PeerGalaxy Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring over 82,000 monthly offerings of FREE telephone- and online-accessible peer support, recovery support + wellness activities!

Over 30+ warmlines plus webinars, workshops, job postings, special events, consumer input opportunities and more.

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

Click the Accessibility Button on the right side, halfway down in the middle, for enhanced viewing and/or access options!  Click the Translate Button in the lower left corner for language options. 

Your use of this site is subject to the Privacy Policy, Terms and Conditions of Use.  Reminder: Fees or charges may be charged by your carrier for sending or receiving SMS text messaging, phone, or data.

If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

How Events are Sorted:

First, at the top of the list: Disaster Hotline & Oregon Safe + Strong Helpline.

Next in the list: Bundled “All Day” Events for organizations with events happening at multiple times throughout the day and/or in many formats or locations; these are bundled into a single listing to prevent endless scrolling.  Usually these offer a lookup by zip code or other criteria. 

Lastly, Time-Specific Events listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  Warmlines and places east of Oregon’s time zone tend to start earlier (e.g. 4am in Oregon is 7am in New York).

Oct
5
Wed
00 – Hotlilne – Nation Wide Launch of 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline – 24/7 @ online event register for details.
Oct 5 all-day

 

Oregon is ready for nationwide launch of 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline

Starting July 16, people in Oregon and nationwide will be able to call, text or chat 988, a new three-digit number, available 24/7, that will directly connect anyone experiencing a behavioral health crisis to compassionate care and support from trained crisis counselors. The 988 dialing-code connects callers to the existing National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, a network of local crisis call-centers throughout the country. In Oregon, 988 call-centers are operated by Lines for Life statewide, and Northwest Human Services in Marion and Polk counties.

How Does 988 Work?

988 was established in July 2022 to improve access to crisis services in a way that meets our country’s growing suicide and mental health-related crisis care needs. 988 provides easier access to behavioral health crisis services, which are distinct from the public safety purposes of 911 (where the focus is on dispatching Emergency Medical Services, fire and police as needed).

911 continues to operate as it does across the state. For serious and life-threatening situations, 988 call centers work with local mental health providers to support appropriate interventions.

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and Oregon’s 988 call centers are collaborating with 911 Public Safety Answering Points to develop a roadmap on how 911 and 988 can coordinate with each other in the future.

988 crisis counselors are trained to use the least invasive interventions. Oftentimes, responding to a call, text or chat is all that is needed to help someone in crisis. In fact, more than 95 percent of current calls are resolved over the phone.

If a 988 call cannot be resolved over the phone, a mobile crisis team or first responder may be dispatched.

Other important facts to know:

  • 988 is available through every landline, cell phone and voice-over internet device in the United States, as well as text and chat.
  • The current technology for 988 routes callers by area code, not geolocation.
  • 988 is not currently available when phones are locked or do not have prepaid minutes.
  • The transition to 988 does not impact the availability of crisis services for veterans and military service members. They can call 988 and press 1 to connect with the Veterans Crisis Line.
  • For support in Spanish, callers can press 2 to connect with the Red Nacional de Prevención del Suicidio.

The 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline has an infographic with more information on what happens when people call, text or chat.

Community partners interested in helping promote 988 can use posters, social media shareables and other materials about 988 from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration at samhsa.gov/988. Learn more about 988 in Oregon on OHA’s 988 webpage. Read OHA’s press release about 988.

 

00 – Hotline – VideoPhone+ASL DEAF – Accessible Hotline @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) – Anytime 24/7/365 – Weekdays and Weekends @ VideoPhone+ASL
Oct 5 all-day
00 - Hotline - VideoPhone+ASL DEAF - Accessible Hotline @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) - Anytime 24/7/365 - Weekdays and Weekends @ VideoPhone+ASL

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

01 – Helpline – SSH – Safe + Strong Helpline for Behavioral, Mental and Emotional Health Support – Interpreters Available @ 1-800-923-4357 (HELP) – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free
Oct 5 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

04 – PRS – Peer Recovery Solutions – Peer Development Initiative 2022 – 2023 – Earn CEUs – Training Dates @ Online Via Goole Meet
Oct 5 all-day

 

FREE Peer and CRM CEU’s

Peer Recovery Solutions is excited to provide over 150 FREE continuing education units in 2022-23. Our goal is to help make the peer/recovery mentor field strong, healthy, and effective.

Below is a list of trainings you can take for FREE that will help build skills, meet the requirements of re-certification, and even achieve an CRM II (an advanced peer certification through the Mental Health and Addiction Certification Board of Oregon).

Learn more about CRM II status by visiting www.mhacbo.org and clicking certifications.

Participant Criteria and Directions

To receive credit you will need to be a peer/recovery mentor or someone who supervises/works with peers/recovery mentors. To receive credit you will need to attend the entire meeting and be visibly engaged.

To attend, you just need to click the links below. All trainings are hosted digitally on GoogleMeets.

Have questions? Email or call me: 5037340474 | tony@peerrecoverysolutions.org

August Training Dates

Motivational Interviewing, Supervisors 8/5/2022 1-5pm: Click HERE TO JOINGoes towards CRM II

Motivational Interviewing, Outreach and Engagement 8/12/2022 1-5pm: Click HERE TO JOINGoes towards CRM II

Peer Supervision 8/19/2022 1-5pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

Transition Age Youth Peer Best Practices 8/26/2022 1-5pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

September Training Dates

Recovery Capital 9/25/2022 1012pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

OctoberTraining Dates

Recovery Capital 10/6/2022 10-12pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

Recovery Capital 10/13/2022 10-12pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

LGBTQ+ Peer 10/28/2022 9-12pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

November Training Dates

Recovery Capital 11/10/2022 10-12pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

Peer Supervision Best Practices 11/16/2022 812pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

Recovery Capital 11/24/2022 10-12pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

December Training Dates

Recovery Capital 12/8/2022 10-12pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

Ethics 12/14/2022 8-12pm: Click HERE TO JOINGoes towards CRM II

Recovery Capital 12/22/2022 10-12pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

January Training Dates

Recovery Capital 1/5/2022 10-12pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

LGBTQ+ Peer 10/28/2022 9-12pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

Feburary Training Dates

Not yet posted…

March Training Dates

LGBTQ+ Peer 3/17/2022 9-12pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

April Training Dates

Not yet posted…

04 – Resources – Resource Lists for First Responders, Educators, LGBTQ, Hispanic, Youth, Elderly, Parents and More
Oct 5 all-day

 

Suicide Prevention Resource Center

 

Event Image

Rescource Lists to Support Mental Health and Coping with the Coronavirus (COVID-19)

 

LISTS COURTESY OF THE SUICIDE PREVENTION RESCOURCE CENTER

 

GENERAL AUDIANCE

MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

HEALTH CARE WORKERS AND FIRST RESPONDERS

 

COMMUNITY LEADERS

AMERICAN INDIANS AND ALASKA NATIVES

COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITES

 

SCHOOLS

PARENTS AND CARE GIVERS

TEENAGERS

OLDER ADULTS

HISPANICS/LATINOS

LGBTQ

FAITH COMMUNITIES

WORKPLACES

COVID-19 Resource Lists from Partners of the Suicide Prevention Resource Center

  • The National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention (Action Alliance) has developed a list of resources on safe messaging and for some specific populations.
  • The Zero Suicide Institute (ZSI) has developed a resource list for health care leaders and mental health professionals that addresses safe suicide care.
  • The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has developed a resource list for individuals, providers, communities, and states focused on behavioral health care.
  • Education Development Center (EDC) has developed a list of resources related to health, mental health, and education.

 

 

04 Resource – Veterans Support Groups, Resources, Education and Advocacy
Oct 5 all-day

USE THIS LINK TO OPEN THE VA WELCOME KIT

Print out your VA Welcome Kit

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned.

Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy, so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

 

LOCATE SERVICES IN OREGON

Veteran Resource Navigator

The Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs (ODVA) has a comprehensive online resource guide (VETERAN RESOURCE NAVIGATOR) available to assist veterans in finding the benefits that are most useful to their unique circumstances at this time.

Use the link below for the Veteran Resource Navigator

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

Veteran Services by County

Click on the link blow for interactive map  access resources in your county in Oregon.

Other Resources Available to Veterans and Military Service Members

DD214 & Military Records Request:

https://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records

Veteran Resource Navigator site by ODVA:

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

(Oregon)Military Help Line:  

Call 888-457-4838

VA Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255:

Press 1.VA Confidential crisis chat at net or text to 838255 

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD:

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/

Defining Discharge Status:

https://militarybenefits.info/character-of-discharge/#:~:text=There%20are%206%20types%20of,DD%20214%20must%20have%20a

How to apply for a discharge status upgrade:

https://www.va.gov/discharge-upgrade-instructions/

Oregon Supportive Services for Vets & Families (Housing):

https://caporegon.org/what-we-do/ssvf/

Clackamas County VSO’s (Veteran Service Officers):

https://www.clackamas.us/socialservices/veterans.html

Portland VA Clinic that can help with homelessness & medical care:

https://www.portland.va.gov/locations/crrc.asp

Portland VA Mental Health Clinic:

https://www.portland.va.gov/services/mentalhealth.asp

Veterans Crisis Line/ Suicide Prevention:

https://www.veteranscrisisline.net/

If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance,

please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.

Contact ODVA Headquarters

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs
700 Summer St NE
Salem, OR 97301

Web: https://www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/default.aspx

Phone: (800) 692-9666 or (503) 373-2085

Fax: (503) 373-2392

Email:orvetsbenefits@odva.state.or.us

 

 

 

 

Web Resources

Oregon Health Plan – Enrollment Page

https://www.oregon.gov/oha/hsd/ohp/pages/apply.aspx

 

SAMHSA Treatment Locator

https://findtreatment.gov/

VA National Center on PTSD

 PTSD Treatment Decision Aid

 Educational Materials

  Mobile Apps

  Whiteboard Videos

  Consultation Program

 

VA Healthcare – Community Care network

https://www.va.gov/COMMUNITYCARE/providers/Community_Care_Network.asp

 

VA’s Center for Women Veterans (CWV)

https://www.va.gov/womenvet/

Minority Veterans of America

https://www.minorityvets.org/

 

Vet Centers:

Central Oregon Vet Center

Eugene Vet Center

Grants Pass Vet Center

Portland Vet Center

Salem Vet Center

 Community Based Outpatient Clinics:

Bend CBOC

Morrow County VA Telehealth Clinic (Boardman OR)

Brookings VA Clinic

Wallowa County VA Telehealth Clinic (Enterprise OR)

Eugene Health Care Center

Eugene VA Downtown Clinic

Fairview Clinic

Grants Pass West VA CBOC

Hillsboro CBOC

Klamath Falls CBOC

La Grande CBOC

Lincoln City Clinic

North Bend VA Clinic

Community Resource and Referral Center (CRRC)

Salem CBOC

North Coast CBOC

 

Additional Resources By Phone:

Veterans Crisis Line: 800-273-8255, Press 1

Women Veterans Hotline: 855-829-663

Vet Center Call Center: 877-WAR-VETS (927-8387)

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Caregiver Support Line: 855-260-3274

Lines for Life Military Help Line:  Call 1-888-457-4838

Senior Loneliness Line:  Call 503-200-1633

The Trevor Project:  866-488-7386

PEER SUPPORT AND PEER TRAINING

USE THIS LINK TO APPLY

Online BIPOC Veteran Peer Support Specialist Training – April 2022

NAMI Multnomah is pleased to offer this Oregon Health Authority (OHA) approved Peer Support Specialist Training (PSST) for adults in Mental Health recovery. In collaboration with Cultivating a New Life LLC, we will offer the Warriors in Recovery: Forging an Alliance of Peers, Peer Support Specialist Training, 𝙨𝙥𝙚𝙘𝙞𝙛𝙞𝙘 𝙩𝙤 𝙑𝙚𝙩𝙚𝙧𝙖𝙣𝙨 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙈𝙞𝙡𝙞𝙩𝙖𝙧𝙮 𝙎𝙚𝙧𝙫𝙞𝙘𝙚 𝙈𝙚𝙢𝙗𝙚𝙧𝙨 𝙞𝙙𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙞𝙛𝙮𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙖𝙨 𝘽𝙡𝙖𝙘𝙠, 𝙄𝙣𝙙𝙞𝙜𝙚𝙣𝙤𝙪𝙨 𝙤𝙧 𝙖𝙨 𝙖 𝙥𝙚𝙧𝙨𝙤𝙣 𝙤𝙛 𝙘𝙤𝙡𝙤𝙧 (𝘽𝙄𝙋𝙊𝘾).

Warriors in Recovery: Forging an Alliance of Peers represents 44 hours of comprehensive training designed to inform and empower individuals wishing to work as peers for veterans within peer-delivered services, assisting individuals past or presently affected by mental health services, mental health system survival, addiction(s), co-occurring disorder(s), and traumatic experience(s), as they re-enter the community utilizing naturally occurring support.

The core elements of this program include wellness coping skills and WRAP training (Wellness Recovery Action Plan), all from a social justice framework with an emphasis on trauma-informed care, cultural humility model and narrative approaches. Through a narrative approach, participants will recognize the power of the stories that they tell themselves, and how to reconstruct their life narrative according to person-centered principles that will assist them in reducing the influence of problems in their lives.

Individuals who complete the 44-hour PSST training are eligible to become Oregon State Certified Peer Support Specialists for adult mental health under the Traditional Health Worker (THW) program. The training consists of 44 online classroom hours and a written exam.

This training is offered at no cost to Veterans and Active/Past Military Service Members who live, work, or volunteer in the state of Oregon.

𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗮𝗽𝗽𝗹𝗶𝗰𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗽𝗲𝗿𝗶𝗼𝗱 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝘁𝗿𝗮𝗶𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘄𝗶𝗹𝗹 𝗰𝗹𝗼𝘀𝗲 𝗮𝘁 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗲𝗻𝗱 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗱𝗮𝘆 𝗦𝘂𝗻𝗱𝗮𝘆, 𝗙𝗲𝗯𝗿𝘂𝗮𝗿𝘆 𝟮𝟴𝘁𝗵, 𝟮𝟬𝟮𝟮.

𝗧𝗿𝗮𝗶𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗥𝗲𝗾𝘂𝗶𝗿𝗲𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁𝘀

1. 𝗬𝗼𝘂 𝗺𝘂𝘀𝘁 𝗶𝗱𝗲𝗻𝘁𝗶𝗳𝘆 𝗮𝘀 𝗮 𝗽𝗲𝗲𝗿 which is defined as a self-identified person currently or formerly receiving mental health services. (𝗣𝗟𝗘𝗔𝗦𝗘 𝗡𝗢𝗧𝗘: If you do not self-identify as a peer, you will not be eligible for this training. If you identify as a family member, please go to OHA’s website to find certified Family Support Specialist Trainings in Oregon.)

2. 𝗙𝗼𝗿 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝘀𝗽𝗲𝗰𝗶𝗳𝗶𝗰 𝘁𝗿𝗮𝗶𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗴, 𝘆𝗼𝘂 𝗺𝘂𝘀𝘁:

-be a Veteran or active/past Military Service Member

-identify as Black, Indigenous or a person of color

-be at least 18 years of age

-live, work, and/or volunteer in Oregon

-not be listed on the Medicaid provider exclusion list

-have the ability to attend the entirety of the 44-hour/6 session training ONLINE

𝙏𝙧𝙖𝙞𝙣𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝘿𝙖𝙩𝙚𝙨 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙏𝙞𝙢𝙚𝙨:

-Friday, April 8th, 3:00pm-7:00pm

-Saturday, April 9th, 9:00am-5:00pm

-Sunday, April 10th, 9:00am-5:00pm

-Friday, April 22nd, 9:00am-5:00pm

-Saturday, April 23rd, 9:00am-5:00pm

-Sunday, April 24th, 9:00am-5:00pm

*𝙏𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙚 𝙖𝙧𝙚 1-𝙝𝙤𝙪𝙧 𝙡𝙪𝙣𝙘𝙝 𝙗𝙧𝙚𝙖𝙠𝙨 𝙤𝙛𝙛𝙚𝙧𝙚𝙙 𝙤𝙣 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙡𝙤𝙣𝙜𝙚𝙧 𝙙𝙖𝙮𝙨 𝙤𝙛 𝙩𝙧𝙖𝙞𝙣𝙞𝙣𝙜*

𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗮𝗽𝗽𝗹𝗶𝗰𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗽𝗲𝗿𝗶𝗼𝗱 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝘁𝗿𝗮𝗶𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘄𝗶𝗹𝗹 𝗰𝗹𝗼𝘀𝗲 𝗮𝘁 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗲𝗻𝗱 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗱𝗮𝘆 𝗦𝘂𝗻𝗱𝗮𝘆, 𝗙𝗲𝗯𝗿𝘂𝗮𝗿𝘆 𝟮𝟴𝘁𝗵, 𝟮𝟬𝟮𝟮. 𝗔𝗽𝗽𝗹𝗶𝗰𝗮𝗻𝘁𝘀 𝘄𝗶𝗹𝗹 𝗯𝗲 𝗻𝗼𝘁𝗶𝗳𝗶𝗲𝗱 𝗼𝗳 𝗱𝗲𝗰𝗶𝘀𝗶𝗼𝗻𝘀 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘁𝗿𝗮𝗶𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗯𝘆 𝗲𝗺𝗮𝗶𝗹 𝗯𝘆 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗲𝗻𝗱 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘄𝗲𝗲𝗸 𝗼𝗳 𝗠𝗮𝗿𝗰𝗵 𝟳𝘁𝗵, 𝟮𝟬𝟮𝟮.

Apply Here: BIPOC Veteran & Military Service Member PSST Application

PUBLICATIONS

Psychosocial Interventions for Older Adults With Serious Mental Illness

The guide provides considerations and strategies for interdisciplinary teams, peer specialists, clinicians, registered nurses, behavioral health organizations, and policymakers in understanding, selecting, and implementing evidence-based interventions that support older adults with serious mental illness.

Publication ID
PEP21-06-05-001
Publication Date
November 2021

Download your VA Welcome Kit

You are welcome to share this guide with friends or family members who need help with their benefits too. You can print out copies for yourself and others:

Download our guides to VA benefits and services

For Veterans

For family members

Apply for survivor benefits (PDF)

 

 

Opportunities for Engagement

  What:  Warriors in Recovery:  Forging an Alliance of Peers

Host/Coordinating Organization: NAMI Multnomah

Dates:  November 4th through 6th and 18th through 20th

Additional Information:  An OHA-approved Peer Support Specialist Training for adults in mental health recovery. This training is offered at no cost to participants and is open to Veterans across Oregon.  To apply online, please click here.  Applications are due by September 18, 2022

 

What:  Veteran Volunteer Program – flyer attached

Host/Coordinating Organization:  Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs (ODVA)

Additional Information:  Join the ODVA in implementing the new veteran volunteer program to ensure very Oregon veteran is connected to the benefits they have earned.  For additional information, or to sign up, please review the attached flyer or reach out to Mark Newell, ODVA Veteran Volunteer Coordinator by calling 503.373.2057, emailing veteranvolunteer@odva.state.or.us, or visiting the ODVA volunteer website by clicking here.

 

What:  Free Veteran Peer Support – flyer attached

Host/Coordinating Organization:  NAMI Multnomah

Additional Information:  Did you know NAMI Multnomah offers FREE veteran peer support?  Veteran Peer Support Specialists are veterans who use their personal experiences with military culture, mental health challenges, and recovery to support and inspire hope in other veterans.  Check out the attached PDF to learn more how NAMI Multnomah’s Veteran Peer Support Specialists can assist you.  To get started or learn more, contact Dan at 971.303.2671 or dfriedrich@namimultnomah.org

 

What:  Opportunity to Join NAMI Multnomah Veteran Outreach Team (repeat from 7/19/22)  

Host/Coordinating Organization: NAMI Multnomah

Additional Information:  NAMI Multnomah is looking for veterans and family members interested in volunteering. Our primary need is for folks interested in joining our Veteran Outreach Team. These volunteers will participate in tabling events and/or presentations sharing NAMI resources with communities of Veterans, family members, and those who work with Veterans. These opportunities are primarily in-person, and require proof of vaccination against COVID-19. Please reach out to Alyssa at acarnes@namimultnomah.org if you have any questions or are interested in volunteering.

 

What:  Oregon Suicide Prevention Conference (repeat from 7/19/22)

Host/Coordinating Organization:  Lines for Life

Dates:  October 11 – 13, 2022, with pre-conference trainings held on October 10, 2022

Additional Information:   OSPC 2022 – Reconnecting to Hope: Growing Responsive Communities – focuses on rebuilding and growing connections between individuals, providers, local and state resources, advocates and prevention leaders. These connections strengthen networks of community support and create systems that can respond with compassion and care to address the unique needs of individuals – lifting Oregonians to reconnect to hope when they are struggling.  Update your calendar and stay tuned for our registration announcement!  Click here to access the OSPC website.

Funding & Scholarship Opportunities

 What:  RFGA #5487 Increasing Access to Veteran and Military Peer Support Specialist Training (repeat from 7/19/22) 

Funder:  Oregon Health Authority (OHA)

Additional Information:  OHA is pleased to announce this solicitation of applications for funding Peer Support Specialist trainings.  The intention is to make in-person Peer Support Specialist trainings more accessible to military veterans living in communities designated as Rural or Frontier by the Oregon Office of Rural Health.  OHA is calling for applications from organizations who are well-positioned to provide services to military veterans and have the capacity to grow the peer-delivered services workforce in their communities.  Applications are due by 10 p.m. Aug. 31, 2022.  Please visit the OHA Veterans and Military Behavioral Health website to access application documents.

 

What:  Peer Wellness Specialist Training Scholarship Application

Funder/Coordinating Organization:  Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and Mental Health & Addiction Association of Oregon (MHAAO)

Additional Information:  Scholarships for this training cohort are supported by OHA’s Office of Equity and Inclusion to increase training accessibility across the state.  This scholarship opportunity is meant for Oregon frontier and rural communities.   Completed applications will be reviewed on a first-come, first-serve basis.  Once you complete this application, you will receive a confirmation email that it has been submitted.  Please note that the training details and materials will be shared approximately 2-4 weeks prior to the training start date for the cohort for which you have applied.  If you have any specific questions, please reach out to Training Center Manger, Emily Nelson at enelson@mhaoforegon.org.  The role of a Peer Wellness Specialist is to provide peer support, encouragement, and assistance to address physical and mental health needs.  In order to do that, it is important that the Peer Wellness Specialist has a working knowledge of the various health care and wellness resources in their community and how to access these services and resources.  Click here to access the Peer Wellness Specialist Training Scholarship Application.

 

What:  Integrated Co-Occurring Disorders Start Up Funding

Funder:  Oregon Health Authority (OHA)

Additional Information:  OHA is getting ready to develop contracts for Integrated Co-Occurring Disorders (ICOD) start up funding.  Programs that can and/or want to specialize in working with veterans who experience co-occurring disorders can contact David Corse at David.Corse@dhsoha.state.or.us

 

 

 

 

AM – All Month – Veterans Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255, Veterans and Military Families Resources and Information
Oct 5 all-day

CRISIS LINES AND WARMLINES

 

Veterans Crisis Line: 800-273-8255, Press 1

Women Veterans Hotline: 855-829-663

Vet Center Call Center: 877-WAR-VETS (927-8387)

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Caregiver Support Line: 855-260-3274

Lines for Life Military Help Line:  Call 1-888-457-4838

Senior Loneliness Line:  Call 503-200-1633

The Trevor Project:  866-488-7386

 

RESOURCES AND INFORMATION

Veteran Resource Navigator

The coronavirus pandemic has changed our world. But it has not changed Oregon’s commitment to those who served and fought for us.

This comprehensive online resource guide is meant to assist veterans from all walks of life in finding the benefits that are most useful to their unique circumstances at this time.

These benefits and resources are yours, earned through your faithful and honorable service to our nation; they are also an investment in the state of Oregon, because your success is our success.

Oregon veterans are a diverse community, but we are united in our shared service, and this has never been truer than it is today. We are all in this together, and we are not defeated. We will stand again, united.


If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance, please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.


Resources by Topic Area

COVID Economic Resources

Economic

Emergency aid, employment, disability, taxes, scams, veteran-owned businesses

COVID Housing and Food Resources

Housing and Food

Housing security and support, homelessness resources, food

COVID Education Resources

Education

Federal VA resources, Voc Rehab re-entry, GI Bill updates, apprenticeships info

COVID Resources

Other Resources

Resources for families, aging veterans, and Oregon OEM COVID-19 resources

COVID Health and Wellness Resources

Health and Wellness

Healthcare, mental health, medical transportation, crisis hotlines

COVID Agency Resources

Agency Resources

Changes and updates about ODVA’s programs and resources

 

LOCATE VETERANS SERVICES IN OREGON

 

Veteran Services by County

Click on the  map below to access resources in your county.

 

VETERANS SERVICES IN OREGON BY CATEGORY

Click on the Image Below to find services by category

 

COVID-19 ALERT – Due to COVID-19, many County Offices are limiting in-person services and are providing services by phone.

