PeerGalaxy Original Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring over 99,000+ monthly offerings of FREE telephone- and online-accessible peer support, recovery support + wellness activities!

Over 30+ warmlines plus webinars, workshops, job postings, special events, consumer input opportunities and more.

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

Click the Accessibility Button on the right side, halfway down in the middle, for enhanced viewing and/or access options!  Click the Translate Button in the lower left corner for language options. 

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If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

How Events are Sorted:

First, at the top of the list: SAMHSA Disaster Helpline and similar links.

Next in the list: Bundled “All Day” Events for organizations with events happening at multiple times throughout the day and/or in many formats or locations; these are bundled into a single listing to prevent endless scrolling.  Usually these offer a lookup by zip code or other criteria. 

Lastly, Time-Specific Events listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  Warmlines and places east of Oregon’s time zone tend to start earlier (e.g. 4am in Oregon is 7am in New York).

Apr
21
Sun
2024
0 – Hotline – DH – DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends
Apr 21 all-day
0 - Hotline - DH - DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) - 24/7 - Weekdays and Weekends

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

00 – Hotlilne – 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline – 24/7 Weekdays & Weekends
Apr 21 all-day

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Oregon is ready for nationwide launch of 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline

Starting July 16, people in Oregon and nationwide will be able to call, text or chat 988, a new three-digit number, available 24/7, that will directly connect anyone experiencing a behavioral health crisis to compassionate care and support from trained crisis counselors. The 988 dialing-code connects callers to the existing National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, a network of local crisis call-centers throughout the country. In Oregon, 988 call-centers are operated by Lines for Life statewide, and Northwest Human Services in Marion and Polk counties.

How Does 988 Work?

988 was established in July 2022 to improve access to crisis services in a way that meets our country’s growing suicide and mental health-related crisis care needs. 988 provides easier access to behavioral health crisis services, which are distinct from the public safety purposes of 911 (where the focus is on dispatching Emergency Medical Services, fire and police as needed).

911 continues to operate as it does across the state. For serious and life-threatening situations, 988 call centers work with local mental health providers to support appropriate interventions.

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and Oregon’s 988 call centers are collaborating with 911 Public Safety Answering Points to develop a roadmap on how 911 and 988 can coordinate with each other in the future.

988 crisis counselors are trained to use the least invasive interventions. Oftentimes, responding to a call, text or chat is all that is needed to help someone in crisis. In fact, more than 95 percent of current calls are resolved over the phone.

If a 988 call cannot be resolved over the phone, a mobile crisis team or first responder may be dispatched.

Other important facts to know:

  • 988 is available through every landline, cell phone and voice-over internet device in the United States, as well as text and chat.
  • The current technology for 988 routes callers by area code, not geolocation.
  • 988 is not currently available when phones are locked or do not have prepaid minutes.
  • The transition to 988 does not impact the availability of crisis services for veterans and military service members. They can call 988 and press 1 to connect with the Veterans Crisis Line.
  • For support in Spanish, callers can press 2 to connect with the Red Nacional de Prevención del Suicidio.

The 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline has an infographic with more information on what happens when people call, text or chat.

Community partners interested in helping promote 988 can use posters, social media shareables and other materials about 988 from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration at samhsa.gov/988. Learn more about 988 in Oregon on OHA’s 988 webpage. Read press release about 988.

00 – Hotline – 2SLGBT+ CRISIS CALL & TEXT SERVICES GUIDE – 24/7 Weekdays & Weekends
Apr 21 all-day

 

 

 2SLGBT+ CRISIS CALL & TEXT SERVICES GUIDE

YOUR GUIDE TO CRISIS CALL & TEXT SERVICES

 

988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline Crisis Text Line                           Youthline
Text or cal l988 Text “NATIVE” to 741741 Call 877-968-8491 or text” teen2teen” to 839863
Available 24/7 Available 24/7 Available 24/7, youth peers answering from 4pm-10pm PST.
Connects to Crisis Counselor Connects to Crisis Counselor Connects to youth peer counselors  native youth peer counselors available
For Any Person For Any Person For Youth
For any mental health Crisis For any mental health Crisis For any mental health crisis or general emotional support
Formerly known as the Suicide Prevention Lifeline, operated by SAMHSA Operated by Crisis Text Line Operated by Lines for Life

 

00 – Hotline – Boys Town National Hot Line – A 24/7 crisis, resource and referral number for kids and parents – 1-800-448-3000 – Text VOICE to 20121 @ Phone
Apr 21 all-day

 

 

 

 

 

Increasing Outreach to Teens

Teens are more connected than ever ​before and the Boys Town National Hotline® at 800-448-3000 is right there with them.

In addition to calling, teens can now text VOICE to 20121 or email hotline@boystown.org any day, any time to speak with a trained counselor.

Online resources are also available at yourlifeyourvoice.org.

 

00 – Hotline – HRSA – Health Resources and Services Administration – National Maternal Mental Health Hotline -1-833-TLC-MAMA (1-833-852-6262) – en Espanol – 24/7 @ Phone
Apr 21 all-day
00 - Hotline - HRSA - Health Resources and Services Administration - National Maternal Mental Health Hotline -1-833-TLC-MAMA (1-833-852-6262) - en Espanol - 24/7 @ Phone

 

National Maternal Mental Health Hotline

24/7, free, confidential hotline for pregnant and new moms in English and Spanish

1-833-TLC-MAMA (1-833-852-6262)

About the National Maternal Mental Health Hotline

The National Maternal Mental Health Hotline provides 24/7, free, confidential support before, during, and after pregnancy. The Hotline offers callers:

  • Phone or text access to professional counselors
  • Real-time support and information
  • Response within a few minutes, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week
  • