PeerGalaxy

Oregon's Peer Support Directory

PeerGalaxy Original Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring over 187,600+ monthly offerings of FREE telephone- and online-accessible peer support, recovery support, and wellness activities!  Plus 50+ warmlines, helplines, chatlines, and hotlines.  Plus workshops, webinars, job postings, resources, observances, special events, consumer input opportunities and more.

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

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If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

7

Training Opportunities in July 2020
List Provided Courtesy of State of Oregon, Oregon Health Authority
Click here to download PDF Format, 16 pages

Calendar Event Sorting

At the top, the 24/7/365 SAMHSA Disaster Helpline and similar links.

Next, Bundled “All Day” Events

Some organizations (like 12 step recovery programs, AA, NA, AlAnon, etc.) have so many events happening throughout the day that they need to be in a bundled listing to spare endless scrolling.  Often there is a link to look up events by zip code and other criteria.

Lastly, Time-Specific Events

So you can see what’s happening in the next hours, time specific events are tagged and listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  There can be events and warmlines operating in different time zones, though we try to list all in Oregon’s Pacific Time Zone.

Page Advancement

The calendar displays ~50 listings per page.  To advance to next page with ~50 more listings, click the right arrow in the lower left corner of the calendar


Screenshot image of the page advancing arrows at the bottom of the calendar, lower left corner.
Jul
24
Wed
2024
00 – Hotline – LIR – Love is Respect – Confidential Support for Healthy Relationships – Teens – Young Adults – Loved Ones – 866-331-9473 – 24/7
Jul 24 all-day
00 - Hotline - LIR - Love is Respect - Confidential Support for Healthy Relationships - Teens - Young Adults - Loved Ones - 866-331-9473 - 24/7

Love is Respect Advocates are available 24/7

We offer confidential support for teens, young adults, and their loved ones seeking help, resources, or information related to healthy relationships and dating abuse in the US. We’re available by text (“LOVEIS” to 22522), call (866.331.9474), or live chat online.

Terms & conditions for text services

No matter how you reach out to us, you’ll always receive one-on-one, real-time, confidential support.

Our advocates are trained on issues related to dating abuse and healthy relationships, as well as crisis intervention. When you contact us, we’ll listen to your situation, assess how you’re feeling in the moment, and help you identify what next steps may be best for you.

This might include brainstorming a safety plan together or identifying local resources to further support you, whether it’s a service provider, legal resource, counselor, or survivor network to get in touch with.

01 – Helpline – GR – Grad Resources – The National Grad Crisis Line – (877)-472-3457 – 24/7 – Weekdays & Weekends @ Phone
Jul 24 all-day

 

 

 

 

The National Grad Crisis Line

1.877.GRAD.HLP (1.877.472.3457)

The National Grad Crisis Line helps graduate students reach free, confidential telephone counseling, crisis intervention, suicide prevention, and information and referral services provided by specially-trained call-takers. Caring, professional staff and well-trained volunteers answer around the clock.

All counselors have completed training to understand the unique issues faced by graduate students. In addition to listening to and empathizing with a caller’s concerns, counselors assess the caller’s lethality risk, counsel, and offer various local support services and mental health resources for follow-up.

1.877.GRAD.HLP

https://gradresources.org/

Who We Are

Since 1990, Grad Resources has recognized the significant role of graduate students in America. From our studies on stress in graduate school to the painful stories of student struggles we hear every day, we understand the pressures they face. We offer services that address their personal, emotional and spiritual needs, providing online materials, meaningful connections, engaging speakers, and supportive faith-based communities that enable graduate students to flourish personally and professionally.
01 – Helpline – SAMHSA’s National Helpline 24/7 – Línea Nacional de Ayuda de SAMHSA de salud mental y adicciones – (800) 622-4357
Jul 24 all-day

 

SAMHSA’s National Helpline, 1-800-662-HELP (4357) (also known as the Treatment Referral Routing Service), or TTY: 1-800-487-4889 is a confidential, free, 24-hour-a-day, 365-day-a-year, information service, in English and Spanish, for individuals and family members facing mental and/or substance use disorders. This service provides referrals to local treatment facilities, support groups, and community-based organizations.

Línea Nacional de Ayuda de SAMHSA

  • La Línea Nacional de Ayuda de SAMHSA es un servicio gratuito, confidencial, disponible las 24 horas, los 7 días de la semana, los 365 días del año. Esta línea telefónica es un servicio de información (en inglés y español) para personas y familias que enfrentan trastornos mentales o de uso de sustancias.

     

    Visite también el localizador de tratamientos.

Suggested Resources

What Is Substance Abuse Treatment? A Booklet for Families
Created for family members of people with alcohol abuse or drug abuse problems. Answers questions about substance abuse, its symptoms, different types of treatment, and recovery. Addresses concerns of children of parents with substance use/abuse problems.

It’s Not Your Fault (NACoA) (PDF | 12 KB)

Assures teens with parents who abuse alcohol or drugs that, “It’s not your fault!” and that they are not alone. Encourages teens to seek emotional support from other adults, school counselors, and youth support groups such as Alateen, and provides a resource list.

After an Attempt: A Guide for Taking Care of Your Family Member After Treatment in the Emergency Department
Aids family members in coping with the aftermath of a relative’s suicide attempt. Describes the emergency department treatment process, lists questions to ask about follow-up treatment, and describes how to reduce risk and ensure safety at home.

Family Therapy Can Help: For People in Recovery From Mental Illness or Addiction
Explores the role of family therapy in recovery from mental illness or substance abuse. Explains how family therapy sessions are run and who conducts them, describes a typical session, and provides information on its effectiveness in recovery.

CGAA – Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous – Support Meetings, Support Chat for Family and Friends, Resources – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online Via ZOOM
Jul 24 all-day

 

Who We Are

Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous is a fellowship of people who support each other in recovering from the problems resulting from excessive game playing. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop video gaming, which is completely up to you. CGAA has no dues or fees. Our groups share their collective experience and the principles that helped them, but CGAA has no experts, hierarchy, or required beliefs. We have etiquette and traditions, but no strict rules.
If you are struggling with compulsive gaming, leave your contact info at 970-364-3497 and a CGAA member will call you back
Or email us at helpline@cgaa.info
For other issues, contact us at support@cgaa.info

 

ZOOM MEETINGS

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 
ZOOM MEETING

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 

Gamers Find A Local Support Group

Use the link below to get more information about local groups and a notification when a local meeting is started. Due to the COVID pandemic, most meetings are currently held in an outdoor setting or online.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LOCAL GROUP FINDER TOOL

 

CONTACT GROUPS IN OREGON BY LOCATION

 

 

SUPPORT FOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS

What Can I Do?

Video gaming is a common pastime. To many people, it is surprising that it can become a serious addiction, that is, an activity that is engaged in compulsively, without control or concern for consequences.

Video gaming addiction is a very serious problem that is harmful to everyone it touches. Since everyone involved suffers from it, everyone involved needs some help. Here are some important things to know.

First, no one is responsible for someone else’s compulsive gaming. As the Al-Anon slogan goes, “I didn’t cause it, I can’t control it, and I can’t cure it.”

You didn’t cause it.

Some people partly blame themselves for the dysfunctional behavior of their family members, particularly with addicts who are very quick to shift responsibility off themselves and blame others. Perhaps you played games with your loved one, purchased games, or encouraged it, thinking it was a harmless leisure activity. Maybe you’ve been involved in some conflict and wonder if that has driven him or her to hide away in gaming. But no one is responsible for another person’s behavior or mental disorders.

You can’t control it.

You may have already tried to talk to your friend or family member. Perhaps you have bargained with them, or given ultimatums. You have tried to help them see what damage they are doing to themselves and others. And none of it has worked. This is baffling to you. Why don’t they seem to understand or care? Why can’t they see what is obvious to you? This is actually a symptom of the disease of addiction, one that destines efforts for control to failure.

You can’t cure it.

We all would like to believe that we have the ability to help those we love. We often think that if we can just get the right information, figure out the right thing to say or do, perhaps change something about ourselves, we can fix the problem. People should be able to solve their own problems. Why can’t we do that with this one? There is a simple reason. There is no cure for addiction. It requires treatment. The recovery process is long and difficult. And there is only one person who can start that process, the one who is gaming compulsively. There are things you can do. Here are some suggestions that you may want to consider, that other family members and friends have found helpful.

Get information.

The literature of recovery fellowships for family and friends of addicts (such as Al-Anon) has much helpful guidance, some of which is available online as well. There are people who have been in situations very similar to yours, who have learned much from them, and who are willing to share the lessons learned, their experience, strength and hope. We hope you avail yourself of such resources.

Detach with love.

Putting energy into arguing with someone who is playing compulsively will not help either of you. Your loved one has a serious problem that you are powerless to control or cure, and that they will not get help until they want it. As much as you love someone, you cannot force this process on another person.

Stop enabling.

Paradoxically, at the same time people are arguing with, bargaining with or shaming a compulsive gamer, they are often (perhaps without realizing it) supporting the addiction in many ways. Anything that shields an addict from the consequences of his or her behavior is enabling, and can include such basic things as providing food, shelter, money, companionship, housekeeping, and covering for employment and legal difficulties. Helping a compulsive gamer keep up an appearance of normalcy is helping him or her continue in the destructive behavior. While you cannot change him or her, you can make changes for yourself. You can shift your energy away from enabling behaviors and toward meeting your own needs.

Take care of yourself.

Whether or not your loved one ever stops gaming, you deserve to have a healthy and happy life. Once you have accepted that you are powerless over their gaming behavior, you can begin to focus on what you can do for yourself, to accomplish your own goals. With the help of others who have been where you are, you can learn to set healthy boundaries and stick to them.

Join our WhatsApp Chat Site for Family and Friends!

Game-Anon

WhatsApp Group Invite

Visit whatsapp.com/dl on your mobile phone to install.

By installing WhatsApp, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

 

Chat Using A Macintosh

 

Mac OS X 10.10 and higher. WhatsApp must be installed on your phone.

By clicking the Download button, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

DOWNLOAD FOR MAC OS X

Download for Windows 8 and higher (64-bit)
Download for Windows 8 and higher (32-bit)

 

 


Things To Do Instead of Gaming

One of the things we were trying to do with our gaming was meet some basic needs. If we do not meet those needs in normal healthy ways, we will suffer much stronger urges to game again. Some basic needs to cover are social needs, self expression, creativity, a sense of challenge and accomplishment, stress relief, a sense of purpose and meaning, and a sense of safety through control and predictability.

Here are some ideas for activities that will help meet these needs, reduce cravings, help with recovery from addiction, and fill some of the hours freed from compulsive gaming.

Please don’t let the length of this list overwhelm you. The idea is not to start ten new things and try to change everything all at once. We seek small bits of progress, not perfection. A good place to start is to put first things first. What need is currently most important? What’s right in front of me? What opportunity has come my way recently? If we take steps of small improvement with one or two areas each day, we are moving in the right direction.

 

Stress Relief

  • Talking with a sponsor or recovery buddy, CGAA meetings, or step work
  • Getting outside for fresh air and sunlight by taking a walk or doing some outdoor work
  • Meditation, coloring, craft work, journaling, or reading
 

Sense of safety through freedom, control, and predictability

  • Goal setting
  • Counseling or psychotherapy
  • Home organization, renovation, or spring cleaning
 

Sense of purpose, meaning, and self-respect

  • Supporting and growing the larger CGAA fellowship through service work like helping run a meeting, starting a local meeting, doing outreach to professionals, or attending CGAA business meetings
  • Attending a spiritual group like meditation, yoga, spiritual retreat, or religious gathering
  • Doing volunteer work like teaching, helping others, animal care, or building community places
  • Caring for a pet, house plants, or garden
 

Social needs

  • Attending CGAA meetings, connecting outside of meetings, reaching out to newcomers, or calling someone
  • Joining a hobby group like theater, a hiking group, art workshop, book club, public speaking, board games or card game group
  • Hosting a fun event like board games night or karaoke
  • Playing team sports, taking up martial arts, or playing one-on-one sports
  • Going to fun events like concerts, dances, or events on meetup.com
  • Calling up, video conferencing, or visiting with friends, family, neighbors, or other communities
 

Self expression and creativity

  • Journaling, opening up to a CGAA sponsor, or sharing openly in a meeting
  • Art work like drawing, photography, sculpting, or creative writing
  • Performance art like theater, singing, playing music, or writing music
 

Sense of challenge and accomplishment

  • Working the steps with a sponsor
  • Crafts like woodworking, origami, knitting
  • Outdoor activities like gardening, geocaching, bird watching, star gazing, tracking, plant identification, survival skills, or boating
  • Learning something like a foreign language, dancing, magic tricks, mechanical repair, cooking, a musical instrument, or computer programming
  • Career goals like getting a new job, starting a business, enrolling in school, or taking classes
 

Reconnection to one’s body and whole self

  • Meditating on breath, sounds, or bodily sensations
  • Exercise like walking, hiking, swimming, cycling, yoga, jogging, going to a gym, or playing a sport

If you are in your first week or two off of games, it’s likely that few of these ideas will appeal to you. That’s normal. Until our minds and bodies have some time to heal, we have low interest, energy, and motivation. This list will probably not give you something that you can plug in place of video games and immediately throw yourself into with the same zeal. This list is meant to help us explore new ways of spending our time, meeting our needs, and connecting with people. Find a few that hold some appeal and try taking some small steps in their direction. If you can’t seem to think of anything fun to do except game, you can come back to this list, find the most appealing thing, and just take a couple of little steps in its direction.

Consider setting reminders for yourself or keeping a schedule of your time and new activities. It is important to appreciate the small victories of exercising willpower, regaining motivation, and socializing. It helps to discuss our progress and the challenges we experience with a CGAA sponsor, recovery buddy, personal counselor, or therapist.

Rediscovering What is Fun

It is normal to think that nothing but gaming sounds fun. For most of us, our years of compulsive gaming warped and narrowed our idea of fun. As small children, it meant almost anything new or interesting or social or even mildly rewarding. Years of pulling the dopamine lever with video games changed our concept of fun to require instant gratification, frequent rewards, clear and constant progress, excitement, intense visuals, control, and/or predictability.

Part of recovery is letting our concept of fun expand back outward to a wide world of possible new challenges and experiences, many of which are calm and subtle compared to video games. It takes time to overcome withdrawals and heal from the damage, but the change does happen if we abstain from all gaming long term and focus on new pursuits and improving our lives. This list has many activities that do not meet the old, narrow, warped idea of “fun,” but those of us who persist at exploring them do find many to be gratifying and enjoyable.

Take, for example, a hike up a mountain. To a group of hikers excited to venture into the wilderness with friends and see wildlife and panoramic views from on high, all while getting a great workout, it’s a ton of fun. To someone who is uninterested in hiking, out of shape, and focused on every little unpleasant aspect of it, it’s a torturous death march. It is exactly the same hike in either case. The difference is in the attitude and conditioning.

The same is true with every item of these lists. Whether or not an activity sounds fun or torturous depends entirely upon attitude and conditioning. Every one of them has the potential to be gratifying and enjoyable if we adopt a positive attitude, try to have fun, and persist at it, especially when we involve friends and like-minded people.

CPI – Crisis Prevention Institute – De-escalation and Non-Violent Intervention Training Programs @ Register for Details
Jul 24 all-day

 

Verbal Intervention

Verbal Intervention (VI) instills the confidence and skills to verbally de‑escalate disruptive behaviors and prevent further escalation. It’s well‑suited to organizations with a hands‑off policy or that require non‑restrictive techniques.

Available as a virtual (Online & Live Virtual) Instructor Certification Program.

More About VI Register Now

Program Features & Benefits:

  • Limit-setting strategies when verbally intervening to de‑escalate defensive behaviors.
  • Recognize opportunities for post‑crisis learning.
  • The effects of trauma and the psychology of the brain on the person in crisis as well as the responding individual.
  • Person-centered to help ensure a consistently inclusive and culturally sensitive approach to a person displaying crisis behavior.
  • Verbal de‑escalation techniques and skills also featured in Nonviolent Crisis Intervention® and NCI With Advanced Physical Skills training.