Please call your County Veteran Service Office before going in to confirm how they can best serve you during this time.

 

If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance,

please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.

Contact ODVA Headquarters

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs
700 Summer St NE
Salem, OR 97301

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned. Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy, so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

Print out your VA Welcome Kit

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned.

Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

Download your VA Welcome Kit

Feel free to share this guide with friends or family members who need help with their benefits too. You can print out copies for yourself and others:

Download our guides to VA benefits and services

For Veterans

For family members

 

Other Resources Available to Veterans and Military Service Members

DD214 & Military Records Request:

https://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records

Veteran Resource Navigator site by ODVA:

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

(Oregon)Military Help Line:  

Call 888-457-4838

VA Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255:

Press 1.VA Confidential crisis chat at net or text to 838255 

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD:

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/

Defining Discharge Status:

https://militarybenefits.info/character-of-discharge/#:~:text=There%20are%206%20types%20of,DD%20214%20must%20have%20a

How to apply for a discharge status upgrade:

https://www.va.gov/discharge-upgrade-instructions/

Oregon Supportive Services for Vets & Families (Housing):

https://caporegon.org/what-we-do/ssvf/

Clackamas County VSO’s (Veteran Service Officers):

https://www.clackamas.us/socialservices/veterans.html

Portland VA Clinic that can help with homelessness & medical care:

https://www.portland.va.gov/locations/crrc.asp

 

National Resource Directory (NRD)

https://nrd.gov/

The National Resource Directory (NRD) is a resource website that connects wounded warriors, Service Members, Veterans, their families, and caregivers to programs and services that support them. The NRD is hosted, managed, maintained, sustained and developed by the Defense Health Agency’s Recovery Coordination Program.

It provides access to services and resources at the national, state and local levels to support recovery, rehabilitation and community reintegration. Visitors can find information on a variety of topics that supply an abundance of vetted resources. For help finding resources on the site, visit the How to Use this site section of the NRD. Please see below for some of our major categories.

 

The National Recovery Directory is a partnership among the Departments of Defense, Labor, and Veterans Affairs. Information contained within the NRD is from federal, state, and local government agencies; Veteran and military service organizations; non-profit and community-based organizations; academic institutions and professional associations that provide assistance to wounded warriors and their families.

GLOSSARIES

Find definitions to commonly used terms in VA, DoD, DOL, and other federal government agencies.

NRD FACT SHEET

Get to know your NRD: why it was created, who operates it, and all the resources meant for you.

KEY CONTACTS

Find contacts in the Departments of Defense, Labor, and Veterans Affairs and Military Services.

 

 

 

 

Tue, January 25, 2022, 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM PST

ONLINE EVENT

Semper Fi & America’s Fund offers a Caregiver Support Program encompassing a variety of activities, education, support tools and resource connections designed to assist the spouses, parents, siblings, extended family members, or close friends who drop everything to care for a catastrophically wounded, critically ill or injured service member. The Caregiver Support Program provides different types of events to suit the busy schedules of our caregivers.

Join MVCN with special guest Karen Hetherington, Director of Case Management for the Semper Fi & America’s Fund, a non-profit that assists catastrophically wounded, ill and injured service members. Ms. Hetherington will share about Semper Fi & America’s Fund’s programs and answer questions.

Come learn how Semper Fi & America’s Fund can help you!

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

**Please SAVE your confirmation email as it contains information to join the Zoom group.** Check your spam or junk folder if you do not receive an email confirmation from Eventbrite.Find other peer support opportunities on our Caregiver Calendar on the MVCN website. https://www.redcross.org/caregiversVisit the safe and secure, caregiver-only Online Community available 24/7 for support. https://mvcn.force.com/login.

 

 

 

 

Dual Diagnosis Anonymous

 

 

“You protected us, now we support you!”

https://ddainc.org/dda-veterans-page/

DDA was founded by a highly decorated veteran, Corbett Monica. After serving in the Vietnam War, like other veterans, returning to home only find anguish, trauma, and remorse. After suffering from severe PTSD, OCD, survivors guilt, and addictions, Corbett found a way to transcend from destructive means with the inception of Dual Diagnosis Anonymous (DDA) providing hope and recovery through our peer support which is now his legacy.

Culturally responsive DDA’s Veterans meetings are intended to provide a safe venue to be open about depression, post-traumatic stress, alcohol and drug use, abuse, and addiction as well as serve as a resource for navigation of the telehealth system, It will encourage healthy solutions for adapting to the changing times. Specifically. the project will Improve access for Veterans and military service members to dual diagnosis services through the creation of on-line recovery support groups and on-line DDA meetings.

This project will serve Veterans throughout the state and is beginning outreach through Veterans publications, local newspapers, the VA, Veterans websites, list services, and anything else that will help identify Oregonians who can use the services.

 

More Ways to Connect

Join our Private Online Group

DDA Veterans Resource Group and Chatroom: www.facebook.com/groups/345810496697764

In Person Meetings

 

Wednesdays 5pm to 7pm

1520 Sherman Ave North Bend, OR 97459

Online Meetings

 

Tuesdays 12pm-1pm Pacific Time Zone

Join Zoom Meeting https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84398341923 Meeting ID: 843 9834 1923

By Phone

Give our Central Office a call at (503)-222-6484

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES AND LINKS

VA National Center on PTSD

                PTSD Treatment Decision Aid

                Educational Materials

                Mobile Apps

                Whiteboard Videos

                Consultation Program

 

VA Healthcare – Community Care network

Minority Veterans of America

https://www.minorityvets.org/

 

Vet Centers:

Central Oregon Vet Center

Eugene Vet Center

Grants Pass Vet Center

Portland Vet Center

Salem Vet Center

 

Community Based Outpatient Clinics:

Bend CBOC

Morrow County VA Telehealth Clinic (Boardman OR)

Brookings VA Clinic

Wallowa County VA Telehealth Clinic (Enterprise OR)

Eugene Health Care Center

Eugene VA Downtown Clinic

Fairview Clinic

Grants Pass West VA CBOC

Hillsboro CBOC

Klamath Falls CBOC

La Grande CBOC

Lincoln City Clinic

North Bend VA Clinic

Community Resource and Referral Center (CRRC)

Salem CBOC

North Coast CBOC

 

Military Children Resources

Military kids face unique psychological challenges related to military life. Compared to their non-military peers, military kids are many times more likely to move multiple times during their school careers and have a parent absent for long periods of time in potentially dangerous locations – factors that can greatly stress military kids’ mental health.

The Defense Health Agency maintains two online resources to support military children use the links povided below:

  • Military Kids Connect is an online community specifically for military children ages 6-17, and provides access to age-appropriate resources for military kids and also for parents, caregivers, and educators to help them understand and support military kids at home and in school.
  • Sesame Street for Military Families is a free, bilingual (English and Spanish) website where families can find information and multimedia resources on the topics of military deployments, multiple deployments, homecomings, injuries, grief, and self-expression.
AM – All Month – Hispanic Heritage Month – AFSP – American Foundation for Suicide Prevention – An Introduction to Suicide Prevention For Latinx and Hispanic Communities – Resources
Oct 5 all-day

 

 

 

Hispanic Heritage Month

AFSP – American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

An Introduction to Suicide Prevention For Latinx and Hispanic Communities – Resources

¡Feliz mes de la herencia hispana! Today, September 15, marks the start of National Hispanic Heritage Month, in which we celebrate the histories, cultures and contributions of Latinx and Hispanic people in the United States including Puerto Rico. It is also an opportunity to reflect on the progress we’ve made to advance mental health for Latinx and Hispanic communities.

One of those ways is through partnerships. It is our privilege to be partnering with the National Latino Behavioral Health Association (NLBHA) and others for the 2022 National Latino Behavioral Health Conference taking place September 15 and 16, featuring remarks from AFSP’s Chief Medical Officer Dr. Christine Yu-Moutier, and Vice President of Public Relations María de los Ángeles Corral.

Another way in which we are making inroads is through new programming. We are thrilled to announce that this October, in collaboration with NLBHA, we will be launching Talk Saves Lives™ (TSL): An Introduction to Suicide Prevention for Latinx and Hispanic Communities, a much-needed and vital new resource for mental health and suicide awareness education for communities of Latinx and Hispanic heritage. The presentation will be available in English and Spanish, in person and virtually.

Join us this month as we shine a light on mental health resources for Latinx and Hispanic communities, as well as the stories and perspectives of individuals who have reflected on their cultural background and how it can impact their experiences with mental health through our Real Stories blog over the years. You can find those resources, stories, social shareables and more here. Another great resource is our website! It can be translated into Spanish by clicking on the “Accessibility” top right button, then “Choose language,” then “Spanish.”

National Hispanic Heritage Month is a time to celebrate and support Latinx and Hispanic communities.

We encourage you to share the resources above, this month and beyond.

 

FIND RESOURCES

 

AM – All Month – MHA – Mental Health America – Mental Health Month 2022 – Resources – American Indian/Alaska Native – Asian/Pacific – Arab/Muslim/Middle Eastern/South Asian – Black/African American – Latinix/Hispanic – Multiracial
Oct 5 all-day

A MESSAGE FROM MHA’S CEO

Mental Health America has long been at the forefront of progressive values in mental health care. We pride ourselves on being community-oriented and led by the voices of those with lived experience. Throughout our history, we have sought to lift the stories of individuals who are traumatized by discrimination or mistreatment.

MHA’s commitment began with our founder Clifford Beers, who sought to lead a social reform movement to end the inhumane institutionalization of those with mental illness. This undertaking changed the landscape of mental health care in America. Our Mental Health Bell, forged in 1953 from smelt-down shackles that used to bind “asylum patients,” is our proudest symbol. It rings out in hope for those oppressed by systemic injustices which undermine the mental health and well-being of marginalized and disenfranchised individuals and communities.

This month of July, we turn our hearts and minds to the mental health of individuals and communities of color with the release of this Toolkit.

Even as we look toward the future and prioritize the unique needs of the next generation, we must first look to the past to honor and learn from our history. July was first recognized as Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month in 2008. Campbell was a pioneer, author, and commentator, whose writings and advocacy highlighted the mental health of diverse communities in the U.S. Without her tireless dedication to the unique needs of Black and minoritized communities, the month of July would not be dedicated to promoting the mental health of BIPOC people.

Working for equity requires ongoing reflection and evolution. We are continually learning in our quest to be consistently and accountably equitable, and we know we have a long way to go before we can claim equity in mental health. Compared to their white counterparts, Black, Indigenous, and people of color are less likely to seek or gain access to mental health services and are less likely to receive high quality care which is culturally responsive and reflective. Barriers such as a high likelihood of being uninsured, differences of communication styles and language, and well-founded mistrust of mental health treatment also contribute to the inequities.

We acknowledge these serious inequities, and we are taking action to push for increased access to mental health care and improvements in culturally and linguistically responsive community-based approaches to healthcare. This includes bringing new voices, perspectives and representation to the table, increasing the amount of diverse educational materials, translating resources, and creating an equity-driven strategy to guide all of our work in public education, research, community-based care, and policy and advocacy.

We are using the term “BIPOC” to encompass all people and communities of color. We know that inclusive language and respect for individual self-identification is critical. We are listening to the voices of lived experience and evolving with them.

MHA hopes that each of you reading this will join us on this journey of learning and action as we move forward, together.

