcing pro-social behavior.

HHS Launches New Maternal Mental Health Hotline
The Maternal Mental Health Hotline is a new, confidential, toll-free hotline for expecting and new moms experiencing mental health challenges. Those who contact the hotline can receive a range of support, including brief interventions from trained culturally and trauma-informed counselors and referrals to both community-based and telehealth providers as needed. Callers also will receive evidence-based information and referrals to support groups and other community resources.

Six Things You Need To Know About Music and Health
A growing body of research suggests that listening to or performing music affects the brain in ways that may help promote health and manage disease symptoms. More justification for the plethora of music videos posted in Friday Update!

Know Your Rights: Parity for Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Benefits
This brochure gives an overview of the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008. It lists some common limits placed on mental health and substance use disorder benefits and services.

Going Digital: Behavioral Health Tech
Aaahhhh!!! Less than 20 days!!! Well? Have you registered for the 2022 Going Digital: Behavioral Health Tech summit on June 8-9th yet? Can’t make it? Wondering if you can access all of the sessions with our hundreds of speakers after June 8-9th? YES, but ONLY if you register in advance. So, you should probably get on that.

Building a More Equitable Juvenile Justice System for Everyone
Racial inequities regarding the policing of children, and the subsequent disparities in their treatment within the juvenile justice system, have been problems in this country for far too long. It is encouraging that many states and counties are not only recognizing these issues but are taking action. The CSG Justice Center is committed to providing research-driven, data-informed solutions to our partners to continue building safer and stronger communities for everyone, especially our youth.

Disruptions to School and Home Life Among High School Students During the COVID-19 Pandemic — Adolescent Behaviors and Experiences Survey, United States, January–June 2021
Young people have experienced disruptions to school and home life since the COVID-19 pandemic began in March 2020. From January to June 2021, CDC conducted the Adolescent Behaviors and Experiences Survey (ABES), an online survey of a probability-based, nationally representative sample of U.S. public- and private-school students in grades 9–12. ABES data were used to estimate the prevalence of disruptions and adverse experiences during the pandemic, including parental and personal job loss, homelessness, hunger, emotional or physical abuse by a parent or other adult at home, receipt of telemedicine, and difficulty completing schoolwork. Prevalence estimates are presented for all students by sex, race and ethnicity, grade, sexual identity, and difficulty completing schoolwork.

CDC Survey Finds the Pandemic Had a Big Impact on Teens’ Mental Health
According to a survey published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than four in 10 teens report feeling “persistently sad or hopeless” during the COVID-19 pandemic. Girls were twice as likely to experience mental health troubles compared to boys. And LGBTQ students were hit the hardest. The CDC’s findings were gathered from online surveys from a sample of 7,700 US students during the first six months of 2021.

New Initiative to Define Policy Recommendations for Embedding Equity into 988
The Kennedy-Satcher Center for Mental Health Equity & Beacon Health Options are joining forces to create and develop an equitable crisis response for the future of behavioral health service delivery ahead of the July 2022 launch of 988.

State Policymakers Can Support Equitable School-based Telemental Health Services
This brief presents five ways state policymakers can support equitable school-based telemental health services, with recommendations based on relevant policy context, existing research, and—in some cases—feedback from interviews with five TMH providers who testified to on-the-ground experience with these interventions.

 

University of MaryLand School of Social Work Institue for Innovation and Implimentation logo

SAMHSA Resources

 

General Resources
For Parents & Caregivers
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Daniel Tiger

Helping Children with Tragic Events in the News

In times of community or world-wide crisis, it’s easy to assume that young children don’t know what’s going on. But one thing’s for sure — children are very sensitive to how their parents feel. They’re keenly aware of the expressions on their parents’ faces and the tone of their voices. Children can sense when their parents are really worried, whether they’re watching the news or talking about it with others. No matter what children know about a “crisis,” it’s especially scary for children to realize that their parents are scared.

Some Scary, Confusing Images

The way that news is presented on television can be quite confusing for a young child. The same video segment may be shown over and over again through the day, as if each showing was a different event. Someone who has died turns up alive and then dies again and again. Children often become very anxious since they don’t understand much about videotape replays, closeups, and camera angles. Any televised danger seems close to home to them because the tragic scenes are taking place on the TV set in their own living room. Children can’t tell the difference between what’s close and what’s far away, what’s real and what’s pretend, or what’s new and what’s re-run.

The younger the children are, the more likely they are to be interested in scenes of close-up faces, particularly if the people are expressing some strong feelings. When there’s tragic news, the images on TV are most often much too graphic and disturbing for young children.

“Who will take care of me?”

In times of crisis, children want to know, “Who will take care of me?” They’re dependent on adults for their survival and security. They’re naturally self-centered. They need to hear very clearly that their parents are doing all they can to take care of them and to keep them safe. They also need to hear that people in the government and other grown-ups they don’t even know are working hard to keep them safe, too.

Helping Children Feel More Secure

Play is one of the important ways young children have of dealing with their concerns. Of course, playing about violent news can be scary and sometimes unsafe, so adults need to be nearby to help redirect that kind of play into nurturing themes, such as a hospital for the wounded or a pretend meal for emergency workers.

When children are scared and anxious, they might become more dependent, clingy, and afraid to go to bed at night. Whining, aggressive behavior, or toilet “accidents” may be their way of asking for more comfort from the important adults in their lives. Little by little, as the adults around them become more confident, hopeful and secure, our children probably will, too.

Turn Off the TV

When there’s something tragic in the news, many parents get concerned about what and how to tell their children. It’s even harder than usual if we’re struggling with our own powerful feelings about what has happened. Adults are sometimes surprised that their own reactions to a televised crisis are so strong, but great loss and devastation in the news often reawaken our own earlier losses and fears – even some we think we might have “forgotten”

It’s easy to allow ourselves to get drawn into watching televised news of a crisis for hours and hours; however, exposing ourselves to so many tragedies can make us feel hopeless, insecure, and even depressed. We help our children and ourselves if we’re able to limit our own television viewing. Our children need us to spend time with them – away from the frightening images on the screen.

Talking and Listening

Even if we wanted to, it would be impossible to give our children all the reasons for such things as war, terrorists, abuse, murders, major fires, hurricanes, and earthquakes. If they ask questions, our best answer may be to ask them, “What do you think happened?” If the answer is “I don’t know,” then the simplest reply might be something like, “I’m sad about the news, and I’m worried. But I love you, and I’m here to care for you.”

If we don’t let children know it’s okay to feel sad and scared, they may think something is wrong with them when they do feel that way. They certainly don’t need to hear all the details of what’s making us sad or scared, but if we can help them accept their own feelings as natural and normal, their feelings will be much more manageable for them.

Angry feelings are part of being human, especially when we feel powerless. One of the most important messages we can give our children is, “It’s okay to be angry, but it’s not okay to hurt ourselves or others.” Besides giving children the right to their anger, we can help them find constructive things to do with their feelings. This way, we’ll be giving them useful tools that will serve them all their life, and help them to become the worlds’ future peacemakers — the world’s future “helpers.”

Helpful Hints

  • Do your best to keep the television off, or at least limit how much your child sees of any news event.
  • Try to keep yourself calm. Your presence can help your child feel more secure.
  • Give your child extra comfort and physical affection, like hugs or snuggling up together with a favorite book. Physical comfort goes a long way towards providing inner security. That closeness can nourish you, too.
  • Try to keep regular routines as normal as possible. Children and adults count on their familiar pattern of everyday life.
  • Plan something that you and your child enjoy doing together, like taking a walk, going on a picnic, having some quiet time, or doing something silly. It can help to know there are simple things in life that can help us feel better, in good times and in bad.
  • Even if children don’t mention what they’ve seen or heard in the news, it can help to ask what they think has happened. If parents don’t bring up the subject, children can be left with their misinterpretations. You may be really surprised at how much your child has heard from others.
  • Focus attention on the helpers, like the police, firemen, doctors, nurses, paramedics, and volunteers. It’s reassuring to know there are many caring people who are doing all they can to help others in this world.
  • Let your child know if you’re making a donation, going to a town meeting, writing a letter or e-mail of support, or taking some other action. It can help children to know that adults take many different active roles and that we don’t give in to helplessness in times of worldwide crisis.

 

 

What do we tell our children? How do we reassure them of their own safety?
At The Dougy Center in Portland, Oregon, we’ve provided grief support groups for children, teens, young adults and their parents or adult caregivers since 1982.

Based on our experience, here are some things for adults to keep in mind as you struggle with how to talk with children following tragic events, such as natural disasters, plane crashes, or school shootings.

1. Don’t project your fears onto your children. They take their cues from the adults around them.
You can’t hear the news about children being murdered or communities devastated by natural disasters without thinking about how you’d feel if it happened to your family, friends, or hometown. The outpouring of care and empathy for the families who lost loved ones will be powerful, and…we all know it could have been our friends, our child, our family and community members who died or were injured.

Identifying with the senselessness and randomness makes us all feel more vulnerable. But we should remember that children don’t always see things the same way that adults do, and it won’t be helpful to them for us to fall apart. They need to see that we care, that we feel terrible about this tragedy, and that we will do everything we can to keep them safe. They will take their cues from our behavior.