Nonviolent Crisis Intervention®

Nonviolent Crisis Intervention® (NCI) provides your staff with the skills to safely recognize and respond to everyday crisis situations that may involve more challenging behaviors. NCI training is designed to help you achieve compliance with current legislative initiatives and best practices.

Available as a blended (Online & In-Person) Instructor Certification Program.

More About NCI Register Now

Program Features & Benefits:

  • Safety interventions and disengagement techniques for escalating risk behaviors.
  • Limit-setting strategies when verbally intervening to de-escalate defensive behaviors.
  • Recognize opportunities for post-crisis learning.
  • The effects of trauma and the psychology of the brain on the person in crisis as well as the responding individual.
  • Person-centered to help ensure a consistently inclusive and culturally sensitive approach to a person displaying crisis behavior.

Nonviolent Crisis Intervention® With Advanced Physical Skills

Nonviolent Crisis Intervention® With Advanced Physical Skills (APS) equips your staff with the decision-making skills needed to confidently assess and address risk in the face of complex behaviors. It combines verbal intervention strategies and restrictive interventions with advanced physical skills for the highest-risk scenarios. Instructors can customize training to each staff member’s individual risk level.

Available as a blended (Online, Live Virtual & In-Person) Instructor Certification Program.

More About APS Register Now

Program Features & Benefits:

  • Safe and advanced deceleration, disengagement, and physical intervention techniques for situations involving dangerous behaviors.
  • Intervene in high- and medium-risk situations that don’t require advanced skills.
  • Safety interventions and disengagement techniques for escalating risk behaviors.
  • Limit-setting strategies when verbally intervening to de-escalate defensive behaviors.
  • Recognize opportunities for post-crisis learning.
  • The effects of trauma and the psychology of the brain on the person in crisis as well as the responding individual.
  • Person-centered to help ensure a consistently inclusive and culturally sensitive approach to a person displaying crisis behavior.
FCA – Family Caregiver Alliance – Caregiver Support Group – 24/7 @ Email Group
Jul 24 all-day
FCA - Family Caregiver Alliance - Caregiver Support Group - 24/7 @ Email Group

 

Family Caregiver Alliance
Email Support Group 24/7

This group is in e-mail format. Participants send and receive e-mail to take part in discussions. You can receive your posts all together, in one delivery each day, or you can receive them one-by-one, as they are sent.

The choice is yours. It’s fun, easy, and available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. To join, complete the form below and click the submit button.

Subscribe to Caregiver-Online

You can subscribe to Caregiver-online by following this link and completing the form.  After completing the Subscription form you will email requesting confirmation, to prevent others from gratuitously subscribing you. This is a hidden list, which means that the list of members is available only to the list administrator.

To subscribe, Use this Link and complete the subscription form online:

http://lists.caregiver.org/mailman/listinfo/caregiver-online_lists.caregiver.org

 

Using Caregiver-online

To post a message to all the list members, send email to caregiver-online@lists.caregiver.org. Be sure to subscribe first!

HP – HeyPeers – PeerGalaxy Peer Support Groups and More @ Online Via Zoom
Jul 24 all-day

 

 

 

HeyPeers is an online Peer Support Community offering online community meetings, one-to-one coaching, and private chat rooms to connect with others on your journey.

HeyPeers features over 1,100 meetings, including weekly offerings from PeerGalaxy such as: Wellness Buddies, Creative Writing, Discovering Felt Sense of Safety, Kitchen Empowerment Hour, Peer Recovery, Resilience and Reconnection, plus more.

If you’re NEW to HeyPeers, you can sign-up / onboard with PeerGalaxy
and access MyJourneyTracker for FREE while available at this link:
If you’re an existing HeyPeers member, you can check out PeerGalaxy offerings:
For more about HeyPeers, visit https://www.heypeers.com
Native American Heritage – Education, Celebrations, Arts and Culture,Resources @ Zoom and Other Platforms
Jul 24 all-day

NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE

 

EDUCATION

National Constution Center Logo

 

 

 

 

In celebration of Native American Heritage Month, the National Constitution Center is hosting a series of scholar talks and activities highlighting the history of American Indians, tribal governments, and their relationship to the U.S. Constitution and American democracy.

 

Scholar Talk: American Indian Influence on the Constitution and the Founding Fathers Featuring Robert J. Miller  
Thursday, November 17 at 10 p.m. PST, Kirby Auditorium and Livestreamed

Join Robert J. Miller for a conversation about American Indians political theories and how their governments had a profound effect on many of the Founding Fathers, shaping specific provisions in the U.S. Constitution. The framers were influenced by both “positive” aspects of tribal governance and political science that they were familiar with and adopted into the Constitution, and they were also influenced by what can be called the “negative” aspects of the threats posed by the American Indian tribes to the new United States. Many of these effects are reflected in provisions in our Constitution. This talk examines how Indigenous theories of government affected our Founding Fathers in drafting the U.S. Constitution.    

 Robert J. Miller is a professor at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University where he is also the Willard H. Pedrick Distinguished Research Scholar and the director of the Rosette LLP American Indian Economic Development Program. He is the chief justice of the Pascua Yaqui Tribe Court of Appeals and an appellate judge in other tribal courts. He graduated from Lewis & Clark Law School in 1991 and then clerked for Judge Diarmuid O’Scannlain of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in 1991-92. Miller is a citizen of the Eastern Shawnee Tribe. He was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 2014, the oldest learned society in the United States.  

Scholar Talk: Native Americans’ Fight for Citizenship and Sovereignty Featuring Paul C. Rosier  
Friday, November 25 at 10 p.m. PST, Kirby Auditorium and Livestreamed

Dr. Paul C. Rosier, professor of history at Villanova University, will explore the Native Americans’ fight for American citizenship and tribal sovereignty, focusing on their extraordinary efforts to both protect their autonomy and secure the civil rights afforded American citizens: a dual citizenship codified in the 1924 Indian Citizenship Act. His presentation will highlight native people’s vision of an inclusive country that lives up to the ideals expressed in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, championing via military service, activism, and political writings their belief in a multi-racial and multi-cultural America that honored its legal obligations as it assumed international prominence in the 20th century.

Paul C. Rosier received his Ph.D. in American History from the University of Rochester in 1998. He currently serves as professor of history at Villanova University, where he teaches Native American history, American environmental history, global environmental history, and 20th century American history. He also serves as the director of the Albert Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest at Villanova. He previously held the inaugural Mary M. Birle Chair in American History (2016-2022) and served as department chair (2013-2016). In 2001, he published his first book, Rebirth of the Blackfeet Nation, 1912-1954; he co-edited the 2006 volume Echoes from the Poisoned Well: Global Memories of Environmental Injustice. In 2009, Harvard University Press published his Serving Their Country: American Indian Politics and Patriotism in the Twentieth Century, which won the 2010 American Indian National Book Award. He has published numerous essays on Native American topics, including three articles in The Journal of American History. Reflecting his commitment to public-facing work, he has published several blog posts on Native American political issues in Hindsights and the History News Network. He is in the final stages of two projects: an edited volume on environmental justice in North America; and a monograph on Native Americans’ political history, “The American Way of Life”: Native Americans’ Fight for Sovereignty and Citizenship.

Native Americans and the Constitution Town Hall Video (YouTube)

In celebration of Native American Heritage Month, join experts Maggie Blackhawk of the New York University School of Law; Donald Grinde, Jr. of the University at Buffalo and co-author of Exemplar of Liberty: Native America and the Evolution of Democracy; Gregory Dowd of the University of Michigan; and Woody Holton of the University of South Carolina and author of Liberty Is Sweet: The Hidden History of the American Revolution, for a conversation exploring the influence of Indigenous people and tribal governments on the U.S. Constitution and American democracy, from before the Revolution to today. Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, moderates.

 

CELEBRATIONS

Smithsonian Institute Logo

Native Veterans Procession and Dedication Ceremony

Veterans Day, November 11, 2022 and up live stream.

Join the museum in honoring the exceptional military service of Native Americans in a formal dedication of the National Native American Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC. The dedication and processional will honor American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian veterans and their families.   Use this link to Regester and View Live Stream


WEEKEND CELEBRATION  

Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 12–13 | Washington, D.C. 

All are welcome to join as the museum honors the military service of Native American, Native Hawai’ian and Alaska Native veterans, Friday, Nov. 11. The Native veterans’ procession and dedication ceremony will take place beginning at 2 p.m. on the National Mall as part of a three-day celebration featuring hands-on activities, films, performances, and a veterans hospitality suite. The procession and dedication will be livestreamed. For more information about the weekend program, visit AmericanIndian.si.edu/visit/washington/nnavm-dedication 

2022 Native Cinema Showcase 
Nov. 18–25

Live Streaming

The National Museum of the American Indian’s Native Cinema Showcase is an annual celebration of the best in Indigenous film. Embracing their communities’ oral histories, knowledge and ancestral lands, Indigenous filmmakers are seeking guidance from the past and envisioning new paths for the future. The showcase provides a unique forum for engagement with filmmakers from Indigenous communities throughout the Western Hemisphere and Arctic.

The online program includes a total of 35 films (six features and 30 shorts) representing 30 Native nations in eight different countries: US, Canada, New Zealand, Mexico, Guatemala, Ecuador, Colombia and Sweden. There are 10 Indigenous languages spoken in the films. Genres include documentaries, music videos, kid-friendly shorts, films in Indigenous languages and more.

Use this Link to Attend Online

Native Cinema Showcase is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature

 

Facing History & Ourselves Logo

 

Native American Boarding Schools as a Tool of U.S. Empire
Friday, November 19, 2021
10:00am EST/ 7:00 am PST
University of Michigan Alumni Association

“The Alumni Association is sponsoring the November Clements Bookworm. The Clements Bookworm is a webinar series in which panelists discuss history topics. In this episode, Dr. Veronica Pasfield discusses her continuing research to understand the full purpose and force of federal Indian boarding schools. She asserts that the creation story of Carlisle Indian School must be rooted in missionary schools founded to prepare Kanaka Maoli for wage labor on their own Hawaiian homelands as well as in the captivity of Native children in the Southwest by a U.S. Army desperate to bring about the submission of Western tribes by any means necessary. While administrators touted assimilation as a benevolent enterprise, the archives show that Indian children were used as hostages to secure the extraction of tribal resources, and ‘schools’ were used as an instrument for transforming indigenous peoples into a permanent underclass in their own homeland.”

Celebrate! with Wampanoag Nation Singers & Dancers
Saturday, November 20, 2021
11:30 AM – 12:30 PM EST
Hosted by the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum

“Join the Wampanoag Nation Singers and Dancers as they share stories of both their history and modern culture in a performance that culminates with a dance in honor of Native American Heritage Month. During this virtual program from wherever you are, the whole family can join in learning new movements and words for interactive elements. The Celebrate! series, appropriate for family audiences and children ages 5 and up, highlights America’s rich cultural diversity through the arts. This program is tied directly to President and Mrs. Kennedy’s concern for and support of the arts and culture in a democratic society. Thanks to generous support from the Martin Richard Foundation and the Mass Cultural Council all performances are free.”

Cultural Representation in Education
Tuesday, November 23, 2021
6:00 pm – 7:00 pm CST
Hosted by the Mitchell Museum

“Join us to learn about Native American history, culture and traditions first-hand from the perspectives of Indigenous educators… Waqnahwew Benjamin Grignon (Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin) is a teacher of traditional Menominee arts. He represents the Menominee Nation and approaches culturally-responsive education by using Menominee Language, Culture, and art to promote and preserve tribal history as a pathway for future generations and positively influence the education of the youth in his community. He is the 2019 Wisconsin High School Teacher of the Year and the recipient of the 2020 National Education Association’s Leo Reano Memorial Human and Civil Rights Award. Benjamin will be speaking about his journey to becoming a teacher at the Menominee Indian High School. He will be sharing the lessons he has learned over his 14 years of teaching experience and how this journey influences Menominee education by helping to design the Kaehkēnawapahta͞eq Menominee Immersion Charter School.”

Kyle T. Mays — An Afro-Indigenous History of the United States
Monday, November 29, 2021
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Hosted by the Boston Public Library

“Join us for an online talk with Kyle T. Mays, author of An Afro-Indigenous History of the United States, the first intersectional history of the Black and Native American struggle for freedom in our country that also reframes our understanding of who was Indigenous in early America…

Beginning with pre-Revolutionary America and moving into the movement for Black lives and contemporary Indigenous activism, Afro-Indigenous historian Kyle T. Mays argues that the foundations of the US are rooted in antiblackness and settler colonialism, and that these parallel oppressions continue into the present. He explores how Black and Indigenous peoples have always resisted and struggled for freedom, sometimes together, and sometimes apart… Mays compels us to rethink both our history as well as contemporary debates and to imagine the powerful possibilities of Afro-Indigenous solidarity.”

Facing History and Ourselves invites educators to explore our interview with Facing History Canada in which we discuss strategies for teaching settler colonialism beyond Canada.

 

ARTS AND CULTURE

Native American Worldview

Native American Worldview: A Conversation between Dr. Tink Tinker and Dr. Lisa Dellinger, Tinker Visiting Professor

In well-meaning white (mostly) institutions, it has become a standard practice that land acknowledgment is invoked in every event, and the discussion about or the demand for LandBack is publicly made.

Many assume that such is a step toward improving white institutions, solving settler colonialism, and reconciling with the Native people. However, Drs. Tinker and Dellinger warn that such discussions can deteriorate into sessions alleviating christian guilt, and maintaining the status quo. Dr. Tinker has argued that “the Native worldview and christianity cannot be reconciled because they were never “conciled” in the first place, so there is no state of conciliation to go back to (reconciliation).” Then all of us, the settler population, wonder what we can do?

This conversation between Drs. Tinker and Dellinger offers you an opportunity to deep listening to them, and invites you to learn from them with cultural humility first.”

 

Native American Worldview image

Dr. Lisa Dellinger

Native American Worldview image

Dr. Tink Tinker

Use this Link to Attend on ZOOM

 

Everything You Think You Know About Native Americans is Wrong (and Why Thats Not Your Fault)

In honor of Native American Heritage Month, the American Family Insurance DreamBank invites you to an enlightening presentation around common misperceptions of Native Americans with Rebecca Nagle, an award-winning advocate, writer, podcaster and citizen of the Cherokee Nation. Drawing from her extensive research, Rebecca will guide you in confronting any personal and societal ignorance and institutional bias that may exist. You’ll leave with a better understanding on how to create a more inclusive, empathetic culture in your personal and professional life — while advocating for Native American culture and progress.

Use this Link to Attend On Zoom

Native American Art and Culture

Thursday, November 10  8 PM to 9 PM PST

Join us for an online presentation on Native American Art and Culture – brought to you by Kent State Geauga and the Smithsonian Art Museum.

Join Kent State Geauga and the Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) for an interactive presentation on Native American Art and Culture. “American Indians are part of the past, present, and future of the United States.” This presentation will “explore histories and cultures of some American Indians as captured by both Native and non-Native artists” (SAAM).

Use this Link to Attend On Zoom

 

RESCOURCES

North Idaho College Logo

 

Native American Web Sites

Related Native American Web Sites Information from sites selected for those interested in American Indians/Alaskan Natives. Includes demographics of state and federally recognized tribes within the United States, population figures, tribal contact information, tribal home pages and more.

Native American Web Sites

Related Native American Web Sites Information from sites selected for those interested in American Indians/Alaskan Natives. Includes demographics of state and federally recognized tribes within the United States, population figures, tribal contact information, tribal home pages and more.


 

Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) – ATNI is a nonprofit organization representing 54 Northwest tribal governments from Oregon, Idaho, Washington, southeast Alaska, Northern California and Western Montana. ATNI is an organization whose foundation is composed of the people it is meant to serve — the Indian peoples.

Alaska Inter-Tribal Council – The Alaska Inter-Tribal Council is a statewide, tribally-governed non-profit organization that advocates in support of Tribal governments throughout the state.

Alaska Native Knowledge Network – is designed to serve as a resource for compiling and exchanging information related to Alaska Native knowledge systems and ways of knowing.

American Indian Lands Environmental Support Project – The American Indian Lands Environmental Support Project (AILESP) was developed by EPA’s Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance (OECA). AILESP integrates and assesses recent multi-media point-source releases, the potential impacts of contaminants, and recent compliance and enforcement histories for facilities located on and within five kilometers of Tribal areas.

American Indian Law Review – The purpose of the American Indian Law Review, a specialized law review devoted exclusively to Indian law, will be to provide a forum for scholarly writing in the areas of the law that particularly affect American Indians. . . . A distinguishing feature of the Review will be that the discussion will not be limited to any particular viewpoint. In fact, the Review will encourage expression of differing viewpoints concerning American Indian legal problems.

American Indian Science and Engineering Society (A.I.S.E.S.) – The American Indian Science & Engineering Society (AISES) is a national, nonprofit organization which nurtures building of community by bridging science and technology with traditional Native values. Through its educational programs, AISES provides opportunities for American Indians and Native Alaskans to pursue studies in science, engineering, business and other academic arenas.

Bristol Bay Native Corporation (BBNC) – Strategic Intent 1997 – 2005 Mission Enriching our Native way of life. Vision To be a corporation that protects the past, present, and future of the Natives from Bristol Bay. Goals To double dividends within eight years (by 2005). To protect Native use of land and water in Bristol Bay. Values To protect the best interests of our shareholders. To maintain or grow total dividends paid annually by providing a solvent corporation. To celebrate and preserve the Alaskan Native culture and linkage with the land that provides the basis for our style of life.

Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) – DOI, Interior The Bureau of Indian Affairs’ mission is to enhance the quality of life, to promote economic opportunity, and to carry out the responsibility to protect and improve the trust assets of American Indians, Indian tribes and Alaska Natives. We will accomplish this through the delivery of quality services, maintaining government-to-government relationships within the spirit of Indian self-determination

Center for World Indigenous Studies (CWIS) – The Underlying Principle Guiding CWIS is: Access to knowledge and peoples’ ideas reduces the possibility of conflict and increases the possibility of cooperation between peoples on the basis of mutual consent. By democratizing relations between peoples, between nations and states, the diversity of nations and their cultures will continue to enrich the world.

Cherokee Nation – Official site of the Cherokee Nation.

Chinook Nation – Official site of the Chinook Indian Tribe

Code Talk – CodeTalk is a federal, inter-agency, Native American Web site designed specifically to deliver electronic information from government agencies and other organizations to Native American communities.

Coeur d’Alene Tribe – Because there was always a commitment to the future, so will there always be a commitment to the past. The modern Coeur d’ Alene Tribe is the sum of uncounted centuries and of untold generations. .

Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes – The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes are comprised of the Bitterroot Salish, the Pend d’Oreille and the Kootenai tribes. The Flathead Reservation of 1.317 million acres in northwest Montana is our home now but our ancestors lived in the territory now known as western Montana, parts of Idaho, British Columbia and Wyoming. This aboriginal territory exceeded 20 million acres at the time of the 1855 Hellgate Treaty.

Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation – Official site of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation – The Cayuse, Umatilla and Walla Walla Tribes make up the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

Cook Inlet Tribal Council – Located in Anchorage, Alaska, CITC administers programs to perpetuate and enhance the cultural heritage, social and economic well-being of Alaska Natives and American Indians residing in the Cook Inlet region of Alaska.

Coquille Indian Tribe – Preserving our past with the technology of the future. This is the starting point for you to explore the dynamic facets of the Coquille Indian Tribe.

Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians – Official site of the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians

CRITFC – Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission – CRITFC is made up of four Columbia Basin tribes. These tribes are the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and the Nez Perce Tribe.

Denali Commission of Alaska – Introduced by Congress in 1998, the Denali Commission is an innovative federal-state partnership designed to provide critical utilities, infrastructure, and economic support throughout Alaska.

Index of Native American Resources – American Indians Index of Native American Resources on the Internet.

Indian Country Today – The on-line version of Indian Country Today does not include the full content – articles, advertisements, notices and listings – that appear only in our newsprint edition. For complete access to America’s Leading Indian News source, subscribe to Indian Country Today!

Indian Health Service – The Indian Health Service (I H S) is an agency within the U S Dept. of Health and Human Services and is responsible for providing federal health services to American Indians and Alaska Natives.

Indian Reservation Roads Program (IRR) – The IRR Program is a jointly administered program by the Federal Highway Administration and by the Bureau of Indian Affairs through an Interagency Memorandum of Agreement as established by Title 23 U.S.C. Section 204.

Indianz.Com – Your Internet Resource Our Mission Welcome to Indianz.Com, Your Internet Resource. Our mission is to provide you with quality news, information, and entertainment from a Native American perspective.

Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada – The Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada, Inc. (ITCN) was incorporated as a non-profit organization under Nevada State Law on February 23, 1966. ITCN is a Tribal organization serving the member reservations and colonies in Nevada. The Governing Body of ITCN consists of an Executive Board, composed of Tribal Chairman from each of these Tribes.

Intertribal Timber Council – The ITC is a nation-wide consortium of Indian Tribes, Alaska Native Corporations, and individuals dedicated to improving the management of natural resources of importance to Native American communities.

Kalispel Tribe of Indians – The Kalispel Tribe of Indians’ official website.

Kappler’s Indian Affairs: Laws and Treaties – Indian Affairs: Laws and Treaties, compiled and edited by Charles J. Kappler, is an historically significant, seven volume compilation of U.S. treaties, laws and executive orders pertaining to Native American Indian tribes.

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) – The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), founded in 1944, is the oldest, largest and most representative national Indian organization serving the needs of a broad membership of American Indian and Alaska Native governments. Our founding members stressed the need for unity and cooperation among tribal governments and people for the security and protection of treaty and sovereign rights.

National Indian Education Association (NIEA) – The National Indian Education Association (NIEA)was founded in 1969 to give American Indians and Alaska Natives a national voice in their struggle to improve access to educational opportunity. NIEA is the largest and oldest Indian education organization in the nation and strives to keep Indian Country moving toward educational equity.

Vision Maker Media – The mission of Native American Public Telecommunications (NAPT) is to inform, educate and encourage the awareness of tribal histories, cultures, languages, opportunities and aspirations through the fullest participation of American Indians and Alaska Natives in creating and employing all forms of educational and public telecommunications programs and services, thereby supporting tribal sovereignty.

Native American Rights Fund (NARF) – The Native American Rights Fund (NARF) is a non-profit organization that provides legal representation and technical assistance to Indian tribes, organizations and individuals nationwide.

Native American Times – The Native American Times, Oklahoma state’s Indian news source, is published monthly by Oklahoma Indian Times, Inc. It is Oklahoma’s only independent newspaper that serves all of Oklahoma’s federally-recognized Indian Nations.

Native Sense – Information, case law and resources for and about Indians and Native American legal issues. Nez Perce Tribe – Official site of the Nez Perce Tribe.

Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board – Information about the Northwest Portland Area Health Board.

NPS: Tribal Preservation Program – The National Park Service (NPS) Tribal Preservation Program assists Indian tribes in preserving their historic properties and cultural traditions.

Office of American Indian Trust – The American Indian Trust Office was created to ensure that the Secretary’s obligations under the Federal Indian trust responsibility are performed in accordance with the standards required by the laws and policies of the United States. Among its responsibilities, the Office conducts annual reviews of tribal performance of trust functions assumed under of the Self-Governance Act of 1994 25 U.S.C. 458cc(d).

ONABEN – A Native American Business Network A Native American Business Network is a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation created by Northwest Indian Tribes to increase the success of private businesses owned by Native Americans. ONABEN offers training and support focused on developing entrepreneurship in Indian communities.

Red Feather Development Group – Red Feather Development Group is a national nonprofit housing and community development organization. We work with American Indian nations to find lasting solutions for the acute lack of proper housing and desperate poverty that continue to plague many of these communities.

Salmon Homecoming Alliance – is a 501 (c) 3 non-profit foundation, established to organize, plan, develop and facilitate programs and events associated with Salmon Homecoming.

The SGCE Tribal Consortium – a communication & education resource for the Self-Governance Tribes.

Spokane Tribe of Indians – The official page of the Spokane Tribe of Indians.

State-Tribal Relations – National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) tracks a variety of policy issues affecting state-tribal relations including economic development, environmental protection, human services, taxation, jurisdiction and law enforcement, and trust land issues. Tribal governments across the United States are exercising their self-governing powers and taking more control over program administration and the provision of services within their communities.

Tribal Court Clearinghouse – Welcome to the Tribal Court Clearinghouse – the first web site devoted to providing information to people working in Native American tribal courts. The Tribal Court Clearinghouse is designed as a resource for tribal justice systems and others involved in the enhancement of justice in Indian country.

Tulalip Tribes – The Tulalip Tribes official homepage

Yakama Nation – The official site of the Confederated Tribes of the Yakama Nation

 

SRC – Swindells Resource Center – Powerful Tools for Caregivers – Wednesdays @ online register for details
Jul 24 @ 9:30 am – 11:30 am

 

 

Powerful Tools for Caregivers

This virtual series provides an opportunity for parents and caregivers of children who experience developmental, behavioral, or complex healthcare needs to make connections with others and develop tools to better care for loved ones and themselves.

Classes include strategies and tools to:

  • Reduce stress
  • Improve self-confidence
  • Manage time, set goals, and solve problems
  • better communicate your feelings
  • Make tough decisions
  • Locate helpful resources

6 WEEK VIRTUAL SERIES

Wednesdays

July 17 – August 21

9:30 – 11:30PM

Jul
25
Thu
2024
00 – Hotline – LIR – Love is Respect – Confidential Support for Healthy Relationships – Teens – Young Adults – Loved Ones – 866-331-9473 – 24/7
Jul 25 all-day
00 - Hotline - LIR - Love is Respect - Confidential Support for Healthy Relationships - Teens - Young Adults - Loved Ones - 866-331-9473 - 24/7

Love is Respect Advocates are available 24/7

We offer confidential support for teens, young adults, and their loved ones seeking help, resources, or information related to healthy relationships and dating abuse in the US. We’re available by text (“LOVEIS” to 22522), call (866.331.9474), or live chat online.

Terms & conditions for text services

No matter how you reach out to us, you’ll always receive one-on-one, real-time, confidential support.

Our advocates are trained on issues related to dating abuse and healthy relationships, as well as crisis intervention. When you contact us, we’ll listen to your situation, assess how you’re feeling in the moment, and help you identify what next steps may be best for you.

This might include brainstorming a safety plan together or identifying local resources to further support you, whether it’s a service provider, legal resource, counselor, or survivor network to get in touch with.

01 – Helpline – GR – Grad Resources – The National Grad Crisis Line – (877)-472-3457 – 24/7 – Weekdays & Weekends @ Phone
Jul 25 all-day

 

 

 

 

The National Grad Crisis Line

1.877.GRAD.HLP (1.877.472.3457)

The National Grad Crisis Line helps graduate students reach free, confidential telephone counseling, crisis intervention, suicide prevention, and information and referral services provided by specially-trained call-takers. Caring, professional staff and well-trained volunteers answer around the clock.

All counselors have completed training to understand the unique issues faced by graduate students. In addition to listening to and empathizing with a caller’s concerns, counselors assess the caller’s lethality risk, counsel, and offer various local support services and mental health resources for follow-up.

1.877.GRAD.HLP

https://gradresources.org/

Who We Are

Since 1990, Grad Resources has recognized the significant role of graduate students in America. From our studies on stress in graduate school to the painful stories of student struggles we hear every day, we understand the pressures they face. We offer services that address their personal, emotional and spiritual needs, providing online materials, meaningful connections, engaging speakers, and supportive faith-based communities that enable graduate students to flourish personally and professionally.
01 – Helpline – SAMHSA’s National Helpline 24/7 – Línea Nacional de Ayuda de SAMHSA de salud mental y adicciones – (800) 622-4357
Jul 25 all-day

 

SAMHSA’s National Helpline, 1-800-662-HELP (4357) (also known as the Treatment Referral Routing Service), or TTY: 1-800-487-4889 is a confidential, free, 24-hour-a-day, 365-day-a-year, information service, in English and Spanish, for individuals and family members facing mental and/or substance use disorders. This service provides referrals to local treatment facilities, support groups, and community-based organizations.

Línea Nacional de Ayuda de SAMHSA

  • La Línea Nacional de Ayuda de SAMHSA es un servicio gratuito, confidencial, disponible las 24 horas, los 7 días de la semana, los 365 días del año. Esta línea telefónica es un servicio de información (en inglés y español) para personas y familias que enfrentan trastornos mentales o de uso de sustancias.

     

    Visite también el localizador de tratamientos.

Suggested Resources

What Is Substance Abuse Treatment? A Booklet for Families
Created for family members of people with alcohol abuse or drug abuse problems. Answers questions about substance abuse, its symptoms, different types of treatment, and recovery. Addresses concerns of children of parents with substance use/abuse problems.

It’s Not Your Fault (NACoA) (PDF | 12 KB)

Assures teens with parents who abuse alcohol or drugs that, “It’s not your fault!” and that they are not alone. Encourages teens to seek emotional support from other adults, school counselors, and youth support groups such as Alateen, and provides a resource list.

After an Attempt: A Guide for Taking Care of Your Family Member After Treatment in the Emergency Department
Aids family members in coping with the aftermath of a relative’s suicide attempt. Describes the emergency department treatment process, lists questions to ask about follow-up treatment, and describes how to reduce risk and ensure safety at home.

Family Therapy Can Help: For People in Recovery From Mental Illness or Addiction
Explores the role of family therapy in recovery from mental illness or substance abuse. Explains how family therapy sessions are run and who conducts them, describes a typical session, and provides information on its effectiveness in recovery.

CGAA – Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous – Support Meetings, Support Chat for Family and Friends, Resources – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online Via ZOOM
Jul 25 all-day

 

Who We Are

Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous is a fellowship of people who support each other in recovering from the problems resulting from excessive game playing. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop video gaming, which is completely up to you. CGAA has no dues or fees. Our groups share their collective experience and the principles that helped them, but CGAA has no experts, hierarchy, or required beliefs. We have etiquette and traditions, but no strict rules.
If you are struggling with compulsive gaming, leave your contact info at 970-364-3497 and a CGAA member will call you back
Or email us at helpline@cgaa.info
For other issues, contact us at support@cgaa.info

 

ZOOM MEETINGS

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 
ZOOM MEETING

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 

Gamers Find A Local Support Group

Use the link below to get more information about local groups and a notification when a local meeting is started. Due to the COVID pandemic, most meetings are currently held in an outdoor setting or online.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LOCAL GROUP FINDER TOOL

 

CONTACT GROUPS IN OREGON BY LOCATION

 

 

SUPPORT FOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS

What Can I Do?

Video gaming is a common pastime. To many people, it is surprising that it can become a serious addiction, that is, an activity that is engaged in compulsively, without control or concern for consequences.

Video gaming addiction is a very serious problem that is harmful to everyone it touches. Since everyone involved suffers from it, everyone involved needs some help. Here are some important things to know.

First, no one is responsible for someone else’s compulsive gaming. As the Al-Anon slogan goes, “I didn’t cause it, I can’t control it, and I can’t cure it.”

You didn’t cause it.

Some people partly blame themselves for the dysfunctional behavior of their family members, particularly with addicts who are very quick to shift responsibility off themselves and blame others. Perhaps you played games with your loved one, purchased games, or encouraged it, thinking it was a harmless leisure activity. Maybe you’ve been involved in some conflict and wonder if that has driven him or her to hide away in gaming. But no one is responsible for another person’s behavior or mental disorders.

You can’t control it.

You may have already tried to talk to your friend or family member. Perhaps you have bargained with them, or given ultimatums. You have tried to help them see what damage they are doing to themselves and others. And none of it has worked. This is baffling to you. Why don’t they seem to understand or care? Why can’t they see what is obvious to you? This is actually a symptom of the disease of addiction, one that destines efforts for control to failure.

You can’t cure it.

We all would like to believe that we have the ability to help those we love. We often think that if we can just get the right information, figure out the right thing to say or do, perhaps change something about ourselves, we can fix the problem. People should be able to solve their own problems. Why can’t we do that with this one? There is a simple reason. There is no cure for addiction. It requires treatment. The recovery process is long and difficult. And there is only one person who can start that process, the one who is gaming compulsively. There are things you can do. Here are some suggestions that you may want to consider, that other family members and friends have found helpful.

Get information.

