PeerGalaxy Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring over 82,000 monthly offerings of FREE telephone- and online-accessible peer support, recovery support + wellness activities!

Over 30+ warmlines plus webinars, workshops, job postings, special events, consumer input opportunities and more.

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

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If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

Training Opportunities in July 2020
List Provided Courtesy of State of Oregon, Oregon Health Authority
Click here to download PDF Format, 16 pages

How Events are Sorted:

First, at the top of the list: Disaster Hotline & Oregon Safe + Strong Helpline.

Next in the list: Bundled “All Day” Events for organizations with events happening at multiple times throughout the day and/or in many formats or locations; these are bundled into a single listing to prevent endless scrolling.  Usually these offer a lookup by zip code or other criteria. 

Lastly, Time-Specific Events listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  Warmlines and places east of Oregon’s time zone tend to start earlier (e.g. 4am in Oregon is 7am in New York).

May
27
Fri
AM – All Month – Eating and/or Body Image Struggles – Resources for Peer Support, Recovery & Wellness
May 27 all-day
Eating Problems 
Body Image Struggles, Wellness, Support
A 12-step recovery program

https://www.foodaddicts.org/

Food addiction can take many forms. Symptoms include obesity, under eating, and bulimia. People often think of the term “eating disorders” when describing the disease of food addiction. Food addicts are obsessed with food, body size, and weight. We spend our days thinking about when and what we are going to eat or not eat. Binging, purging, and dieting are a way of life. The bottom line is that we can’t stop thinking about eating. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) offers relief from the symptoms of eating disorders and guidance on living in recovery.


ANAD – National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders
https://anad.org/get-help/
ANAD is committed to providing free, peer support services to anyone struggling with an eating disorder Our free, eating disorders Helpline is available for treatment referrals, support and encouragement, and general questions about eating disorders.
Call the Helpline // 888.375.7767
Support Group // Find a Support Group
Peer Mentors // Request a Mentor
 
Treatment // Search our national directory
Our Helpline is available Monday-Friday, 9am-9pm CST. We will return messages left outside these hours.
NEDA – National Eating Disorders Association
NEDA: External link  list of virtual support groups for different time zones offered by multiple organizations dedicated to eating disorder recovery across the United States.
CONTACT THE NEDA HELPLINE
  1. Online chat

    Online Chat

    Monday—Thursday 9am—9pm ET

    Friday 9am—5pm ET

  1. Call NEDA's eating disorders helpline

    Call

    (800) 931-2237

    Monday—Thursday 11am—9pm ET

    Friday 11am—5pm ET

    Translation services are available on the phone.

  1. Call NEDA's eating disorders helpline

    Text

    (800) 931-2237

    Pilot hours: Monday—Thursday 3pm—6pm ET

https://eatingdisorderfoundation.org/get-help/support-groups/

Eating Disorder Foundation Support Groups, Eating Disorder Foundation: External link  list of recurring virtual support groups for people recovering from eating disorders, as well as family members and friends who are supporting someone through recovery.

https://www.feast-ed.org/around-the-dinner-table-forum/

Around the Dinner Table Forum, FEAST: External link  online community of parents of eating disorder patients around the world.  [note, I would say parents/caregivers of family members or persons experiencing eating struggles or struggling with eating, not patients!]

https://www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk/sanctuary

The Sanctuary, Beat Eating Disorders: External link  information about an online chat room for U.K. residents recovering from an eating disorder.

https://rockrecoveryed.org/coffee-conversations-for-moms/

Coffee and Conversations for Moms, Rock Recovery: External link  monthly virtual support group for mothers who are recovering from an eating disorder.

https://centerfordiscovery.com/groups/

Free Eating Disorder and Mental Health Support Groups, Center for Discovery Eating Disorder Treatment: External link  free platform for peer-based support groups for anyone who has been affected by an eating disorder or seeking mental health support.

ARFID (Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder) / Duke University

  Support Group NameDuke ARFID Parent Education Group
  Contact Name Chantal Gil
Meeting Location  Virtual through our community website. Members must first sign up for a free membership to our website, and then they can register for a group. (https://eatingdisorders.dukehealth.org/)

Pro-Recovery Support Group, Monday Evenings

7:00 PM EST /4:00 PM PST

Pro-Recovery Support Group, Saturday Mornings

11:00 AM EST/ 8:00 AM PST

Pro-Recovery support groups are open to individuals, ages 18+, who are  experiencing and/or are on the journey to recovery from an eating disorder.

Register here.

Family and Friends Group, Wednesday Evenings

7:00 PM EST /4:00 PM PST

https://18percent.org

18percent is a free online community based off Slack, where one can receive peer to peer support. 18percent has channels on various mental health issues, one of which is eating disorders. They offer free, 24/7 eating disorder support in a moderated environment. For more information, click the link below and sign up.

Click Here to Learn More

The main aim of EDRC is to increase awareness and understanding of eating disorders for the public and for health professionals; to promote early diagnosis, effective treatment, and recovery; and to advocate for mental health parity legislation and effective insurance coverage. We collaborate with other organizations such as National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) in our effort to bring the needed attention to eating disorders.

The Lotus Collaborative: Online Eating Disorder Recovery Support Group

This group is for anyone struggling with an eating disorder to get recovery support as well as to practice giving recovery support to others. While this is not a therapy group, it is a supportive virtual environment in which to meet others working towards recovery, build relationships, gain insight, and practice recovery skills. ​Everyone working towards eating disorder recovery is welcome.

Where: This group will take place via Zoom Room Meetings (Phone app or web browser). Sign up at https://www.thelotuscollaborative.com/online-eating-disorder-recovery-support-group.html

When: Every Sunday, 1pm – 2:30pm

Contact: email: info@thelotuscollaborative.com or set up a consultation: https://www.thelotuscollaborative.com/contact-us.html

The Lotus Collaborative: Online Supporters Group

The Lotus Collaborative hosts a free online support group for the friends and family members supporting a loved one through eating disorder recovery. This group is a space for family members and friends to get support, ask questions and connect with others in the supporting role.

Where: This group will take place via Zoom Room Meetings (Phone app or web browser). Sign up at https://www.thelotuscollaborative.com/online-supporters-group.html

When: ​Every Thursday, 6pm – 7pm PST

Contact: email: info@thelotuscollaborative.com or set up a consultation: https://www.thelotuscollaborative.com/contact-us.html

AM – All Month – TQC -The Q Center – Virtual, Diverse Support Groups for People in the LGBTQ+ Community @ Online Regerster for Details
May 27 all-day

Sponsor Logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The Q Center: Out of Portland OR, Continues To Offer Several Virtual, Diverse Support Groups for People in the LGBTQ+ Community:

As the largest LGBTQ+ community center in the Pacific Northwest, Q Center proudly serves the LGBTQ2SIA+ communities of Portland Metro and Southwest Washington. Our drop-in and event space on North Mississippi Avenue is a frequent first stop for new arrivals in Portland, and for longtime residents who are newly out or questioning their sexual or gender identity.

Q Center also serves as an information hub for friends, partners, community, and family members of LGBTQ2SIA+ individuals. We pride ourselves on our collaborative approach and seek out ways to share resources with other nonprofits and public institutions locally and statewide.

 

To learn about the many groups offered by the Q Center, here is the link to their calendar page: https://www.pdxqcenter.org/calendar.

To register for any of these groups please either email info@pdxqcenter.org, or call 503-234-7837.  

BRMA – Brown Mamas – The Ultimate List of Support Groups for Black Moms
May 27 all-day

 

The Ultimate List of Support Groups for Black Moms

Brown Mamas – Pittsburgh & U.S.  – Brown Mamas, Inc. has been around for seven years in the Pittsburgh region.  Brown Mamas began in the living room of Muffy Mendoza.  What started as 5 moms has grown to over 4000  Our mamas love our Pittsburgh chapter so much that we are expanding.  If you are mom who is ready to not just find her tribe, but to inspire other mothers and be the change she wants to see in her community, click here to learn more about starting your own Brown Mamas chapter.

Black Moms Connect – Canada & U.S.

Mommin’ Society – North Carolina & Online

Moms of Black Boys United – Atlanta & Online

Moms Make It Work – NYC

Mocha Moms, Inc. – U.S. (seriously, everywhere)

Whine & Cheese – 27 Chapters in U.S. (including D.C., PA, South Carolina, New York, etc.)

Black Women Do Breastfeed

Motherwork by Mater Mea – NYC

Beautiful Brown Girls Brunch Club – New Jersey

District Motherhued’s DMV MomTribe – D.C. Metro Area

Soul Food for Your Baby – Hawthorne, Calif.

Black Moms Blog Events – Atlanta, GA

Birthing Beautiful Communities – Cleveland, OH

Tessera Collective – Online, Self-Care Support

Melanin Mommies – Pittsburgh, PA

Pittsburgh Black Breastfeeding Circle –

Not-So Melinated Support Groups for Black Moms

Moms Club

La Leche League

Circle of Moms

Meetup.com

Facebook Support Groups for Black Moms

Black Stay-At-Home Mom Village

Black Moms Connection

Black Moms in Charge

Single Black Mothers

Moms of Black Daughters

Moms of Black Sons

Black Moms in College & Beyond

Breast Milk Donation for Black Moms

Sisterhood for Young Black Moms

CGAA – Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous – Support Meetings, Support Chat for Family and Friends, Resources – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online Via ZOOM
May 27 all-day

 

Who We Are

Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous is a fellowship of people who support each other in recovering from the problems resulting from excessive game playing. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop video gaming, which is completely up to you. CGAA has no dues or fees. Our groups share their collective experience and the principles that helped them, but CGAA has no experts, hierarchy, or required beliefs. We have etiquette and traditions, but no strict rules.
If you are struggling with compulsive gaming, leave your contact info at 970-364-3497 and a CGAA member will call you back
Or email us at helpline@cgaa.info
For other issues, contact us at support@cgaa.info

 

ZOOM MEETINGS

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 
ZOOM MEETING

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 

Gamers Find A Local Support Group

Use the link below to get more information about local groups and a notification when a local meeting is started. Due to the COVID pandemic, most meetings are currently held in an outdoor setting or online.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LOCAL GROUP FINDER TOOL

 

CONTACT GROUPS IN OREGON BY LOCATION

 

 

SUPPORT FOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS

What Can I Do?