It’s okay to show emotion. We can model for children that feeling sad, scared, and upset is normal after tragedies. But we don’t want to overwhelm them with our emotions, or put them in the position of having to ‘parent,’ or take care of, the adults around them. Make sure you also model taking care of yourself, by sharing with trusted and supportive adult friends, eating (and drinking) healthfully.

2. Try to limit their access to the recurring news and exposure to the tragedy over and over.
Over-exposure to the graphic and emotional news can be overwhelming for children and can cause unnecessary anxiety and fear. Some children who repeatedly watched the footage of planes crashing into the towers on 9/11 thought it was happening again and again. Some children (and some adults) may have difficulty getting graphic scenes and images out of their minds. Too much exposure can fuel their fear, so don’t let them sit and watch the news over and over. Better yet, set the example of not doing so yourself as well.

3. Understand that you can’t completely shield them from what happened.
It would be next to impossible to hide these events from children, as much as we wish we could. You might be able to shield your own child in your home, for example, by not turning on (or owning) a television, but you can’t protect your children from hearing about it from other kids. The fact is, they will hear about it, so although they don’t “need” to know about it, pretending we can shield them is magical thinking.

That said, you don’t need to give them more information than they can handle, or more than they’re asking for. A simple, “Did they talk about what happened in _____ today at school?” would be a good starter. They need to know that you’re not trying to hide the truth from them, that you’re open to talking about it, but that you’re also not forcing them to do so.

4. Model truth-telling and build trust with your children by letting them hear things, even hard things, from you directly.
Eight days after the 9/11 attacks, I was meeting in small groups with pre-school workers in New York City, talking about how to respond to the young children in their care about the events. A man asked to speak to me privately after one of the trainings, and asked for my advice around his 7-year-old daughter. For the last week, since September 12th, she had been having stomach aches and difficulty sleeping. He said it was not tied to the events of 9/11 because, “We don’t have a television.” As his story unfolded it was evident that he did not want to have to explain to his child why people would do such horrible things, a normal dilemma that we face as parents and adults. This child was experiencing physical reactions, as it turned out, not primarily because of her reaction to the events of 9/11, but because she was unable to share her fears and concerns and questions in her own home, faced with her parents’ denial.

Here are some principles to keep in mind as you talk with children:

1. There is no one typical reaction one can or should expect from children.
Their responses will vary all over the ‘emotional’ map, from seeming disinterest to nightmares, eating issues, and anxiety. How any specific child will respond will depend on their age, previous experience with death and loss, and their personality style. Fearful children will tend to worry; quiet children may keep their feelings to themselves; those who want to appear unfazed may exhibit a sense of bravado or lack of caring. Of course, children directly affected – those who had a family member die; those who witnessed the tragedy; those who had friends die – will tend to have longer-term reactions and needs. Watch for changes in behavior, or concerning trends. While it would be normal to have heightened anxiety and sleeplessness, any concerning behavior or troubling symptoms should be taken seriously, and if warranted, professional help sought.

2. Many children will have an increased sense of fear about their safety.
Understandably. So will many adults. After a shooting at an Oregon mall in December 2012, the news outlets were filled with people who said they’d never take their children there again. Others said they’d return as soon as it opened in order to support the stores and employees who had experienced the traumatic events, and whose livelihoods were going to suffer as a result of the several day closure. Some runners in the Boston Marathon vowed to return; others said they would never do so again.

While we can’t guarantee to our children that nothing bad will ever happen to them, we can provide assurance that these events are relatively rare, and that we will do everything we can to keep them safe. Children may have many questions about the events, particularly about natural disasters. Answer their questions with language that fits their developmental stage. It’s okay if you don’t know the answer to a question. If it’s a question that might have an answer, offer to look up more information. You can also ask children what they think the answer is as they often have thoughts and ideas they want to share with you. In the case of natural disasters, if your child is fearful of something like that happening in your community, talk with them about the safety plan that you have in place for your family and home. You can also look into what community safety measures are in place and whatever elements are relevant with your children. Many children will be reassured knowing that there are specific, tangible things they and your family can do if something occurs. Some examples include, picking a meeting place, keeping flashlights in every bedroom, talking about where you will keep emergency water and food.

3. Children want, need, and deserve the truth.
In over 30 years of providing grief support to thousands of children and teens at The Dougy Center for Grieving Children & Families, we have never heard a child say, “I’m glad I was lied to.” Many, however, struggle with anger and lack of trust toward parents or other adults who lied to them. When we don’t tell the truth, they learn that we cannot be trusted. As difficult as it can be at times, and as horrendous as the truth may be, children want, need, and deserve the truth. Being able to talk openly and honestly with your children about tragic events and other losses, creates a foundation of trust, enabling them to come to you in the future with their questions, fears, and concerns.

 

How race-related stress affects you and your relationship with your child

What effect does racism have on your health and well-being?

Not only does racism impact you as a parent, it can also impact how you interact with your children. Experiences of racism build on each other and can chip away at your emotional, physical and spiritual resources as a parent, contributing to race-related stress. Race-related stress can make it hard to have the space needed to take care of yourself as a parent, which reduces the emotional space you need to adequately take care of your children.

 

Physical effects

Physical Effects

Physical Effects can include increased hypertension, illness and risky behaviors such as substance use.

 

Emotional effects

Emotional Effects

Emotional effects can include depression, anxiety, anger, irritability and aggression.

 

Spiritual effects

Spiritual Effects

Spiritual effects can include a decreased sense of purpose, lack of connection with the larger community, isolation from larger social groups and reduced involvement in communal activities that you enjoy.

 

Potential reactions to racial stress or trauma

Insecure feelings

Insecure Feelings

Feelings of shame and lack of confidence due to feeling that a situation cannot be changed.

Lack of trust

Lack of Trust

Feeling detached or a lack of trust for others due to experiencing multiple losses or letdowns. This can make it very difficult to seek out help and to identify potential safe sources of support.

Triggers

Triggers

Reminders of the event, such as particular people or situations, can also trigger strong emotional or physical responses (e.g., crying or rapid heartbeat).

Emotions

Difficulty Controlling Emotions

Difficulty controlling emotional responses (going from “zero to one hundred”) can occur as the body helps you adapt to potentially unsafe situations, making you feel constantly on “alert.”

The body’s response to the experience of racism can make accessing resources to cope with the situation difficult. Race-related stress is unique in that it threatens psychological resources that are needed to cope and fulfill basic needs such as financial support, housing, access to jobs, etc.

When your body is in stress mode, it is geared up to help you and your child survive, which sometimes leads to impulsive decisions. If you live in a chronic state of stress related to racism, you can start to engage in survival coping. Survival coping can help you to deal with very hard or potentially life-threatening situations. However, if you continue to exist in this mode long-term, it can make it difficult to enjoy being in the moment with your child and can reduce your ability to feel safe and in control.

 

What impact can racial stress have on your parenting?

Experiencing race-related stress can also impact the quality of parenting relationships in the following ways:

Impostor syndrome

When you are exposed to racism repeatedly, you often start doubting yourself and can feel like you are an imposter in dominant culture settings or in settings where you feel as though you do not belong. Your inner thoughts might sound something like: “Am I being judged?” “Am I worthy?” “I got lucky.” “I only got this because I am Black.”

Being overly alert (hypervigilance)

Experiencing racial stress can make you more aware of potential dangers and negative experiences that can occur. This, in turn, can make the experience of parenting even more stressful. When you interact with your children, you can sometimes be reminded of negative race-related experiences that you had when you were a child. This reminder can amp up emotional responses, or hyperarousal, making it hard for you to “keep your cool” and be open to flexible problem solving.

“Helicopter parenting” (monitoring in fear)

These experiences of racism and unwarranted blame or lack of acceptance can make you want to protect your children so much, that you don’t allow them to explore in the way that they need to. You may shelter them from failures, which everyone needs to experience in order to learn how to manage everyday life. You may tend to be overly cautious or suspicious. Examples can include not allowing your children to have sleepovers or go to the park, even with your supervision.

Difficulty regulating emotions

  • When your past influences your emotional state, it can affect your emotional responses to both big and minor stressors with children, such as when they misbehave. This, in turn, can lead to being overprotective or overuse of physical discipline, as a means of survival.
  • For children, having parents who can keep perspective (stay cool) when children are upset, or misbehaving is very important. Likewise, it is important to stay calm when disciplining a child, otherwise discipline may go overboard. Both of these things can be hard if you are having difficulty controlling your emotions.

Avoidance

  • Avoiding situations that are related to racism can be a needed strategy to survive; such as instances that may involve violence or threat to yourself or your family. Sometimes you may avoid reminders of past experiences due to the pain or discomfort they cause.
  • If you find yourself avoiding strong feelings or situations with your child that bring up painful memories, it may make it hard to show affection and support for your child. It may even make it difficult to know how to provide emotional support for your child during times of stress. For instance, if your child brings up their own experience of oppression or an event in their life reminds you of something from your own childhood.

Mistrusting others

  • Racism can lead to distrust or mistrust of other communities. Internalized racism is when you begin to accept negative messages about your own abilities and inherent worth by the dominant group in society.
  • When you use society’s norms to judge yourself, you can feel depressed, unworthy and just not good enough. You are taught in many ways to take these feelings and paint them onto another group.
  • Intra and interracial violence, contention among disenfranchised communities or color, and the way the media conveys information about people of color, contribute to this.
  • This kind of coping can make you more vulnerable to racism, because on some level you may believe in racial hierarchy and difference when you belittle other groups. And when you show your children that it is right to discriminate against certain other groups, you make them more vulnerable to discrimination that they face.

Minimizing racism

  • Racism is overwhelming, as is the history of violence. You are sometimes taught that accepting this and minimizing racism is the only thing you can do. But when you ignore racism, and accept powerlessness, you encourage your kids to internalize racism. This can lead to increased levels of depression, anxiety and externalizing behaviors (e.g., engaging in risky behaviors, such as alcohol or substance use).
  • When you believe that you should be able to handle and manage it all without a break or without asking for help, you are at increased risk for health problems and can miss important cues about your well-being and safety.

Self-blame

Experiencing chronically unfair and dangerous discriminatory practices due to race can lead to feelings of low worth. For parents, this can also lead to a questioning of your parenting choices and abilities.

Unbalanced Racial and Ethnic Socialization (RES)

Unbalanced messaging or communication about race and ethnicity occurs when you only promote messages of mistrust, preparation for bias, or only give racial pride messages to your children.

 

Strategies to deal with racial stress and practice self-care.

So, what can you do to mitigate racial stress?

As parents, it is important to develop positive identities and share your cultural identities with your children. Positive cultural identity and advocacy are protective factors against racism, which can help to reduce and prevent racial stress.

There are many other ways to cope with stress and everyone has different preferences. Reducing stress can also allow you to model healthy coping strategies for your child. Here are some suggestions you can try.

You are not the only person dealing with race-related stress and connecting with other people with similar experiences and feelings can help you to successfully navigate racism.

  • Talk with family and trusted friends specifically about racialized events that have occurred and how to handle them
  • Start or join a group with others who may have had similar experiences and similar interests, like a book club that reads books by Black authors, or spend time with other African American parents who have the same concerns you do about how your children are treated at the school.
  • Seek out activities that you can do with your friends or family (e.g., exercising, cooking, watching a family show or movie together, etc.)

 

Legislation
Much of the debate today is around gun control. Below are links to two bills currently pending in Congress.

HR 1446 Enhanced Background Check Act of 2021

HR 8 Bipartisan Background Checks Act of 2021

 

 

AM – All Month – Eating and/or Body Image Struggles – Resources for Peer Support, Recovery & Wellness
Oct 6 all-day
Eating Problems 
Body Image Struggles, Wellness, Support
A 12-step recovery program

https://www.foodaddicts.org/

Food addiction can take many forms. Symptoms include obesity, under eating, and bulimia. People often think of the term “eating disorders” when describing the disease of food addiction. Food addicts are obsessed with food, body size, and weight. We spend our days thinking about when and what we are going to eat or not eat. Binging, purging, and dieting are a way of life. The bottom line is that we can’t stop thinking about eating. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) offers relief from the symptoms of eating disorders and guidance on living in recovery.


ANAD – National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders
https://anad.org/get-help/
ANAD is committed to providing free, peer support services to anyone struggling with an eating disorder Our free, eating disorders Helpline is available for treatment referrals, support and encouragement, and general questions about eating disorders.
Call the Helpline // 888.375.7767
Support Group // Find a Support Group
Peer Mentors // Request a Mentor
 
Treatment // Search our national directory
Our Helpline is available Monday-Friday, 9am-9pm CST. We will return messages left outside these hours.
NEDA – National Eating Disorders Association
NEDA: External link  list of virtual support groups for different time zones offered by multiple organizations dedicated to eating disorder recovery across the United States.
CONTACT THE NEDA HELPLINE
  1. Online chat

    Online Chat

    Monday—Thursday 9am—9pm ET

    Friday 9am—5pm ET

  1. Call NEDA's eating disorders helpline

    Call

    (800) 931-2237

    Monday—Thursday 11am—9pm ET

    Friday 11am—5pm ET

    Translation services are available on the phone.

  1. Call NEDA's eating disorders helpline

    Text

    (800) 931-2237

    Pilot hours: Monday—Thursday 3pm—6pm ET

https://eatingdisorderfoundation.org/get-help/support-groups/

Eating Disorder Foundation Support Groups, Eating Disorder Foundation: External link  list of recurring virtual support groups for people recovering from eating disorders, as well as family members and friends who are supporting someone through recovery.

https://www.feast-ed.org/around-the-dinner-table-forum/

Around the Dinner Table Forum, FEAST: External link  online community of parents of eating disorder patients around the world.  [note, I would say parents/caregivers of family members or persons experiencing eating struggles or struggling with eating, not patients!]

https://www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk/sanctuary

The Sanctuary, Beat Eating Disorders: External link  information about an online chat room for U.K. residents recovering from an eating disorder.

https://rockrecoveryed.org/coffee-conversations-for-moms/

Coffee and Conversations for Moms, Rock Recovery: External link  monthly virtual support group for mothers who are recovering from an eating disorder.

https://centerfordiscovery.com/groups/

Free Eating Disorder and Mental Health Support Groups, Center for Discovery Eating Disorder Treatment: External link  free platform for peer-based support groups for anyone who has been affected by an eating disorder or seeking mental health support.

ARFID (Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder) / Duke University

  Support Group NameDuke ARFID Parent Education Group
  Contact Name Chantal Gil
Meeting Location  Virtual through our community website. Members must first sign up for a free membership to our website, and then they can register for a group. (https://eatingdisorders.dukehealth.org/)

Pro-Recovery Support Group, Monday Evenings

7:00 PM EST /4:00 PM PST

Pro-Recovery Support Group, Saturday Mornings

11:00 AM EST/ 8:00 AM PST

Pro-Recovery support groups are open to individuals, ages 18+, who are  experiencing and/or are on the journey to recovery from an eating disorder.

Register here.

Family and Friends Group, Wednesday Evenings

7:00 PM EST /4:00 PM PST

https://18percent.org

18percent is a free online community based off Slack, where one can receive peer to peer support. 18percent has channels on various mental health issues, one of which is eating disorders. They offer free, 24/7 eating disorder support in a moderated environment. For more information, click the link below and sign up.

Click Here to Learn More

The main aim of EDRC is to increase awareness and understanding of eating disorders for the public and for health professionals; to promote early diagnosis, effective treatment, and recovery; and to advocate for mental health parity legislation and effective insurance coverage. We collaborate with other organizations such as National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) in our effort to bring the needed attention to eating disorders.

The Lotus Collaborative: Online Eating Disorder Recovery Support Group

This group is for anyone struggling with an eating disorder to get recovery support as well as to practice giving recovery support to others. While this is not a therapy group, it is a supportive virtual environment in which to meet others working towards recovery, build relationships, gain insight, and practice recovery skills. ​Everyone working towards eating disorder recovery is welcome.

Where: This group will take place via Zoom Room Meetings (Phone app or web browser). Sign up at https://www.thelotuscollaborative.com/online-eating-disorder-recovery-support-group.html

When: Every Sunday, 1pm – 2:30pm

Contact: email: info@thelotuscollaborative.com or set up a consultation: https://www.thelotuscollaborative.com/contact-us.html

The Lotus Collaborative: Online Supporters Group

The Lotus Collaborative hosts a free online support group for the friends and family members supporting a loved one through eating disorder recovery. This group is a space for family members and friends to get support, ask questions and connect with others in the supporting role.

Where: This group will take place via Zoom Room Meetings (Phone app or web browser). Sign up at https://www.thelotuscollaborative.com/online-supporters-group.html

When: ​Every Thursday, 6pm – 7pm PST

Contact: email: info@thelotuscollaborative.com or set up a consultation: https://www.thelotuscollaborative.com/contact-us.html

AM – All Month – Hispanic Heritage Month – AFSP – American Foundation for Suicide Prevention – An Introduction to Suicide Prevention For Latinx and Hispanic Communities – Resources
Oct 6 all-day

 

 

 

Hispanic Heritage Month

AFSP – American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

An Introduction to Suicide Prevention For Latinx and Hispanic Communities – Resources

¡Feliz mes de la herencia hispana! Today, September 15, marks the start of National Hispanic Heritage Month, in which we celebrate the histories, cultures and contributions of Latinx and Hispanic people in the United States including Puerto Rico. It is also an opportunity to reflect on the progress we’ve made to advance mental health for Latinx and Hispanic communities.

One of those ways is through partnerships. It is our privilege to be partnering with the National Latino Behavioral Health Association (NLBHA) and others for the 2022 National Latino Behavioral Health Conference taking place September 15 and 16, featuring remarks from AFSP’s Chief Medical Officer Dr. Christine Yu-Moutier, and Vice President of Public Relations María de los Ángeles Corral.

Another way in which we are making inroads is through new programming. We are thrilled to announce that this October, in collaboration with NLBHA, we will be launching Talk Saves Lives™ (TSL): An Introduction to Suicide Prevention for Latinx and Hispanic Communities, a much-needed and vital new resource for mental health and suicide awareness education for communities of Latinx and Hispanic heritage. The presentation will be available in English and Spanish, in person and virtually.