The literature of recovery fellowships for family and friends of addicts (such as Al-Anon) has much helpful guidance, some of which is available online as well. There are people who have been in situations very similar to yours, who have learned much from them, and who are willing to share the lessons learned, their experience, strength and hope. We hope you avail yourself of such resources.

Detach with love.

Putting energy into arguing with someone who is playing compulsively will not help either of you. Your loved one has a serious problem that you are powerless to control or cure, and that they will not get help until they want it. As much as you love someone, you cannot force this process on another person.

Stop enabling.

Paradoxically, at the same time people are arguing with, bargaining with or shaming a compulsive gamer, they are often (perhaps without realizing it) supporting the addiction in many ways. Anything that shields an addict from the consequences of his or her behavior is enabling, and can include such basic things as providing food, shelter, money, companionship, housekeeping, and covering for employment and legal difficulties. Helping a compulsive gamer keep up an appearance of normalcy is helping him or her continue in the destructive behavior. While you cannot change him or her, you can make changes for yourself. You can shift your energy away from enabling behaviors and toward meeting your own needs.

Take care of yourself.

Whether or not your loved one ever stops gaming, you deserve to have a healthy and happy life. Once you have accepted that you are powerless over their gaming behavior, you can begin to focus on what you can do for yourself, to accomplish your own goals. With the help of others who have been where you are, you can learn to set healthy boundaries and stick to them.

Join our WhatsApp Chat Site for Family and Friends!

Game-Anon

WhatsApp Group Invite

Visit whatsapp.com/dl on your mobile phone to install.

By installing WhatsApp, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

 

Chat Using A Macintosh

 

Mac OS X 10.10 and higher. WhatsApp must be installed on your phone.

By clicking the Download button, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

DOWNLOAD FOR MAC OS X

Download for Windows 8 and higher (64-bit)
Download for Windows 8 and higher (32-bit)

 

 


Things To Do Instead of Gaming

One of the things we were trying to do with our gaming was meet some basic needs. If we do not meet those needs in normal healthy ways, we will suffer much stronger urges to game again. Some basic needs to cover are social needs, self expression, creativity, a sense of challenge and accomplishment, stress relief, a sense of purpose and meaning, and a sense of safety through control and predictability.

Here are some ideas for activities that will help meet these needs, reduce cravings, help with recovery from addiction, and fill some of the hours freed from compulsive gaming.

Please don’t let the length of this list overwhelm you. The idea is not to start ten new things and try to change everything all at once. We seek small bits of progress, not perfection. A good place to start is to put first things first. What need is currently most important? What’s right in front of me? What opportunity has come my way recently? If we take steps of small improvement with one or two areas each day, we are moving in the right direction.

 

Stress Relief

  • Talking with a sponsor or recovery buddy, CGAA meetings, or step work
  • Getting outside for fresh air and sunlight by taking a walk or doing some outdoor work
  • Meditation, coloring, craft work, journaling, or reading
 

Sense of safety through freedom, control, and predictability

  • Goal setting
  • Counseling or psychotherapy
  • Home organization, renovation, or spring cleaning
 

Sense of purpose, meaning, and self-respect

  • Supporting and growing the larger CGAA fellowship through service work like helping run a meeting, starting a local meeting, doing outreach to professionals, or attending CGAA business meetings
  • Attending a spiritual group like meditation, yoga, spiritual retreat, or religious gathering
  • Doing volunteer work like teaching, helping others, animal care, or building community places
  • Caring for a pet, house plants, or garden
 

Social needs

  • Attending CGAA meetings, connecting outside of meetings, reaching out to newcomers, or calling someone
  • Joining a hobby group like theater, a hiking group, art workshop, book club, public speaking, board games or card game group
  • Hosting a fun event like board games night or karaoke
  • Playing team sports, taking up martial arts, or playing one-on-one sports
  • Going to fun events like concerts, dances, or events on meetup.com
  • Calling up, video conferencing, or visiting with friends, family, neighbors, or other communities
 

Self expression and creativity

  • Journaling, opening up to a CGAA sponsor, or sharing openly in a meeting
  • Art work like drawing, photography, sculpting, or creative writing
  • Performance art like theater, singing, playing music, or writing music
 

Sense of challenge and accomplishment

  • Working the steps with a sponsor
  • Crafts like woodworking, origami, knitting
  • Outdoor activities like gardening, geocaching, bird watching, star gazing, tracking, plant identification, survival skills, or boating
  • Learning something like a foreign language, dancing, magic tricks, mechanical repair, cooking, a musical instrument, or computer programming
  • Career goals like getting a new job, starting a business, enrolling in school, or taking classes
 

Reconnection to one’s body and whole self

  • Meditating on breath, sounds, or bodily sensations
  • Exercise like walking, hiking, swimming, cycling, yoga, jogging, going to a gym, or playing a sport

If you are in your first week or two off of games, it’s likely that few of these ideas will appeal to you. That’s normal. Until our minds and bodies have some time to heal, we have low interest, energy, and motivation. This list will probably not give you something that you can plug in place of video games and immediately throw yourself into with the same zeal. This list is meant to help us explore new ways of spending our time, meeting our needs, and connecting with people. Find a few that hold some appeal and try taking some small steps in their direction. If you can’t seem to think of anything fun to do except game, you can come back to this list, find the most appealing thing, and just take a couple of little steps in its direction.

Consider setting reminders for yourself or keeping a schedule of your time and new activities. It is important to appreciate the small victories of exercising willpower, regaining motivation, and socializing. It helps to discuss our progress and the challenges we experience with a CGAA sponsor, recovery buddy, personal counselor, or therapist.

Rediscovering What is Fun

It is normal to think that nothing but gaming sounds fun. For most of us, our years of compulsive gaming warped and narrowed our idea of fun. As small children, it meant almost anything new or interesting or social or even mildly rewarding. Years of pulling the dopamine lever with video games changed our concept of fun to require instant gratification, frequent rewards, clear and constant progress, excitement, intense visuals, control, and/or predictability.

Part of recovery is letting our concept of fun expand back outward to a wide world of possible new challenges and experiences, many of which are calm and subtle compared to video games. It takes time to overcome withdrawals and heal from the damage, but the change does happen if we abstain from all gaming long term and focus on new pursuits and improving our lives. This list has many activities that do not meet the old, narrow, warped idea of “fun,” but those of us who persist at exploring them do find many to be gratifying and enjoyable.

Take, for example, a hike up a mountain. To a group of hikers excited to venture into the wilderness with friends and see wildlife and panoramic views from on high, all while getting a great workout, it’s a ton of fun. To someone who is uninterested in hiking, out of shape, and focused on every little unpleasant aspect of it, it’s a torturous death march. It is exactly the same hike in either case. The difference is in the attitude and conditioning.

The same is true with every item of these lists. Whether or not an activity sounds fun or torturous depends entirely upon attitude and conditioning. Every one of them has the potential to be gratifying and enjoyable if we adopt a positive attitude, try to have fun, and persist at it, especially when we involve friends and like-minded people.

CPI – Crisis Prevention Institute – De-escalation and Non-Violent Intervention Training Programs @ Register for Details
Jul 25 all-day

 

Verbal Intervention

Verbal Intervention (VI) instills the confidence and skills to verbally de‑escalate disruptive behaviors and prevent further escalation. It’s well‑suited to organizations with a hands‑off policy or that require non‑restrictive techniques.

Available as a virtual (Online & Live Virtual) Instructor Certification Program.

More About VI Register Now

Program Features & Benefits:

  • Limit-setting strategies when verbally intervening to de‑escalate defensive behaviors.
  • Recognize opportunities for post‑crisis learning.
  • The effects of trauma and the psychology of the brain on the person in crisis as well as the responding individual.
  • Person-centered to help ensure a consistently inclusive and culturally sensitive approach to a person displaying crisis behavior.
  • Verbal de‑escalation techniques and skills also featured in Nonviolent Crisis Intervention® and NCI With Advanced Physical Skills training.

Nonviolent Crisis Intervention®

Nonviolent Crisis Intervention® (NCI) provides your staff with the skills to safely recognize and respond to everyday crisis situations that may involve more challenging behaviors. NCI training is designed to help you achieve compliance with current legislative initiatives and best practices.

Available as a blended (Online & In-Person) Instructor Certification Program.

More About NCI Register Now

Program Features & Benefits:

  • Safety interventions and disengagement techniques for escalating risk behaviors.
  • Limit-setting strategies when verbally intervening to de-escalate defensive behaviors.
  • Recognize opportunities for post-crisis learning.
  • The effects of trauma and the psychology of the brain on the person in crisis as well as the responding individual.
  • Person-centered to help ensure a consistently inclusive and culturally sensitive approach to a person displaying crisis behavior.

Nonviolent Crisis Intervention® With Advanced Physical Skills

Nonviolent Crisis Intervention® With Advanced Physical Skills (APS) equips your staff with the decision-making skills needed to confidently assess and address risk in the face of complex behaviors. It combines verbal intervention strategies and restrictive interventions with advanced physical skills for the highest-risk scenarios. Instructors can customize training to each staff member’s individual risk level.

Available as a blended (Online, Live Virtual & In-Person) Instructor Certification Program.

More About APS Register Now

Program Features & Benefits:

  • Safe and advanced deceleration, disengagement, and physical intervention techniques for situations involving dangerous behaviors.
  • Intervene in high- and medium-risk situations that don’t require advanced skills.
  • Safety interventions and disengagement techniques for escalating risk behaviors.
  • Limit-setting strategies when verbally intervening to de-escalate defensive behaviors.
  • Recognize opportunities for post-crisis learning.
  • The effects of trauma and the psychology of the brain on the person in crisis as well as the responding individual.
  • Person-centered to help ensure a consistently inclusive and culturally sensitive approach to a person displaying crisis behavior.
FCA – Family Caregiver Alliance – Caregiver Support Group – 24/7 @ Email Group
Jul 25 all-day
FCA - Family Caregiver Alliance - Caregiver Support Group - 24/7 @ Email Group

 

Family Caregiver Alliance
Email Support Group 24/7

This group is in e-mail format. Participants send and receive e-mail to take part in discussions. You can receive your posts all together, in one delivery each day, or you can receive them one-by-one, as they are sent.

The choice is yours. It’s fun, easy, and available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. To join, complete the form below and click the submit button.

Subscribe to Caregiver-Online

You can subscribe to Caregiver-online by following this link and completing the form.  After completing the Subscription form you will email requesting confirmation, to prevent others from gratuitously subscribing you. This is a hidden list, which means that the list of members is available only to the list administrator.

To subscribe, Use this Link and complete the subscription form online:

http://lists.caregiver.org/mailman/listinfo/caregiver-online_lists.caregiver.org

 

Using Caregiver-online

To post a message to all the list members, send email to caregiver-online@lists.caregiver.org. Be sure to subscribe first!

HP – HeyPeers – PeerGalaxy Peer Support Groups and More @ Online Via Zoom
Jul 25 all-day

 

 

 

HeyPeers is an online Peer Support Community offering online community meetings, one-to-one coaching, and private chat rooms to connect with others on your journey.

HeyPeers features over 1,100 meetings, including weekly offerings from PeerGalaxy such as: Wellness Buddies, Creative Writing, Discovering Felt Sense of Safety, Kitchen Empowerment Hour, Peer Recovery, Resilience and Reconnection, plus more.

If you’re NEW to HeyPeers, you can sign-up / onboard with PeerGalaxy
and access MyJourneyTracker for FREE while available at this link:
If you’re an existing HeyPeers member, you can check out PeerGalaxy offerings:
For more about HeyPeers, visit https://www.heypeers.com
Native American Heritage – Education, Celebrations, Arts and Culture,Resources @ Zoom and Other Platforms
Jul 25 all-day

NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE

 

EDUCATION

National Constution Center Logo

 

 

 

 

In celebration of Native American Heritage Month, the National Constitution Center is hosting a series of scholar talks and activities highlighting the history of American Indians, tribal governments, and their relationship to the U.S. Constitution and American democracy.

 

Scholar Talk: American Indian Influence on the Constitution and the Founding Fathers Featuring Robert J. Miller  
Thursday, November 17 at 10 p.m. PST, Kirby Auditorium and Livestreamed

Join Robert J. Miller for a conversation about American Indians political theories and how their governments had a profound effect on many of the Founding Fathers, shaping specific provisions in the U.S. Constitution. The framers were influenced by both “positive” aspects of tribal governance and political science that they were familiar with and adopted into the Constitution, and they were also influenced by what can be called the “negative” aspects of the threats posed by the American Indian tribes to the new United States. Many of these effects are reflected in provisions in our Constitution. This talk examines how Indigenous theories of government affected our Founding Fathers in drafting the U.S. Constitution.    

 Robert J. Miller is a professor at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University where he is also the Willard H. Pedrick Distinguished Research Scholar and the director of the Rosette LLP American Indian Economic Development Program. He is the chief justice of the Pascua Yaqui Tribe Court of Appeals and an appellate judge in other tribal courts. He graduated from Lewis & Clark Law School in 1991 and then clerked for Judge Diarmuid O’Scannlain of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in 1991-92. Miller is a citizen of the Eastern Shawnee Tribe. He was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 2014, the oldest learned society in the United States.  

Scholar Talk: Native Americans’ Fight for Citizenship and Sovereignty Featuring Paul C. Rosier  
Friday, November 25 at 10 p.m. PST, Kirby Auditorium and Livestreamed

Dr. Paul C. Rosier, professor of history at Villanova University, will explore the Native Americans’ fight for American citizenship and tribal sovereignty, focusing on their extraordinary efforts to both protect their autonomy and secure the civil rights afforded American citizens: a dual citizenship codified in the 1924 Indian Citizenship Act. His presentation will highlight native people’s vision of an inclusive country that lives up to the ideals expressed in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, championing via military service, activism, and political writings their belief in a multi-racial and multi-cultural America that honored its legal obligations as it assumed international prominence in the 20th century.

Paul C. Rosier received his Ph.D. in American History from the University of Rochester in 1998. He currently serves as professor of history at Villanova University, where he teaches Native American history, American environmental history, global environmental history, and 20th century American history. He also serves as the director of the Albert Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest at Villanova. He previously held the inaugural Mary M. Birle Chair in American History (2016-2022) and served as department chair (2013-2016). In 2001, he published his first book, Rebirth of the Blackfeet Nation, 1912-1954; he co-edited the 2006 volume Echoes from the Poisoned Well: Global Memories of Environmental Injustice. In 2009, Harvard University Press published his Serving Their Country: American Indian Politics and Patriotism in the Twentieth Century, which won the 2010 American Indian National Book Award. He has published numerous essays on Native American topics, including three articles in The Journal of American History. Reflecting his commitment to public-facing work, he has published several blog posts on Native American political issues in Hindsights and the History News Network. He is in the final stages of two projects: an edited volume on environmental justice in North America; and a monograph on Native Americans’ political history, “The American Way of Life”: Native Americans’ Fight for Sovereignty and Citizenship.

Native Americans and the Constitution Town Hall Video (YouTube)

In celebration of Native American Heritage Month, join experts Maggie Blackhawk of the New York University School of Law; Donald Grinde, Jr. of the University at Buffalo and co-author of Exemplar of Liberty: Native America and the Evolution of Democracy; Gregory Dowd of the University of Michigan; and Woody Holton of the University of South Carolina and author of Liberty Is Sweet: The Hidden History of the American Revolution, for a conversation exploring the influence of Indigenous people and tribal governments on the U.S. Constitution and American democracy, from before the Revolution to today. Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, moderates.

 

CELEBRATIONS

Smithsonian Institute Logo

Native Veterans Procession and Dedication Ceremony

Veterans Day, November 11, 2022 and up live stream.

Join the museum in honoring the exceptional military service of Native Americans in a formal dedication of the National Native American Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC. The dedication and processional will honor American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian veterans and their families.   Use this link to Regester and View Live Stream


WEEKEND CELEBRATION  

Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 12–13 | Washington, D.C. 

All are welcome to join as the museum honors the military service of Native American, Native Hawai’ian and Alaska Native veterans, Friday, Nov. 11. The Native veterans’ procession and dedication ceremony will take place beginning at 2 p.m. on the National Mall as part of a three-day celebration featuring hands-on activities, films, performances, and a veterans hospitality suite. The procession and dedication will be livestreamed. For more information about the weekend program, visit AmericanIndian.si.edu/visit/washington/nnavm-dedication 

2022 Native Cinema Showcase 
Nov. 18–25

Live Streaming

The National Museum of the American Indian’s Native Cinema Showcase is an annual celebration of the best in Indigenous film. Embracing their communities’ oral histories, knowledge and ancestral lands, Indigenous filmmakers are seeking guidance from the past and envisioning new paths for the future. The showcase provides a unique forum for engagement with filmmakers from Indigenous communities throughout the Western Hemisphere and Arctic.

The online program includes a total of 35 films (six features and 30 shorts) representing 30 Native nations in eight different countries: US, Canada, New Zealand, Mexico, Guatemala, Ecuador, Colombia and Sweden. There are 10 Indigenous languages spoken in the films. Genres include documentaries, music videos, kid-friendly shorts, films in Indigenous languages and more.

Use this Link to Attend Online

Native Cinema Showcase is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature

 

Facing History & Ourselves Logo

 

Native American Boarding Schools as a Tool of U.S. Empire
Friday, November 19, 2021
10:00am EST/ 7:00 am PST
University of Michigan Alumni Association

“The Alumni Association is sponsoring the November Clements Bookworm. The Clements Bookworm is a webinar series in which panelists discuss history topics. In this episode, Dr. Veronica Pasfield discusses her continuing research to understand the full purpose and force of federal Indian boarding schools. She asserts that the creation story of Carlisle Indian School must be rooted in missionary schools founded to prepare Kanaka Maoli for wage labor on their own Hawaiian homelands as well as in the captivity of Native children in the Southwest by a U.S. Army desperate to bring about the submission of Western tribes by any means necessary. While administrators touted assimilation as a benevolent enterprise, the archives show that Indian children were used as hostages to secure the extraction of tribal resources, and ‘schools’ were used as an instrument for transforming indigenous peoples into a permanent underclass in their own homeland.”

Celebrate! with Wampanoag Nation Singers & Dancers
Saturday, November 20, 2021
11:30 AM – 12:30 PM EST
Hosted by the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum

“Join the Wampanoag Nation Singers and Dancers as they share stories of both their history and modern culture in a performance that culminates with a dance in honor of Native American Heritage Month. During this virtual program from wherever you are, the whole family can join in learning new movements and words for interactive elements. The Celebrate! series, appropriate for family audiences and children ages 5 and up, highlights America’s rich cultural diversity through the arts. This program is tied directly to President and Mrs. Kennedy’s concern for and support of the arts and culture in a democratic society. Thanks to generous support from the Martin Richard Foundation and the Mass Cultural Council all performances are free.”

Cultural Representation in Education
Tuesday, November 23, 2021
6:00 pm – 7:00 pm CST
Hosted by the Mitchell Museum

“Join us to learn about Native American history, culture and traditions first-hand from the perspectives of Indigenous educators… Waqnahwew Benjamin Grignon (Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin) is a teacher of traditional Menominee arts. He represents the Menominee Nation and approaches culturally-responsive education by using Menominee Language, Culture, and art to promote and preserve tribal history as a pathway for future generations and positively influence the education of the youth in his community. He is the 2019 Wisconsin High School Teacher of the Year and the recipient of the 2020 National Education Association’s Leo Reano Memorial Human and Civil Rights Award. Benjamin will be speaking about his journey to becoming a teacher at the Menominee Indian High School. He will be sharing the lessons he has learned over his 14 years of teaching experience and how this journey influences Menominee education by helping to design the Kaehkēnawapahta͞eq Menominee Immersion Charter School.”

Kyle T. Mays — An Afro-Indigenous History of the United States
Monday, November 29, 2021
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Hosted by the Boston Public Library

“Join us for an online talk with Kyle T. Mays, author of An Afro-Indigenous History of the United States, the first intersectional history of the Black and Native American struggle for freedom in our country that also reframes our understanding of who was Indigenous in early America…

Beginning with pre-Revolutionary America and moving into the movement for Black lives and contemporary Indigenous activism, Afro-Indigenous historian Kyle T. Mays argues that the foundations of the US are rooted in antiblackness and settler colonialism, and that these parallel oppressions continue into the present. He explores how Black and Indigenous peoples have always resisted and struggled for freedom, sometimes together, and sometimes apart… Mays compels us to rethink both our history as well as contemporary debates and to imagine the powerful possibilities of Afro-Indigenous solidarity.”

Facing History and Ourselves invites educators to explore our interview with Facing History Canada in which we discuss strategies for teaching settler colonialism beyond Canada.

 

ARTS AND CULTURE

Native American Worldview

Native American Worldview: A Conversation between Dr. Tink Tinker and Dr. Lisa Dellinger, Tinker Visiting Professor

In well-meaning white (mostly) institutions, it has become a standard practice that land acknowledgment is invoked in every event, and the discussion about or the demand for LandBack is publicly made.

Many assume that such is a step toward improving white institutions, solving settler colonialism, and reconciling with the Native people. However, Drs. Tinker and Dellinger warn that such discussions can deteriorate into sessions alleviating christian guilt, and maintaining the status quo. Dr. Tinker has argued that “the Native worldview and christianity cannot be reconciled because they were never “conciled” in the first place, so there is no state of conciliation to go back to (reconciliation).” Then all of us, the settler population, wonder what we can do?

This conversation between Drs. Tinker and Dellinger offers you an opportunity to deep listening to them, and invites you to learn from them with cultural humility first.”

 

Native American Worldview image

Dr. Lisa Dellinger

Native American Worldview image

Dr. Tink Tinker

Use this Link to Attend on ZOOM

 

Everything You Think You Know About Native Americans is Wrong (and Why Thats Not Your Fault)

In honor of Native American Heritage Month, the American Family Insurance DreamBank invites you to an enlightening presentation around common misperceptions of Native Americans with Rebecca Nagle, an award-winning advocate, writer, podcaster and citizen of the Cherokee Nation. Drawing from her extensive research, Rebecca will guide you in confronting any personal and societal ignorance and institutional bias that may exist. You’ll leave with a better understanding on how to create a more inclusive, empathetic culture in your personal and professional life — while advocating for Native American culture and progress.

Use this Link to Attend On Zoom

Native American Art and Culture

Thursday, November 10  8 PM to 9 PM PST

Join us for an online presentation on Native American Art and Culture – brought to you by Kent State Geauga and the Smithsonian Art Museum.

Join Kent State Geauga and the Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) for an interactive presentation on Native American Art and Culture. “American Indians are part of the past, present, and future of the United States.” This presentation will “explore histories and cultures of some American Indians as captured by both Native and non-Native artists” (SAAM).

Use this Link to Attend On Zoom

 

RESCOURCES

North Idaho College Logo

 

Native American Web Sites

Related Native American Web Sites Information from sites selected for those interested in American Indians/Alaskan Natives. Includes demographics of state and federally recognized tribes within the United States, population figures, tribal contact information, tribal home pages and more.

Native American Web Sites

Related Native American Web Sites Information from sites selected for those interested in American Indians/Alaskan Natives. Includes demographics of state and federally recognized tribes within the United States, population figures, tribal contact information, tribal home pages and more.


 

Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) – ATNI is a nonprofit organization representing 54 Northwest tribal governments from Oregon, Idaho, Washington, southeast Alaska, Northern California and Western Montana. ATNI is an organization whose foundation is composed of the people it is meant to serve — the Indian peoples.

Alaska Inter-Tribal Council – The Alaska Inter-Tribal Council is a statewide, tribally-governed non-profit organization that advocates in support of Tribal governments throughout the state.

Alaska Native Knowledge Network – is designed to serve as a resource for compiling and exchanging information related to Alaska Native knowledge systems and ways of knowing.

American Indian Lands Environmental Support Project – The American Indian Lands Environmental Support Project (AILESP) was developed by EPA’s Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance (OECA). AILESP integrates and assesses recent multi-media point-source releases, the potential impacts of contaminants, and recent compliance and enforcement histories for facilities located on and within five kilometers of Tribal areas.

American Indian Law Review – The purpose of the American Indian Law Review, a specialized law review devoted exclusively to Indian law, will be to provide a forum for scholarly writing in the areas of the law that particularly affect American Indians. . . . A distinguishing feature of the Review will be that the discussion will not be limited to any particular viewpoint. In fact, the Review will encourage expression of differing viewpoints concerning American Indian legal problems.

American Indian Science and Engineering Society (A.I.S.E.S.) – The American Indian Science & Engineering Society (AISES) is a national, nonprofit organization which nurtures building of community by bridging science and technology with traditional Native values. Through its educational programs, AISES provides opportunities for American Indians and Native Alaskans to pursue studies in science, engineering, business and other academic arenas.

Bristol Bay Native Corporation (BBNC) – Strategic Intent 1997 – 2005 Mission Enriching our Native way of life. Vision To be a corporation that protects the past, present, and future of the Natives from Bristol Bay. Goals To double dividends within eight years (by 2005). To protect Native use of land and water in Bristol Bay. Values To protect the best interests of our shareholders. To maintain or grow total dividends paid annually by providing a solvent corporation. To celebrate and preserve the Alaskan Native culture and linkage with the land that provides the basis for our style of life.

Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) – DOI, Interior The Bureau of Indian Affairs’ mission is to enhance the quality of life, to promote economic opportunity, and to carry out the responsibility to protect and improve the trust assets of American Indians, Indian tribes and Alaska Natives. We will accomplish this through the delivery of quality services, maintaining government-to-government relationships within the spirit of Indian self-determination

Center for World Indigenous Studies (CWIS) – The Underlying Principle Guiding CWIS is: Access to knowledge and peoples’ ideas reduces the possibility of conflict and increases the possibility of cooperation between peoples on the basis of mutual consent. By democratizing relations between peoples, between nations and states, the diversity of nations and their cultures will continue to enrich the world.

Cherokee Nation – Official site of the Cherokee Nation.

Chinook Nation – Official site of the Chinook Indian Tribe

Code Talk – CodeTalk is a federal, inter-agency, Native American Web site designed specifically to deliver electronic information from government agencies and other organizations to Native American communities.

Coeur d’Alene Tribe – Because there was always a commitment to the future, so will there always be a commitment to the past. The modern Coeur d’ Alene Tribe is the sum of uncounted centuries and of untold generations. .

Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes – The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes are comprised of the Bitterroot Salish, the Pend d’Oreille and the Kootenai tribes. The Flathead Reservation of 1.317 million acres in northwest Montana is our home now but our ancestors lived in the territory now known as western Montana, parts of Idaho, British Columbia and Wyoming. This aboriginal territory exceeded 20 million acres at the time of the 1855 Hellgate Treaty.

Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation – Official site of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation – The Cayuse, Umatilla and Walla Walla Tribes make up the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

Cook Inlet Tribal Council – Located in Anchorage, Alaska, CITC administers programs to perpetuate and enhance the cultural heritage, social and economic well-being of Alaska Natives and American Indians residing in the Cook Inlet region of Alaska.

Coquille Indian Tribe – Preserving our past with the technology of the future. This is the starting point for you to explore the dynamic facets of the Coquille Indian Tribe.

Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians – Official site of the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians

CRITFC – Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission – CRITFC is made up of four Columbia Basin tribes. These tribes are the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and the Nez Perce Tribe.

Denali Commission of Alaska – Introduced by Congress in 1998, the Denali Commission is an innovative federal-state partnership designed to provide critical utilities, infrastructure, and economic support throughout Alaska.

Index of Native American Resources – American Indians Index of Native American Resources on the Internet.

Indian Country Today – The on-line version of Indian Country Today does not include the full content – articles, advertisements, notices and listings – that appear only in our newsprint edition. For complete access to America’s Leading Indian News source, subscribe to Indian Country Today!

Indian Health Service – The Indian Health Service (I H S) is an agency within the U S Dept. of Health and Human Services and is responsible for providing federal health services to American Indians and Alaska Natives.

Indian Reservation Roads Program (IRR) – The IRR Program is a jointly administered program by the Federal Highway Administration and by the Bureau of Indian Affairs through an Interagency Memorandum of Agreement as established by Title 23 U.S.C. Section 204.

Indianz.Com – Your Internet Resource Our Mission Welcome to Indianz.Com, Your Internet Resource. Our mission is to provide you with quality news, information, and entertainment from a Native American perspective.

Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada – The Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada, Inc. (ITCN) was incorporated as a non-profit organization under Nevada State Law on February 23, 1966. ITCN is a Tribal organization serving the member reservations and colonies in Nevada. The Governing Body of ITCN consists of an Executive Board, composed of Tribal Chairman from each of these Tribes.

Intertribal Timber Council – The ITC is a nation-wide consortium of Indian Tribes, Alaska Native Corporations, and individuals dedicated to improving the management of natural resources of importance to Native American communities.

Kalispel Tribe of Indians – The Kalispel Tribe of Indians’ official website.

Kappler’s Indian Affairs: Laws and Treaties – Indian Affairs: Laws and Treaties, compiled and edited by Charles J. Kappler, is an historically significant, seven volume compilation of U.S. treaties, laws and executive orders pertaining to Native American Indian tribes.

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) – The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), founded in 1944, is the oldest, largest and most representative national Indian organization serving the needs of a broad membership of American Indian and Alaska Native governments. Our founding members stressed the need for unity and cooperation among tribal governments and people for the security and protection of treaty and sovereign rights.

National Indian Education Association (NIEA) – The National Indian Education Association (NIEA)was founded in 1969 to give American Indians and Alaska Natives a national voice in their struggle to improve access to educational opportunity. NIEA is the largest and oldest Indian education organization in the nation and strives to keep Indian Country moving toward educational equity.

Vision Maker Media – The mission of Native American Public Telecommunications (NAPT) is to inform, educate and encourage the awareness of tribal histories, cultures, languages, opportunities and aspirations through the fullest participation of American Indians and Alaska Natives in creating and employing all forms of educational and public telecommunications programs and services, thereby supporting tribal sovereignty.

Native American Rights Fund (NARF) – The Native American Rights Fund (NARF) is a non-profit organization that provides legal representation and technical assistance to Indian tribes, organizations and individuals nationwide.

Native American Times – The Native American Times, Oklahoma state’s Indian news source, is published monthly by Oklahoma Indian Times, Inc. It is Oklahoma’s only independent newspaper that serves all of Oklahoma’s federally-recognized Indian Nations.

Native Sense – Information, case law and resources for and about Indians and Native American legal issues. Nez Perce Tribe – Official site of the Nez Perce Tribe.

Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board – Information about the Northwest Portland Area Health Board.

NPS: Tribal Preservation Program – The National Park Service (NPS) Tribal Preservation Program assists Indian tribes in preserving their historic properties and cultural traditions.

Office of American Indian Trust – The American Indian Trust Office was created to ensure that the Secretary’s obligations under the Federal Indian trust responsibility are performed in accordance with the standards required by the laws and policies of the United States. Among its responsibilities, the Office conducts annual reviews of tribal performance of trust functions assumed under of the Self-Governance Act of 1994 25 U.S.C. 458cc(d).

ONABEN – A Native American Business Network A Native American Business Network is a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation created by Northwest Indian Tribes to increase the success of private businesses owned by Native Americans. ONABEN offers training and support focused on developing entrepreneurship in Indian communities.

Red Feather Development Group – Red Feather Development Group is a national nonprofit housing and community development organization. We work with American Indian nations to find lasting solutions for the acute lack of proper housing and desperate poverty that continue to plague many of these communities.

Salmon Homecoming Alliance – is a 501 (c) 3 non-profit foundation, established to organize, plan, develop and facilitate programs and events associated with Salmon Homecoming.

The SGCE Tribal Consortium – a communication & education resource for the Self-Governance Tribes.

Spokane Tribe of Indians – The official page of the Spokane Tribe of Indians.

State-Tribal Relations – National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) tracks a variety of policy issues affecting state-tribal relations including economic development, environmental protection, human services, taxation, jurisdiction and law enforcement, and trust land issues. Tribal governments across the United States are exercising their self-governing powers and taking more control over program administration and the provision of services within their communities.

Tribal Court Clearinghouse – Welcome to the Tribal Court Clearinghouse – the first web site devoted to providing information to people working in Native American tribal courts. The Tribal Court Clearinghouse is designed as a resource for tribal justice systems and others involved in the enhancement of justice in Indian country.