President & CEO, Mental Health America

Download the Full BIPOC Mental Health Month Toolkit

Full Toolkit (PDF)

Rescource page header

 

WEBPAGES:

●  BIPOC Communities and COVID-19: https://mhanational.org/bipoc-communities-and-covid-19

●  BIPOC Mental Health: https://www.mhanational.org/bipoc-mental-health

●  Health Care Disparities Among Black, Indigenous, and People of Color:

https://www.mhanational.org/issues/healthcare-disparities-among-black-indigenous-and-people-color

●  How to Be An Ally in the Fight Against Racial Justice: https://mhanational.org/blog/how-be-ally-

fight-against-racial-injustice-and-better-mental-health-all

●  How to Find an Anti-Racist Therapist: https://screening.mhanational.org/content/how-find-anti-

racist-therapist/?layout=actions_ah_topics

●  I’m Angry About the Injustices I See Around Me: https://screening.mhanational.org/content/im-

angry-about-injustices-i-see-around-me/?layout=actions_ah_topics

●  Infographic- BIPOC and LGBTQ: https://www.mhanational.org/infographic-bipoc-and-lgbtq-

mental-health

●  Is My Therapist Being Racist?: https://screening.mhanational.org/content/my-therapist-being-

racist/?layout=actions_ah_topicsMental Health

●  Racial Trauma: https://mhanational.org/racial-trauma

●  Racism and Mental Health: https://mhanational.org/racism-and-mental-health

●  Take a Mental Health Screening: https://screening.mhanational.org/screening-tools

WEBINARS:

●  Back To Basics: Impact Of Culture On Mental Health Conversations:

https://mhanational.org/events/back-basics-impact-culture-mental-health-conversations

●  Racial Trauma and Communities of Color: Assessment and Treatment: https://mhanational.org/events/racial-trauma-and-communities-color-assessment-and- treatment

EN ESPAÑOL:

●  Prueba de Ansiedad: https://screening.mhanational.org/screening-tools/test-de-ansiedad/

●  Prueba de Depresión: https://screening.mhanational.org/screening-tools/test-de-depresion/

●  Recursos En Español: https://mhanational.org/recursos-en-espan

 

AMERICAN INDIAN/ALASKA NATIVE RESOURCES

●  All My Relations Podcast: https://www.allmyrelationspodcast.com/

●  American Indian Health and Family Services: https://aihfs.org/about/

●  Anxiety and Depression Association of America: Native and Indigenous Communities:

https://adaa.org/find-help/by-demographics/native-indigenous-communities

●  Behavioral Health Services for American Indians and Alaska Natives For Behavioral Health Service Providers, Administrators, and Supervisors: https://store.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/d7/priv/tip_61_aian_full_document_020419_0.pdf

●  Center for Native American Youth: https://www.cnay.org/

●  Healthy Native Youth: https://www.healthynativeyouth.org/

●  Indian Health Service: https://www.ihs.gov/

●  Indigenous Story Studio: https://istorystudio.com/

●  MHA: Native and Indigenous Communities and Mental Health:

https://www.mhanational.org/issues/native-and-indigenous-communities-and-mental-health

●  National American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Technology Transfer Center Network: https://mhttcnetwork.org/centers/national-american-indian-and-alaska-native-mhttc/home

●  National Indian Health Board: https://www.nihb.org/index.php

●  Native Americans for Community Action: https://nacainc.org/

●  Native Hope: https://www.nativehope.org/

●  One Sky Center- The American Indian/Alaska Native National Resource Center for Health, Education,

and Research: https://www.oneskycenter.org/

●  SAMHSA Circles of Care: https://www.samhsa.gov/tribal-ttac/circles-care

●  SAMHSA Tribal Affairs: https://www.samhsa.gov/tribal-affairs

●  StrongHearts Native Help Line: https://strongheartshelpline.org/

●  WeRNative: https://www.wernative.org/

 

ASIAN/PACIFIC RESOURCES

● Asian American Health Initiative: https://aahiinfo.org/

○ Asian American Health Initiative Mental Health Resources: https://aahiinfo.org/aahi-

resources/#mental-health-resources

●  Asian American Psychological Association: https://aapaonline.org/

●  Asian Americans with Disabilities Initiative: https://www.aadinitiative.org/

○ The Asian Americans with Disabilities Initiative Resource Guide: https://static1.squarespace.com/static/60cfe519bb807927ef5c9cd0/t/61e05e61718a1e76a5b848b 2/1642094184561/AADI%2B2022%2BResource%2BGuide-011222.pdf

●  Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum: https://www.apiahf.org/

●  Asian Mental Health Collective: https://www.asianmhc.org/

●  Asian Pacific Community In Action: https://apcaaz.org/

●  Asian Pacific Institute on Gender Based Violence: https://www.api-gbv.org/

●  Asian Pride Project: http://asianprideproject.org/

●  Coming Out Living Authentically as LGBTQ+ Asian and Pacific Islander Americans: https://assets2.hrc.org/files/assets/resources/HRC-Coming_Out-API-FINAL-web-2018.pdf

●  Mental Health Association For Chinese Communities: https://www.mhacc-usa.org/

●  Mustard Seed Generation: https://www.mustardseedgeneration.org/

●  National Asian American Pacific Islander Mental Health Association: https://www.naapimha.org/

●  National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance: https://www.nqapia.org/

●  Stop AAPI Hate: https://stopaapihate.org/

●  Viet Care: https://www.viet-care.org/

 

ARAB/MUSLIM/MIDDLE EASTERN/SOUTH ASIAN RESOURCES

●  Arab-American Family Support Center: https://www.aafscny.org/

●  Desi/LGBTQ+ Helpline: https://www.deqh.org/

●  Institute for Muslim Mental Health: https://muslimmentalhealth.com/

●  Islamic Relief USA: https://irusa.org/

●  Khalil Center: https://khalilcenter.com/

●  Mannmukti: https://mannmukti.org/

●  Muslim Mental Health Toolkit: https://www.ispu.org/mental-health/

●  Resources for Muslim Mental Health Advocates: https://muslimmentalhealth.com/

●  My Mantra: https://www.mymantrawellness.com/

●  Naseeha Mental Health Helpline: https://naseeha.org/

●  Sakhi for South Asian Women: http://sakhi.org

●  South Asian Americans Leading Together (SAALT): https://saalt.org/

●  South Asian Mental Health Initiative & Network (SAMHIN): https://samhin.org/

●  South Asian Network: https://www.southasiannetwork.org/

●  South Asian Sexual and Mental Health Alliance: https://www.sasmha.org/

●  South Asian Therapists: https://southasiantherapists.org/

●  The South Asian Public Health Association: https://joinsapha.org/

●  What Does Islam Say About Mental Health?: https://www.amaliah.com/post/62822/mental-health-

in-islam-quran-and-hadith-mental-health-depression-in-islam

●  Yalla! Let’s Talk: https://yallaletstalk.com/

 

BLACK/AFRICAN AMERICAN RESOURCES

●  AAKOMA Project: https://aakomaproject.org/

●  Black Emotional Mental Health (BEAM): https://beam.community/

●  Black Men Heal: https://blackmenheal.org/

●  Black Women’s Health Imperative: https://bwhi.org/

●  Eustress: https://www.eustressinc.org/

●  GirlTrek: https://www.girltrek.org/

●  MHA: Reimagining Self-Care for Black Folks: https://www.mhanational.org/blog/reimagining-self-

care-black-folks

●  National Black Justice Coalition: https://nbjc.org/

●  Ourselves Black: https://ourselvesblack.com/

●  Sista Afya: https://www.sistaafya.com/

●  The Black Mental Wellness Lounge: https://www.facebook.com/TheBlackMentalWellnessLounge/

●  The Boris Lawrence Henson Foundation: https://borislhensonfoundation.org/

●  The Confess Project: https://www.theconfessproject.com/

●  The Loveland Foundation: https://thelovelandfoundation.org/

●  Therapy for Black Girls: https://therapyforblackgirls.com/

●  Therapy for Black Men: https://therapyforblackmen.org/

●  Tips for Self-Care for Black Families: https://www.onoursleeves.org/mental-health-

resources/minority-mental-health/self-care-for-black-families

 

LATINX/HISPANIC RESOURCES

●  American Society of Hispanic Psychiatry: https://www.americansocietyhispanicpsychiatry.com/

●  Caminar Latino: https://caminarlatino.org/

●  Esperanza United: https://esperanzaunited.org/en/

●  Estoy Aqui: https://estoy-aqui.org/

●  Latino Equality Alliance: https://www.somoslea.org/

●  Latinx Therapists Action Network: https://latinxtherapistsactionnetwork.org/

○ Latinx Therapy Podcast: https://latinxtherapy.com/podcast/

●  Latinx Therapy: https://latinxtherapy.com/

●  MHA- Latinx/Hispanic Communities- Información Y Materiales De Salud Mental En Español:

https://mhanational.org/latinxhispanic-communities-informacion-y-materiales-de-salud-

mental-en-espanol

●  NAMI: Compartiendo Esperanza: https://www.nami.org/Support-Education/Mental-Health-

Education/NAMI-Compartiendo-Esperanza-Mental-Wellness-in-the-Latinx-Community

●  National Alliance for Hispanic Health: https://www.healthyamericas.org/

●  National Latino Behavioral Health Association: http://www.nlbha.org/

●  Sad Girls Club: https://sadgirlsclub.org/

●  The Latinx Mental Health Podcast: https://www.latinxmhpodcast.com/

●  Therapy for Latinx: https://www.therapyforlatinx.com/

●  UnidosUS: https://www.unidosus.org/

●  Yo Soy Ella: https://www.yosoyella.org/

 

MULTIRACIAL RESOURCES

●  American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy: Multiracial Families: https://www.aamft.org/Consumer_Updates/Multiracial_Families.aspx

●  APA Bill of Rights For People Of Mixed Heritage: https://www.apa.org/pubs/videos/4310742- rights.pdf

●  For Multiracial People Toolkit: https://thetoolkit.wixsite.com/toolkit/for-multiracial-people-families

●  Mandala Center for Change: Multi-Heritage and Mixed Race Resources: https://www.mandalaforchange.com/resources/articles/multi-heritage-mixed-race-resources/

●  Mixed in America: https://www.mixedinamerica.org/

○ Mixed Identity Workbook: https://www.mixedinamerica.org/free-workbook/

●  Mixed Life Media: https://www.mixedlife.net/

●  NPR Code Switch Team: https://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/

○ Racial Imposter Syndrome- Here are your stories: https://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2018/01/17/578386796/racial-impostor-syndrome- here-are-your-stories

●  Resources That Explore Identity for Multicultural or Mixed-Race Families: https://socialworklicensemap.com/blog/resources-explore-multicultural-identity-mixed-race- families/

●  The Wholeness of Being a Mixed Race Person: https://www.inclusivetherapists.com/blog/the- wholeness-of-being-a-mixed-race-person

●  Toward Racial Justice- Multiracial Family Dynamics: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z9K_tyymNp0

●  Why Imposter Syndrome Goes Deep for Multiracial People: https://mhanational.org/blog/why- imposter-syndrome-goes-deep-multiracial-people

 

AM – All Month – National Hispanic Heritage Month 2022 – Resources – Cultural Events, History, Veterans, Housing, Education
Oct 5 all-day

 

Hispanic Heritage Month 2022

RESOURCES

 

History and Culture

Hispanic Heritage Month Family Festival

Friday, September 16, and Saturday, September 17

 

Each year, people across the United States observe National Hispanic Heritage Month from September 15 to October 15 by celebrating and reflecting on the histories, cultures, and contributions of Americans with ancestry from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. While Hispanic Heritage Month is only 30 days, the museum’s curators, researchers, and educators work with communities across the country to document and share Latino histories every day of the year.

As part of the museum’s commitment to sharing Hispanic and Latino history, the museum has updated its Latino History topic page, where you can find even more exhibitions, programs, museum collections, and resources that reflect the richness and diversity of Latino history in the United States.

Our mission as a national public history institution is not only to tell complex stories but also to use history to empower people to create a just, compassionate, and equitable future. In an increasingly divided country, it is more important than ever to learn about and stand in solidarity with Latino communities.

Cada año las personas en Estados Unidos observan el mes de la herencia hispana desde el 15 de septiembre al 15 de octubre celebrando y reflexionando sobre la historia, cultura y contribuciones de las personas que rastrean sus orígenes a España, Méjico, el Caribe, y América Central y Sur. Aunque el mes conste de solo 30 días, los/las curadores/as, educadores/as, investigadores/as trabajan con comunidades a lo largo de todo el país para documentar y compartir las historias de Latinos/as cada día del año.

Como parte del compromiso del museo de compartir y diseminar estas historias, el museo ha actualizado su página Latino History topic page, en la cual pueden encontrar exhibiciones, colecciones, programas y recursos educativos que reflejan la rica , diversa y complicada historia de las comunidades Latinas en los Estados Unidos.

Nuestra misión como entidad de historia publica no es solo compartir historias complejas sino que apuntamos a utilizar la historia como herramienta de empoderamiento de  las personas para crear un futuro con equidad y compasión. Frente a un país tan dividido, es más importante que nunca aprender acerca de las comunidades Latinas y brindar solidaridad.

The National Museum of the American Latino recently debuted the Molina Family Latino Gallery, located within the National Museum of American History, the Smithsonian’s first gallery dedicated to the Latino experience. The inaugural exhibition ¡Presente! A Latino History of the United States illuminates U.S. Latinos’ historical and cultural legacies.

Two days of public events will kick off Hispanic Heritage Month in celebration of the gallery’s opening and commemorate 25 years of Latinidad at the Smithsonian. The program will include an evening dance party on Friday, September 16, and a Latino Heritage family day and cooking demonstration (details below) on Saturday, September 17, at the National Museum of American History. For more information, go to latino.si.edu.