Join us this month as we shine a light on mental health resources for Latinx and Hispanic communities, as well as the stories and perspectives of individuals who have reflected on their cultural background and how it can impact their experiences with mental health through our Real Stories blog over the years. You can find those resources, stories, social shareables and more here. Another great resource is our website! It can be translated into Spanish by clicking on the “Accessibility” top right button, then “Choose language,” then “Spanish.”

National Hispanic Heritage Month is a time to celebrate and support Latinx and Hispanic communities.

We encourage you to share the resources above, this month and beyond.

 

FIND RESOURCES

 

AM – All Month – National Hispanic Heritage Month 2022 – Resources – Cultural Events, History, Veterans, Housing, Education
Oct 6 all-day

 

Hispanic Heritage Month 2022

RESOURCES

 

History and Culture

Hispanic Heritage Month Family Festival

Friday, September 16, and Saturday, September 17

 

Each year, people across the United States observe National Hispanic Heritage Month from September 15 to October 15 by celebrating and reflecting on the histories, cultures, and contributions of Americans with ancestry from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. While Hispanic Heritage Month is only 30 days, the museum’s curators, researchers, and educators work with communities across the country to document and share Latino histories every day of the year.

As part of the museum’s commitment to sharing Hispanic and Latino history, the museum has updated its Latino History topic page, where you can find even more exhibitions, programs, museum collections, and resources that reflect the richness and diversity of Latino history in the United States.

Our mission as a national public history institution is not only to tell complex stories but also to use history to empower people to create a just, compassionate, and equitable future. In an increasingly divided country, it is more important than ever to learn about and stand in solidarity with Latino communities.

Cada año las personas en Estados Unidos observan el mes de la herencia hispana desde el 15 de septiembre al 15 de octubre celebrando y reflexionando sobre la historia, cultura y contribuciones de las personas que rastrean sus orígenes a España, Méjico, el Caribe, y América Central y Sur. Aunque el mes conste de solo 30 días, los/las curadores/as, educadores/as, investigadores/as trabajan con comunidades a lo largo de todo el país para documentar y compartir las historias de Latinos/as cada día del año.

Como parte del compromiso del museo de compartir y diseminar estas historias, el museo ha actualizado su página Latino History topic page, en la cual pueden encontrar exhibiciones, colecciones, programas y recursos educativos que reflejan la rica , diversa y complicada historia de las comunidades Latinas en los Estados Unidos.

Nuestra misión como entidad de historia publica no es solo compartir historias complejas sino que apuntamos a utilizar la historia como herramienta de empoderamiento de  las personas para crear un futuro con equidad y compasión. Frente a un país tan dividido, es más importante que nunca aprender acerca de las comunidades Latinas y brindar solidaridad.

The National Museum of the American Latino recently debuted the Molina Family Latino Gallery, located within the National Museum of American History, the Smithsonian’s first gallery dedicated to the Latino experience. The inaugural exhibition ¡Presente! A Latino History of the United States illuminates U.S. Latinos’ historical and cultural legacies.

Two days of public events will kick off Hispanic Heritage Month in celebration of the gallery’s opening and commemorate 25 years of Latinidad at the Smithsonian. The program will include an evening dance party on Friday, September 16, and a Latino Heritage family day and cooking demonstration (details below) on Saturday, September 17, at the National Museum of American History. For more information, go to latino.si.edu.

Objects Out of Storage

Celebrating 25 years of Latinidad with the National Museum of American History Collections
Saturday, September 17; 11:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.
1 West

Curators with knowledge and expertise about the rich diversity of Latino history will engage in informal conversations with visitors while telling stories related to artifacts in the museum collections. Guests will have a unique opportunity to ask questions about the objects, the stories, and how they came to be part of the national collections.

Batter Up! Demonstration with Juan Baret

Saturday, September 17; 11:30 a.m.
Southwest Mall Terrace

Juan Baret’s passion for baseball spans his entire life, from his childhood in the Dominican Republic, to cheering for the Yankees when he migrated to the Bronx as a young man, to his time in the U.S. military. Join Baret as he channels his love of the game into the craftsmanship of bats. This program is in conjunction with the exhibition, ¡Pleibol! In the Barrios and the Big Leagues / En los barrios y las grandes ligas which is currently on display until January 2023 at the National Museum of American History and will travel across the country through 2025 with the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Services.

Cooking Up History

Celebrating Comida Chingona & the Low-Rider Lifestyle
Saturday, September 17; noon–1:00 p.m.
Coulter Plaza, 1 West 

The National Museum of American History continues its popular series of live cooking demonstrations for Hispanic Heritage Month. Guest Chef Silvana Salido Esparza made her mark on the U.S. food scene with the comida chingona, or “badass food,” that she serves at her Phoenix-based restaurant, Barrio Café. She draws inspiration from her Mexican heritage with the restaurant’s offerings, which honor her family’s 800-year-old gastronomic legacy with a twist. Chef Esparza is not only passionate about putting her own spin on Mexican food, but also about cars, specifically lowriders. Chef Esparza will explain the lowrider tradition during this cooking demonstration and conversation and the food culture connected to the lowrider lifestyle in Phoenix. Chef Esparza will prepare a dish illuminating Mayan barbecue, providing insights into this important, but often overlooked, culinary tradition. Visitors are encouraged to view Dave’s Dream, a lowrider from Chimayo, New Mexico.

This program is produced in collaboration with the National Museum of the American Latino.

A Conversation with Linda Alvarado

Saturday, September 17; 2:00–3:00 p.m.
Coulter Plaza, 1 West 

Dr. Margaret Salazar-Porzio, curator of the Smithsonian’s ¡Pleibol! In the Barrios and the Big Leagues / En los barrios y las grandes ligas exhibition, will interview Linda Alvarado, owner of the Colorado Rockies, about her life and career. In 1991, Alvarado became the first Latino owner—male or female—of a Major League Baseball franchise. She is a nationally recognized speaker who extends her passion for breaking barriers to motivating and encouraging young Latinas and women of all ages to achieve their dreams.

Dr. Salazar will sign copies of her book following the onstage conversation.

¡Pleibol! In the Barrios and the Big Leagues /  En los barrios y las grandes ligas is currently on display until January 2023 at the National Museum of American History and will travel across the country through 2025 with the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Services.

Selected Exhibitions

Dave’s Dream, Lowrider, 1992

Ongoing
First Floor, Center 

“Dave’s Dream” is a modified 1969 Ford LTD known as a “lowrider” and named for David Jaramillo of Chimayo, New Mexico who began customizing this car in the 1970s. After his death, Jaramillo’s family and local artisans completed the modifications that he had planned, and the car often won “first” or “best in show” in area competitions. Lowriding is a family and community activity with parades, trophies, and other events celebrating cars and paying homage to their power and beauty. Artistic paint schemes and custom upholstery make each lowrider unique and culturally significant. Hydraulic lifts enable lowriders to hop, making them seem alive and animated.

¡Pleibol! In the Barrios and the Big Leagues / En los barrios y las grandes ligas

Red silhouette of baseball player with "Pleibol"Ongoing; closes January 2023
2 East

This bilingual exhibition takes audiences on a journey into the heart of American baseball to understand how generations of Latinas/os have helped make the game what it is today. For nearly a century, baseball has been a social and cultural force in Latino communities across the United States. From hometown baseball teams to the Major Leagues, the exhibit shows how the game can bring people together and how Latino players have made a huge impact on the sport. Explore the ¡Pleibol! exhibition online.

Many Voices, One Nation

Ongoing
2 West

How did we become US? Many Voices, One Nation explores how the many voices of people in America have shaped our nation. The exhibition explores many Latino stories, including the Indigenous peoples of Spanish New Mexico and the Pueblo Revolt; the incorporation of Mexican California; the U.S. acquisition of Puerto Rico; Mexican neighborhoods in Chicago and Los Angeles; immigration and the southwest borderlands; and Cuban migration.

¡Presente! A Latino History of the United States

Molina Family Latino Gallery
1 East

The inaugural exhibition by the Smithsonian’s newest museum—the National Museum of the American Latino—introduces visitors to key concepts, moments and biographies that illuminate U.S. Latinos’ historical and cultural legacies. Hosted at the National Museum of American History, also the largest object lender to the exhibition, the 4,500 square foot gallery is an interactive space where multigenerational and cross-cultural visitors can celebrate and learn about Latino history and culture year-round. Learn more about ¡Presente! online.

Educational Resources

“The Resplendent Quetzal Bird”

History Time video 

How do people earn money? What is money made of? Elementary school students can practice their “See, Think, Wonder” routine by observing the resplendent Quetzal bird, whose long tail feathers were used as money in Central America. Watch the video.

Becoming US

Becoming US is a suite of resources for educators to present more accurate and inclusive immigration and migration narratives. There are five units organized by a theme, each with three case studies for in depth learning. Within the theme of Borderlands, we have resources on the Mexican American War. Nested in the theme of Belonging is a case study on Mexican Repatriation, and within Policy is a case study about DACA. The case studies include standards of learning, key questions and terms, primary sources, and teacher- and student-facing documents.

History Explorer

For more Latino History materials to use in the classroom, please visit our Hispanic Heritage Month themed landing page on History Explorer, the museum’s home for K-12 resources.