Tulalip Tribes – The Tulalip Tribes official homepage

Yakama Nation – The official site of the Confederated Tribes of the Yakama Nation

 

MHAAO – Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon – Connecting with the World – Mental Health, Peer Support, Compassion Fatigue – Thursdays @ Online via Zoom
Jul 25 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
MHAAO - Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon - Connecting with the World - Mental Health, Peer Support, Compassion Fatigue - Thursdays @ Online via Zoom

 

Connecting With The World

Thursday, February 3 – 4 PM PT

Mental health, Peer support, Compassion Fatigue,
PeerZone for Peer Support Specialists is a weekly workforce support group that provides an opportunity to build connection, get mutual support, and participate within a PeerZone workshop. PeerZone workshops are peer-led and developed, and cover a variety of topics related to holistic wellbeing and recovery education.
Click Here To Register and Attend

 

Jul
26
Fri
2024
00 – Hotline – LIR – Love is Respect – Confidential Support for Healthy Relationships – Teens – Young Adults – Loved Ones – 866-331-9473 – 24/7
Jul 26 all-day
00 - Hotline - LIR - Love is Respect - Confidential Support for Healthy Relationships - Teens - Young Adults - Loved Ones - 866-331-9473 - 24/7

Love is Respect Advocates are available 24/7

We offer confidential support for teens, young adults, and their loved ones seeking help, resources, or information related to healthy relationships and dating abuse in the US. We’re available by text (“LOVEIS” to 22522), call (866.331.9474), or live chat online.

Terms & conditions for text services

No matter how you reach out to us, you’ll always receive one-on-one, real-time, confidential support.

Our advocates are trained on issues related to dating abuse and healthy relationships, as well as crisis intervention. When you contact us, we’ll listen to your situation, assess how you’re feeling in the moment, and help you identify what next steps may be best for you.

This might include brainstorming a safety plan together or identifying local resources to further support you, whether it’s a service provider, legal resource, counselor, or survivor network to get in touch with.

01 – Helpline – GR – Grad Resources – The National Grad Crisis Line – (877)-472-3457 – 24/7 – Weekdays & Weekends @ Phone
Jul 26 all-day

 

 

 

 

The National Grad Crisis Line

1.877.GRAD.HLP (1.877.472.3457)

The National Grad Crisis Line helps graduate students reach free, confidential telephone counseling, crisis intervention, suicide prevention, and information and referral services provided by specially-trained call-takers. Caring, professional staff and well-trained volunteers answer around the clock.

All counselors have completed training to understand the unique issues faced by graduate students. In addition to listening to and empathizing with a caller’s concerns, counselors assess the caller’s lethality risk, counsel, and offer various local support services and mental health resources for follow-up.

1.877.GRAD.HLP

https://gradresources.org/

Who We Are

Since 1990, Grad Resources has recognized the significant role of graduate students in America. From our studies on stress in graduate school to the painful stories of student struggles we hear every day, we understand the pressures they face. We offer services that address their personal, emotional and spiritual needs, providing online materials, meaningful connections, engaging speakers, and supportive faith-based communities that enable graduate students to flourish personally and professionally.
01 – Helpline – SAMHSA’s National Helpline 24/7 – Línea Nacional de Ayuda de SAMHSA de salud mental y adicciones – (800) 622-4357
Jul 26 all-day

 

SAMHSA’s National Helpline, 1-800-662-HELP (4357) (also known as the Treatment Referral Routing Service), or TTY: 1-800-487-4889 is a confidential, free, 24-hour-a-day, 365-day-a-year, information service, in English and Spanish, for individuals and family members facing mental and/or substance use disorders. This service provides referrals to local treatment facilities, support groups, and community-based organizations.

Línea Nacional de Ayuda de SAMHSA

  • La Línea Nacional de Ayuda de SAMHSA es un servicio gratuito, confidencial, disponible las 24 horas, los 7 días de la semana, los 365 días del año. Esta línea telefónica es un servicio de información (en inglés y español) para personas y familias que enfrentan trastornos mentales o de uso de sustancias.

     

    Visite también el localizador de tratamientos.

Suggested Resources

What Is Substance Abuse Treatment? A Booklet for Families
Created for family members of people with alcohol abuse or drug abuse problems. Answers questions about substance abuse, its symptoms, different types of treatment, and recovery. Addresses concerns of children of parents with substance use/abuse problems.

It’s Not Your Fault (NACoA) (PDF | 12 KB)

Assures teens with parents who abuse alcohol or drugs that, “It’s not your fault!” and that they are not alone. Encourages teens to seek emotional support from other adults, school counselors, and youth support groups such as Alateen, and provides a resource list.

After an Attempt: A Guide for Taking Care of Your Family Member After Treatment in the Emergency Department
Aids family members in coping with the aftermath of a relative’s suicide attempt. Describes the emergency department treatment process, lists questions to ask about follow-up treatment, and describes how to reduce risk and ensure safety at home.

Family Therapy Can Help: For People in Recovery From Mental Illness or Addiction
Explores the role of family therapy in recovery from mental illness or substance abuse. Explains how family therapy sessions are run and who conducts them, describes a typical session, and provides information on its effectiveness in recovery.

CGAA – Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous – Support Meetings, Support Chat for Family and Friends, Resources – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online Via ZOOM
Jul 26 all-day

 

Who We Are

Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous is a fellowship of people who support each other in recovering from the problems resulting from excessive game playing. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop video gaming, which is completely up to you. CGAA has no dues or fees. Our groups share their collective experience and the principles that helped them, but CGAA has no experts, hierarchy, or required beliefs. We have etiquette and traditions, but no strict rules.
If you are struggling with compulsive gaming, leave your contact info at 970-364-3497 and a CGAA member will call you back
Or email us at helpline@cgaa.info
For other issues, contact us at support@cgaa.info

 

ZOOM MEETINGS

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
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        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
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        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 
ZOOM MEETING

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 

Gamers Find A Local Support Group

Use the link below to get more information about local groups and a notification when a local meeting is started. Due to the COVID pandemic, most meetings are currently held in an outdoor setting or online.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LOCAL GROUP FINDER TOOL

 

CONTACT GROUPS IN OREGON BY LOCATION

 

 

SUPPORT FOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS

What Can I Do?

Video gaming is a common pastime. To many people, it is surprising that it can become a serious addiction, that is, an activity that is engaged in compulsively, without control or concern for consequences.

Video gaming addiction is a very serious problem that is harmful to everyone it touches. Since everyone involved suffers from it, everyone involved needs some help. Here are some important things to know.

First, no one is responsible for someone else’s compulsive gaming. As the Al-Anon slogan goes, “I didn’t cause it, I can’t control it, and I can’t cure it.”

You didn’t cause it.

Some people partly blame themselves for the dysfunctional behavior of their family members, particularly with addicts who are very quick to shift responsibility off themselves and blame others. Perhaps you played games with your loved one, purchased games, or encouraged it, thinking it was a harmless leisure activity. Maybe you’ve been involved in some conflict and wonder if that has driven him or her to hide away in gaming. But no one is responsible for another person’s behavior or mental disorders.

You can’t control it.

You may have already tried to talk to your friend or family member. Perhaps you have bargained with them, or given ultimatums. You have tried to help them see what damage they are doing to themselves and others. And none of it has worked. This is baffling to you. Why don’t they seem to understand or care? Why can’t they see what is obvious to you? This is actually a symptom of the disease of addiction, one that destines efforts for control to failure.

You can’t cure it.

We all would like to believe that we have the ability to help those we love. We often think that if we can just get the right information, figure out the right thing to say or do, perhaps change something about ourselves, we can fix the problem. People should be able to solve their own problems. Why can’t we do that with this one? There is a simple reason. There is no cure for addiction. It requires treatment. The recovery process is long and difficult. And there is only one person who can start that process, the one who is gaming compulsively. There are things you can do. Here are some suggestions that you may want to consider, that other family members and friends have found helpful.

Get information.

The literature of recovery fellowships for family and friends of addicts (such as Al-Anon) has much helpful guidance, some of which is available online as well. There are people who have been in situations very similar to yours, who have learned much from them, and who are willing to share the lessons learned, their experience, strength and hope. We hope you avail yourself of such resources.

Detach with love.

Putting energy into arguing with someone who is playing compulsively will not help either of you. Your loved one has a serious problem that you are powerless to control or cure, and that they will not get help until they want it. As much as you love someone, you cannot force this process on another person.

Stop enabling.

Paradoxically, at the same time people are arguing with, bargaining with or shaming a compulsive gamer, they are often (perhaps without realizing it) supporting the addiction in many ways. Anything that shields an addict from the consequences of his or her behavior is enabling, and can include such basic things as providing food, shelter, money, companionship, housekeeping, and covering for employment and legal difficulties. Helping a compulsive gamer keep up an appearance of normalcy is helping him or her continue in the destructive behavior. While you cannot change him or her, you can make changes for yourself. You can shift your energy away from enabling behaviors and toward meeting your own needs.

Take care of yourself.

Whether or not your loved one ever stops gaming, you deserve to have a healthy and happy life. Once you have accepted that you are powerless over their gaming behavior, you can begin to focus on what you can do for yourself, to accomplish your own goals. With the help of others who have been where you are, you can learn to set healthy boundaries and stick to them.

Join our WhatsApp Chat Site for Family and Friends!

Game-Anon

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Visit whatsapp.com/dl on your mobile phone to install.

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Chat Using A Macintosh

 

Mac OS X 10.10 and higher. WhatsApp must be installed on your phone.

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DOWNLOAD FOR MAC OS X

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Things To Do Instead of Gaming

One of the things we were trying to do with our gaming was meet some basic needs. If we do not meet those needs in normal healthy ways, we will suffer much stronger urges to game again. Some basic needs to cover are social needs, self expression, creativity, a sense of challenge and accomplishment, stress relief, a sense of purpose and meaning, and a sense of safety through control and predictability.

Here are some ideas for activities that will help meet these needs, reduce cravings, help with recovery from addiction, and fill some of the hours freed from compulsive gaming.

Please don’t let the length of this list overwhelm you. The idea is not to start ten new things and try to change everything all at once. We seek small bits of progress, not perfection. A good place to start is to put first things first. What need is currently most important? What’s right in front of me? What opportunity has come my way recently? If we take steps of small improvement with one or two areas each day, we are moving in the right direction.

 

Stress Relief

  • Talking with a sponsor or recovery buddy, CGAA meetings, or step work
  • Getting outside for fresh air and sunlight by taking a walk or doing some outdoor work
  • Meditation, coloring, craft work, journaling, or reading
 

Sense of safety through freedom, control, and predictability

  • Goal setting
  • Counseling or psychotherapy
  • Home organization, renovation, or spring cleaning
 

Sense of purpose, meaning, and self-respect

  • Supporting and growing the larger CGAA fellowship through service work like helping run a meeting, starting a local meeting, doing outreach to professionals, or attending CGAA business meetings
  • Attending a spiritual group like meditation, yoga, spiritual retreat, or religious gathering
  • Doing volunteer work like teaching, helping others, animal care, or building community places
  • Caring for a pet, house plants, or garden
 

Social needs

  • Attending CGAA meetings, connecting outside of meetings, reaching out to newcomers, or calling someone
  • Joining a hobby group like theater, a hiking group, art workshop, book club, public speaking, board games or card game group
  • Hosting a fun event like board games night or karaoke
  • Playing team sports, taking up martial arts, or playing one-on-one sports
  • Going to fun events like concerts, dances, or events on meetup.com
  • Calling up, video conferencing, or visiting with friends, family, neighbors, or other communities
 

Self expression and creativity

  • Journaling, opening up to a CGAA sponsor, or sharing openly in a meeting
  • Art work like drawing, photography, sculpting, or creative writing
  • Performance art like theater, singing, playing music, or writing music
 

Sense of challenge and accomplishment

  • Working the steps with a sponsor
  • Crafts like woodworking, origami, knitting
  • Outdoor activities like gardening, geocaching, bird watching, star gazing, tracking, plant identification, survival skills, or boating
  • Learning something like a foreign language, dancing, magic tricks, mechanical repair, cooking, a musical instrument, or computer programming
  • Career goals like getting a new job, starting a business, enrolling in school, or taking classes
 

Reconnection to one’s body and whole self

  • Meditating on breath, sounds, or bodily sensations
  • Exercise like walking, hiking, swimming, cycling, yoga, jogging, going to a gym, or playing a sport

If you are in your first week or two off of games, it’s likely that few of these ideas will appeal to you. That’s normal. Until our minds and bodies have some time to heal, we have low interest, energy, and motivation. This list will probably not give you something that you can plug in place of video games and immediately throw yourself into with the same zeal. This list is meant to help us explore new ways of spending our time, meeting our needs, and connecting with people. Find a few that hold some appeal and try taking some small steps in their direction. If you can’t seem to think of anything fun to do except game, you can come back to this list, find the most appealing thing, and just take a couple of little steps in its direction.

Consider setting reminders for yourself or keeping a schedule of your time and new activities. It is important to appreciate the small victories of exercising willpower, regaining motivation, and socializing. It helps to discuss our progress and the challenges we experience with a CGAA sponsor, recovery buddy, personal counselor, or therapist.

Rediscovering What is Fun

It is normal to think that nothing but gaming sounds fun. For most of us, our years of compulsive gaming warped and narrowed our idea of fun. As small children, it meant almost anything new or interesting or social or even mildly rewarding. Years of pulling the dopamine lever with video games changed our concept of fun to require instant gratification, frequent rewards, clear and constant progress, excitement, intense visuals, control, and/or predictability.

Part of recovery is letting our concept of fun expand back outward to a wide world of possible new challenges and experiences, many of which are calm and subtle compared to video games. It takes time to overcome withdrawals and heal from the damage, but the change does happen if we abstain from all gaming long term and focus on new pursuits and improving our lives. This list has many activities that do not meet the old, narrow, warped idea of “fun,” but those of us who persist at exploring them do find many to be gratifying and enjoyable.

Take, for example, a hike up a mountain. To a group of hikers excited to venture into the wilderness with friends and see wildlife and panoramic views from on high, all while getting a great workout, it’s a ton of fun. To someone who is uninterested in hiking, out of shape, and focused on every little unpleasant aspect of it, it’s a torturous death march. It is exactly the same hike in either case. The difference is in the attitude and conditioning.

The same is true with every item of these lists. Whether or not an activity sounds fun or torturous depends entirely upon attitude and conditioning. Every one of them has the potential to be gratifying and enjoyable if we adopt a positive attitude, try to have fun, and persist at it, especially when we involve friends and like-minded people.

CPI – Crisis Prevention Institute – De-escalation and Non-Violent Intervention Training Programs @ Register for Details
Jul 26 all-day

 

Verbal Intervention

Verbal Intervention (VI) instills the confidence and skills to verbally de‑escalate disruptive behaviors and prevent further escalation. It’s well‑suited to organizations with a hands‑off policy or that require non‑restrictive techniques.

Available as a virtual (Online & Live Virtual) Instructor Certification Program.

More About VI Register Now

Program Features & Benefits:

  • Limit-setting strategies when verbally intervening to de‑escalate defensive behaviors.
  • Recognize opportunities for post‑crisis learning.
  • The effects of trauma and the psychology of the brain on the person in crisis as well as the responding individual.
  • Person-centered to help ensure a consistently inclusive and culturally sensitive approach to a person displaying crisis behavior.
  • Verbal de‑escalation techniques and skills also featured in Nonviolent Crisis Intervention® and NCI With Advanced Physical Skills training.

Nonviolent Crisis Intervention®

Nonviolent Crisis Intervention® (NCI) provides your staff with the skills to safely recognize and respond to everyday crisis situations that may involve more challenging behaviors. NCI training is designed to help you achieve compliance with current legislative initiatives and best practices.

Available as a blended (Online & In-Person) Instructor Certification Program.

More About NCI Register Now

Program Features & Benefits:

  • Safety interventions and disengagement techniques for escalating risk behaviors.
  • Limit-setting strategies when verbally intervening to de-escalate defensive behaviors.
  • Recognize opportunities for post-crisis learning.
  • The effects of trauma and the psychology of the brain on the person in crisis as well as the responding individual.
  • Person-centered to help ensure a consistently inclusive and culturally sensitive approach to a person displaying crisis behavior.