Video gaming is a common pastime. To many people, it is surprising that it can become a serious addiction, that is, an activity that is engaged in compulsively, without control or concern for consequences.

Video gaming addiction is a very serious problem that is harmful to everyone it touches. Since everyone involved suffers from it, everyone involved needs some help. Here are some important things to know.

First, no one is responsible for someone else’s compulsive gaming. As the Al-Anon slogan goes, “I didn’t cause it, I can’t control it, and I can’t cure it.”

You didn’t cause it.

Some people partly blame themselves for the dysfunctional behavior of their family members, particularly with addicts who are very quick to shift responsibility off themselves and blame others. Perhaps you played games with your loved one, purchased games, or encouraged it, thinking it was a harmless leisure activity. Maybe you’ve been involved in some conflict and wonder if that has driven him or her to hide away in gaming. But no one is responsible for another person’s behavior or mental disorders.

You can’t control it.

You may have already tried to talk to your friend or family member. Perhaps you have bargained with them, or given ultimatums. You have tried to help them see what damage they are doing to themselves and others. And none of it has worked. This is baffling to you. Why don’t they seem to understand or care? Why can’t they see what is obvious to you? This is actually a symptom of the disease of addiction, one that destines efforts for control to failure.

You can’t cure it.

We all would like to believe that we have the ability to help those we love. We often think that if we can just get the right information, figure out the right thing to say or do, perhaps change something about ourselves, we can fix the problem. People should be able to solve their own problems. Why can’t we do that with this one? There is a simple reason. There is no cure for addiction. It requires treatment. The recovery process is long and difficult. And there is only one person who can start that process, the one who is gaming compulsively. There are things you can do. Here are some suggestions that you may want to consider, that other family members and friends have found helpful.

Get information.

The literature of recovery fellowships for family and friends of addicts (such as Al-Anon) has much helpful guidance, some of which is available online as well. There are people who have been in situations very similar to yours, who have learned much from them, and who are willing to share the lessons learned, their experience, strength and hope. We hope you avail yourself of such resources.

Detach with love.

Putting energy into arguing with someone who is playing compulsively will not help either of you. Your loved one has a serious problem that you are powerless to control or cure, and that they will not get help until they want it. As much as you love someone, you cannot force this process on another person.

Stop enabling.

Paradoxically, at the same time people are arguing with, bargaining with or shaming a compulsive gamer, they are often (perhaps without realizing it) supporting the addiction in many ways. Anything that shields an addict from the consequences of his or her behavior is enabling, and can include such basic things as providing food, shelter, money, companionship, housekeeping, and covering for employment and legal difficulties. Helping a compulsive gamer keep up an appearance of normalcy is helping him or her continue in the destructive behavior. While you cannot change him or her, you can make changes for yourself. You can shift your energy away from enabling behaviors and toward meeting your own needs.

Take care of yourself.

Whether or not your loved one ever stops gaming, you deserve to have a healthy and happy life. Once you have accepted that you are powerless over their gaming behavior, you can begin to focus on what you can do for yourself, to accomplish your own goals. With the help of others who have been where you are, you can learn to set healthy boundaries and stick to them.

Join our WhatsApp Chat Site for Family and Friends!

Game-Anon

WhatsApp Group Invite

Visit whatsapp.com/dl on your mobile phone to install.

By installing WhatsApp, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

 

Chat Using A Macintosh

 

Mac OS X 10.10 and higher. WhatsApp must be installed on your phone.

By clicking the Download button, you agree to our Terms & Privacy Policy.

DOWNLOAD FOR MAC OS X

Download for Windows 8 and higher (64-bit)
Download for Windows 8 and higher (32-bit)

 

 


Things To Do Instead of Gaming

One of the things we were trying to do with our gaming was meet some basic needs. If we do not meet those needs in normal healthy ways, we will suffer much stronger urges to game again. Some basic needs to cover are social needs, self expression, creativity, a sense of challenge and accomplishment, stress relief, a sense of purpose and meaning, and a sense of safety through control and predictability.

Here are some ideas for activities that will help meet these needs, reduce cravings, help with recovery from addiction, and fill some of the hours freed from compulsive gaming.

Please don’t let the length of this list overwhelm you. The idea is not to start ten new things and try to change everything all at once. We seek small bits of progress, not perfection. A good place to start is to put first things first. What need is currently most important? What’s right in front of me? What opportunity has come my way recently? If we take steps of small improvement with one or two areas each day, we are moving in the right direction.

Stress Relief

  • Talking with a sponsor or recovery buddy, CGAA meetings, or step work
  • Getting outside for fresh air and sunlight by taking a walk or doing some outdoor work
  • Meditation, coloring, craft work, journaling, or reading

Sense of safety through freedom, control, and predictability

  • Goal setting
  • Counseling or psychotherapy
  • Home organization, renovation, or spring cleaning

Sense of purpose, meaning, and self-respect

  • Supporting and growing the larger CGAA fellowship through service work like helping run a meeting, starting a local meeting, doing outreach to professionals, or attending CGAA business meetings
  • Attending a spiritual group like meditation, yoga, spiritual retreat, or religious gathering
  • Doing volunteer work like teaching, helping others, animal care, or building community places
  • Caring for a pet, house plants, or garden

Social needs

  • Attending CGAA meetings, connecting outside of meetings, reaching out to newcomers, or calling someone
  • Joining a hobby group like theater, a hiking group, art workshop, book club, public speaking, board games or card game group
  • Hosting a fun event like board games night or karaoke
  • Playing team sports, taking up martial arts, or playing one-on-one sports
  • Going to fun events like concerts, dances, or events on meetup.com
  • Calling up, video conferencing, or visiting with friends, family, neighbors, or other communities

Self expression and creativity

  • Journaling, opening up to a CGAA sponsor, or sharing openly in a meeting
  • Art work like drawing, photography, sculpting, or creative writing
  • Performance art like theater, singing, playing music, or writing music

Sense of challenge and accomplishment

  • Working the steps with a sponsor
  • Crafts like woodworking, origami, knitting
  • Outdoor activities like gardening, geocaching, bird watching, star gazing, tracking, plant identification, survival skills, or boating
  • Learning something like a foreign language, dancing, magic tricks, mechanical repair, cooking, a musical instrument, or computer programming
  • Career goals like getting a new job, starting a business, enrolling in school, or taking classes

Reconnection to one’s body and whole self

  • Meditating on breath, sounds, or bodily sensations
  • Exercise like walking, hiking, swimming, cycling, yoga, jogging, going to a gym, or playing a sport

If you are in your first week or two off of games, it’s likely that few of these ideas will appeal to you. That’s normal. Until our minds and bodies have some time to heal, we have low interest, energy, and motivation. This list will probably not give you something that you can plug in place of video games and immediately throw yourself into with the same zeal. This list is meant to help us explore new ways of spending our time, meeting our needs, and connecting with people. Find a few that hold some appeal and try taking some small steps in their direction. If you can’t seem to think of anything fun to do except game, you can come back to this list, find the most appealing thing, and just take a couple of little steps in its direction.

Consider setting reminders for yourself or keeping a schedule of your time and new activities. It is important to appreciate the small victories of exercising willpower, regaining motivation, and socializing. It helps to discuss our progress and the challenges we experience with a CGAA sponsor, recovery buddy, personal counselor, or therapist.

Rediscovering What is Fun

It is normal to think that nothing but gaming sounds fun. For most of us, our years of compulsive gaming warped and narrowed our idea of fun. As small children, it meant almost anything new or interesting or social or even mildly rewarding. Years of pulling the dopamine lever with video games changed our concept of fun to require instant gratification, frequent rewards, clear and constant progress, excitement, intense visuals, control, and/or predictability.

Part of recovery is letting our concept of fun expand back outward to a wide world of possible new challenges and experiences, many of which are calm and subtle compared to video games. It takes time to overcome withdrawals and heal from the damage, but the change does happen if we abstain from all gaming long term and focus on new pursuits and improving our lives. This list has many activities that do not meet the old, narrow, warped idea of “fun,” but those of us who persist at exploring them do find many to be gratifying and enjoyable.

Take, for example, a hike up a mountain. To a group of hikers excited to venture into the wilderness with friends and see wildlife and panoramic views from on high, all while getting a great workout, it’s a ton of fun. To someone who is uninterested in hiking, out of shape, and focused on every little unpleasant aspect of it, it’s a torturous death march. It is exactly the same hike in either case. The difference is in the attitude and conditioning.

The same is true with every item of these lists. Whether or not an activity sounds fun or torturous depends entirely upon attitude and conditioning. Every one of them has the potential to be gratifying and enjoyable if we adopt a positive attitude, try to have fun, and persist at it, especially when we involve friends and like-minded people.

CL – Cancer Lifeline – Line, Chat, and Virtual Groups – Weekdays @ Online
May 27 all-day

 

 

 

 

CancerLine offers online and telephone peer support for persons experiencing or impacted by cancer.

Online Support Groups Links:

https://cancerlifeline.org/about-our-support-groups/

Phone:

206.297.2500 or toll-free 1.800.255.5505

Chat:

Weekdays 6am-2pm PST / 9am-5pm EST

https://cancerlifeline.org/lifeline-chat/

Online Support Groups

Our cancer support groups are designed to meet four key needs:

* Members have a place where emotions can be expressed and not judged
* Members gain a sense of community & inclusion with others in a similar situation
* Members find ways in which choice & control can be attained while living with cancer
* Members are provided with opportunities for education and information

While we are online, please note that our Support Group Norms require participation by both video and audio unless you have been granted an exception by Cancer Lifeline. To inquire about an exception, please call (206) 832-1271.

Current Support Groups

NWI – North West Insituto – Online Recovery Meetings – Narcotics Anonymous and Alcoholics Anonymous – Mondays, Wednesday, Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays @ Online Via ZOOM
May 27 all-day

 

 

NA—Narcotics Anonymous “Sorority” (women only)

Online

Monday and Thursday 10-11:30am

Zoom ID – 595 167 4496

Code – 3hQ4ij

NA-Narcotics Anonymous “Breaking the Chains”.

Online

Sunday 2-3pm

Zoom ID – 636 542 9919

Code – 4127

AA-Alcoholics Anonymous “El Reencuentro” (The Reunion)

Online

Monday, Wednesday, & Saturday 7-8:30pm

Zoom ID – 636 542 9919

Code – No code

NW Instituto Latino

Telephone: 503-719-7609

E-mail address:  INFO@NWILPDX.COM

Mailing AddressPO Box: 92070, Portland OR 97266
Physical address is: 10209 SE Division BLDG: B Suite: 100, Portland, OR 97206The Recovery Center is located behind the main building at the west end of the parking lot**
PSI – Postpartum Support International – Maternal Depression Support Groups and Educational Resources – Online @ Regester for Details
May 27 all-day

Sponsor

 

Event Banner

 

Maternal Depression Support Groups and Educational  Resources

On-line

Peer Support Groups & More! Postpartum

Support International (PSI) Weekly Support Groups: PSI facilitates a wide variety of postpartum support groups every week for diverse populations, and all family members.

PSI also staffs a non-emergency helpline for education and support:  The number is 1-800-944-4773. PSI also offers a free peer mentor program where Mons or Dads can work 1-1 with a peer mentor once per week for up to 6 months.

Link to webpage for specific support groups, dates and times: 

https://www.postpartum.net/get-help/psi-online-support-meetings/

 

West Coast On-line Peer Support Forum:

Postpartum Progress Hosts Regional, On-line Forums for Maternal Depression and/or Anxiety:

These regional forums are moderated by volunteer Warrior Mom® Ambassadors who have completed Mental Health First Aid training.

Link to webpage to select a particular region, including West Coast (includes Oregon):

https://postpartumprogress.com/postpartum-progdress-online-peer-support

 

Oregon On-line Peer Support Groups: 

Free peer support groups and discussion forums, moderated by, “Well Mama,” for mothers and families on a wide variety of topics related to pregnancy and postpartum mental health.

Link to register:  https://www.wellmamaoregon.com/support/

 

 On-line Maternal Depression Education Resources:  

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH): NIMH provides a comprehensive, downloadable educational manual about Postpartum (Perinatal) Depression. 

Link to the webpage to download this educational material: 

https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/perinatal-depression/index.shtml

 

Oregon Health Authority (OHA):

OHA provides a wide variety of educational materials on pregnancy and postpartum depression for both mothers and family members.

Link to this information: 

https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/HealthyPeopleFamilies/Women/MaternalMentalHealth/Pages/index.aspx

RTG – Recover Together with Google – Online Recovery Meetings Finder, Locator Map, Links and Resources – Weekdays & Weekends
May 27 all-day

 

 

Together we are stronger

Even when apart, our voices are united. The #RecoveryMovement celebrates the 23 million Americans recovering from addiction, and paves the way for the 20 million still struggling to seek treatment. Our voices matter.

For people seeking and/or in recovery

COVID-19 has changed the way we can gather and meet. Some support group meetings have changed to fully virtual, while other meetings are hybrids-a combination of digital and in-person participants who can all see and hear each other. Since requirements and practices vary by region, we’ve created a locator tool that you can use to find your nearest support group or recovery chapter (e.g. AA or NA). To use the tool, simply enter a zip code into the search bar and choose a support group (e.g. AA). Information for groups closest to that area will be displayed – if no local resources are available, the nearest available resources, e.g. state/national, will be shown instead.

Meeting Locator Map

This map contains links to external resources that are not operated or maintained by Google.

Use the following link to access the map and find meetings in your area.

https://recovertogether.withgoogle.com/ 

To report an inaccuracy or missing resource, email recover-together@google.com

Selected Recovery Group Links: 

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)   https://aa-intergroup.org/
Al-Anon Family Groups   https://al-anon.org/al-anon-meetings/electronic-meetings/
Cocaine Anonymous  https://ca.org/meetings/
Co-Dependents Anonymous   https://coda.org/find-a-meeting/online-meetings/
Crystal Meth Anonymous  https://www.crystalmeth.org/cma-meetings.html
Families Anonymous  https://www.familiesanonymous.org/meetings/virtual-meetings/
Heroin Anonymous  https://heroinanonymous.org/covid-19/
LifeRing Secular Recovery   https://www.lifering.org/online-meeting-schedule
Marijuana Anonymous  https://marijuana-anonymous.org/find-a-meeting/
Narcotics Anonymous (NA)  https://na.org/?ID=virtual_meetings
Parents of Addicted Loved Ones  https://meetings.palgroup.org/meetings
Partnership to End Addiction  https://drugfree.org/article/online-support-community-for-parents-caregivers/
Recovery Dharma   https://recoverydharma.online/
Refuge Recovery  https://refugerecovery.org/meetings?tsml-day=any&tsml-region=online-english
SMART Recovery  https://www.smartrecovery.org/community/
The Phoenix  https://thephoenix.org/find-a-class/
Wellbriety meetings  http://whitebison.org/wellbriety-online-meetings/
YPR Chapters’ All Recovery Meetings   http://youngpeopleinrecovery.org/virtual-event-schedule/Online Telehealth Drug Rehab Facilities  https://drugrehabus.org/rehabs/treatment/online-telehealth/

For additional listings, use the locator Map.

Looking for a different group?

Try the Online meetings list  to find virtual meeting options throughout the globe.

There are additional resources that you can connect with, including a Facebook group owned and moderated by the Voices Project. You are not alone.

Support resources for family and friends

Online meetings

Resources for supporting your loved ones

Voices for recovery

Many communities, one message

One in fourteen Americans is in recovery from addiction. A group ranging from a Google employee in California to a recovery community organizer in Baltimore, shared their stories of addiction, recovery, and community to help break the stigma and end the silence.

 

SARDAA – Schizophrenia and Related Disorders Alliance of America – Conference Calls and Online Meetings @ Online via Zoom
May 27 all-day

logo

Improving Lives Affected by Psychosis, Schizophrenia and Related Disorders Alliance of America

You are Not Alone

Our vision is that every person living with a schizophrenia-related brain disorder achieves recovery and fulfilling life in a compassionate community free of stigma and discrimination.

SARDAA invites you to attend its meetings and/or conference calls (peer support and family support)

Online and in-person support groups and conference calls are available.

SARDAA in-person meetings are ON HOLD until further notice at this time due to the pandemic.

Find SARDAA meeting locations, groups, and conference call information at this web page:

https://sardaa.org/schizophrenia-alliance/sa-group-locations/

To register for conference call groups, visit this link: 

https://sardaa.org/call-registration/

Current conference call group times include:

Sundays 4pm PST / 7pm EST

Mondays 1pm PST / 4pm EST

Tuesdays 10am PST / 1pm EST

Wednesdays 10am PST / 1pm EST

Thursdays 10am PST / 1pm EST and 4pm PST / 7pm EST

Fridays 11am PST / 2pm EST and 4pm PST / 7pm EST

Saturdays 10am PST / 1pm EST

Families / Caregivers Conference Call Group

Tuesdays 4pm PST / 7pm EST – Families for Care Support Conference Call Group

Online meetings via ZOOM are also offered including:

Saturdays 9am PST / 12pm EST – SA: Psychosis Support & Acceptance

Sundays 1pm PST / 4pm EST – SA: Psychosis Support & Acceptance

Tuesdays 4:30pm PST / 7:30pm EST – Spanish / Espanol Meeting

Families / Caregivers Online meetings via ZOOM

Wednesdays 3pm PST / 6pm EST

Sundays 11am PST / 2pm EST

Fridays (1st and 3rd monthly) 6pm PST / 9pm EST – Spanish / Espanol Family / Caregiver Support Meetings

Additional Contact Information

Toll Free:

800-493-2094

Phone:

240-423-9432     

Email:

info@sardaa.org

Website:

https://www.sardaa.org

Social Media Facebook Page: 

https://www.facebook.com/sardaaorg

Social Media Twitter Feed:

https://twitter.com/sardaa_org

TDC – The Dougy Center – National Center for Grieving Children and Families – Support Groups
May 27 all-day

Dougy Center: The National Center for Grieving Children and Families

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Website: https://www.dougy.org

Phone: 503-775-5683

Phone Toll Free: 866-775-5683

Email: help@dougy.org

A safe place to talk. A safe place to listen.

People grieving a death often feel like no one understands what they’re going through. And truthfully, no one’s grief is exactly same. But people tell us the help they appreciate most comes from sharing with others who are also grieving a death.

Our children’s support groups are designed around age, type of death, and the connection to the person who died. Parent/adult caregiver groups run at the same time as the children’s support groups. Around 500 children and 350 adult family members come to our groups each month. Each person decides how long he or she wants to be at The Dougy Center.

In the groups, there is no right or wrong way to be. Nobody will tell you it’s time to move on. Or that an emotion you have is wrong or inappropriate. Here, through talking and listening, you’re free to find hope and comfort in your own personal way. Children can express themselves through play, music, art, games, and sharing.

Our unique approach, using peer group support to help people discover their own way through grief, has made The Dougy Center a worldwide leader in the field. More than 500 programs based on our model now thrive in the U.S., Canada, Africa, Australia, Europe and Japan. Our guidebooks assist parents, schools and others who deal with children affected by death, and our children’s activity books provide them an outlet for expression.

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, The Dougy Center is hosting virtual support groups for our bereavement and Pathways programs. If your family lives in the Portland metro area and would like to participate, please call 503.775.5683 or email help@dougy.org.