Objects Out of Storage

Celebrating 25 years of Latinidad with the National Museum of American History Collections
Saturday, September 17; 11:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.
1 West

Curators with knowledge and expertise about the rich diversity of Latino history will engage in informal conversations with visitors while telling stories related to artifacts in the museum collections. Guests will have a unique opportunity to ask questions about the objects, the stories, and how they came to be part of the national collections.

Batter Up! Demonstration with Juan Baret

Saturday, September 17; 11:30 a.m.
Southwest Mall Terrace

Juan Baret’s passion for baseball spans his entire life, from his childhood in the Dominican Republic, to cheering for the Yankees when he migrated to the Bronx as a young man, to his time in the U.S. military. Join Baret as he channels his love of the game into the craftsmanship of bats. This program is in conjunction with the exhibition, ¡Pleibol! In the Barrios and the Big Leagues / En los barrios y las grandes ligas which is currently on display until January 2023 at the National Museum of American History and will travel across the country through 2025 with the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Services.

Cooking Up History

Celebrating Comida Chingona & the Low-Rider Lifestyle
Saturday, September 17; noon–1:00 p.m.
Coulter Plaza, 1 West 

The National Museum of American History continues its popular series of live cooking demonstrations for Hispanic Heritage Month. Guest Chef Silvana Salido Esparza made her mark on the U.S. food scene with the comida chingona, or “badass food,” that she serves at her Phoenix-based restaurant, Barrio Café. She draws inspiration from her Mexican heritage with the restaurant’s offerings, which honor her family’s 800-year-old gastronomic legacy with a twist. Chef Esparza is not only passionate about putting her own spin on Mexican food, but also about cars, specifically lowriders. Chef Esparza will explain the lowrider tradition during this cooking demonstration and conversation and the food culture connected to the lowrider lifestyle in Phoenix. Chef Esparza will prepare a dish illuminating Mayan barbecue, providing insights into this important, but often overlooked, culinary tradition. Visitors are encouraged to view Dave’s Dream, a lowrider from Chimayo, New Mexico.

This program is produced in collaboration with the National Museum of the American Latino.

A Conversation with Linda Alvarado

Saturday, September 17; 2:00–3:00 p.m.
Coulter Plaza, 1 West 

Dr. Margaret Salazar-Porzio, curator of the Smithsonian’s ¡Pleibol! In the Barrios and the Big Leagues / En los barrios y las grandes ligas exhibition, will interview Linda Alvarado, owner of the Colorado Rockies, about her life and career. In 1991, Alvarado became the first Latino owner—male or female—of a Major League Baseball franchise. She is a nationally recognized speaker who extends her passion for breaking barriers to motivating and encouraging young Latinas and women of all ages to achieve their dreams.

Dr. Salazar will sign copies of her book following the onstage conversation.

¡Pleibol! In the Barrios and the Big Leagues /  En los barrios y las grandes ligas is currently on display until January 2023 at the National Museum of American History and will travel across the country through 2025 with the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Services.

Selected Exhibitions

Dave’s Dream, Lowrider, 1992

Ongoing
First Floor, Center 

“Dave’s Dream” is a modified 1969 Ford LTD known as a “lowrider” and named for David Jaramillo of Chimayo, New Mexico who began customizing this car in the 1970s. After his death, Jaramillo’s family and local artisans completed the modifications that he had planned, and the car often won “first” or “best in show” in area competitions. Lowriding is a family and community activity with parades, trophies, and other events celebrating cars and paying homage to their power and beauty. Artistic paint schemes and custom upholstery make each lowrider unique and culturally significant. Hydraulic lifts enable lowriders to hop, making them seem alive and animated.

¡Pleibol! In the Barrios and the Big Leagues / En los barrios y las grandes ligas

Red silhouette of baseball player with "Pleibol"Ongoing; closes January 2023
2 East

This bilingual exhibition takes audiences on a journey into the heart of American baseball to understand how generations of Latinas/os have helped make the game what it is today. For nearly a century, baseball has been a social and cultural force in Latino communities across the United States. From hometown baseball teams to the Major Leagues, the exhibit shows how the game can bring people together and how Latino players have made a huge impact on the sport. Explore the ¡Pleibol! exhibition online.

Many Voices, One Nation

Ongoing
2 West

How did we become US? Many Voices, One Nation explores how the many voices of people in America have shaped our nation. The exhibition explores many Latino stories, including the Indigenous peoples of Spanish New Mexico and the Pueblo Revolt; the incorporation of Mexican California; the U.S. acquisition of Puerto Rico; Mexican neighborhoods in Chicago and Los Angeles; immigration and the southwest borderlands; and Cuban migration.

¡Presente! A Latino History of the United States

Molina Family Latino Gallery
1 East

The inaugural exhibition by the Smithsonian’s newest museum—the National Museum of the American Latino—introduces visitors to key concepts, moments and biographies that illuminate U.S. Latinos’ historical and cultural legacies. Hosted at the National Museum of American History, also the largest object lender to the exhibition, the 4,500 square foot gallery is an interactive space where multigenerational and cross-cultural visitors can celebrate and learn about Latino history and culture year-round. Learn more about ¡Presente! online.

Educational Resources

“The Resplendent Quetzal Bird”

History Time video 

How do people earn money? What is money made of? Elementary school students can practice their “See, Think, Wonder” routine by observing the resplendent Quetzal bird, whose long tail feathers were used as money in Central America. Watch the video.

Becoming US

Becoming US is a suite of resources for educators to present more accurate and inclusive immigration and migration narratives. There are five units organized by a theme, each with three case studies for in depth learning. Within the theme of Borderlands, we have resources on the Mexican American War. Nested in the theme of Belonging is a case study on Mexican Repatriation, and within Policy is a case study about DACA. The case studies include standards of learning, key questions and terms, primary sources, and teacher- and student-facing documents.

History Explorer

For more Latino History materials to use in the classroom, please visit our Hispanic Heritage Month themed landing page on History Explorer, the museum’s home for K-12 resources.

Exhibitions

Eagle statuette, around 1850
Many Voices, One Nation
People playing a baseball game
Pleibol! In the Barrios and the Big Leagues / En los barrios y las grandes ligas
American Enterprise
American Enterprise
Illustration of girls in school
Girlhood (It’s complicated)

See more exhibitions

From Our Blog

Graduation cap, gown, rainbow-colored stole, and costume wings in the pattern of Monarch butterfly wings. The top of the cap is decorated with flowers and has a message, "I am one of those people Mexico sent."

To explore the history of  Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), the museum’s Undocumented Organizing Collecting Initiative reached out to three undocumented organizers to share their reflections from inside the movement.

 

Gordo comic strip. Uncle Mio (wearing a suit and carrying a box of chocolates bouquet of flowers) talks to his nephew, who explains the qualities of different types of flowers. Behind the two figures appear precise, scientific diagrams of flowers.
According to Gus Arriola, creator of the comic strip Gordo, “my main goal was to maintain a positive awareness of Mexico through all the years, every day, without being political. When I started [in 1941], words like ‘burrito’ were unknown in the United States.”

See more blog posts

 

Rescources for Hispanic Veterans

ODVA Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15 through Oct. 15), the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs will be sharing stories from the state’s and nation’s military and cultural history, including profiling individual Hispanic American veterans and family members.

There are an estimated 560,000 Hispanic Americans living in Oregon today — and more than 60 million — across the United States. They represent a rich and diverse cultural heritage — as well as a proud history of service in our nation’s military — dating to some of our earliest conflicts.

Spanish-American War

April-December 1898

Col. Theodore Roosevelt and the “Rough Riders.”

Several thousand Hispanic volunteers, mostly from the southwest, fought with distinction in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War in 1898. Capt. Maximiliano Luna and others comprised a portion of the famous 1st U.S. Volunteer Cavalry — better known as “The Rough Riders” — which fought in Cuba under the command of Col. Theodore Roosevelt, who had resigned his position as assistant secretary of the Navy to join the volunteer cavalry.

The Rough Riders saw action at Las Guásimas, a village three miles north of Siboney on the way to Santiago and became the stuff of legend for their courage during the Battle of San Juan Hill. Sgt. George Armijo, another Rough Rider, later became a member of Congress and served on the school board and city council in his hometown of Santa Fe, New Mexico.

World War I

1914-1918

In May 1917, two months after legislation granting United States citizenship to individuals born in Puerto Rico was signed into law, and one month after the United States entered World War I, a unit of volunteer soldiers was transferred to the Panama Canal Zone.

Another Act of Congress was passed in 1917 to obtain needed manpower for the war effort, and the Hispanic community was eager to serve its country. They included both native-born service members, mostly of Mexican descent, and new immigrants from Latin America, Mexico and Spain. In June 1920, the unit was redesignated as the 65th Infantry Regiment and served as the U.S. military’s last segregated unit.

Hispanic soldiers like Nicholas Lucero and Marcelino Serna served with great distinction and were among the most decorated service members from WWI. Lucero received the French Croix de Guerre (roughly the equivalent of the U.S. Bronze or Silver Star) during World War I for destroying two German machine gun nests and maintaining constant fire for three hours, while Serna became the first Hispanic to be awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, the second-highest military decoration of the U.S. Armed Forces.

While serving in the Meuse-Argonne offensive, Serna also destroyed a German machine gun nest that had killed a dozen American soldiers. Even though his helmet was hit twice by bullets, Serna was able to get close enough to throw four grenades into the nest — leading to the surrender of the remaining combatants.

The courageous actions that earned Serna the Service Cross occurred on Sept. 12, 1918, when he shot and wounded a German sniper, then followed the wounded soldier to a trench. Singlehanded, he threw three grenades into the trench, which resulted in the death of 26 enemy soldiers and the capture of 24.

World War II

1939-1945

The Arizona National Guard’s 158th Infantry Regiment, better known as the “Bushmasters.”

In January 1943, 13 months after the attack on Pearl Harbor that marked the entry of the United States into World War II, the 65th Infantry Regiment again deployed to the Panama Canal Zone before being redirected overseas.

Despite relatively limited combat service in World War II, the regiment suffered casualties defending against enemy attacks, with one Distinguished Service Cross, two Silver Stars, two Bronze Stars and 90 Purple Hearts being credited to the unit.

In total, approximately 500,000 Hispanic service members served in the U.S. Armed Forces during WWII, including the Arizona National Guard’s 158th Infantry Regiment, the “Bushmasters” — which Gen. Douglas MacArthur declared “one of the greatest fighting combat teams ever deployed for battle.” The regiment was composed of many Hispanic Soldiers.

The Bushmasters’ motto was “Cuidado” — Spanish for “Take Care” — and comprised mainly of soldiers of Mexican American descent and North American Indian descent from 20 tribes. The regiment became one of the few to complete the trail from Australia to Japan, fighting day after day in critical battles to open the Visayan passages for Allied shipping in the Pacific.

The merciless campaign lasted two months in terrain laced with tank traps, wires, mines and bamboo thickets.

A total of six Hispanic Americans were flying aces in World War II and the Korean War. Approximately 200 Puerto Rican women served in the Women’s Army Corps and served in the critical role of Code Talkers to avoid enemy intelligence.

Korean War

1950-1953

When the Korean War broke out, Hispanic Americans again answered the call to duty as they, their brothers, cousins, and friends had done in World War II. Many of them became members of the 65th Infantry Regiment, which was still an all-Hispanic unit and fought in every major campaign of the war.

The 65th was nicknamed “The Borinqueneers,” a term originating from the Borinquen — one of the native Taino names for the island of Puerto Rico. Many members of the 65th were direct descendants of that tribe.

Fighting as a segregated unit from 1950 to 1952, the regiment participated in some of the fiercest battles of the war, and its toughness, courage and loyalty earned the admiration of many, including Brig. Gen. William W. Harris, who later called the unit’s members “the best damn soldiers that I had ever seen.”

Vietnam War

1959-1973

More than 80,000 Hispanic-Americans served with distinction in the Vietnam War, from the Battle for Hue City to the Siege of Khe Sanh. Among them were 1st Sgt. Maximo Yabes, the  only known Hispanic American Medal of Honor recipient with a link to Oregon.

In February 1967, Yabes’ company was assigned to provide security for a team of Army engineers who had been tasked with creating a clear zone of land between Cu Chu, a small hamlet northwest of Saigon, and a plantation to keep enemy snipers from using the thick jungle as cover.

1st Sgt. Maximo Yabes.

Yabes moved into the bunker and covered several of his troops, using his own body as a shield. Despite being struck painfully numerous times by grenade fragments, Yabes moved to another bunker and fired on the enemy with a grenade launcher he retrieved from a fallen comrade — singlehandedly halting the enemy’s advance.

Yabes went on to assist two fallen soldiers to a safe area where they could receive medical aid before seeing an enemy machine gun within the perimeter that threatened the whole company. Alone and undefended, Yabes charged across open ground toward the enemy machine gun, killing the entire crew and destroying the weapon before being mortally wounded himself.

He was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor, the United States’ highest military decoration, which was credited to Colorado, where Yabes and his family were residing at the time. A memorial was also built to honor Yabes in his original hometown of Oakridge.

On March 18, 2014, President Barack Obama presented 24 service members of Jewish or Hispanic American descent with the Medal of Honor in one of the largest Medal of Honor ceremonies in history.

Each of these soldiers’ bravery had been previously recognized by the award of the Distinguished Service Cross, the nation’s second highest award; that award was upgraded to the Medal of Honor upon further Congressional review.

Gulf War-Modern Era

1990-Present

Approximately 20,000 Hispanic servicemen and women participated in Operation Desert Shield and Operation Desert Storm in 1990 and 1991. According to Defense Manpower Data Center statistics, Hispanics comprised 4.2 percent of the Army representation in the Persian Gulf theater during the war.

And, during the most recent wars and campaigns in the Middle East, thousands of men and women of Hispanic heritage answered the call to serve in the Global War on Terror, Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, and they continue to place their boots on the ground in more than 120 countries around the world.

Now representing more than 16% of the nation’s active-duty military, the Hispanic community continues its selfless sacrifice in bringing freedom to people in other countries, making major sacrifices, and risking their lives to bring justice to those who commit or plan evil against the United States and lay a foundation for a sustainable peace.

Whether their heritage can be traced to Spain, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Mexico, or one of dozens of other Spanish-speaking countries or cultures, Hispanic Americans have, time and time again, answered the call to duty, defending America with unwavering valor and honor.

 

Mental Health, Health, Housing, Education

Social determinants of health (SDOH) are the conditions in the environments where people are born, live, learn, work, play, worship, and age that affect a wide range of health, functioning, and quality-of-life outcomes and risks. Many SDOH have a major impact on the health, well-being, and quality of life of Hispanic/Latino communities, such as:

  • Safe housing, transportation, and neighborhoods
  • Racism, discrimination, and violence
  • Education, job opportunities, and income
  • Language barriers and literacy skills

SDOH also contribute to wide health disparities and inequities. For example, people who don’t have access to grocery stores with healthy foods are less likely to have good nutrition, which can raise their risk of health conditions like heart disease, diabetes, and obesity.

Use this page to learn more about the SDOH affecting Hispanic/Latino communities and to find helpful resources from OMH’s partners to share with your communities, patients, and organizations.

Visit Health People 2030 to learn more about SDOH, learn about federal efforts to address SDOH, and explore research related to SDOH.

Visit the CDC’s website to find tools for putting SDOH in action.

 

Economic Stability

Economic stability refers to a person’s ability to find and maintain a steady income, as well as earn enough money to afford things that help them live a healthy lifestyle. Being a homeowner, working in a safe environment, having access to affordable childcare, and having financial savings can help increase economic stability. When a person is economically stable, they can afford steady housing, healthy food, and health care.

According to a 2020 report from the Joint Economic Committee, there are an estimated 29 million Hispanics in the U.S. workforce, making up 18 percent of all workers. The unemployment rate for Hispanic Americans is higher than overall unemployment rates but has been dropping steadily. Latinos are more likely to hold jobs in industries that have above-average risks of injury and exposure to harmful chemicals, such as construction, agriculture, and hospitality.

Hispanics in the U.S. tend to have lower-paying jobs than non-Hispanics. In 2018, the median income for Hispanic households was nearly $20,000 less than the median income for non-Hispanic white households. The pay gap is even larger for Hispanic women.

Despite lower wages and less financial capital, Hispanics are more likely than any other group to become new entrepreneurs. As of 2017, experts believe there are at least four million Hispanic-owned businesses in the U.S., contributing over $700 billion annually to the American economy.

Want to learn more about how economic stability impact Hispanic and Latino communities? Browse a short collection of free, related resources in the OMH Knowledge Center online catalog.

Federal Resources

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) Money Smart: Money Smart offers a Spanish-language financial education program to help individuals improve their financial health. The website is also available in Spanish.

MyMoney.gov: A one-stop shop for federal financial literacy and education programs, grants, and other information. The website is also available in Spanish.

Money and Taxes (USAGov): Learn about taxes, money the government may owe you, investing, credit help, and more. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

Government Benefits, Grants, and Loans (USAGov): Learn about government programs providing financial help to individuals and organizations. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

Jobs and Unemployment (USAGov): Find out how and where to look for a new job or career, get help if you are unemployed, and more. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

Small Business (USAGov): Learn the steps to start a small business, get financing help from the government, and more. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

MyCreditUnion.gov (National Credit Union Administration): MyCreditUnion.gov and its financial literacy microsite Pocket Cents provide a list of saving options for college as well as information on other financial services provided by credit unions. The website is also available in Spanish.

Non-Federal Resources

Social Determinants Factors that Influence your Health – Income: An infographic developed by The Nation’s Health explaining how income can influence well-being and life expectancy.

The Community Action Poverty Simulation (Missouri Community Action Network): A simulation activity that seeks to raise awareness about the complexities of poverty experienced. This resource offers information about the simulation sessions, which last 2 to 4 hours, in addition to how to purchase the simulation materials.

SUMA Wealth: The leading financial technology company devoted to increasing prosperity, opportunity, and financial inclusion for young U.S. Latinos. The website is also available in Spanish.

SUMA Academy: A wealth-building digital platform that aims to help young Latinos with personal finance through creating culturally relevant, easy-to-digest material.

 

Education Access and Quality

Research shows that the more education a person has, the more likely they are to live a healthy lifestyle. Children are more likely to be academically successful when they have access to high-quality education and safe school environments free of violence and bullying. Individuals are more likely to have higher paying jobs if they have a high school diploma, and even more so with a college degree.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of Hispanic students enrolled in schools, colleges, and universities has increased substantially between 1996 and 2016, growing from 8.8 million to 17.9 million students. This trend applies to all levels of education, ranging from nursery school to higher education institutions.

College enrollment has more than tripled for Hispanics in the United States. Compared to other racial/ethnic groups, a larger percentage of Hispanic college students (over 40 percent) attend two-year colleges rather than four-year colleges.

According to the Pew Research Center, education levels for recently arrived Latino immigrants (defined as living in the United States for five years or less) are high as well. In 2018, the percentage of recently arrived Hispanic immigrants who completed high school was 67 percent, while in 1990, this number was 38 percent.

Despite these positive trends, the percentage of young adult Hispanics who have not completed high school and are not enrolled in school is higher than non-Hispanics. Hispanics aged 25 – 34 also have the lowest percentage of graduate school enrollment compared to white, Black, and Asian Americans.

Want to learn more about how education access and quality impact Hispanic and Latino communities? Browse a short collection of free, related resources in the OMH Knowledge Center online catalog.

National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy (HHS)

National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy (HHS): A national action plan that envisions a restructuring of the ways we create and disseminate all types of health information to ensure that all children graduate with health literacy skills that will help them live healthier throughout their lifespan.

White House Initiative on Advancing Educational Equity, Excellence and Economic Opportunity for Hispanics

White House Initiative on Advancing Educational Equity, Excellence and Economic Opportunity for Hispanics: Originally established in 1990, the White House Initiative on Advancing Educational Equity, Excellence and Economic Opportunity for Hispanics was re-established in 2021 through executive order by President Joe Biden. The Initiative’s scope was expanded to advance educational equity and economic opportunity for Latino and Hispanic students, families, and communities.

Education (USAGov): Find government information on education, including primary, secondary, and higher education. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

College Scorecard (U.S. Department of Education): This online tool was designed with direct input from students, families, and their advisers to provide the clearest, most accessible, and reliable national data on college cost, graduation, debt, and post-college earnings.

Federal Student Aid (U.S. Department of Education): They provide more than $125 billion in federal grants, work-study, and loans for students attending career schools, community colleges, and colleges or universities. Their information center helps students complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and provides the public with free information about their programs. The website can be converted into Spanish.

Non-Federal Resources

Social Determinant Factors that Influence your Health – Education: An infographic created by The Nation’s Health about the connection between education and healthier people.

Health Care Access and Quality

Being able to access and use high-quality health care services is a critical part of preventing disease and keeping people healthy. There are many reasons why people cannot access or use health care services: language barriers, lack of transportation, health care costs, inability to find childcare, inability to take off time from work, and discrimination when receiving health care can all factor into a person’s ability or willingness to use health care services.

Health care access and utilization vary widely in the U.S. Hispanic population. Factors include age, country of birth, English language fluency, and length of residency in the U.S. Hispanics aged 65 and older are more likely than younger Hispanics to have a primary care provider and are more likely to have seen a provider in the past 12 months.

The percentage of Hispanic Americans with health insurance has risen over the past decade. However, this group is still more likely than any other racial/ethnic group in the U.S. to be uninsured.

Language barriers influence health care utilization as well. Approximately 46 percent of Hispanic American adults say they have a close family member or friend who requires interpretation services or a Spanish-speaking health care provider, and 50 percent of Hispanic Americans say it is difficult to understand the process of getting medical care and have had negative experiences receiving health care.

Want to learn more about how health care access and quality impact Hispanic and Latino communities? Browse a short collection of free, related resources in the OMH Knowledge Center online catalog.

Federal Resources

QuestionBuilder App: The HHS Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) QuestionBuilder app helps patients and caregivers prepare for medical appointments and maximize visit time. Also available in Spanish.

All of Us Research Program (National Institutes of Health): The NIH All of Us Research Program is a platform for conducting research whose goal is to create diverse databases of health information, which will allow researchers to understand and address health disparities in underrepresented populations. Also available in Spanish.

From Coverage to Care: A Roadmap to Better Care and a Healthier You: This roadmap explains what health coverage is and how to use it to get primary care and preventive services so that you and your family live long, healthy lives. Available in Spanish and multiple other languages.

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Consumer Resources in English and Spanish. Resources are also available in multiple other languages.

Health (USAGov): Find health resources from the government. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

 

Non-Federal Resources
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Therapy for Latinx: A database of therapists who either identify as Latinx or have worked closely with Latinx communities and understand their needs. The website is available in English and Spanish and offers other helpful tools and resources.

Mental Health America: Has Spanish-language tools and resources regarding mental health for Latinos, along with articles and ways to get help.

NAMI Compartiendo Esperanza: A helpful tool that includes a three-part video series to increase mental health awareness in Latino communities.

 

Neighborhood and Built Environment

Safe neighborhoods allow people to live healthier and happier lives. Racial and ethnic minority populations are more likely to live in areas where there is violence, water and air pollution, exposure to toxic substances, a lack of trees and green spaces, loud noise, and a lack of access to healthy foods. All these factors can directly or indirectly impact a person’s health.

A 2019 report from the Joint Economic Committee states that 94 percent of Latinos currently live in urban areas, but this is changing. States with historically low Hispanic populations, such as North and South Dakota, are experiencing fast increases in Hispanic residents.

Hispanic Americans are far more likely than non-Hispanic white Americans to be concerned about environmental issues. According to a Pew Research Center survey, 71 percent of Hispanic adults state climate change has affected their community, compared to 54 percent of non-Hispanic adults. This percentage is even higher for foreign-born Hispanics.

According to Yale Climate Connections, an initiative of the Yale Center for Environmental Communication, several research teams have found that Hispanics are often disproportionately affected by environmental factors. Many predominantly Latino neighborhoods have a higher risk of flooding, drought, and air pollution. These neighborhoods often have fewer green spaces, which are known to lower temperatures during extreme heat.

Want to learn more about how neighborhoods and built environments impact Hispanic and Latino communities? Browse a short collection of free, related resources in the OMH Knowledge Center online catalog.

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD): HUD offers housing counseling to help consumers make informed housing decisions. HUD works with organizations, such as UnidosUS, to develop and support Latino homeownership programs in various states. The website can be converted into Spanish.

Housing (USAGov): Get information and services to help find and keep a home. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

Housing and the Latino community (UnidosUS)

Social Determinant Factors that Influence your Health – Housing: An infographic created by The Nation’s Health addressing where and how people live, can influence how healthy they are and how well they live.

COVID-19 Informational Guide for Public Housing Residents – Know the Basics of Seeking Care: A bilingual tool developed by the National Center for Health in Public Housing to provide general information on how public housing residents can seek care for COVID-19 testing services provided by health centers near public housing agencies and how the Public Charge rule does not apply for these services. Also available in Spanish.

Resources Related to Coronavirus and Rural Housing (Housing Assistant Council): This webpage presents a list of COVID-19-related resources that pertain to housing. Although the webpage title explicitly refers to rural housing, it links to resources that typically pertain to housing in general that would be relevant to readers interested in housing in both rural and non-rural areas.