Nonviolent Crisis Intervention® With Advanced Physical Skills

Nonviolent Crisis Intervention® With Advanced Physical Skills (APS) equips your staff with the decision-making skills needed to confidently assess and address risk in the face of complex behaviors. It combines verbal intervention strategies and restrictive interventions with advanced physical skills for the highest-risk scenarios. Instructors can customize training to each staff member’s individual risk level.

Available as a blended (Online, Live Virtual & In-Person) Instructor Certification Program.

More About APS Register Now

Program Features & Benefits:

  • Safe and advanced deceleration, disengagement, and physical intervention techniques for situations involving dangerous behaviors.
  • Intervene in high- and medium-risk situations that don’t require advanced skills.
  • Safety interventions and disengagement techniques for escalating risk behaviors.
  • Limit-setting strategies when verbally intervening to de-escalate defensive behaviors.
  • Recognize opportunities for post-crisis learning.
  • The effects of trauma and the psychology of the brain on the person in crisis as well as the responding individual.
  • Person-centered to help ensure a consistently inclusive and culturally sensitive approach to a person displaying crisis behavior.
FCA – Family Caregiver Alliance – Caregiver Support Group – 24/7 @ Email Group
Jul 26 all-day
FCA - Family Caregiver Alliance - Caregiver Support Group - 24/7 @ Email Group

 

Family Caregiver Alliance
Email Support Group 24/7

This group is in e-mail format. Participants send and receive e-mail to take part in discussions. You can receive your posts all together, in one delivery each day, or you can receive them one-by-one, as they are sent.

The choice is yours. It’s fun, easy, and available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. To join, complete the form below and click the submit button.

Subscribe to Caregiver-Online

You can subscribe to Caregiver-online by following this link and completing the form.  After completing the Subscription form you will email requesting confirmation, to prevent others from gratuitously subscribing you. This is a hidden list, which means that the list of members is available only to the list administrator.

To subscribe, Use this Link and complete the subscription form online:

http://lists.caregiver.org/mailman/listinfo/caregiver-online_lists.caregiver.org

 

Using Caregiver-online

To post a message to all the list members, send email to caregiver-online@lists.caregiver.org. Be sure to subscribe first!

HP – HeyPeers – PeerGalaxy Peer Support Groups and More @ Online Via Zoom
Jul 26 all-day

 

 

 

HeyPeers is an online Peer Support Community offering online community meetings, one-to-one coaching, and private chat rooms to connect with others on your journey.

HeyPeers features over 1,100 meetings, including weekly offerings from PeerGalaxy such as: Wellness Buddies, Creative Writing, Discovering Felt Sense of Safety, Kitchen Empowerment Hour, Peer Recovery, Resilience and Reconnection, plus more.

If you’re NEW to HeyPeers, you can sign-up / onboard with PeerGalaxy
and access MyJourneyTracker for FREE while available at this link:
If you’re an existing HeyPeers member, you can check out PeerGalaxy offerings:
For more about HeyPeers, visit https://www.heypeers.com
Native American Heritage – Education, Celebrations, Arts and Culture,Resources @ Zoom and Other Platforms
Jul 26 all-day

NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE

 

EDUCATION

National Constution Center Logo

 

 

 

 

In celebration of Native American Heritage Month, the National Constitution Center is hosting a series of scholar talks and activities highlighting the history of American Indians, tribal governments, and their relationship to the U.S. Constitution and American democracy.

 

Scholar Talk: American Indian Influence on the Constitution and the Founding Fathers Featuring Robert J. Miller  
Thursday, November 17 at 10 p.m. PST, Kirby Auditorium and Livestreamed

Join Robert J. Miller for a conversation about American Indians political theories and how their governments had a profound effect on many of the Founding Fathers, shaping specific provisions in the U.S. Constitution. The framers were influenced by both “positive” aspects of tribal governance and political science that they were familiar with and adopted into the Constitution, and they were also influenced by what can be called the “negative” aspects of the threats posed by the American Indian tribes to the new United States. Many of these effects are reflected in provisions in our Constitution. This talk examines how Indigenous theories of government affected our Founding Fathers in drafting the U.S. Constitution.    

 Robert J. Miller is a professor at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University where he is also the Willard H. Pedrick Distinguished Research Scholar and the director of the Rosette LLP American Indian Economic Development Program. He is the chief justice of the Pascua Yaqui Tribe Court of Appeals and an appellate judge in other tribal courts. He graduated from Lewis & Clark Law School in 1991 and then clerked for Judge Diarmuid O’Scannlain of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in 1991-92. Miller is a citizen of the Eastern Shawnee Tribe. He was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 2014, the oldest learned society in the United States.  

Scholar Talk: Native Americans’ Fight for Citizenship and Sovereignty Featuring Paul C. Rosier  
Friday, November 25 at 10 p.m. PST, Kirby Auditorium and Livestreamed

Dr. Paul C. Rosier, professor of history at Villanova University, will explore the Native Americans’ fight for American citizenship and tribal sovereignty, focusing on their extraordinary efforts to both protect their autonomy and secure the civil rights afforded American citizens: a dual citizenship codified in the 1924 Indian Citizenship Act. His presentation will highlight native people’s vision of an inclusive country that lives up to the ideals expressed in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, championing via military service, activism, and political writings their belief in a multi-racial and multi-cultural America that honored its legal obligations as it assumed international prominence in the 20th century.

Paul C. Rosier received his Ph.D. in American History from the University of Rochester in 1998. He currently serves as professor of history at Villanova University, where he teaches Native American history, American environmental history, global environmental history, and 20th century American history. He also serves as the director of the Albert Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest at Villanova. He previously held the inaugural Mary M. Birle Chair in American History (2016-2022) and served as department chair (2013-2016). In 2001, he published his first book, Rebirth of the Blackfeet Nation, 1912-1954; he co-edited the 2006 volume Echoes from the Poisoned Well: Global Memories of Environmental Injustice. In 2009, Harvard University Press published his Serving Their Country: American Indian Politics and Patriotism in the Twentieth Century, which won the 2010 American Indian National Book Award. He has published numerous essays on Native American topics, including three articles in The Journal of American History. Reflecting his commitment to public-facing work, he has published several blog posts on Native American political issues in Hindsights and the History News Network. He is in the final stages of two projects: an edited volume on environmental justice in North America; and a monograph on Native Americans’ political history, “The American Way of Life”: Native Americans’ Fight for Sovereignty and Citizenship.

Native Americans and the Constitution Town Hall Video (YouTube)

In celebration of Native American Heritage Month, join experts Maggie Blackhawk of the New York University School of Law; Donald Grinde, Jr. of the University at Buffalo and co-author of Exemplar of Liberty: Native America and the Evolution of Democracy; Gregory Dowd of the University of Michigan; and Woody Holton of the University of South Carolina and author of Liberty Is Sweet: The Hidden History of the American Revolution, for a conversation exploring the influence of Indigenous people and tribal governments on the U.S. Constitution and American democracy, from before the Revolution to today. Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, moderates.

 

CELEBRATIONS

Smithsonian Institute Logo

Native Veterans Procession and Dedication Ceremony

Veterans Day, November 11, 2022 and up live stream.

Join the museum in honoring the exceptional military service of Native Americans in a formal dedication of the National Native American Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC. The dedication and processional will honor American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian veterans and their families.   Use this link to Regester and View Live Stream


WEEKEND CELEBRATION  

Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 12–13 | Washington, D.C. 

All are welcome to join as the museum honors the military service of Native American, Native Hawai’ian and Alaska Native veterans, Friday, Nov. 11. The Native veterans’ procession and dedication ceremony will take place beginning at 2 p.m. on the National Mall as part of a three-day celebration featuring hands-on activities, films, performances, and a veterans hospitality suite. The procession and dedication will be livestreamed. For more information about the weekend program, visit AmericanIndian.si.edu/visit/washington/nnavm-dedication 

2022 Native Cinema Showcase 
Nov. 18–25

Live Streaming

The National Museum of the American Indian’s Native Cinema Showcase is an annual celebration of the best in Indigenous film. Embracing their communities’ oral histories, knowledge and ancestral lands, Indigenous filmmakers are seeking guidance from the past and envisioning new paths for the future. The showcase provides a unique forum for engagement with filmmakers from Indigenous communities throughout the Western Hemisphere and Arctic.

The online program includes a total of 35 films (six features and 30 shorts) representing 30 Native nations in eight different countries: US, Canada, New Zealand, Mexico, Guatemala, Ecuador, Colombia and Sweden. There are 10 Indigenous languages spoken in the films. Genres include documentaries, music videos, kid-friendly shorts, films in Indigenous languages and more.

Use this Link to Attend Online

Native Cinema Showcase is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature

 

Facing History & Ourselves Logo

 

Native American Boarding Schools as a Tool of U.S. Empire
Friday, November 19, 2021
10:00am EST/ 7:00 am PST
University of Michigan Alumni Association

“The Alumni Association is sponsoring the November Clements Bookworm. The Clements Bookworm is a webinar series in which panelists discuss history topics. In this episode, Dr. Veronica Pasfield discusses her continuing research to understand the full purpose and force of federal Indian boarding schools. She asserts that the creation story of Carlisle Indian School must be rooted in missionary schools founded to prepare Kanaka Maoli for wage labor on their own Hawaiian homelands as well as in the captivity of Native children in the Southwest by a U.S. Army desperate to bring about the submission of Western tribes by any means necessary. While administrators touted assimilation as a benevolent enterprise, the archives show that Indian children were used as hostages to secure the extraction of tribal resources, and ‘schools’ were used as an instrument for transforming indigenous peoples into a permanent underclass in their own homeland.”

Celebrate! with Wampanoag Nation Singers & Dancers
Saturday, November 20, 2021
11:30 AM – 12:30 PM EST
Hosted by the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum

“Join the Wampanoag Nation Singers and Dancers as they share stories of both their history and modern culture in a performance that culminates with a dance in honor of Native American Heritage Month. During this virtual program from wherever you are, the whole family can join in learning new movements and words for interactive elements. The Celebrate! series, appropriate for family audiences and children ages 5 and up, highlights America’s rich cultural diversity through the arts. This program is tied directly to President and Mrs. Kennedy’s concern for and support of the arts and culture in a democratic society. Thanks to generous support from the Martin Richard Foundation and the Mass Cultural Council all performances are free.”

Cultural Representation in Education
Tuesday, November 23, 2021
6:00 pm – 7:00 pm CST
Hosted by the Mitchell Museum

“Join us to learn about Native American history, culture and traditions first-hand from the perspectives of Indigenous educators… Waqnahwew Benjamin Grignon (Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin) is a teacher of traditional Menominee arts. He represents the Menominee Nation and approaches culturally-responsive education by using Menominee Language, Culture, and art to promote and preserve tribal history as a pathway for future generations and positively influence the education of the youth in his community. He is the 2019 Wisconsin High School Teacher of the Year and the recipient of the 2020 National Education Association’s Leo Reano Memorial Human and Civil Rights Award. Benjamin will be speaking about his journey to becoming a teacher at the Menominee Indian High School. He will be sharing the lessons he has learned over his 14 years of teaching experience and how this journey influences Menominee education by helping to design the Kaehkēnawapahta͞eq Menominee Immersion Charter School.”

Kyle T. Mays — An Afro-Indigenous History of the United States
Monday, November 29, 2021
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Hosted by the Boston Public Library

“Join us for an online talk with Kyle T. Mays, author of An Afro-Indigenous History of the United States, the first intersectional history of the Black and Native American struggle for freedom in our country that also reframes our understanding of who was Indigenous in early America…

Beginning with pre-Revolutionary America and moving into the movement for Black lives and contemporary Indigenous activism, Afro-Indigenous historian Kyle T. Mays argues that the foundations of the US are rooted in antiblackness and settler colonialism, and that these parallel oppressions continue into the present. He explores how Black and Indigenous peoples have always resisted and struggled for freedom, sometimes together, and sometimes apart… Mays compels us to rethink both our history as well as contemporary debates and to imagine the powerful possibilities of Afro-Indigenous solidarity.”

Facing History and Ourselves invites educators to explore our interview with Facing History Canada in which we discuss strategies for teaching settler colonialism beyond Canada.

 

ARTS AND CULTURE

Native American Worldview

Native American Worldview: A Conversation between Dr. Tink Tinker and Dr. Lisa Dellinger, Tinker Visiting Professor

In well-meaning white (mostly) institutions, it has become a standard practice that land acknowledgment is invoked in every event, and the discussion about or the demand for LandBack is publicly made.

Many assume that such is a step toward improving white institutions, solving settler colonialism, and reconciling with the Native people. However, Drs. Tinker and Dellinger warn that such discussions can deteriorate into sessions alleviating christian guilt, and maintaining the status quo. Dr. Tinker has argued that “the Native worldview and christianity cannot be reconciled because they were never “conciled” in the first place, so there is no state of conciliation to go back to (reconciliation).” Then all of us, the settler population, wonder what we can do?

This conversation between Drs. Tinker and Dellinger offers you an opportunity to deep listening to them, and invites you to learn from them with cultural humility first.”

 

Native American Worldview image

Dr. Lisa Dellinger

Native American Worldview image

Dr. Tink Tinker

Use this Link to Attend on ZOOM

 

Everything You Think You Know About Native Americans is Wrong (and Why Thats Not Your Fault)

In honor of Native American Heritage Month, the American Family Insurance DreamBank invites you to an enlightening presentation around common misperceptions of Native Americans with Rebecca Nagle, an award-winning advocate, writer, podcaster and citizen of the Cherokee Nation. Drawing from her extensive research, Rebecca will guide you in confronting any personal and societal ignorance and institutional bias that may exist. You’ll leave with a better understanding on how to create a more inclusive, empathetic culture in your personal and professional life — while advocating for Native American culture and progress.

Use this Link to Attend On Zoom

Native American Art and Culture

Thursday, November 10  8 PM to 9 PM PST

Join us for an online presentation on Native American Art and Culture – brought to you by Kent State Geauga and the Smithsonian Art Museum.

Join Kent State Geauga and the Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) for an interactive presentation on Native American Art and Culture. “American Indians are part of the past, present, and future of the United States.” This presentation will “explore histories and cultures of some American Indians as captured by both Native and non-Native artists” (SAAM).

Use this Link to Attend On Zoom

 

RESCOURCES

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Native American Web Sites

Related Native American Web Sites Information from sites selected for those interested in American Indians/Alaskan Natives. Includes demographics of state and federally recognized tribes within the United States, population figures, tribal contact information, tribal home pages and more.

Native American Web Sites

Related Native American Web Sites Information from sites selected for those interested in American Indians/Alaskan Natives. Includes demographics of state and federally recognized tribes within the United States, population figures, tribal contact information, tribal home pages and more.


 

Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) – ATNI is a nonprofit organization representing 54 Northwest tribal governments from Oregon, Idaho, Washington, southeast Alaska, Northern California and Western Montana. ATNI is an organization whose foundation is composed of the people it is meant to serve — the Indian peoples.

Alaska Inter-Tribal Council – The Alaska Inter-Tribal Council is a statewide, tribally-governed non-profit organization that advocates in support of Tribal governments throughout the state.

Alaska Native Knowledge Network – is designed to serve as a resource for compiling and exchanging information related to Alaska Native knowledge systems and ways of knowing.

American Indian Lands Environmental Support Project – The American Indian Lands Environmental Support Project (AILESP) was developed by EPA’s Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance (OECA). AILESP integrates and assesses recent multi-media point-source releases, the potential impacts of contaminants, and recent compliance and enforcement histories for facilities located on and within five kilometers of Tribal areas.

American Indian Law Review – The purpose of the American Indian Law Review, a specialized law review devoted exclusively to Indian law, will be to provide a forum for scholarly writing in the areas of the law that particularly affect American Indians. . . . A distinguishing feature of the Review will be that the discussion will not be limited to any particular viewpoint. In fact, the Review will encourage expression of differing viewpoints concerning American Indian legal problems.

American Indian Science and Engineering Society (A.I.S.E.S.) – The American Indian Science & Engineering Society (AISES) is a national, nonprofit organization which nurtures building of community by bridging science and technology with traditional Native values. Through its educational programs, AISES provides opportunities for American Indians and Native Alaskans to pursue studies in science, engineering, business and other academic arenas.