At The Dougy Center we realize that:

  • Grief is a natural reaction to death;
  • Each individual has a natural capacity to heal from loss;
  • Duration and intensity of grief are unique to each individual; and
  • Caring and acceptance assist in the healing process.

Support Group FAQs

https://www.dougy.org/grief-resources/faqs/

Bill of Rights for Grieving Teens

https://www.dougy.org/grief-resources/bill-of-rights/

Orientation

Orientation lasts approximately one hour. During that time, adults and children/teens are broken into separate groups where we explain the program. Questions are answered, and everyone is given a tour. Children and teens watch a Dougy Center video produced by the TV program 20/20. The adults learn about how to have a child or teen begin participation at the Center and receive all the application forms. Coming to an orientation does not mean the child/teen becomes a participant. We encourage the adults to allow the children and teens to make the final decision for themselves.

Pathways Groups

https://www.dougy.org/grief-resources/pathways/

Spanish Support (Esperanza: Grupos en Espanol):

https://www.dougy.org/grief-resources/esperanza-spanish-support-group/

LYGHT Groups – Listening and Led by Youth in Foster Care: Grief, Hope, and Transitions

At the core of the L.Y.G.H.T. program, we aim to raise awareness about how grieving youth in foster care experience marginalization on various levels, create ways to provide trauma-informed peer support to youth in foster care, and promote the importance of moving the child welfare community toward a grief-informed holistic model of care.

“It helps you to feel like you are not alone. They are also going through something as well and you can help each other.” – L.Y.G.H.T. program participant

https://www.dougy.org/grief-resources/lyght/

Grief Support Groups in Oregon listed with Dougy Center for those not in Portland:

19 places based on search at:  https://www.dougy.org/grief-support-programs/


*Cason’s Place: Grief Support for Children and Families of Eastern Oregon

1416 SE Court Avenue
PO Box 1142
Pendleton, Oregon 97801

p: (541) 612.0828
www.casonsplace.org


*Blue Mountain Hospice

422 West Main
John Day, Oregon 97845

p: (541) 575-1648
www.bluemountainhospital.org


*Vange John Memorial Hospice/Good Shepherd Medical Center

645 W. Orchard Avenue, Suite 300
Hermiston, Oregon 97838

p: (541) 667-3543
f: (541) 667-3544
www.gshealth.org/hospice/


Benton Hospice Service

2350 NW Professional Drive
Corvallis, Oregon 97330

p: (541) 757-9616
p: (800) 898-9616
f: (541) 757-1760
www.bentonhospice.org


*SHELL: Support and Healing for Early Life Losses

Mt. Hood Hospice
PO Box 1269
39641 Scenic Street
Sandy, Oregon 97055

p: (503) 668-5545
f: (503) 668-5545
www.mthoodhospice.org


Me Too. and Company

PO Box 10796
Portland, Oregon 97296

p: (503) 228-2104
www.oregonhospice.org


*Mercy Medical Center Hospice

Wings of Hope
2400 Stewart Parkway
Roseburg, Oregon 97470

p: (541) 677-2384
f: (541) 440-0761


*Courageous Kids/Hospice of Sacred Heart

1121 Fairfield Ave
Eugene, Oregon 97402

p: (541) 461-7577
f: (541) 461-7697
www.peacehealth.org


Mourning Resources Inc.

PO Box 82573
Portland, Oregon 97202

p: (503) 777-0433


*Light House Center

1620 Thompson Rd
Coos Bay, Oregon 97420

p: (541) 269-2986
f: (541) 267-0458


Good Grief – Lovejoy Hospice

939 SE 8th St
Grants Pass, Oregon 97526

p: (541) 474-1193
p: (888) 758-8569
f: (541) 474-3035
www.lovejoyhospice.org


*Douglas Community Hospital

738 W Harvard
Roseburg, Oregon 97470

p: (541) 673-6641


Partners in Care

2075 NE Wyatt Ct
Bend, Oregon 97701

p: (541) 382-5882
www.partnersbend.org/bend-hospice-services/childrens-grief-support/


My Friends House Inc.

1293 Wall Street #1339
PMB 1339
Bend, Oregon 97701

p: (541) 382-5882
www.partnersbend.org/bend-hospice-services/childrens-grief-support/


St. Anthony Hospital Hospice

3001 St. Anthony Way, Level 2
Pendleton, Oregon 97801

p: (541) 276-4100
f: (541) 276-4103
www.sahpendleton.org/services/hospice/


Compassionate Friends Portland Chapter

PO Box 3065
Portland, Oregon 97208-3065

p: (503) 248-0102
www.portlandtcf.org/home.aspx


*Winterspring

PO Box 8169
Medford, Oregon 97501

p: (541) 772-2527
www.winterspring.org


*Willamette Valley Hospice

Willamette Valley Hospice
1015 3rd Street NW
Salem, Oregon 97304

p: (503) 588-3600
p: (800) 555-2431
f: (503) 363-3891
www.wvh.org


The Dougy Center

3909 SE 52nd Avenue
Portland, Oregon 97206

p: 503 775-5683
f: 503 777-3097
dougy.org

VWF – Very Well Family – Pregnancy Loss Support Organizations
May 27 all-day

Pregnancy Loss Support Organizations

Miscarriage, Stillbirth, and Ectopic Pregnancy Support Groups

If you have suffered a miscarriage, stillbirth, or ectopic pregnancy and need an extra source of support, or if you wish to do something to help further miscarriage awareness, there is help out there. A number of nonprofit organizations around the world aim to spread awareness of pregnancy and infant loss and offer support services. Some are regional in focus but others have a national and even international reach. The following is a list of some of the major pregnancy loss awareness organizations.

 

Share Pregnancy and Infant Loss Support

women in support group for pregnancy loss
Steve Debenport/E+/Getty Images

Share Pregnancy and Infant Loss Support was established in 1977 and has been active in numerous pregnancy loss advocacy and awareness activities including everything from promoting the rights of parents to bury their miscarried babies, to organizing support groups around the nation. The organization’s website contains a collection of support resources as well as a list of regional support groups. If no support group is in your area, Share can also advise you on how to start one

March of Dimes

The March of Dimes is one of the most well-known and well-established organizations focusing on pregnancy health. March of Dimes has a lot of information on the causes and possible prevention of premature birth, a leading cause of infant death, and it is involved in numerous advocacy efforts to drive research into ways to prevent birth defects and infant death.

As a start, every woman who is pregnant should be aware of the risk factors for premature birth as well as the signs and symptoms of premature labor.1

International Stillbirth Alliance (ISA)

The International Stillbirth Alliance (ISA) is a coalition of stillbirth awareness groups and organizations that work to promote stillbirth research and awareness of stillbirth. The group offers support resources for parents as well as information about ongoing research into stillbirth.

The Miscarriage Association

The Miscarriage Association is a UK-based support association that offers many resources to help families cope with miscarriage and to spread awareness of miscarriage. They use the general term miscarriage but include support for those who have had an ectopic pregnancy or molar pregnancy as well. The group has a network of support volunteers who can lend a listening ear

The miscarriage association also provides information to help people better understand everything from the tests done to look for a miscarriage, to information on “trying again” after your loss.

Sands

Sands stands for Stillbirth and Neonatal Death Support. This group is based in the UK, but Sands has chapters in countries around the world. The group offers support to all individuals affected by stillbirth or loss of a newborn infant, and its website includes information on local groups and advocacy opportunities.

Sands also recognizes the importance of bereavement care,2 which has, unfortunately, been addressed to a less degree than the symptoms and treatment of pregnancy loss.

The Compassionate Friends

The Compassionate Friends (TCF) is not exclusively focused on pregnancy loss but focuses on providing support for bereaved families who are grieving the death of a child. The group does offer information and support for pregnancy loss of any kind.

MISS Foundation

The MISS Foundation focuses on crisis support and other aid to families grieving the loss of a child. The group is not exclusively focused on pregnancy loss but is involved in a lot of activities related to miscarriage and stillbirth awareness, such as the MISSing Angels Bills that have been considered or passed in many U.S. states with the idea of granting parents the right to receive a state-issued certificate of stillbirth recognizing the loss of a baby to stillbirth.

Center for Loss in Multiple Birth (CLIMB)

The Center for Loss in Multiple Birth (CLIMB) offers support to parents who have lost babies in multiple pregnancies, including those who have lost all babies in the pregnancy as well as those who have lost one twin.

The site offers fact sheets aimed at dads, grandparents, siblings, and survivors as well as information about research into this type of pregnancy loss.

Helping After Neonatal Death (HAND)

Helping After Neonatal Death (HAND) is a California support group for late pregnancy loss and neonatal loss. Its website features fact sheets and information about local groups in northern California. The group also offers two in-person support groups as well as phone support for grieving parents.

Even if you are not a California native, the HAND website provides support, including letters addressed to parents, friends , and family, and even health care professionals who are facing the grief which accompanies stillbirth and neonatal death.

 

The Ectopic Pregnancy Trust

The Ectopic Pregnancy Trust is a group sponsored by London’s King College Hospital. The website has information on the causes and treatment of ectopic pregnancy, as well as support forums. The group supports research into early diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy and means of prevention.

The website (of course, easily accessible to those outside the UK) has abundant resources with information on a number of topics surrounding ectopic pregnancy. It even has information for dad’s and ectopic pregnancy, recognizing the difficulties faced by those who are “so close but yet so far.”3

Tommy’s

Tommy’s functions as something of a UK-based March of Dimes equivalent. The group has information on how to have a healthy pregnancy and prevent any preventable stillbirths or preterm births. The group also supports research on miscarriage prevention and causes.