Exhibitions

Eagle statuette, around 1850
Many Voices, One Nation
People playing a baseball game
Pleibol! In the Barrios and the Big Leagues / En los barrios y las grandes ligas
American Enterprise
American Enterprise
Illustration of girls in school
Girlhood (It’s complicated)

See more exhibitions

From Our Blog

Graduation cap, gown, rainbow-colored stole, and costume wings in the pattern of Monarch butterfly wings. The top of the cap is decorated with flowers and has a message, "I am one of those people Mexico sent."

To explore the history of  Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), the museum’s Undocumented Organizing Collecting Initiative reached out to three undocumented organizers to share their reflections from inside the movement.

 

Gordo comic strip. Uncle Mio (wearing a suit and carrying a box of chocolates bouquet of flowers) talks to his nephew, who explains the qualities of different types of flowers. Behind the two figures appear precise, scientific diagrams of flowers.
According to Gus Arriola, creator of the comic strip Gordo, “my main goal was to maintain a positive awareness of Mexico through all the years, every day, without being political. When I started [in 1941], words like ‘burrito’ were unknown in the United States.”

See more blog posts

 

Rescources for Hispanic Veterans

ODVA Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15 through Oct. 15), the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs will be sharing stories from the state’s and nation’s military and cultural history, including profiling individual Hispanic American veterans and family members.

There are an estimated 560,000 Hispanic Americans living in Oregon today — and more than 60 million — across the United States. They represent a rich and diverse cultural heritage — as well as a proud history of service in our nation’s military — dating to some of our earliest conflicts.

Spanish-American War

April-December 1898

Col. Theodore Roosevelt and the “Rough Riders.”

Several thousand Hispanic volunteers, mostly from the southwest, fought with distinction in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War in 1898. Capt. Maximiliano Luna and others comprised a portion of the famous 1st U.S. Volunteer Cavalry — better known as “The Rough Riders” — which fought in Cuba under the command of Col. Theodore Roosevelt, who had resigned his position as assistant secretary of the Navy to join the volunteer cavalry.

The Rough Riders saw action at Las Guásimas, a village three miles north of Siboney on the way to Santiago and became the stuff of legend for their courage during the Battle of San Juan Hill. Sgt. George Armijo, another Rough Rider, later became a member of Congress and served on the school board and city council in his hometown of Santa Fe, New Mexico.

World War I

1914-1918

In May 1917, two months after legislation granting United States citizenship to individuals born in Puerto Rico was signed into law, and one month after the United States entered World War I, a unit of volunteer soldiers was transferred to the Panama Canal Zone.

Another Act of Congress was passed in 1917 to obtain needed manpower for the war effort, and the Hispanic community was eager to serve its country. They included both native-born service members, mostly of Mexican descent, and new immigrants from Latin America, Mexico and Spain. In June 1920, the unit was redesignated as the 65th Infantry Regiment and served as the U.S. military’s last segregated unit.

Hispanic soldiers like Nicholas Lucero and Marcelino Serna served with great distinction and were among the most decorated service members from WWI. Lucero received the French Croix de Guerre (roughly the equivalent of the U.S. Bronze or Silver Star) during World War I for destroying two German machine gun nests and maintaining constant fire for three hours, while Serna became the first Hispanic to be awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, the second-highest military decoration of the U.S. Armed Forces.

While serving in the Meuse-Argonne offensive, Serna also destroyed a German machine gun nest that had killed a dozen American soldiers. Even though his helmet was hit twice by bullets, Serna was able to get close enough to throw four grenades into the nest — leading to the surrender of the remaining combatants.

The courageous actions that earned Serna the Service Cross occurred on Sept. 12, 1918, when he shot and wounded a German sniper, then followed the wounded soldier to a trench. Singlehanded, he threw three grenades into the trench, which resulted in the death of 26 enemy soldiers and the capture of 24.

World War II

1939-1945

The Arizona National Guard’s 158th Infantry Regiment, better known as the “Bushmasters.”

In January 1943, 13 months after the attack on Pearl Harbor that marked the entry of the United States into World War II, the 65th Infantry Regiment again deployed to the Panama Canal Zone before being redirected overseas.

Despite relatively limited combat service in World War II, the regiment suffered casualties defending against enemy attacks, with one Distinguished Service Cross, two Silver Stars, two Bronze Stars and 90 Purple Hearts being credited to the unit.

In total, approximately 500,000 Hispanic service members served in the U.S. Armed Forces during WWII, including the Arizona National Guard’s 158th Infantry Regiment, the “Bushmasters” — which Gen. Douglas MacArthur declared “one of the greatest fighting combat teams ever deployed for battle.” The regiment was composed of many Hispanic Soldiers.

The Bushmasters’ motto was “Cuidado” — Spanish for “Take Care” — and comprised mainly of soldiers of Mexican American descent and North American Indian descent from 20 tribes. The regiment became one of the few to complete the trail from Australia to Japan, fighting day after day in critical battles to open the Visayan passages for Allied shipping in the Pacific.

The merciless campaign lasted two months in terrain laced with tank traps, wires, mines and bamboo thickets.

A total of six Hispanic Americans were flying aces in World War II and the Korean War. Approximately 200 Puerto Rican women served in the Women’s Army Corps and served in the critical role of Code Talkers to avoid enemy intelligence.

Korean War

1950-1953

When the Korean War broke out, Hispanic Americans again answered the call to duty as they, their brothers, cousins, and friends had done in World War II. Many of them became members of the 65th Infantry Regiment, which was still an all-Hispanic unit and fought in every major campaign of the war.

The 65th was nicknamed “The Borinqueneers,” a term originating from the Borinquen — one of the native Taino names for the island of Puerto Rico. Many members of the 65th were direct descendants of that tribe.

Fighting as a segregated unit from 1950 to 1952, the regiment participated in some of the fiercest battles of the war, and its toughness, courage and loyalty earned the admiration of many, including Brig. Gen. William W. Harris, who later called the unit’s members “the best damn soldiers that I had ever seen.”

Vietnam War

1959-1973

More than 80,000 Hispanic-Americans served with distinction in the Vietnam War, from the Battle for Hue City to the Siege of Khe Sanh. Among them were 1st Sgt. Maximo Yabes, the  only known Hispanic American Medal of Honor recipient with a link to Oregon.

In February 1967, Yabes’ company was assigned to provide security for a team of Army engineers who had been tasked with creating a clear zone of land between Cu Chu, a small hamlet northwest of Saigon, and a plantation to keep enemy snipers from using the thick jungle as cover.

1st Sgt. Maximo Yabes.

Yabes moved into the bunker and covered several of his troops, using his own body as a shield. Despite being struck painfully numerous times by grenade fragments, Yabes moved to another bunker and fired on the enemy with a grenade launcher he retrieved from a fallen comrade — singlehandedly halting the enemy’s advance.

Yabes went on to assist two fallen soldiers to a safe area where they could receive medical aid before seeing an enemy machine gun within the perimeter that threatened the whole company. Alone and undefended, Yabes charged across open ground toward the enemy machine gun, killing the entire crew and destroying the weapon before being mortally wounded himself.

He was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor, the United States’ highest military decoration, which was credited to Colorado, where Yabes and his family were residing at the time. A memorial was also built to honor Yabes in his original hometown of Oakridge.

On March 18, 2014, President Barack Obama presented 24 service members of Jewish or Hispanic American descent with the Medal of Honor in one of the largest Medal of Honor ceremonies in history.

Each of these soldiers’ bravery had been previously recognized by the award of the Distinguished Service Cross, the nation’s second highest award; that award was upgraded to the Medal of Honor upon further Congressional review.

Gulf War-Modern Era

1990-Present

Approximately 20,000 Hispanic servicemen and women participated in Operation Desert Shield and Operation Desert Storm in 1990 and 1991. According to Defense Manpower Data Center statistics, Hispanics comprised 4.2 percent of the Army representation in the Persian Gulf theater during the war.

And, during the most recent wars and campaigns in the Middle East, thousands of men and women of Hispanic heritage answered the call to serve in the Global War on Terror, Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, and they continue to place their boots on the ground in more than 120 countries around the world.

Now representing more than 16% of the nation’s active-duty military, the Hispanic community continues its selfless sacrifice in bringing freedom to people in other countries, making major sacrifices, and risking their lives to bring justice to those who commit or plan evil against the United States and lay a foundation for a sustainable peace.

Whether their heritage can be traced to Spain, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Mexico, or one of dozens of other Spanish-speaking countries or cultures, Hispanic Americans have, time and time again, answered the call to duty, defending America with unwavering valor and honor.

 

Mental Health, Health, Housing, Education

Social determinants of health (SDOH) are the conditions in the environments where people are born, live, learn, work, play, worship, and age that affect a wide range of health, functioning, and quality-of-life outcomes and risks. Many SDOH have a major impact on the health, well-being, and quality of life of Hispanic/Latino communities, such as:

  • Safe housing, transportation, and neighborhoods
  • Racism, discrimination, and violence
  • Education, job opportunities, and income
  • Language barriers and literacy skills

SDOH also contribute to wide health disparities and inequities. For example, people who don’t have access to grocery stores with healthy foods are less likely to have good nutrition, which can raise their risk of health conditions like heart disease, diabetes, and obesity.

Use this page to learn more about the SDOH affecting Hispanic/Latino communities and to find helpful resources from OMH’s partners to share with your communities, patients, and organizations.

Visit Health People 2030 to learn more about SDOH, learn about federal efforts to address SDOH, and explore research related to SDOH.

Visit the CDC’s website to find tools for putting SDOH in action.

 

Economic Stability

Economic stability refers to a person’s ability to find and maintain a steady income, as well as earn enough money to afford things that help them live a healthy lifestyle. Being a homeowner, working in a safe environment, having access to affordable childcare, and having financial savings can help increase economic stability. When a person is economically stable, they can afford steady housing, healthy food, and health care.

According to a 2020 report from the Joint Economic Committee, there are an estimated 29 million Hispanics in the U.S. workforce, making up 18 percent of all workers. The unemployment rate for Hispanic Americans is higher than overall unemployment rates but has been dropping steadily. Latinos are more likely to hold jobs in industries that have above-average risks of injury and exposure to harmful chemicals, such as construction, agriculture, and hospitality.

Hispanics in the U.S. tend to have lower-paying jobs than non-Hispanics. In 2018, the median income for Hispanic households was nearly $20,000 less than the median income for non-Hispanic white households. The pay gap is even larger for Hispanic women.

Despite lower wages and less financial capital, Hispanics are more likely than any other group to become new entrepreneurs. As of 2017, experts believe there are at least four million Hispanic-owned businesses in the U.S., contributing over $700 billion annually to the American economy.

Want to learn more about how economic stability impact Hispanic and Latino communities? Browse a short collection of free, related resources in the OMH Knowledge Center online catalog.

Federal Resources

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) Money Smart: Money Smart offers a Spanish-language financial education program to help individuals improve their financial health. The website is also available in Spanish.

MyMoney.gov: A one-stop shop for federal financial literacy and education programs, grants, and other information. The website is also available in Spanish.

Money and Taxes (USAGov): Learn about taxes, money the government may owe you, investing, credit help, and more. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

Government Benefits, Grants, and Loans (USAGov): Learn about government programs providing financial help to individuals and organizations. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

Jobs and Unemployment (USAGov): Find out how and where to look for a new job or career, get help if you are unemployed, and more. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

Small Business (USAGov): Learn the steps to start a small business, get financing help from the government, and more. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

MyCreditUnion.gov (National Credit Union Administration): MyCreditUnion.gov and its financial literacy microsite Pocket Cents provide a list of saving options for college as well as information on other financial services provided by credit unions. The website is also available in Spanish.

Non-Federal Resources

Social Determinants Factors that Influence your Health – Income: An infographic developed by The Nation’s Health explaining how income can influence well-being and life expectancy.

The Community Action Poverty Simulation (Missouri Community Action Network): A simulation activity that seeks to raise awareness about the complexities of poverty experienced. This resource offers information about the simulation sessions, which last 2 to 4 hours, in addition to how to purchase the simulation materials.

SUMA Wealth: The leading financial technology company devoted to increasing prosperity, opportunity, and financial inclusion for young U.S. Latinos. The website is also available in Spanish.

SUMA Academy: A wealth-building digital platform that aims to help young Latinos with personal finance through creating culturally relevant, easy-to-digest material.

 

Education Access and Quality

Research shows that the more education a person has, the more likely they are to live a healthy lifestyle. Children are more likely to be academically successful when they have access to high-quality education and safe school environments free of violence and bullying. Individuals are more likely to have higher paying jobs if they have a high school diploma, and even more so with a college degree.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of Hispanic students enrolled in schools, colleges, and universities has increased substantially between 1996 and 2016, growing from 8.8 million to 17.9 million students. This trend applies to all levels of education, ranging from nursery school to higher education institutions.

College enrollment has more than tripled for Hispanics in the United States. Compared to other racial/ethnic groups, a larger percentage of Hispanic college students (over 40 percent) attend two-year colleges rather than four-year colleges.

According to the Pew Research Center, education levels for recently arrived Latino immigrants (defined as living in the United States for five years or less) are high as well. In 2018, the percentage of recently arrived Hispanic immigrants who completed high school was 67 percent, while in 1990, this number was 38 percent.

Despite these positive trends, the percentage of young adult Hispanics who have not completed high school and are not enrolled in school is higher than non-Hispanics. Hispanics aged 25 – 34 also have the lowest percentage of graduate school enrollment compared to white, Black, and Asian Americans.

Want to learn more about how education access and quality impact Hispanic and Latino communities? Browse a short collection of free, related resources in the OMH Knowledge Center online catalog.

National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy (HHS)

National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy (HHS): A national action plan that envisions a restructuring of the ways we create and disseminate all types of health information to ensure that all children graduate with health literacy skills that will help them live healthier throughout their lifespan.

White House Initiative on Advancing Educational Equity, Excellence and Economic Opportunity for Hispanics

White House Initiative on Advancing Educational Equity, Excellence and Economic Opportunity for Hispanics: Originally established in 1990, the White House Initiative on Advancing Educational Equity, Excellence and Economic Opportunity for Hispanics was re-established in 2021 through executive order by President Joe Biden. The Initiative’s scope was expanded to advance educational equity and economic opportunity for Latino and Hispanic students, families, and communities.

Education (USAGov): Find government information on education, including primary, secondary, and higher education. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

College Scorecard (U.S. Department of Education): This online tool was designed with direct input from students, families, and their advisers to provide the clearest, most accessible, and reliable national data on college cost, graduation, debt, and post-college earnings.

Federal Student Aid (U.S. Department of Education): They provide more than $125 billion in federal grants, work-study, and loans for students attending career schools, community colleges, and colleges or universities. Their information center helps students complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and provides the public with free information about their programs. The website can be converted into Spanish.

Non-Federal Resources

Social Determinant Factors that Influence your Health – Education: An infographic created by The Nation’s Health about the connection between education and healthier people.

Health Care Access and Quality

Being able to access and use high-quality health care services is a critical part of preventing disease and keeping people healthy. There are many reasons why people cannot access or use health care services: language barriers, lack of transportation, health care costs, inability to find childcare, inability to take off time from work, and discrimination when receiving health care can all factor into a person’s ability or willingness to use health care services.

Health care access and utilization vary widely in the U.S. Hispanic population. Factors include age, country of birth, English language fluency, and length of residency in the U.S. Hispanics aged 65 and older are more likely than younger Hispanics to have a primary care provider and are more likely to have seen a provider in the past 12 months.

The percentage of Hispanic Americans with health insurance has risen over the past decade. However, this group is still more likely than any other racial/ethnic group in the U.S. to be uninsured.

Language barriers influence health care utilization as well. Approximately 46 percent of Hispanic American adults say they have a close family member or friend who requires interpretation services or a Spanish-speaking health care provider, and 50 percent of Hispanic Americans say it is difficult to understand the process of getting medical care and have had negative experiences receiving health care.

Want to learn more about how health care access and quality impact Hispanic and Latino communities? Browse a short collection of free, related resources in the OMH Knowledge Center online catalog.

Federal Resources

QuestionBuilder App: The HHS Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) QuestionBuilder app helps patients and caregivers prepare for medical appointments and maximize visit time. Also available in Spanish.

All of Us Research Program (National Institutes of Health): The NIH All of Us Research Program is a platform for conducting research whose goal is to create diverse databases of health information, which will allow researchers to understand and address health disparities in underrepresented populations. Also available in Spanish.

From Coverage to Care: A Roadmap to Better Care and a Healthier You: This roadmap explains what health coverage is and how to use it to get primary care and preventive services so that you and your family live long, healthy lives. Available in Spanish and multiple other languages.

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Consumer Resources in English and Spanish. Resources are also available in multiple other languages.

Health (USAGov): Find health resources from the government. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

 

Non-Federal Resources
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Therapy for Latinx: A database of therapists who either identify as Latinx or have worked closely with Latinx communities and understand their needs. The website is available in English and Spanish and offers other helpful tools and resources.

Mental Health America: Has Spanish-language tools and resources regarding mental health for Latinos, along with articles and ways to get help.

NAMI Compartiendo Esperanza: A helpful tool that includes a three-part video series to increase mental health awareness in Latino communities.

 

Neighborhood and Built Environment

Safe neighborhoods allow people to live healthier and happier lives. Racial and ethnic minority populations are more likely to live in areas where there is violence, water and air pollution, exposure to toxic substances, a lack of trees and green spaces, loud noise, and a lack of access to healthy foods. All these factors can directly or indirectly impact a person’s health.

A 2019 report from the Joint Economic Committee states that 94 percent of Latinos currently live in urban areas, but this is changing. States with historically low Hispanic populations, such as North and South Dakota, are experiencing fast increases in Hispanic residents.

Hispanic Americans are far more likely than non-Hispanic white Americans to be concerned about environmental issues. According to a Pew Research Center survey, 71 percent of Hispanic adults state climate change has affected their community, compared to 54 percent of non-Hispanic adults. This percentage is even higher for foreign-born Hispanics.

According to Yale Climate Connections, an initiative of the Yale Center for Environmental Communication, several research teams have found that Hispanics are often disproportionately affected by environmental factors. Many predominantly Latino neighborhoods have a higher risk of flooding, drought, and air pollution. These neighborhoods often have fewer green spaces, which are known to lower temperatures during extreme heat.