Bristol Bay Native Corporation (BBNC) – Strategic Intent 1997 – 2005 Mission Enriching our Native way of life. Vision To be a corporation that protects the past, present, and future of the Natives from Bristol Bay. Goals To double dividends within eight years (by 2005). To protect Native use of land and water in Bristol Bay. Values To protect the best interests of our shareholders. To maintain or grow total dividends paid annually by providing a solvent corporation. To celebrate and preserve the Alaskan Native culture and linkage with the land that provides the basis for our style of life.

Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) – DOI, Interior The Bureau of Indian Affairs’ mission is to enhance the quality of life, to promote economic opportunity, and to carry out the responsibility to protect and improve the trust assets of American Indians, Indian tribes and Alaska Natives. We will accomplish this through the delivery of quality services, maintaining government-to-government relationships within the spirit of Indian self-determination

Center for World Indigenous Studies (CWIS) – The Underlying Principle Guiding CWIS is: Access to knowledge and peoples’ ideas reduces the possibility of conflict and increases the possibility of cooperation between peoples on the basis of mutual consent. By democratizing relations between peoples, between nations and states, the diversity of nations and their cultures will continue to enrich the world.

Cherokee Nation – Official site of the Cherokee Nation.

Chinook Nation – Official site of the Chinook Indian Tribe

Code Talk – CodeTalk is a federal, inter-agency, Native American Web site designed specifically to deliver electronic information from government agencies and other organizations to Native American communities.

Coeur d’Alene Tribe – Because there was always a commitment to the future, so will there always be a commitment to the past. The modern Coeur d’ Alene Tribe is the sum of uncounted centuries and of untold generations. .

Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes – The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes are comprised of the Bitterroot Salish, the Pend d’Oreille and the Kootenai tribes. The Flathead Reservation of 1.317 million acres in northwest Montana is our home now but our ancestors lived in the territory now known as western Montana, parts of Idaho, British Columbia and Wyoming. This aboriginal territory exceeded 20 million acres at the time of the 1855 Hellgate Treaty.

Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation – Official site of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation – The Cayuse, Umatilla and Walla Walla Tribes make up the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

Cook Inlet Tribal Council – Located in Anchorage, Alaska, CITC administers programs to perpetuate and enhance the cultural heritage, social and economic well-being of Alaska Natives and American Indians residing in the Cook Inlet region of Alaska.

Coquille Indian Tribe – Preserving our past with the technology of the future. This is the starting point for you to explore the dynamic facets of the Coquille Indian Tribe.

Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians – Official site of the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians

CRITFC – Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission – CRITFC is made up of four Columbia Basin tribes. These tribes are the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and the Nez Perce Tribe.

Denali Commission of Alaska – Introduced by Congress in 1998, the Denali Commission is an innovative federal-state partnership designed to provide critical utilities, infrastructure, and economic support throughout Alaska.

Index of Native American Resources – American Indians Index of Native American Resources on the Internet.

Indian Country Today – The on-line version of Indian Country Today does not include the full content – articles, advertisements, notices and listings – that appear only in our newsprint edition. For complete access to America’s Leading Indian News source, subscribe to Indian Country Today!

Indian Health Service – The Indian Health Service (I H S) is an agency within the U S Dept. of Health and Human Services and is responsible for providing federal health services to American Indians and Alaska Natives.

Indian Reservation Roads Program (IRR) – The IRR Program is a jointly administered program by the Federal Highway Administration and by the Bureau of Indian Affairs through an Interagency Memorandum of Agreement as established by Title 23 U.S.C. Section 204.

Indianz.Com – Your Internet Resource Our Mission Welcome to Indianz.Com, Your Internet Resource. Our mission is to provide you with quality news, information, and entertainment from a Native American perspective.

Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada – The Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada, Inc. (ITCN) was incorporated as a non-profit organization under Nevada State Law on February 23, 1966. ITCN is a Tribal organization serving the member reservations and colonies in Nevada. The Governing Body of ITCN consists of an Executive Board, composed of Tribal Chairman from each of these Tribes.

Intertribal Timber Council – The ITC is a nation-wide consortium of Indian Tribes, Alaska Native Corporations, and individuals dedicated to improving the management of natural resources of importance to Native American communities.

Kalispel Tribe of Indians – The Kalispel Tribe of Indians’ official website.

Kappler’s Indian Affairs: Laws and Treaties – Indian Affairs: Laws and Treaties, compiled and edited by Charles J. Kappler, is an historically significant, seven volume compilation of U.S. treaties, laws and executive orders pertaining to Native American Indian tribes.

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) – The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), founded in 1944, is the oldest, largest and most representative national Indian organization serving the needs of a broad membership of American Indian and Alaska Native governments. Our founding members stressed the need for unity and cooperation among tribal governments and people for the security and protection of treaty and sovereign rights.

National Indian Education Association (NIEA) – The National Indian Education Association (NIEA)was founded in 1969 to give American Indians and Alaska Natives a national voice in their struggle to improve access to educational opportunity. NIEA is the largest and oldest Indian education organization in the nation and strives to keep Indian Country moving toward educational equity.

Vision Maker Media – The mission of Native American Public Telecommunications (NAPT) is to inform, educate and encourage the awareness of tribal histories, cultures, languages, opportunities and aspirations through the fullest participation of American Indians and Alaska Natives in creating and employing all forms of educational and public telecommunications programs and services, thereby supporting tribal sovereignty.

Native American Rights Fund (NARF) – The Native American Rights Fund (NARF) is a non-profit organization that provides legal representation and technical assistance to Indian tribes, organizations and individuals nationwide.

Native American Times – The Native American Times, Oklahoma state’s Indian news source, is published monthly by Oklahoma Indian Times, Inc. It is Oklahoma’s only independent newspaper that serves all of Oklahoma’s federally-recognized Indian Nations.

Native Sense – Information, case law and resources for and about Indians and Native American legal issues. Nez Perce Tribe – Official site of the Nez Perce Tribe.

Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board – Information about the Northwest Portland Area Health Board.

NPS: Tribal Preservation Program – The National Park Service (NPS) Tribal Preservation Program assists Indian tribes in preserving their historic properties and cultural traditions.

Office of American Indian Trust – The American Indian Trust Office was created to ensure that the Secretary’s obligations under the Federal Indian trust responsibility are performed in accordance with the standards required by the laws and policies of the United States. Among its responsibilities, the Office conducts annual reviews of tribal performance of trust functions assumed under of the Self-Governance Act of 1994 25 U.S.C. 458cc(d).

ONABEN – A Native American Business Network A Native American Business Network is a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation created by Northwest Indian Tribes to increase the success of private businesses owned by Native Americans. ONABEN offers training and support focused on developing entrepreneurship in Indian communities.

Red Feather Development Group – Red Feather Development Group is a national nonprofit housing and community development organization. We work with American Indian nations to find lasting solutions for the acute lack of proper housing and desperate poverty that continue to plague many of these communities.

Salmon Homecoming Alliance – is a 501 (c) 3 non-profit foundation, established to organize, plan, develop and facilitate programs and events associated with Salmon Homecoming.

The SGCE Tribal Consortium – a communication & education resource for the Self-Governance Tribes.

Spokane Tribe of Indians – The official page of the Spokane Tribe of Indians.

State-Tribal Relations – National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) tracks a variety of policy issues affecting state-tribal relations including economic development, environmental protection, human services, taxation, jurisdiction and law enforcement, and trust land issues. Tribal governments across the United States are exercising their self-governing powers and taking more control over program administration and the provision of services within their communities.

Tribal Court Clearinghouse – Welcome to the Tribal Court Clearinghouse – the first web site devoted to providing information to people working in Native American tribal courts. The Tribal Court Clearinghouse is designed as a resource for tribal justice systems and others involved in the enhancement of justice in Indian country.

Tulalip Tribes – The Tulalip Tribes official homepage

Yakama Nation – The official site of the Confederated Tribes of the Yakama Nation

 

Jul
27
Sat
2024
00 – Hotline – LIR – Love is Respect – Confidential Support for Healthy Relationships – Teens – Young Adults – Loved Ones – 866-331-9473 – 24/7
Jul 27 all-day
00 - Hotline - LIR - Love is Respect - Confidential Support for Healthy Relationships - Teens - Young Adults - Loved Ones - 866-331-9473 - 24/7

Love is Respect Advocates are available 24/7

We offer confidential support for teens, young adults, and their loved ones seeking help, resources, or information related to healthy relationships and dating abuse in the US. We’re available by text (“LOVEIS” to 22522), call (866.331.9474), or live chat online.

Terms & conditions for text services

No matter how you reach out to us, you’ll always receive one-on-one, real-time, confidential support.

Our advocates are trained on issues related to dating abuse and healthy relationships, as well as crisis intervention. When you contact us, we’ll listen to your situation, assess how you’re feeling in the moment, and help you identify what next steps may be best for you.

This might include brainstorming a safety plan together or identifying local resources to further support you, whether it’s a service provider, legal resource, counselor, or survivor network to get in touch with.

01 – Helpline – GR – Grad Resources – The National Grad Crisis Line – (877)-472-3457 – 24/7 – Weekdays & Weekends @ Phone
Jul 27 all-day

 

 

 

 

The National Grad Crisis Line

1.877.GRAD.HLP (1.877.472.3457)

The National Grad Crisis Line helps graduate students reach free, confidential telephone counseling, crisis intervention, suicide prevention, and information and referral services provided by specially-trained call-takers. Caring, professional staff and well-trained volunteers answer around the clock.

All counselors have completed training to understand the unique issues faced by graduate students. In addition to listening to and empathizing with a caller’s concerns, counselors assess the caller’s lethality risk, counsel, and offer various local support services and mental health resources for follow-up.

1.877.GRAD.HLP

https://gradresources.org/

Who We Are

Since 1990, Grad Resources has recognized the significant role of graduate students in America. From our studies on stress in graduate school to the painful stories of student struggles we hear every day, we understand the pressures they face. We offer services that address their personal, emotional and spiritual needs, providing online materials, meaningful connections, engaging speakers, and supportive faith-based communities that enable graduate students to flourish personally and professionally.
01 – Helpline – SAMHSA’s National Helpline 24/7 – Línea Nacional de Ayuda de SAMHSA de salud mental y adicciones – (800) 622-4357
Jul 27 all-day

 

SAMHSA’s National Helpline, 1-800-662-HELP (4357) (also known as the Treatment Referral Routing Service), or TTY: 1-800-487-4889 is a confidential, free, 24-hour-a-day, 365-day-a-year, information service, in English and Spanish, for individuals and family members facing mental and/or substance use disorders. This service provides referrals to local treatment facilities, support groups, and community-based organizations.

Línea Nacional de Ayuda de SAMHSA

  • La Línea Nacional de Ayuda de SAMHSA es un servicio gratuito, confidencial, disponible las 24 horas, los 7 días de la semana, los 365 días del año. Esta línea telefónica es un servicio de información (en inglés y español) para personas y familias que enfrentan trastornos mentales o de uso de sustancias.

     

    Visite también el localizador de tratamientos.

Suggested Resources

What Is Substance Abuse Treatment? A Booklet for Families
Created for family members of people with alcohol abuse or drug abuse problems. Answers questions about substance abuse, its symptoms, different types of treatment, and recovery. Addresses concerns of children of parents with substance use/abuse problems.

It’s Not Your Fault (NACoA) (PDF | 12 KB)

Assures teens with parents who abuse alcohol or drugs that, “It’s not your fault!” and that they are not alone. Encourages teens to seek emotional support from other adults, school counselors, and youth support groups such as Alateen, and provides a resource list.

After an Attempt: A Guide for Taking Care of Your Family Member After Treatment in the Emergency Department
Aids family members in coping with the aftermath of a relative’s suicide attempt. Describes the emergency department treatment process, lists questions to ask about follow-up treatment, and describes how to reduce risk and ensure safety at home.

Family Therapy Can Help: For People in Recovery From Mental Illness or Addiction
Explores the role of family therapy in recovery from mental illness or substance abuse. Explains how family therapy sessions are run and who conducts them, describes a typical session, and provides information on its effectiveness in recovery.

CGAA – Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous – Support Meetings, Support Chat for Family and Friends, Resources – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online Via ZOOM
Jul 27 all-day

 

Who We Are

Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous is a fellowship of people who support each other in recovering from the problems resulting from excessive game playing. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop video gaming, which is completely up to you. CGAA has no dues or fees. Our groups share their collective experience and the principles that helped them, but CGAA has no experts, hierarchy, or required beliefs. We have etiquette and traditions, but no strict rules.
If you are struggling with compulsive gaming, leave your contact info at 970-364-3497 and a CGAA member will call you back
Or email us at helpline@cgaa.info
For other issues, contact us at support@cgaa.info

 

ZOOM MEETINGS

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

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+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
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Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 
ZOOM MEETING

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 

Gamers Find A Local Support Group

Use the link below to get more information about local groups and a notification when a local meeting is started. Due to the COVID pandemic, most meetings are currently held in an outdoor setting or online.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LOCAL GROUP FINDER TOOL

 

CONTACT GROUPS IN OREGON BY LOCATION

 

 

SUPPORT FOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS

What Can I Do?

Video gaming is a common pastime. To many people, it is surprising that it can become a serious addiction, that is, an activity that is engaged in compulsively, without control or concern for consequences.

Video gaming addiction is a very serious problem that is harmful to everyone it touches. Since everyone involved suffers from it, everyone involved needs some help. Here are some important things to know.

First, no one is responsible for someone else’s compulsive gaming. As the Al-Anon slogan goes, “I didn’t cause it, I can’t control it, and I can’t cure it.”

You didn’t cause it.

Some people partly blame themselves for the dysfunctional behavior of their family members, particularly with addicts who are very quick to shift responsibility off themselves and blame others. Perhaps you played games with your loved one, purchased games, or encouraged it, thinking it was a harmless leisure activity. Maybe you’ve been involved in some conflict and wonder if that has driven him or her to hide away in gaming. But no one is responsible for another person’s behavior or mental disorders.

You can’t control it.

You may have already tried to talk to your friend or family member. Perhaps you have bargained with them, or given ultimatums. You have tried to help them see what damage they are doing to themselves and others. And none of it has worked. This is baffling to you. Why don’t they seem to understand or care? Why can’t they see what is obvious to you? This is actually a symptom of the disease of addiction, one that destines efforts for control to failure.

You can’t cure it.

We all would like to believe that we have the ability to help those we love. We often think that if we can just get the right information, figure out the right thing to say or do, perhaps change something about ourselves, we can fix the problem. People should be able to solve their own problems. Why can’t we do that with this one? There is a simple reason. There is no cure for addiction. It requires treatment. The recovery process is long and difficult. And there is only one person who can start that process, the one who is gaming compulsively. There are things you can do. Here are some suggestions that you may want to consider, that other family members and friends have found helpful.

Get information.

The literature of recovery fellowships for family and friends of addicts (such as Al-Anon) has much helpful guidance, some of which is available online as well. There are people who have been in situations very similar to yours, who have learned much from them, and who are willing to share the lessons learned, their experience, strength and hope. We hope you avail yourself of such resources.

Detach with love.

Putting energy into arguing with someone who is playing compulsively will not help either of you. Your loved one has a serious problem that you are powerless to control or cure, and that they will not get help until they want it. As much as you love someone, you cannot force this process on another person.

Stop enabling.

Paradoxically, at the same time people are arguing with, bargaining with or shaming a compulsive gamer, they are often (perhaps without realizing it) supporting the addiction in many ways. Anything that shields an addict from the consequences of his or her behavior is enabling, and can include such basic things as providing food, shelter, money, companionship, housekeeping, and covering for employment and legal difficulties. Helping a compulsive gamer keep up an appearance of normalcy is helping him or her continue in the destructive behavior. While you cannot change him or her, you can make changes for yourself. You can shift your energy away from enabling behaviors and toward meeting your own needs.

Take care of yourself.

Whether or not your loved one ever stops gaming, you deserve to have a healthy and happy life. Once you have accepted that you are powerless over their gaming behavior, you can begin to focus on what you can do for yourself, to accomplish your own goals. With the help of others who have been where you are, you can learn to set healthy boundaries and stick to them.

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