Warmline – MHAW – Association for Mental Health and Wellness – Healing Connections Peer Support – Weekdays @ Phone
May 27 all-day
Healing Connections Guiding Principles and Core Values shared below
PEER SUPPORT LINE
631-471-7242 ext. 1217
Monday – Friday 9am -5pm (EST)
if you reach our voicemail we are on the other line,
please leave us a message
and
PEER SUPPORT GROUP
Monday – Friday 12pm – 1:30pm (EST)
please register for Support Group, updates, and information:
Healing Connections Peer Support Group
available online or by phone:
At the time of meeting, access our online Peer Support Group by
On our website:
Access by http://mhaw.org/programs/online-peer-support-groups/ and clicking on: “Click here to join the online support group.” at the time of the meeting
You may be prompted to download the “Zoom” app the first time you log in. You will have the option of using the audio from your device/computer, or from a telephone.
You may also call in to join this meeting by phone:
1 929 205 6099
Meeting ID: 350 838 4591
or
Find your local number: https://zoom.us/u/ab49ZfkmGG
If our group is full, or if one is late
they may not gain access.
For one-to-one telephone mutual support:
PEER SUPPORT LINE
Monday – Friday 9am – 5pm
631-471-7242 ext. 1217
if you reach our voicemail, we are on the other line
please leave us a message and we will return your call
Questions or Reflections:

 

Warmline – MHAW – Association for Mental Health and Wellness – Healing Connections Peer Support Line – (631) 471-7242 ext 1217 – Weekdays – 6am-2pm (PST) @ Phone
May 27 all-day
May
28
Sat
AM – All Month – Eating and/or Body Image Struggles – Resources for Peer Support, Recovery & Wellness
May 28 all-day
Eating Problems 
Body Image Struggles, Wellness, Support
A 12-step recovery program

https://www.foodaddicts.org/

Food addiction can take many forms. Symptoms include obesity, under eating, and bulimia. People often think of the term “eating disorders” when describing the disease of food addiction. Food addicts are obsessed with food, body size, and weight. We spend our days thinking about when and what we are going to eat or not eat. Binging, purging, and dieting are a way of life. The bottom line is that we can’t stop thinking about eating. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) offers relief from the symptoms of eating disorders and guidance on living in recovery.


ANAD – National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders
https://anad.org/get-help/
ANAD is committed to providing free, peer support services to anyone struggling with an eating disorder Our free, eating disorders Helpline is available for treatment referrals, support and encouragement, and general questions about eating disorders.
Call the Helpline // 888.375.7767
Support Group // Find a Support Group
Peer Mentors // Request a Mentor
 
Treatment // Search our national directory
Our Helpline is available Monday-Friday, 9am-9pm CST. We will return messages left outside these hours.
NEDA – National Eating Disorders Association
NEDA: External link  list of virtual support groups for different time zones offered by multiple organizations dedicated to eating disorder recovery across the United States.
CONTACT THE NEDA HELPLINE
  1. Online chat

    Online Chat

    Monday—Thursday 9am—9pm ET

    Friday 9am—5pm ET

  1. Call NEDA's eating disorders helpline

    Call

    (800) 931-2237

    Monday—Thursday 11am—9pm ET

    Friday 11am—5pm ET

    Translation services are available on the phone.

  1. Call NEDA's eating disorders helpline

    Text

    (800) 931-2237

    Pilot hours: Monday—Thursday 3pm—6pm ET

https://eatingdisorderfoundation.org/get-help/support-groups/

Eating Disorder Foundation Support Groups, Eating Disorder Foundation: External link  list of recurring virtual support groups for people recovering from eating disorders, as well as family members and friends who are supporting someone through recovery.

https://www.feast-ed.org/around-the-dinner-table-forum/

Around the Dinner Table Forum, FEAST: External link  online community of parents of eating disorder patients around the world.  [note, I would say parents/caregivers of family members or persons experiencing eating struggles or struggling with eating, not patients!]

https://www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk/sanctuary

The Sanctuary, Beat Eating Disorders: External link  information about an online chat room for U.K. residents recovering from an eating disorder.

https://rockrecoveryed.org/coffee-conversations-for-moms/

Coffee and Conversations for Moms, Rock Recovery: External link  monthly virtual support group for mothers who are recovering from an eating disorder.

https://centerfordiscovery.com/groups/

Free Eating Disorder and Mental Health Support Groups, Center for Discovery Eating Disorder Treatment: External link  free platform for peer-based support groups for anyone who has been affected by an eating disorder or seeking mental health support.

ARFID (Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder) / Duke University

  Support Group NameDuke ARFID Parent Education Group
  Contact Name Chantal Gil
Meeting Location  Virtual through our community website. Members must first sign up for a free membership to our website, and then they can register for a group. (https://eatingdisorders.dukehealth.org/)

Pro-Recovery Support Group, Monday Evenings

7:00 PM EST /4:00 PM PST

Pro-Recovery Support Group, Saturday Mornings

11:00 AM EST/ 8:00 AM PST

Pro-Recovery support groups are open to individuals, ages 18+, who are  experiencing and/or are on the journey to recovery from an eating disorder.

Register here.

Family and Friends Group, Wednesday Evenings

7:00 PM EST /4:00 PM PST

https://18percent.org

18percent is a free online community based off Slack, where one can receive peer to peer support. 18percent has channels on various mental health issues, one of which is eating disorders. They offer free, 24/7 eating disorder support in a moderated environment. For more information, click the link below and sign up.

Click Here to Learn More

The main aim of EDRC is to increase awareness and understanding of eating disorders for the public and for health professionals; to promote early diagnosis, effective treatment, and recovery; and to advocate for mental health parity legislation and effective insurance coverage. We collaborate with other organizations such as National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) in our effort to bring the needed attention to eating disorders.

The Lotus Collaborative: Online Eating Disorder Recovery Support Group

This group is for anyone struggling with an eating disorder to get recovery support as well as to practice giving recovery support to others. While this is not a therapy group, it is a supportive virtual environment in which to meet others working towards recovery, build relationships, gain insight, and practice recovery skills. ​Everyone working towards eating disorder recovery is welcome.

Where: This group will take place via Zoom Room Meetings (Phone app or web browser). Sign up at https://www.thelotuscollaborative.com/online-eating-disorder-recovery-support-group.html

When: Every Sunday, 1pm – 2:30pm

Contact: email: info@thelotuscollaborative.com or set up a consultation: https://www.thelotuscollaborative.com/contact-us.html

The Lotus Collaborative: Online Supporters Group

The Lotus Collaborative hosts a free online support group for the friends and family members supporting a loved one through eating disorder recovery. This group is a space for family members and friends to get support, ask questions and connect with others in the supporting role.

Where: This group will take place via Zoom Room Meetings (Phone app or web browser). Sign up at https://www.thelotuscollaborative.com/online-supporters-group.html

When: ​Every Thursday, 6pm – 7pm PST

Contact: email: info@thelotuscollaborative.com or set up a consultation: https://www.thelotuscollaborative.com/contact-us.html

AM – All Month – TQC -The Q Center – Virtual, Diverse Support Groups for People in the LGBTQ+ Community @ Online Regerster for Details
May 28 all-day

Sponsor Logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The Q Center: Out of Portland OR, Continues To Offer Several Virtual, Diverse Support Groups for People in the LGBTQ+ Community:

As the largest LGBTQ+ community center in the Pacific Northwest, Q Center proudly serves the LGBTQ2SIA+ communities of Portland Metro and Southwest Washington. Our drop-in and event space on North Mississippi Avenue is a frequent first stop for new arrivals in Portland, and for longtime residents who are newly out or questioning their sexual or gender identity.

Q Center also serves as an information hub for friends, partners, community, and family members of LGBTQ2SIA+ individuals. We pride ourselves on our collaborative approach and seek out ways to share resources with other nonprofits and public institutions locally and statewide.

 

To learn about the many groups offered by the Q Center, here is the link to their calendar page: https://www.pdxqcenter.org/calendar.

To register for any of these groups please either email info@pdxqcenter.org, or call 503-234-7837.  

BRMA – Brown Mamas – The Ultimate List of Support Groups for Black Moms
May 28 all-day

 

The Ultimate List of Support Groups for Black Moms

Brown Mamas – Pittsburgh & U.S.  – Brown Mamas, Inc. has been around for seven years in the Pittsburgh region.  Brown Mamas began in the living room of Muffy Mendoza.  What started as 5 moms has grown to over 4000  Our mamas love our Pittsburgh chapter so much that we are expanding.  If you are mom who is ready to not just find her tribe, but to inspire other mothers and be the change she wants to see in her community, click here to learn more about starting your own Brown Mamas chapter.

Black Moms Connect – Canada & U.S.

Mommin’ Society – North Carolina & Online

Moms of Black Boys United – Atlanta & Online

Moms Make It Work – NYC

Mocha Moms, Inc. – U.S. (seriously, everywhere)

Whine & Cheese – 27 Chapters in U.S. (including D.C., PA, South Carolina, New York, etc.)

Black Women Do Breastfeed

Motherwork by Mater Mea – NYC

Beautiful Brown Girls Brunch Club – New Jersey

District Motherhued’s DMV MomTribe – D.C. Metro Area

Soul Food for Your Baby – Hawthorne, Calif.

Black Moms Blog Events – Atlanta, GA

Birthing Beautiful Communities – Cleveland, OH

Tessera Collective – Online, Self-Care Support

Melanin Mommies – Pittsburgh, PA

Pittsburgh Black Breastfeeding Circle –

Not-So Melinated Support Groups for Black Moms

Moms Club

La Leche League

Circle of Moms

Meetup.com

Facebook Support Groups for Black Moms

Black Stay-At-Home Mom Village

Black Moms Connection

Black Moms in Charge

Single Black Mothers

Moms of Black Daughters

Moms of Black Sons

Black Moms in College & Beyond

Breast Milk Donation for Black Moms

Sisterhood for Young Black Moms

CGAA – Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous – Support Meetings, Support Chat for Family and Friends, Resources – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online Via ZOOM
May 28 all-day

 

Who We Are

Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous is a fellowship of people who support each other in recovering from the problems resulting from excessive game playing. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop video gaming, which is completely up to you. CGAA has no dues or fees. Our groups share their collective experience and the principles that helped them, but CGAA has no experts, hierarchy, or required beliefs. We have etiquette and traditions, but no strict rules.
If you are struggling with compulsive gaming, leave your contact info at 970-364-3497 and a CGAA member will call you back
Or email us at helpline@cgaa.info
For other issues, contact us at support@cgaa.info

 

ZOOM MEETINGS

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 
ZOOM MEETING

All family and friends of compulsive gamers welcome

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83671786251

Meeting ID: 836 7178 6251

One tap mobile
+13017158592,,83671786251# US (Washington DC)
+13126266799,,83671786251# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 826 013 5782
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/k0jt3FGFs

 

Gamers Find A Local Support Group

Use the link below to get more information about local groups and a notification when a local meeting is started. Due to the COVID pandemic, most meetings are currently held in an outdoor setting or online.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LOCAL GROUP FINDER TOOL

 

CONTACT GROUPS IN OREGON BY LOCATION

 

 

SUPPORT FOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS

What Can I Do?