Want to learn more about how neighborhoods and built environments impact Hispanic and Latino communities? Browse a short collection of free, related resources in the OMH Knowledge Center online catalog.

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD): HUD offers housing counseling to help consumers make informed housing decisions. HUD works with organizations, such as UnidosUS, to develop and support Latino homeownership programs in various states. The website can be converted into Spanish.

Housing (USAGov): Get information and services to help find and keep a home. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

Housing and the Latino community (UnidosUS)

Social Determinant Factors that Influence your Health – Housing: An infographic created by The Nation’s Health addressing where and how people live, can influence how healthy they are and how well they live.

COVID-19 Informational Guide for Public Housing Residents – Know the Basics of Seeking Care: A bilingual tool developed by the National Center for Health in Public Housing to provide general information on how public housing residents can seek care for COVID-19 testing services provided by health centers near public housing agencies and how the Public Charge rule does not apply for these services. Also available in Spanish.

Resources Related to Coronavirus and Rural Housing (Housing Assistant Council): This webpage presents a list of COVID-19-related resources that pertain to housing. Although the webpage title explicitly refers to rural housing, it links to resources that typically pertain to housing in general that would be relevant to readers interested in housing in both rural and non-rural areas.

The EveryONE Project: Neighborhood Navigator (American Academy of Family Physicians): Allows users to search by zip code for resources and programs in their neighborhood to address their patients’ social determinants of health (SDOH). Provides information on food, housing, goods, transportation, health, care, education, employment, and more. The tool can be converted into Spanish and other languages.

Health Equity Report Card (Salud America!): The Health Equity Report Card generates local housing, transit, healthcare, and other data so you can drive the healthy change your community needs most.

School Food Pantry Action Pack (Salud America!): A free guide to help school personnel talk to decision-makers, work through logistics, and start a School Food Pantry to help hungry students and reduce local food insecurity.

Social and Community Context

Social and community support can greatly improve a person’s health and well-being. Positive, healthy relationships and community engagement can buffer disruptive environmental factors, especially for children and young adults. Disruptive factors can include incarceration, deportation, discrimination, bullying, and violence. When these disruptive and stressful factors are present, a person’s overall stress level (often called “allostatic load”) can directly influence their mental and physical health.

Discrimination and deportation remain key sources of stress for many Hispanic Americans. A Pew Research Center survey found that23 percent of Hispanic Americans were criticized for speaking Spanish in public, and 20 percent were called offensive names in the past year. Research also shows that over 39 percent of Hispanic Americans worry that they or an individual close to them could be deported. In 2019, 80 percent of Hispanics living in the U.S. were citizens. This is an increase from 74 percent in 2010.

According to Voto Latino, a growing number of Hispanic Americans are exercising their voting rights. Experts believe over 16 million Latinos voted in 2020, an increase of nearly 40 percent since 2016. Around 12 million Latinos are eligible to vote but are not registered.

Want to learn more about how social and community context impact Hispanic and Latino communities? Browse a short collection of free, related resources in the OMH Knowledge Center online catalog.

Promoting Health Equity: A Resource to Help Communities Address Social Determinants of Health: A workbook developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for public health practitioners and partners interested in addressing social determinants of health in order to promote health and achieve health equity.

Voting and Elections (USAGov): Find answers to common questions about voting in the United States. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

 

Non-Federal Resources

Anti-Racist Farmers Market Toolkit (The Farmers Market Coalition): The toolkit was developed by a group of Black food systems leaders and market managers to help put anti-racism concepts into practice within farmers markets. The aim is to improve market experiences for Black, Latino, and other people of color.

The Latino Victory Fund: an organization dedicated to building political power in the Latino community so that the voices and values of Latinos are reflected at every level of government and in the policies that drive our country forward.

Voto Latino: a pioneering civic media organization seeking to transform America by recognizing Latinos’ innate leadership. Their work focuses on building a pipeline meant to serve and empower our community, consisting of three parts: civic engagement, issue advocacy, and leadership development. The website is also available in Spanish.

GreenLatinos: an active community of Latino/a/x leaders, emboldened by the power and wisdom of our culture, united to demand equity and dismantle racism, resourced to win our environmental, conservation, and climate justice battles, and driven to secure our political, economic, cultural, and environmental liberation. The website is also available in Spanish.

Office of Minority Health

Get in touch

AM – All Month – Sexual Assault Action Month – Domestic/sexual violence materials, resources, and actions happening across Oregon
Oct 6 all-day
AM - All Month - Sexual Assault Action Month - Domestic/sexual violence materials, resources, and actions happening across Oregon

 

Sexual Assault Action Month

 

Domestic/sexual violence materials, resources, and actions happening across Oregon

Oregon State Proclamation of Sexual Assault Action Month from the Office of Governor Brown

Presidential Proclamation of Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month

VALOR 2022 SAAM Toolkit
“ValorUS (VALOR) leads with prevention of sexual violence. For 2022 Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM), we have released this free toolkit to empower you to lead your own community. With the theme of “Collective Action for Equity,” these resources support you to spread the message of prevention of sexual violence.”
Download in English and Spanish here

Caja De Herramientas Yo Soy SAAM 2022– A collection of 39 original and curated resources for bililngual advocates from ALAS members and allies

Reclaim/Reclama 2022 – SARC’s annual art magazine, highlighting the art of those who have been impacted by sexual violence, will be shared digitally this year at sarcoregon.org and on social media (Facebook and Instagram) through the month of April at @sarcoregon.

Events

Domestic Violence for Mental Health Providers

The first three sessions, Understanding, Screening for, and Intervening in Domestic Violence is available right now to view on demand, the recording of our fourth session will be on our YouTube channel Thursday April 21st.

Open House and Art Gallery at the Family Justice Center 

Take a tour of the Family Justice Center in Washington County (FJC) and meet the other organizations co-located at FJC supporting folks who have experienced violence. View art created by people impacted by violence, collected through the Sexual Assault Resource Center’s Reclaim/Reclama Magazine. Join us on April 24th, 2022 from 2:00 pm to 5:00 pm at 735 SW 158th Ave Suite 100 Beaverton, OR 97006. Reading of the Proclamations and some speaking from survivors of violence will start at 4:00 pm. This event is free and open to the public!

Yo Soy SAAM Webinarios offered by Alianza Latina en contra la Agresión Sexual

Talking Healthy Relationships: A Conversation Guide for Parents & Caregivers

Victim Rights Law Center When Rape Results in Pregnancy: The intersection of Rape and Abortion    

Virtual April 27th at 3pm PST

Hosted by the Victim Rights Law Center (VRLC), “When Rape Results in Pregnancy: The Intersection of Sexual Violence and Abortion,” will examine the intersection of abortion laws and rape and bring together a diversity of speakers in the medical, legal, legislative, and academic fields. Listen to experts share their insights on this complex issue, and learn how you can support survivors who become pregnant resulting from an assault.  100% of proceeds will go towards supporting survivors of rape and sexual assault. Visit our website to learn more about our panelists and the event.

Ask an Expert Series Webinar: Male Victims and Human Trafficking

April 28th at 3pm EST (12pm PST)

What services and support are needed for men and boys who are victims of human trafficking? How are these services different from their female counterparts? Ensuring equity and inclusion of services for all victims of human trafficking means addressing the needs of male victims. Join three national experts for this discussion on male victims’ experiences with sex and labor trafficking. Panelists will share their insight on needed services, how to talk about human trafficking and develop outreach materials in ways that are inclusive of males, and where to find additional resources on this topic.

Events

Rose Haven Open House Event

Virtual Mental Health First Aid

Tuesday April 26th at 9am PST

Offered by Lines for Life, mental Health First Aid (MHFA) teaches people to identify, understand, and respond to signs and symptoms of mental health and substance use challenges.

Register here

Exploring the Incidence and Impact of Economic Abuse Among Teens

Tuesday, April 26th at 11am PST

Offered by Futures Without Violence. Despite the potential lifetime impacts, economic abuse has been long overlooked among teen dating partnerships. Knowing what is at stake, Futures Without Violence in partnership with The Allstate Foundation and University of Pittsburgh Medical Center surveyed nearly 3,000 teens to explore how economic abuse – from disrupting education to interfering with employment to financial control – shows up in their relationships. The findings are eye-opening.

Register here

Interrupting Anti-Blackness Workshop

Tuesday, April 26th & Wednesday, April 27th at 2:30pm PST

This two-part workshop series with Washington Nonprofits is a case study centered workshop for Community leaders, Accountants, Front line workers, Middle Management Professionals, Executive Directors, Nonprofit Professionals, Educators, Board Members and co-conspirators who are committed to deepening their understanding of why Black liberation practices are crucial in interrupting anti-Black racism, macroaggressions, and white supremacist systems. This webinar will not be recorded.

Learn more here

Ask an Expert Series Webinar: Male Victims and Human Trafficking

Thursday, April 28th at 12pm PST
What services and support are needed for men and boys who are victims of human trafficking? How are these services different from their female counterparts? Ensuring equity and inclusion of services for all victims of human trafficking means addressing the needs of male victims. Join three national experts for this discussion on male victims’ experiences with sex and labor trafficking. Panelists will share their insight on needed services, how to talk about human trafficking and develop outreach materials in ways that are inclusive of males, and where to find additional resources on this topic.

Register here

NNEDV Advocacy Days 

June 7th- June 8th 
Trainings June 1st & 2nd

Register here

 

 

Opportunities and things to know about

 

Oregon DOJ launched Sanctuary Promise Hotline

Today, Oregon Department of Justice launches our Sanctuary Promise Hotline!  This program is designed to receive reports from and provide support to individuals and families targeted in violation of Oregon’s longstanding sanctuary laws.  Victims, witnesses, concerned community members, and whistleblowers can report violations to these laws, access culturally responsive support, and request a DOJ investigation into any violations of the laws.

Allstate Foundation Moving Ahead Grant Program

$1.5 Million in Funding for State Domestic Violence Coalitions Committed to Providing Financial Empowerment Services for Survivors
Over the past 16 years, The Allstate Foundation has invested more than $85 million to end relationship abuse. As part of this national effort, The Allstate Foundation is proud to continue the Moving Ahead Grant Program – a competitive grant program for U.S. state and territory domestic violence coalitions committed to the development, acceleration, and implementation of financial empowerment services for relationship abuse survivors.
This year, up to $1.5 million in Moving Ahead grants will support innovative financial empowerment programs that provide financial education services to survivors, through the implementation of The Allstate Foundation Moving Ahead Curriculum and asset-building activities in at least one of the following categories: job readiness and job training; survivor matched savings programs; micro-loans; credit building and/or repair; and micro-enterprise programs.
Eligible state and territory domestic violence coalitions are invited to apply. Grant applications will be accepted March 28 – April 25, 2022. Visit the Moving Ahead Grant Program landing page to learn more about the funding opportunity and requirements, and to register for an informational webinar.

Learn about The Allstate Foundation’s mission and our 70-year history of improving communities across the country.

NNEDV and GNWS launches Lila.Help

Advocates around the world have been discussing the need for a vetted global directory for many years and the pandemic has made the need for online resources even more clear. As a founding member of the GNWS, NNEDV has worked with the Global Network of Women’s Shelters to bring together advocates from across the globe. Since Lila.Help was conceptualized in 2019, NNEDV has partnered in its development and worked closely with other regional and national networks to bring Lila.help to fruition. This directory is a great step toward ensuring survivors around the world are connected to help, including having NNEDV’s resources.

Learn more here

OVW Grants Solicitation Announcements

Check out some of these opportunities for OVW funding

Grants.gov Deadline: April 19
JustGrants Deadline: April 21

Grants.gov Deadline: April 21
JustGrants Deadline: April 26

Grants.gov Deadline: April 26
JustGrants Deadline: April 28th

Recent Job Openings

Sexual Assault Support Services
(Eugene) 
Resiliency Skills Coordinator

Shelter from the Storm
(LaGrande)
Executive Director

OASIS
(Gold Beach)
Program Manager
Systemic Navigator (Co-Located Advocate)

YWCA
(Portland)
Resident Services

Helping Hands Against Violence
(Hood River) 
Outreach Coordinator

Raphael House
(Portland) 
Primary Advocate (Bilingual)
View all available Raphael House positions

NAYA
(Portland)
Domestic Violence Advocate
Click here to view all available NAYA positions

Clackamas Women’s Services
(Clackamas) 
Case Manager
Latina Counselor

Sexual Assault Task Force 
(Keizer)
Executive Director

Portland Community College
(Cascade)
Criminal Justice Faculty Instructor

Self Enhancement Inc.
(Portland)
Domestic Violence Advocate
Domestic Violence Program Manager

Familias En Acción
(Portland + Salem Metro)
HIV/STI Program Coordinator

University of Oregon
(Eugene)
Staff Attorney, DV Clinic

Douglas County Task Force
(Douglas County) 
Family Violence Coordinator

Ohio Domestic Violence Network
(Ohio)
Administrative Coordinator

California Partnership to End Domestic Violence
(California)
Director of Prevention Strategies
Spanish Language Interpreter/Translator Specialist
Lead Spanish Language Interpreter/ Translator Specialist

Futures without Violence
(San Francisco, CA) 
Program Specialist- Health and Workplace

Utah Domestic Violence Coalition
(Utah)
Communications and Engagement Specialist

Violence Free Minnesota
(Minnesota) 
Technology Justice Project Program Manager

Illinois Coalition Against Domestic Violence
(Illinois)
Administrative Assistant
Director of Fatality Review/ Fatality Review Coordinator
Strategic Partnerships Coordinator
Fiscal Technical Assistance Coordinator

North Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence
(North Carolina) 
Finance Director

NNEDV
(Washington D.C.)
Capacity Technical Assistance (CTA) Coordinator
Vice President of External Affairs
Transitional Housing and Positively Safe Coordinator

Is your organization hiring? Attach the job listing document in an email to Rowan@ocadsv.org to be sent along our listservs and to be in the next digest!

Submit Job Posting!

 

Our Work Groups and Caucuses

Advocates! Did you know that we have work groups and caucuses for you to connect with other advocates and get support for struggles you may be experiencing?

Click here to get involved!

AM – All Month – TQC -The Q Center – Virtual, Diverse Support Groups for People in the LGBTQ+ Community @ Online Regerster for Details
Oct 6 all-day

Sponsor Logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The Q Center: Out of Portland OR, Continues To Offer Several Virtual, Diverse Support Groups for People in the LGBTQ+ Community:

As the largest LGBTQ+ community center in the Pacific Northwest, Q Center proudly serves the LGBTQ2SIA+ communities of Portland Metro and Southwest Washington. Our drop-in and event space on North Mississippi Avenue is a frequent first stop for new arrivals in Portland, and for longtime residents who are newly out or questioning their sexual or gender identity.

Q Center also serves as an information hub for friends, partners, community, and family members of LGBTQ2SIA+ individuals. We pride ourselves on our collaborative approach and seek out ways to share resources with other nonprofits and public institutions locally and statewide.

 

To learn about the many groups offered by the Q Center, here is the link to their calendar page: https://www.pdxqcenter.org/calendar.

To register for any of these groups please either email info@pdxqcenter.org, or call 503-234-7837.  

AM – September is Suicide Prevention Month and National Recovery Month – Warmline – Resources
Oct 6 all-day

 

 

September is Suicide Prevention Month

and

National Recovery Month

This month, we share support and resources for suicide prevention and recovery from addiction.

SUICIDE PREVENTION MONTH

Every September, we strive to bring attention to suicide awareness and prevention. Suicide continues to be a leading cause of death in the United States; over 45,00 individuals lost their lives to suicide last year. Suicide rates across all populations have held consistently high since 2016, peaking in 2018. Some people report feeling that the topic of suicide is uncomfortable to talk about. Often after a suicide has occurred, loved ones and friends acknowledge that they thought something was wrong or saw signs they were concerned about but did not know what to do or felt uncomfortable saying or doing anything. Breaking that isolation and that discomfort can save lives, and we encourage engaging with the community around this, in events such as this education and discussion webinar on September 6 run by Mental Health America on identification and prevention of youth suicide.

Below is a list of organizations that contain helpful information and resources. Links provide signs to look for, tips on how best to support someone who could be at risk, as well as information on what to do in such a crisis. We continue to feel it is vital to share resources for immediate safety and long-term support, both for those suffering from suicidal thoughts and their families:

 


NATIONAL RECOVERY MONTH

Chronic alcohol use and drug use impact physical health and mental health, significantly reducing quality of life and shortening life spans.  Chronic addiction continues to be an ongoing national crisis, despite strong efforts in combating the disorder through expanded treatment access. Deaths due to addiction have increased, as well as a 59% increase in reports of alcohol abuse in 2020. There is some good news, overdose rates such as those caused by misuse of methadone have decreased, but we have a long way to go.

Isolation, boredom, frustration, and anxiety all contribute to increased substance use as an escape, as highlighted in this article. Recovery is a lengthy process and a lifetime of challenges for those who are successful in quitting drugs and alcohol. If you are struggling with a dependence on substances and feel like you cannot stop, or are watching someone you love or care about struggle with drugs or alcohol, we want you to know there is help, hope, and support. We wanted to highlight a list of major peer and professional support services that offer both in-person and remote connections, as well as other resources.

As always, please reach out to us here at the City of Boston Employee Assistance Program for immediate support and assistance. Have a safe and warm September.

 

CGAA – Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous – Support Meetings, Support Chat for Family and Friends, Resources – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online Via ZOOM
Oct 6 all-day

 

Who We Are

Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous is a fellowship of people who support each other in recovering from the problems resulting from excessive game playing. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop video gaming, which is completely up to you. CGAA has no dues or fees. Our groups share their collective experience and the principles that helped them, but CGAA has no experts, hierarchy, or required beliefs. We have etiquette and traditions, but no strict rules.
If you are struggling with compulsive gaming, leave your contact info at 970-364-3497 and a CGAA member will call you back
Or email us at helpline@cgaa.info
For other issues, contact us at support@cgaa.info

 

ZOOM MEETINGS

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 
ZOOM MEETING

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 

Gamers Find A Local Support Group

Use the link below to get more information about local groups and a notification when a local meeting is started. Due to the COVID pandemic, most meetings are currently held in an outdoor setting or online.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LOCAL GROUP FINDER TOOL

 

CONTACT GROUPS IN OREGON BY LOCATION