The EveryONE Project: Neighborhood Navigator (American Academy of Family Physicians): Allows users to search by zip code for resources and programs in their neighborhood to address their patients’ social determinants of health (SDOH). Provides information on food, housing, goods, transportation, health, care, education, employment, and more. The tool can be converted into Spanish and other languages.

Health Equity Report Card (Salud America!): The Health Equity Report Card generates local housing, transit, healthcare, and other data so you can drive the healthy change your community needs most.

School Food Pantry Action Pack (Salud America!): A free guide to help school personnel talk to decision-makers, work through logistics, and start a School Food Pantry to help hungry students and reduce local food insecurity.

Social and Community Context

Social and community support can greatly improve a person’s health and well-being. Positive, healthy relationships and community engagement can buffer disruptive environmental factors, especially for children and young adults. Disruptive factors can include incarceration, deportation, discrimination, bullying, and violence. When these disruptive and stressful factors are present, a person’s overall stress level (often called “allostatic load”) can directly influence their mental and physical health.

Discrimination and deportation remain key sources of stress for many Hispanic Americans. A Pew Research Center survey found that23 percent of Hispanic Americans were criticized for speaking Spanish in public, and 20 percent were called offensive names in the past year. Research also shows that over 39 percent of Hispanic Americans worry that they or an individual close to them could be deported. In 2019, 80 percent of Hispanics living in the U.S. were citizens. This is an increase from 74 percent in 2010.

According to Voto Latino, a growing number of Hispanic Americans are exercising their voting rights. Experts believe over 16 million Latinos voted in 2020, an increase of nearly 40 percent since 2016. Around 12 million Latinos are eligible to vote but are not registered.

Want to learn more about how social and community context impact Hispanic and Latino communities? Browse a short collection of free, related resources in the OMH Knowledge Center online catalog.

Promoting Health Equity: A Resource to Help Communities Address Social Determinants of Health: A workbook developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for public health practitioners and partners interested in addressing social determinants of health in order to promote health and achieve health equity.

Voting and Elections (USAGov): Find answers to common questions about voting in the United States. The webpage is also available in Spanish.

 

Non-Federal Resources

Anti-Racist Farmers Market Toolkit (The Farmers Market Coalition): The toolkit was developed by a group of Black food systems leaders and market managers to help put anti-racism concepts into practice within farmers markets. The aim is to improve market experiences for Black, Latino, and other people of color.

The Latino Victory Fund: an organization dedicated to building political power in the Latino community so that the voices and values of Latinos are reflected at every level of government and in the policies that drive our country forward.

Voto Latino: a pioneering civic media organization seeking to transform America by recognizing Latinos’ innate leadership. Their work focuses on building a pipeline meant to serve and empower our community, consisting of three parts: civic engagement, issue advocacy, and leadership development. The website is also available in Spanish.

GreenLatinos: an active community of Latino/a/x leaders, emboldened by the power and wisdom of our culture, united to demand equity and dismantle racism, resourced to win our environmental, conservation, and climate justice battles, and driven to secure our political, economic, cultural, and environmental liberation. The website is also available in Spanish.

Office of Minority Health

Get in touch

AM – All Month – ODVA – Oregon Dept of Veterans Affairs – Veterans Resource number (1-800-698-2411) & Veteran Resource Listings
Oct 5 all-day

 

Veteran Resource Navigator

The Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs (ODVA) has a comprehensive online resource guide (VETERAN RESOURCE NAVIGATOR) available to assist veterans in finding the benefits that are most useful to their unique circumstances at this time.

 

Use the link below for the Veteran Resource Navigator

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx)

 

USE THIS LINK TO OPEN THE VA WELCOME KIT

Print out your VA Welcome Kit

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned.

Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy, so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

Download your VA Welcome Kit

You are welcome to share this guide with friends or family members who need help with their benefits too. You can print out copies for yourself and others:

Download our guides to VA benefits and services

For Veterans

For family members

Other Resources Available to Veterans and Military Service Members

DD214 & Military Records Request:

https://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records

Veteran Resource Navigator site by ODVA:

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

(Oregon)Military Help Line:  

Call 888-457-4838

VA Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255:

Press 1.VA Confidential crisis chat at net or text to 838255 

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD:

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/

Defining Discharge Status:

https://militarybenefits.info/character-of-discharge/#:~:text=There%20are%206%20types%20of,DD%20214%20must%20have%20a

How to apply for a discharge status upgrade:

https://www.va.gov/discharge-upgrade-instructions/

Oregon Supportive Services for Vets & Families (Housing):

https://caporegon.org/what-we-do/ssvf/

Clackamas County VSO’s (Veteran Service Officers):

https://www.clackamas.us/socialservices/veterans.html

Portland VA Clinic that can help with homelessness & medical care:

https://www.portland.va.gov/locations/crrc.asp

Portland VA Mental Health Clinic:

https://www.portland.va.gov/services/mentalhealth.asp

Veterans Crisis Line/ Suicide Prevention:

https://www.veteranscrisisline.net/

 

If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance,

please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.

 

Contact ODVA Headquarters

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs
700 Summer St NE
Salem, OR 97301

Web: https://www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/default.aspx

Phone: (800) 692-9666 or (503) 373-2085

Fax: (503) 373-2392

Email:orvetsbenefits@odva.state.or.us

Frame – FREE Online Recorded Workshops by Frame – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online
Oct 5 all-day

Visit link: tryframe.com

WHAT IF I’M JUST NOT READY TO TRY THERAPY?

That’s OK. The L.A.-based mental health startup Frame hosts digital workshops, led by licensed therapists, “for people who aren’t ready to try therapy,” said the company’s CEO Kendall Bird.

“It’s a way for people around the country — and specifically in Los Angeles — to get a sense of what therapy could be like for them, to have a better understanding of what you can talk about in therapy and also to learn that there are really different styles of therapists,” she said.

For people not ready or wanting to seek counseling with a therapist just yet, but who could use some information on common topics Frame offers FREE anonymous, online recorded workshops led by licensed therapists from the Frame network, designed to leave you with tangible tools for real life. Tune in when and where it works for you, as a supplement to your in-person sessions, or as a convenient way to explore specific topics and learn about what gets talked about in therapy.

Frame workshops:

https://portal-client.tryframe.com/workshops

Topics include but are not limited to:

For now, linking up directly with a therapist or counselor through Frame may only available for California residents, but you can add your name to a waiting list.  If you have insurance, you may want to contact them regarding providers in the network.  If you do not have insurance, you may want to explore community based services and/or faith based services that may offer Free or Sliding Scale services.  Or you may want to explore other self-help options online.
Warmlines – National Warmline Directory and Resources (USA) @ Phone
Oct 5 all-day

Need someone to talk to?  Check out Warmline.org

poster

According to the Center for Hope and Recovery, “A warmline is a telephone service (aka a call line) for people who are looking for someone to discuss their daily struggles. Warmlines are staffed with peers who have lived experience of mental health struggles themselves and who are open to sharing their stories of challenging situations, recovery, and perseverance”  The hours, days and geographic reach may vary.  Fortunately, there are many warmlines including quite a number operating in Oregon such as but not limited to: The David Romprey Warmline.

Check out this article “What is a Warmline and What Should I Expect When I Call One?” by Chaya Grossberg: https://www.madinamerica.com/2014/06/warm-line-expect-call-one/

Find the extensive list of Warmlines for many locations online at: http://www.warmline.org/

To search for Warmlines by state, click on a state in the list below.

(Note: Warmlines listed in red are nationally accessible and welcome calls from anywhere)

Also, be sure to check out the Warmline Resource page by the National Empowerment Center (NEC) at: https://www.power2u.org/peer-run-warmlines-resources

In addition, you can:

  1. Access the Warmline Resources page and Guide by the National Empowerment Center at: https://www.power2u.org/peer-run-warmlines-resources
  2. Join the Yahoo mailing list / group on Warmlines by sending an email to: hdt@mit.edu
  3. Join the Yahoo mailing list / group on Peer Respite by sending an email to: hdt@mit.edu
  4. Send updates to the web page by email to: hdt@mit.edu
  5. Visit links for starting a warmline at: http://www.warmline.org/#Warmline%20training%20Information%20and%20other%20resource%20links

Article regarding Peer Warmlines

Sustaining Recovery through the Night:
Impact of a Peer-Run Warm Line

by Rebecca Spirito Dalgin, Simonne Maline, and Peter Driscoll

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21768081/

Excerpt(s):

Objective: This exploratory study describes the impact of a peer-run warm line on the lives of individuals with psychiatric disabilities.

Methods: Phone surveys were completed with 480 warm line callers over four years. Results: Warm line callers reported a reduction in the use of crisis services and a reduction of feelings of isolation.

Conclusions and Implications for Practice: The results indicate that peer-run warm lines can fill an important void in the lives of individuals living with mental [health challenges]. Although warm lines at any time of day are helpful, keeping warm lines running after 5pm and throughout the night provides support services not typically available after office hours and can assist with loneliness, symptom management, and the process of recovery.

WarmLines – TP – The Trevor Project – TrevorSpace – Warmlines, Chat, Phone – Support Group – 24/7 @ Online VIA ZOOM
Oct 5 all-day

Treavor Porject Logo

Meet new LGBTQ friends in TrevorSpace

TrevorSpace is an affirming, online community for LGBTQ young people between the ages of 13-24 years old. With over 400,000 members across the globe, you can explore your identity, get advice, find support, and make friends in a moderated community intentionally designed for you.

To Join and enter TreavorSpace please use the link provided below.

https://www.trevorspace.org/register/

Warmline for Family + Caregivers Support – AARP – American Association of Retired Persons – Weekdays 4am-8pm PST @ Phone
Oct 5 @ 4:00 am – 8:00 pm

logo

AARP Family Caregiving Resource Line

AARP has a dedicated, toll-free family caregiving line for people taking care of a loved one.  Agents can’t provide specific advice to callers, but they can suggest resources on a variety of caregiving topics.

Along with comprehensive coverage of issues affecting caregivers, AARP offers free care guides, legal checklists, information on care options and an online community that supports all types of family caregivers. You can also call our caregiver support line for one-on-one help.

Agents are Available on Weekdays, Monday-Friday from 4am-8pm PST / 7am-11pm EST

English: 1-877-333-5885

En Español / Spanish: 1-888-971-2013

NEW: CONNECTIONS WEBSITE

https://aarpcommunityconnections.org

NEW: MUTUAL AID GROUPS – Informal groups of volunteers that band together to find effective ways to support those people most in need who live in their local community. Mutual aid can include picking up groceries, providing financial assistance, or lending emotional support to your neighbors.  Visit https://aarpcommunityconnections.org/find-group/

Q: How can I find support groups for family caregivers?  EnglishEn Español / Spanish.

A: Here are some resources

Finding the Right Support Group – Read this First.  An excellent article about the types of support groups available.  https://www.aarp.org/caregiving/life-balance/info-2017/support-groups.html.

Benefits of support groups may include but not be limited to: a safe place for sharing, venting, validating, comparing, uniting, advocating, finding social connection, and building community.

Caregiving.com – Caring for you as you care for family.  Online calendar of virtual support events: https://www.caregiving.com/calendar/

Community Resource Locator – an online database from AARP and the Alzheimer’s Association, provides easy access to a variety of local programs, resources and services.  https://www.communityresourcefinder.org/

Family Care Navigator – the Family Caregiver Alliance’s tool that helps locate state-by-state assistance for family caregivers.  800-445-8106.  https://www.caregiver.org/family-care-navigator

The Eldercare Locator – a public service of the U.S. Administration on Aging that connects you to services for older adults and their families such as respite care, insurance counseling, transportation and other services for older Americans and family members.  They can also be reached at 1-800-677-1116.  https://eldercare.acl.gov/Public/Index.aspx

AARP Caregiving Community Forum – an online discussion and support forum on all topics related to caregiving.  https://community.aarp.org/t5/Caregiving/Welcome-to-the-AARP-Caregiving-Community/m-p/1786782#M3126

Caregiver Action Network – Information, educational materials and support for family caregivers. Toll Free phone number: 855-CARE-640

National Alliance for Caregiving – a coalition of national organizations focused on family caregiving issues. The alliance conducts policy analysis and tracks legislation and initiatives that affect caregivers and care recipients.  Phone: 202-918-1013.  https://www.caregiving.org

National Institute on Aging – an arm of the National Institutes of Health, NIA offers extensive online information on common age-related health problems, including a section on caregiving for people with serious health issues..  800-222-2225. https://www.nia.nih.gov/

Well Spouse Association – provides support for spousal caregivers, including a national network of support groups and an online chat forum. 800-838-0879. https://wellspouse.org/

VA (Veterans Administration) National Caregiver Support Line (CSL) – serves as a primary resource/referral center to assist caregivers, Veterans, and others seeking caregiver information. VA’s Caregiver Support Line has licensed caring professionals standing by.  The National Caregiver Support Line, at 1-855-260-3274, is open weekdays, Monday through Friday from 5am to 5pm PST.  https://www.caregiver.va.gov/help_landing.asp

Rosalyn Carter Institute for Caregiving – Education, Research, Advocacy and more. http://www.rosalynncarter.org/

Alzheimer’s Association – Information and support for people with Alzheimer’s disease and their caregivers. Operates a 24-hour helpline every day and offers care navigator tools. 800-272-3900.  http://www.alz.org/

Alzheimers.gov – a federal government website focusing on Alzheimer’s and dementia care, research and support, including resources for caregivers. 800-438-4380. https://www.alzheimers.gov

Memory Cafe Directory – lists more than 700 memory cafés offered in hospitals, libraries, senior centers and other facilities to help people with dementia and other cognitive issues, as well as their caregivers, combat social isolation and connect with others in similar situations. https://www.memorycafedirectory.com/

AARP care guides – FREE, in-depth information and advice on starting vital conversations with older family members, organizing important documents, assessing your loved one’s needs and finding key resources.