Video gaming is a common pastime. To many people, it is surprising that it can become a serious addiction, that is, an activity that is engaged in compulsively, without control or concern for consequences.

Video gaming addiction is a very serious problem that is harmful to everyone it touches. Since everyone involved suffers from it, everyone involved needs some help. Here are some important things to know.

First, no one is responsible for someone else’s compulsive gaming. As the Al-Anon slogan goes, “I didn’t cause it, I can’t control it, and I can’t cure it.”

You didn’t cause it.

Some people partly blame themselves for the dysfunctional behavior of their family members, particularly with addicts who are very quick to shift responsibility off themselves and blame others. Perhaps you played games with your loved one, purchased games, or encouraged it, thinking it was a harmless leisure activity. Maybe you’ve been involved in some conflict and wonder if that has driven him or her to hide away in gaming. But no one is responsible for another person’s behavior or mental disorders.

You can’t control it.

You may have already tried to talk to your friend or family member. Perhaps you have bargained with them, or given ultimatums. You have tried to help them see what damage they are doing to themselves and others. And none of it has worked. This is baffling to you. Why don’t they seem to understand or care? Why can’t they see what is obvious to you? This is actually a symptom of the disease of addiction, one that destines efforts for control to failure.

You can’t cure it.

We all would like to believe that we have the ability to help those we love. We often think that if we can just get the right information, figure out the right thing to say or do, perhaps change something about ourselves, we can fix the problem. People should be able to solve their own problems. Why can’t we do that with this one? There is a simple reason. There is no cure for addiction. It requires treatment. The recovery process is long and difficult. And there is only one person who can start that process, the one who is gaming compulsively. There are things you can do. Here are some suggestions that you may want to consider, that other family members and friends have found helpful.

Get information.

The literature of recovery fellowships for family and friends of addicts (such as Al-Anon) has much helpful guidance, some of which is available online as well. There are people who have been in situations very similar to yours, who have learned much from them, and who are willing to share the lessons learned, their experience, strength and hope. We hope you avail yourself of such resources.

Detach with love.

Putting energy into arguing with someone who is playing compulsively will not help either of you. Your loved one has a serious problem that you are powerless to control or cure, and that they will not get help until they want it. As much as you love someone, you cannot force this process on another person.

Stop enabling.

Paradoxically, at the same time people are arguing with, bargaining with or shaming a compulsive gamer, they are often (perhaps without realizing it) supporting the addiction in many ways. Anything that shields an addict from the consequences of his or her behavior is enabling, and can include such basic things as providing food, shelter, money, companionship, housekeeping, and covering for employment and legal difficulties. Helping a compulsive gamer keep up an appearance of normalcy is helping him or her continue in the destructive behavior. While you cannot change him or her, you can make changes for yourself. You can shift your energy away from enabling behaviors and toward meeting your own needs.

Take care of yourself.

Whether or not your loved one ever stops gaming, you deserve to have a healthy and happy life. Once you have accepted that you are powerless over their gaming behavior, you can begin to focus on what you can do for yourself, to accomplish your own goals. With the help of others who have been where you are, you can learn to set healthy boundaries and stick to them.

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Things To Do Instead of Gaming

One of the things we were trying to do with our gaming was meet some basic needs. If we do not meet those needs in normal healthy ways, we will suffer much stronger urges to game again. Some basic needs to cover are social needs, self expression, creativity, a sense of challenge and accomplishment, stress relief, a sense of purpose and meaning, and a sense of safety through control and predictability.

Here are some ideas for activities that will help meet these needs, reduce cravings, help with recovery from addiction, and fill some of the hours freed from compulsive gaming.

Please don’t let the length of this list overwhelm you. The idea is not to start ten new things and try to change everything all at once. We seek small bits of progress, not perfection. A good place to start is to put first things first. What need is currently most important? What’s right in front of me? What opportunity has come my way recently? If we take steps of small improvement with one or two areas each day, we are moving in the right direction.

Stress Relief

  • Talking with a sponsor or recovery buddy, CGAA meetings, or step work
  • Getting outside for fresh air and sunlight by taking a walk or doing some outdoor work
  • Meditation, coloring, craft work, journaling, or reading

Sense of safety through freedom, control, and predictability

  • Goal setting
  • Counseling or psychotherapy
  • Home organization, renovation, or spring cleaning

Sense of purpose, meaning, and self-respect

  • Supporting and growing the larger CGAA fellowship through service work like helping run a meeting, starting a local meeting, doing outreach to professionals, or attending CGAA business meetings
  • Attending a spiritual group like meditation, yoga, spiritual retreat, or religious gathering
  • Doing volunteer work like teaching, helping others, animal care, or building community places
  • Caring for a pet, house plants, or garden

Social needs

  • Attending CGAA meetings, connecting outside of meetings, reaching out to newcomers, or calling someone
  • Joining a hobby group like theater, a hiking group, art workshop, book club, public speaking, board games or card game group
  • Hosting a fun event like board games night or karaoke
  • Playing team sports, taking up martial arts, or playing one-on-one sports
  • Going to fun events like concerts, dances, or events on meetup.com
  • Calling up, video conferencing, or visiting with friends, family, neighbors, or other communities

Self expression and creativity

  • Journaling, opening up to a CGAA sponsor, or sharing openly in a meeting
  • Art work like drawing, photography, sculpting, or creative writing
  • Performance art like theater, singing, playing music, or writing music

Sense of challenge and accomplishment

  • Working the steps with a sponsor
  • Crafts like woodworking, origami, knitting
  • Outdoor activities like gardening, geocaching, bird watching, star gazing, tracking, plant identification, survival skills, or boating
  • Learning something like a foreign language, dancing, magic tricks, mechanical repair, cooking, a musical instrument, or computer programming
  • Career goals like getting a new job, starting a business, enrolling in school, or taking classes

Reconnection to one’s body and whole self

  • Meditating on breath, sounds, or bodily sensations
  • Exercise like walking, hiking, swimming, cycling, yoga, jogging, going to a gym, or playing a sport

If you are in your first week or two off of games, it’s likely that few of these ideas will appeal to you. That’s normal. Until our minds and bodies have some time to heal, we have low interest, energy, and motivation. This list will probably not give you something that you can plug in place of video games and immediately throw yourself into with the same zeal. This list is meant to help us explore new ways of spending our time, meeting our needs, and connecting with people. Find a few that hold some appeal and try taking some small steps in their direction. If you can’t seem to think of anything fun to do except game, you can come back to this list, find the most appealing thing, and just take a couple of little steps in its direction.

Consider setting reminders for yourself or keeping a schedule of your time and new activities. It is important to appreciate the small victories of exercising willpower, regaining motivation, and socializing. It helps to discuss our progress and the challenges we experience with a CGAA sponsor, recovery buddy, personal counselor, or therapist.

Rediscovering What is Fun

It is normal to think that nothing but gaming sounds fun. For most of us, our years of compulsive gaming warped and narrowed our idea of fun. As small children, it meant almost anything new or interesting or social or even mildly rewarding. Years of pulling the dopamine lever with video games changed our concept of fun to require instant gratification, frequent rewards, clear and constant progress, excitement, intense visuals, control, and/or predictability.

Part of recovery is letting our concept of fun expand back outward to a wide world of possible new challenges and experiences, many of which are calm and subtle compared to video games. It takes time to overcome withdrawals and heal from the damage, but the change does happen if we abstain from all gaming long term and focus on new pursuits and improving our lives. This list has many activities that do not meet the old, narrow, warped idea of “fun,” but those of us who persist at exploring them do find many to be gratifying and enjoyable.

Take, for example, a hike up a mountain. To a group of hikers excited to venture into the wilderness with friends and see wildlife and panoramic views from on high, all while getting a great workout, it’s a ton of fun. To someone who is uninterested in hiking, out of shape, and focused on every little unpleasant aspect of it, it’s a torturous death march. It is exactly the same hike in either case. The difference is in the attitude and conditioning.

The same is true with every item of these lists. Whether or not an activity sounds fun or torturous depends entirely upon attitude and conditioning. Every one of them has the potential to be gratifying and enjoyable if we adopt a positive attitude, try to have fun, and persist at it, especially when we involve friends and like-minded people.

NWI – North West Insituto – Online Recovery Meetings – Narcotics Anonymous and Alcoholics Anonymous – Mondays, Wednesday, Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays @ Online Via ZOOM
May 28 all-day

 

 

NA—Narcotics Anonymous “Sorority” (women only)

Online

Monday and Thursday 10-11:30am

Zoom ID – 595 167 4496

Code – 3hQ4ij

NA-Narcotics Anonymous “Breaking the Chains”.

Online

Sunday 2-3pm

Zoom ID – 636 542 9919

Code – 4127

AA-Alcoholics Anonymous “El Reencuentro” (The Reunion)

Online

Monday, Wednesday, & Saturday 7-8:30pm

Zoom ID – 636 542 9919

Code – No code

NW Instituto Latino

Telephone: 503-719-7609

E-mail address:  INFO@NWILPDX.COM

Mailing AddressPO Box: 92070, Portland OR 97266
Physical address is: 10209 SE Division BLDG: B Suite: 100, Portland, OR 97206The Recovery Center is located behind the main building at the west end of the parking lot**
PSI – Postpartum Support International – Maternal Depression Support Groups and Educational Resources – Online @ Regester for Details
May 28 all-day

Sponsor

 

Event Banner

 

Maternal Depression Support Groups and Educational  Resources

On-line

Peer Support Groups & More! Postpartum

Support International (PSI) Weekly Support Groups: PSI facilitates a wide variety of postpartum support groups every week for diverse populations, and all family members.

PSI also staffs a non-emergency helpline for education and support:  The number is 1-800-944-4773. PSI also offers a free peer mentor program where Mons or Dads can work 1-1 with a peer mentor once per week for up to 6 months.

Link to webpage for specific support groups, dates and times: 

https://www.postpartum.net/get-help/psi-online-support-meetings/

 

West Coast On-line Peer Support Forum:

Postpartum Progress Hosts Regional, On-line Forums for Maternal Depression and/or Anxiety:

These regional forums are moderated by volunteer Warrior Mom® Ambassadors who have completed Mental Health First Aid training.

Link to webpage to select a particular region, including West Coast (includes Oregon):

https://postpartumprogress.com/postpartum-progdress-online-peer-support

 

Oregon On-line Peer Support Groups: 

Free peer support groups and discussion forums, moderated by, “Well Mama,” for mothers and families on a wide variety of topics related to pregnancy and postpartum mental health.

Link to register:  https://www.wellmamaoregon.com/support/

 

 On-line Maternal Depression Education Resources:  

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH): NIMH provides a comprehensive, downloadable educational manual about Postpartum (Perinatal) Depression. 

Link to the webpage to download this educational material: 

https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/perinatal-depression/index.shtml

 

Oregon Health Authority (OHA):

OHA provides a wide variety of educational materials on pregnancy and postpartum depression for both mothers and family members.

Link to this information: 

https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/HealthyPeopleFamilies/Women/MaternalMentalHealth/Pages/index.aspx

RTG – Recover Together with Google – Online Recovery Meetings Finder, Locator Map, Links and Resources – Weekdays & Weekends
May 28 all-day

 

 

Together we are stronger

Even when apart, our voices are united. The #RecoveryMovement celebrates the 23 million Americans recovering from addiction, and paves the way for the 20 million still struggling to seek treatment. Our voices matter.

For people seeking and/or in recovery

COVID-19 has changed the way we can gather and meet. Some support group meetings have changed to fully virtual, while other meetings are hybrids-a combination of digital and in-person participants who can all see and hear each other. Since requirements and practices vary by region, we’ve created a locator tool that you can use to find your nearest support group or recovery chapter (e.g. AA or NA). To use the tool, simply enter a zip code into the search bar and choose a support group (e.g. AA). Information for groups closest to that area will be displayed – if no local resources are available, the nearest available resources, e.g. state/national, will be shown instead.

Meeting Locator Map

This map contains links to external resources that are not operated or maintained by Google.

Use the following link to access the map and find meetings in your area.

https://recovertogether.withgoogle.com/ 

To report an inaccuracy or missing resource, email recover-together@google.com

Selected Recovery Group Links: 

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)   https://aa-intergroup.org/
Al-Anon Family Groups   https://al-anon.org/al-anon-meetings/electronic-meetings/
Cocaine Anonymous  https://ca.org/meetings/
Co-Dependents Anonymous   https://coda.org/find-a-meeting/online-meetings/
Crystal Meth Anonymous  https://www.crystalmeth.org/cma-meetings.html
Families Anonymous  https://www.familiesanonymous.org/meetings/virtual-meetings/
Heroin Anonymous  https://heroinanonymous.org/covid-19/
LifeRing Secular Recovery   https://www.lifering.org/online-meeting-schedule
Marijuana Anonymous  https://marijuana-anonymous.org/find-a-meeting/
Narcotics Anonymous (NA)  https://na.org/?ID=virtual_meetings
Parents of Addicted Loved Ones  https://meetings.palgroup.org/meetings
Partnership to End Addiction  https://drugfree.org/article/online-support-community-for-parents-caregivers/
Recovery Dharma   https://recoverydharma.online/
Refuge Recovery  https://refugerecovery.org/meetings?tsml-day=any&tsml-region=online-english
SMART Recovery  https://www.smartrecovery.org/community/
The Phoenix  https://thephoenix.org/find-a-class/
Wellbriety meetings  http://whitebison.org/wellbriety-online-meetings/
YPR Chapters’ All Recovery Meetings   http://youngpeopleinrecovery.org/virtual-event-schedule/Online Telehealth Drug Rehab Facilities  https://drugrehabus.org/rehabs/treatment/online-telehealth/

For additional listings, use the locator Map.

Looking for a different group?

Try the Online meetings list  to find virtual meeting options throughout the globe.

There are additional resources that you can connect with, including a Facebook group owned and moderated by the Voices Project. You are not alone.

Support resources for family and friends

Online meetings

Resources for supporting your loved ones

Voices for recovery

Many communities, one message

One in fourteen Americans is in recovery from addiction. A group ranging from a Google employee in California to a recovery community organizer in Baltimore, shared their stories of addiction, recovery, and community to help break the stigma and end the silence.

 

SARDAA – Schizophrenia and Related Disorders Alliance of America – Conference Calls and Online Meetings @ Online via Zoom
May 28 all-day

logo

Improving Lives Affected by Psychosis, Schizophrenia and Related Disorders Alliance of America

You are Not Alone

Our vision is that every person living with a schizophrenia-related brain disorder achieves recovery and fulfilling life in a compassionate community free of stigma and discrimination.

SARDAA invites you to attend its meetings and/or conference calls (peer support and family support)

Online and in-person support groups and conference calls are available.

SARDAA in-person meetings are ON HOLD until further notice at this time due to the pandemic.

Find SARDAA meeting locations, groups, and conference call information at this web page:

https://sardaa.org/schizophrenia-alliance/sa-group-locations/

To register for conference call groups, visit this link: 

https://sardaa.org/call-registration/

Current conference call group times include:

Sundays 4pm PST / 7pm EST

Mondays 1pm PST / 4pm EST

Tuesdays 10am PST / 1pm EST

Wednesdays 10am PST / 1pm EST

Thursdays 10am PST / 1pm EST and 4pm PST / 7pm EST

Fridays 11am PST / 2pm EST and 4pm PST / 7pm EST

Saturdays 10am PST / 1pm EST

Families / Caregivers Conference Call Group

Tuesdays 4pm PST / 7pm EST – Families for Care Support Conference Call Group

Online meetings via ZOOM are also offered including:

Saturdays 9am PST / 12pm EST – SA: Psychosis Support & Acceptance

Sundays 1pm PST / 4pm EST – SA: Psychosis Support & Acceptance

Tuesdays 4:30pm PST / 7:30pm EST – Spanish / Espanol Meeting

Families / Caregivers Online meetings via ZOOM

Wednesdays 3pm PST / 6pm EST

Sundays 11am PST / 2pm EST

Fridays (1st and 3rd monthly) 6pm PST / 9pm EST – Spanish / Espanol Family / Caregiver Support Meetings

Additional Contact Information

Toll Free:

800-493-2094

Phone:

240-423-9432     

Email:

info@sardaa.org

Website:

https://www.sardaa.org

Social Media Facebook Page: 

https://www.facebook.com/sardaaorg

Social Media Twitter Feed:

https://twitter.com/sardaa_org

TDC – The Dougy Center – National Center for Grieving Children and Families – Support Groups
May 28 all-day

Dougy Center: The National Center for Grieving Children and Families

logo

Website: https://www.dougy.org

Phone: 503-775-5683

Phone Toll Free: 866-775-5683

Email: help@dougy.org

A safe place to talk. A safe place to listen.

People grieving a death often feel like no one understands what they’re going through. And truthfully, no one’s grief is exactly same. But people tell us the help they appreciate most comes from sharing with others who are also grieving a death.

Our children’s support groups are designed around age, type of death, and the connection to the person who died. Parent/adult caregiver groups run at the same time as the children’s support groups. Around 500 children and 350 adult family members come to our groups each month. Each person decides how long he or she wants to be at The Dougy Center.

In the groups, there is no right or wrong way to be. Nobody will tell you it’s time to move on. Or that an emotion you have is wrong or inappropriate. Here, through talking and listening, you’re free to find hope and comfort in your own personal way. Children can express themselves through play, music, art, games, and sharing.

Our unique approach, using peer group support to help people discover their own way through grief, has made The Dougy Center a worldwide leader in the field. More than 500 programs based on our model now thrive in the U.S., Canada, Africa, Australia, Europe and Japan. Our guidebooks assist parents, schools and others who deal with children affected by death, and our children’s activity books provide them an outlet for expression.

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, The Dougy Center is hosting virtual support groups for our bereavement and Pathways programs. If your family lives in the Portland metro area and would like to participate, please call 503.775.5683 or email help@dougy.org.

At The Dougy Center we realize that:

  • Grief is a natural reaction to death;
  • Each individual has a natural capacity to heal from loss;
  • Duration and intensity of grief are unique to each individual; and
  • Caring and acceptance assist in the healing process.

Support Group FAQs

https://www.dougy.org/grief-resources/faqs/

Bill of Rights for Grieving Teens

https://www.dougy.org/grief-resources/bill-of-rights/

Orientation

Orientation lasts approximately one hour. During that time, adults and children/teens are broken into separate groups where we explain the program. Questions are answered, and everyone is given a tour. Children and teens watch a Dougy Center video produced by the TV program 20/20. The adults learn about how to have a child or teen begin participation at the Center and receive all the application forms. Coming to an orientation does not mean the child/teen becomes a participant. We encourage the adults to allow the children and teens to make the final decision for themselves.

Pathways Groups

https://www.dougy.org/grief-resources/pathways/

Spanish Support (Esperanza: Grupos en Espanol):

https://www.dougy.org/grief-resources/esperanza-spanish-support-group/

LYGHT Groups – Listening and Led by Youth in Foster Care: Grief, Hope, and Transitions

At the core of the L.Y.G.H.T. program, we aim to raise awareness about how grieving youth in foster care experience marginalization on various levels, create ways to provide trauma-informed peer support to youth in foster care, and promote the importance of moving the child welfare community toward a grief-informed holistic model of care.

“It helps you to feel like you are not alone. They are also going through something as well and you can help each other.” – L.Y.G.H.T. program participant

https://www.dougy.org/grief-resources/lyght/

Grief Support Groups in Oregon listed with Dougy Center for those not in Portland:

19 places based on search at:  https://www.dougy.org/grief-support-programs/


*Cason’s Place: Grief Support for Children and Families of Eastern Oregon

1416 SE Court Avenue
PO Box 1142
Pendleton, Oregon 97801

p: (541) 612.0828
www.casonsplace.org


*Blue Mountain Hospice

422 West Main
John Day, Oregon 97845

p: (541) 575-1648
www.bluemountainhospital.org


*Vange John Memorial Hospice/Good Shepherd Medical Center

645 W. Orchard Avenue, Suite 300
Hermiston, Oregon 97838

p: (541) 667-3543
f: (541) 667-3544
www.gshealth.org/hospice/


Benton Hospice Service

2350 NW Professional Drive
Corvallis, Oregon 97330

p: (541) 757-9616
p: (800) 898-9616
f: (541) 757-1760
www.bentonhospice.org


*SHELL: Support and Healing for Early Life Losses

Mt. Hood Hospice
PO Box 1269
39641 Scenic Street
Sandy, Oregon 97055

p: (503) 668-5545
f: (503) 668-5545
www.mthoodhospice.org


Me Too. and Company

PO Box 10796
Portland, Oregon 97296

p: (503) 228-2104
www.oregonhospice.org


*Mercy Medical Center Hospice

Wings of Hope
2400 Stewart Parkway
Roseburg, Oregon 97470

p: (541) 677-2384
f: (541) 440-0761


*Courageous Kids/Hospice of Sacred Heart

1121 Fairfield Ave
Eugene, Oregon 97402

p: (541) 461-7577
f: (541) 461-7697
www.peacehealth.org


Mourning Resources Inc.

PO Box 82573
Portland, Oregon 97202

p: (503) 777-0433


*Light House Center

1620 Thompson Rd
Coos Bay, Oregon 97420

p: (541) 269-2986
f: (541) 267-0458


Good Grief – Lovejoy Hospice

939 SE 8th St
Grants Pass, Oregon 97526

p: (541) 474-1193
p: (888) 758-8569
f: (541) 474-3035
www.lovejoyhospice.org


*Douglas Community Hospital

738 W Harvard
Roseburg, Oregon 97470

p: (541) 673-6641


Partners in Care

2075 NE Wyatt Ct
Bend, Oregon 97701

p: (541) 382-5882
www.partnersbend.org/bend-hospice-services/childrens-grief-support/


My Friends House Inc.

1293 Wall Street #1339
PMB 1339
Bend, Oregon 97701

p: (541) 382-5882
www.partnersbend.org/bend-hospice-services/childrens-grief-support/


St. Anthony Hospital Hospice

3001 St. Anthony Way, Level 2
Pendleton, Oregon 97801

p: (541) 276-4100
f: (541) 276-4103
www.sahpendleton.org/services/hospice/


Compassionate Friends Portland Chapter

PO Box 3065
Portland, Oregon 97208-3065

p: (503) 248-0102
www.portlandtcf.org/home.aspx


*Winterspring

PO Box 8169
Medford, Oregon 97501

p: (541) 772-2527
www.winterspring.org


*Willamette Valley Hospice

Willamette Valley Hospice
1015 3rd Street NW
Salem, Oregon 97304

p: (503) 588-3600
p: (800) 555-2431
f: (503) 363-3891
www.wvh.org


The Dougy Center

3909 SE 52nd Avenue
Portland, Oregon 97206

p: 503 775-5683
f: 503 777-3097
dougy.org

VWF – Very Well Family – Pregnancy Loss Support Organizations
May 28 all-day

Pregnancy Loss Support Organizations

Miscarriage, Stillbirth, and Ectopic Pregnancy Support Groups

If you have suffered a miscarriage, stillbirth, or ectopic pregnancy and need an extra source of support, or if you wish to do something to help further miscarriage awareness, there is help out there. A number of nonprofit organizations around the world aim to spread awareness of pregnancy and infant loss and offer support services. Some are regional in focus but others have a national and even international reach. The following is a list of some of the major pregnancy loss awareness organizations.

 

Share Pregnancy and Infant Loss Support

women in support group for pregnancy loss
Steve Debenport/E+/Getty Images

Share Pregnancy and Infant Loss Support was established in 1977 and has been active in numerous pregnancy loss advocacy and awareness activities including everything from promoting the rights of parents to bury their miscarried babies, to organizing support groups around the nation. The organization’s website contains a collection of support resources as well as a list of regional support groups. If no support group is in your area, Share can also advise you on how to start one

March of Dimes

The March of Dimes is one of the most well-known and well-established organizations focusing on pregnancy health. March of Dimes has a lot of information on the causes and possible prevention of premature birth, a leading cause of infant death, and it is involved in numerous advocacy efforts to drive research into ways to prevent birth defects and infant death.

As a start, every woman who is pregnant should be aware of the risk factors for premature birth as well as the signs and symptoms of premature labor.1

International Stillbirth Alliance (ISA)

The International Stillbirth Alliance (ISA) is a coalition of stillbirth awareness groups and organizations that work to promote stillbirth research and awareness of stillbirth. The group offers support resources for parents as well as information about ongoing research into stillbirth.

The Miscarriage Association

The Miscarriage Association is a UK-based support association that offers many resources to help families cope with miscarriage and to spread awareness of miscarriage. They use the general term miscarriage but include support for those who have had an ectopic pregnancy or molar pregnancy as well. The group has a network of support volunteers who can lend a listening ear

The miscarriage association also provides information to help people better understand everything from the tests done to look for a miscarriage, to information on “trying again” after your loss.

Sands

Sands stands for Stillbirth and Neonatal Death Support. This group is based in the UK, but Sands has chapters in countries around the world. The group offers support to all individuals affected by stillbirth or loss of a newborn infant, and its website includes information on local groups and advocacy opportunities.

Sands also recognizes the importance of bereavement care,2 which has, unfortunately, been addressed to a less degree than the symptoms and treatment of pregnancy loss.

The Compassionate Friends

The Compassionate Friends (TCF) is not exclusively focused on pregnancy loss but focuses on providing support for bereaved families who are grieving the death of a child. The group does offer information and support for pregnancy loss of any kind.

MISS Foundation

The MISS Foundation focuses on crisis support and other aid to families grieving the loss of a child. The group is not exclusively focused on pregnancy loss but is involved in a lot of activities related to miscarriage and stillbirth awareness, such as the MISSing Angels Bills that have been considered or passed in many U.S. states with the idea of granting parents the right to receive a state-issued certificate of stillbirth recognizing the loss of a baby to stillbirth.

Center for Loss in Multiple Birth (CLIMB)

The Center for Loss in Multiple Birth (CLIMB) offers support to parents who have lost babies in multiple pregnancies, including those who have lost all babies in the pregnancy as well as those who have lost one twin.

The site offers fact sheets aimed at dads, grandparents, siblings, and survivors as well as information about research into this type of pregnancy loss.

Helping After Neonatal Death (HAND)

Helping After Neonatal Death (HAND) is a California support group for late pregnancy loss and neonatal loss. Its website features fact sheets and information about local groups in northern California. The group also offers two in-person support groups as well as phone support for grieving parents.

Even if you are not a California native, the HAND website provides support, including letters addressed to parents, friends , and family, and even health care professionals who are facing the grief which accompanies stillbirth and neonatal death.

 

The Ectopic Pregnancy Trust

The Ectopic Pregnancy Trust is a group sponsored by London’s King College Hospital. The website has information on the causes and treatment of ectopic pregnancy, as well as support forums. The group supports research into early diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy and means of prevention.

The website (of course, easily accessible to those outside the UK) has abundant resources with information on a number of topics surrounding ectopic pregnancy. It even has information for dad’s and ectopic pregnancy, recognizing the difficulties faced by those who are “so close but yet so far.”3

Tommy’s

Tommy’s functions as something of a UK-based March of Dimes equivalent. The group has information on how to have a healthy pregnancy and prevent any preventable stillbirths or preterm births. The group also supports research on miscarriage prevention and causes.

Warmline – MHAW – Association for Mental Health and Wellness – Healing Connections Peer Support – Weekdays @ Phone
May 28 all-day
Healing Connections Guiding Principles and Core Values shared below
PEER SUPPORT LINE
631-471-7242 ext. 1217
Monday – Friday 9am -5pm (EST)
if you reach our voicemail we are on the other line,
please leave us a message
and
PEER SUPPORT GROUP
Monday – Friday 12pm – 1:30pm (EST)
please register for Support Group, updates, and information:
Healing Connections Peer Support Group
available online or by phone:
At the time of meeting, access our online Peer Support Group by
On our website:
Access by http://mhaw.org/programs/online-peer-support-groups/ and clicking on: “Click here to join the online support group.” at the time of the meeting
You may be prompted to download the “Zoom” app the first time you log in. You will have the option of using the audio from your device/computer, or from a telephone.
You may also call in to join this meeting by phone:
1 929 205 6099
Meeting ID: 350 838 4591
or
Find your local number: https://zoom.us/u/ab49ZfkmGG
If our group is full, or if one is late
they may not gain access.
For one-to-one telephone mutual support:
PEER SUPPORT LINE
Monday – Friday 9am – 5pm
631-471-7242 ext. 1217
if you reach our voicemail, we are on the other line
please leave us a message and we will return your call
Questions or Reflections:

 

Warmline – MHAW – Association for Mental Health and Wellness – Healing Connections Peer Support Line – (631) 471-7242 ext 1217 – Weekdays – 6am-2pm (PST) @ Phone
May 28 all-day