Prepare to Care: A Planning Guide for Families. Prepare to Care is also available in Spanish- and Chinese-language versions and editions tailored for Asian American and LGBT families.   https://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/caregiving/2018/02/prepare-to-care-guide-english-aarp.pdf

Military Caregiving Guide: For Veterans, Service Members and Their Families – A road map to meeting the unique challenges of caring for a wounded, ill or aging veteran or service member. AARP has also produced a tool kit for employers to help them accommodate and assist military caregivers in balancing workplace and caregiving responsibilities.  https://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/caregiving/2019/05/military-caregiving-guide-aarp.pdf

Warmline – MHAAO – Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon – Evolve Peer Support Services – Multiple Numbers -Weekdays – 9am-5pm (PST) @ Phone
Oct 5 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

logo 144h

MHAAO is pleased to offer Evolve’s Peer Support by Phone for persons affected by the pandemic, wildfires, and similar issues.

Do you need someone to talk to?  We’re available for anyone to call peer support no matter what!

Happy to work with any age groups from any area.

Will make arrangements for virtual peer support if requested. 

Generally available @ 9am-5pm PST Weekdays, Monday through Friday.

See names and numbers below.

Flyer excerpt(s):
Have you been impacted by COVID-19 or the Oregon Wildfires?
Our Peer Support Specialists are here to help!
Call us Monday through Friday, 9am-5pm PST
==========
Monica Alexander
971-337-6716
Bill Beall
971-337-4550
Roman Becerra
971-930-9017
Bryan Corley
971-282-8101
Amber Hatkoff
971-352-0582
Molly Griggs
971-337-5506
Anthony Jarrard
971-337-4791
Grace Jo
503-314-3309
Amber Lakin
971-930-9404
Jenny Manzanares
971-241-1404
Howard Marlow
971-337-6293
Jesse Maxwell
971-202-6337
Larae Miller
503-719-1725
Brenda Mitchell
971-337-6715
Geoff Moser
971-202-3142
Marianne O’Neill-Tutor
971-337-6624
Tara Prince
971-413-0264
Kristina Teasley
971-930-9014
=========
Evolve is a program of Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon (MHAAO).
flyer p2

 

DDAO – Dual Diagnosis Anonymous of Oregon – 5PM to 6PM PST- Tuesdays @ Online Via ZOOM
Oct 5 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

 

DDA Online Meeting

Tuesdays, 5PM to 6PM PST

Join Zoom Meeting: https://zoom.us/j/268498372

Dual Diagnosis Anonymous (DDA) is a peer support group based on an authorized version of the 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous plus an additional 5 Steps that focus on Dual Diagnosis (mental illness and substance abuse). DDA’s unique 12 Steps Plus 5 Program offers hope for achieving the promise of recovery. Read more about the history of DDA at http://www.ddaoregon.com/about.htm.

Facebook link:

http://www.facebook.com/business/dashboard/#/pages/Portland-OR/Dual-Diagnosis-Anonymous-of-Oregon-Inc/90538964670

Oct
6
Thu
00 – Hotlilne – Nation Wide Launch of 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline – 24/7 @ online event register for details.
Oct 6 all-day

 

Oregon is ready for nationwide launch of 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline

Starting July 16, people in Oregon and nationwide will be able to call, text or chat 988, a new three-digit number, available 24/7, that will directly connect anyone experiencing a behavioral health crisis to compassionate care and support from trained crisis counselors. The 988 dialing-code connects callers to the existing National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, a network of local crisis call-centers throughout the country. In Oregon, 988 call-centers are operated by Lines for Life statewide, and Northwest Human Services in Marion and Polk counties.

How Does 988 Work?

988 was established in July 2022 to improve access to crisis services in a way that meets our country’s growing suicide and mental health-related crisis care needs. 988 provides easier access to behavioral health crisis services, which are distinct from the public safety purposes of 911 (where the focus is on dispatching Emergency Medical Services, fire and police as needed).

911 continues to operate as it does across the state. For serious and life-threatening situations, 988 call centers work with local mental health providers to support appropriate interventions.

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and Oregon’s 988 call centers are collaborating with 911 Public Safety Answering Points to develop a roadmap on how 911 and 988 can coordinate with each other in the future.

988 crisis counselors are trained to use the least invasive interventions. Oftentimes, responding to a call, text or chat is all that is needed to help someone in crisis. In fact, more than 95 percent of current calls are resolved over the phone.

If a 988 call cannot be resolved over the phone, a mobile crisis team or first responder may be dispatched.

Other important facts to know:

  • 988 is available through every landline, cell phone and voice-over internet device in the United States, as well as text and chat.
  • The current technology for 988 routes callers by area code, not geolocation.
  • 988 is not currently available when phones are locked or do not have prepaid minutes.
  • The transition to 988 does not impact the availability of crisis services for veterans and military service members. They can call 988 and press 1 to connect with the Veterans Crisis Line.
  • For support in Spanish, callers can press 2 to connect with the Red Nacional de Prevención del Suicidio.

The 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline has an infographic with more information on what happens when people call, text or chat.

Community partners interested in helping promote 988 can use posters, social media shareables and other materials about 988 from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration at samhsa.gov/988. Learn more about 988 in Oregon on OHA’s 988 webpage. Read OHA’s press release about 988.

 

00 – Hotline – VideoPhone+ASL DEAF – Accessible Hotline @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) – Anytime 24/7/365 – Weekdays and Weekends @ VideoPhone+ASL
Oct 6 all-day
00 - Hotline - VideoPhone+ASL DEAF - Accessible Hotline @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) - Anytime 24/7/365 - Weekdays and Weekends @ VideoPhone+ASL

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

01 – Helpline – SSH – Safe + Strong Helpline for Behavioral, Mental and Emotional Health Support – Interpreters Available @ 1-800-923-4357 (HELP) – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free
Oct 6 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

04 – PRS – Peer Recovery Solutions – Peer Development Initiative 2022 – 2023 – Earn CEUs – Training Dates @ Online Via Goole Meet
Oct 6 all-day

 

FREE Peer and CRM CEU’s

Peer Recovery Solutions is excited to provide over 150 FREE continuing education units in 2022-23. Our goal is to help make the peer/recovery mentor field strong, healthy, and effective.

Below is a list of trainings you can take for FREE that will help build skills, meet the requirements of re-certification, and even achieve an CRM II (an advanced peer certification through the Mental Health and Addiction Certification Board of Oregon).

Learn more about CRM II status by visiting www.mhacbo.org and clicking certifications.

Participant Criteria and Directions

To receive credit you will need to be a peer/recovery mentor or someone who supervises/works with peers/recovery mentors. To receive credit you will need to attend the entire meeting and be visibly engaged.

To attend, you just need to click the links below. All trainings are hosted digitally on GoogleMeets.

Have questions? Email or call me: 5037340474 | tony@peerrecoverysolutions.org

August Training Dates

Motivational Interviewing, Supervisors 8/5/2022 1-5pm: Click HERE TO JOINGoes towards CRM II

Motivational Interviewing, Outreach and Engagement 8/12/2022 1-5pm: Click HERE TO JOINGoes towards CRM II

Peer Supervision 8/19/2022 1-5pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

Transition Age Youth Peer Best Practices 8/26/2022 1-5pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

September Training Dates

Recovery Capital 9/25/2022 1012pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

OctoberTraining Dates

Recovery Capital 10/6/2022 10-12pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

Recovery Capital 10/13/2022 10-12pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

LGBTQ+ Peer 10/28/2022 9-12pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

November Training Dates

Recovery Capital 11/10/2022 10-12pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

Peer Supervision Best Practices 11/16/2022 812pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

Recovery Capital 11/24/2022 10-12pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

December Training Dates

Recovery Capital 12/8/2022 10-12pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

Ethics 12/14/2022 8-12pm: Click HERE TO JOINGoes towards CRM II

Recovery Capital 12/22/2022 10-12pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

January Training Dates

Recovery Capital 1/5/2022 10-12pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

LGBTQ+ Peer 10/28/2022 9-12pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

Feburary Training Dates

Not yet posted…

March Training Dates

LGBTQ+ Peer 3/17/2022 9-12pm: Click HERE TO JOIN

April Training Dates

Not yet posted…

04 – Resources – Resource Lists for First Responders, Educators, LGBTQ, Hispanic, Youth, Elderly, Parents and More
Oct 6 all-day

 

Suicide Prevention Resource Center

 

Event Image

Rescource Lists to Support Mental Health and Coping with the Coronavirus (COVID-19)

 

LISTS COURTESY OF THE SUICIDE PREVENTION RESCOURCE CENTER

 

GENERAL AUDIANCE

MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

HEALTH CARE WORKERS AND FIRST RESPONDERS

 

COMMUNITY LEADERS

AMERICAN INDIANS AND ALASKA NATIVES

COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITES

 

SCHOOLS

PARENTS AND CARE GIVERS

TEENAGERS

OLDER ADULTS

HISPANICS/LATINOS

LGBTQ

FAITH COMMUNITIES

WORKPLACES

COVID-19 Resource Lists from Partners of the Suicide Prevention Resource Center

  • The National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention (Action Alliance) has developed a list of resources on safe messaging and for some specific populations.
  • The Zero Suicide Institute (ZSI) has developed a resource list for health care leaders and mental health professionals that addresses safe suicide care.
  • The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has developed a resource list for individuals, providers, communities, and states focused on behavioral health care.
  • Education Development Center (EDC) has developed a list of resources related to health, mental health, and education.

 

 

04 Resource – Veterans Support Groups, Resources, Education and Advocacy
Oct 6 all-day

USE THIS LINK TO OPEN THE VA WELCOME KIT

Print out your VA Welcome Kit

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned.

Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy, so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

 

LOCATE SERVICES IN OREGON

Veteran Resource Navigator

The Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs (ODVA) has a comprehensive online resource guide (VETERAN RESOURCE NAVIGATOR) available to assist veterans in finding the benefits that are most useful to their unique circumstances at this time.

Use the link below for the Veteran Resource Navigator

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

Veteran Services by County

Click on the link blow for interactive map  access resources in your county in Oregon.

Other Resources Available to Veterans and Military Service Members

DD214 & Military Records Request:

https://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records

Veteran Resource Navigator site by ODVA:

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

(Oregon)Military Help Line:  

Call 888-457-4838

VA Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255:

Press 1.VA Confidential crisis chat at net or text to 838255 

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD:

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/

Defining Discharge Status:

https://militarybenefits.info/character-of-discharge/#:~:text=There%20are%206%20types%20of,DD%20214%20must%20have%20a

How to apply for a discharge status upgrade:

https://www.va.gov/discharge-upgrade-instructions/

Oregon Supportive Services for Vets & Families (Housing):

https://caporegon.org/what-we-do/ssvf/

Clackamas County VSO’s (Veteran Service Officers):

https://www.clackamas.us/socialservices/veterans.html

Portland VA Clinic that can help with homelessness & medical care:

https://www.portland.va.gov/locations/crrc.asp

Portland VA Mental Health Clinic:

https://www.portland.va.gov/services/mentalhealth.asp

Veterans Crisis Line/ Suicide Prevention:

https://www.veteranscrisisline.net/

If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance,

please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.

Contact ODVA Headquarters

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs
700 Summer St NE
Salem, OR 97301

Web: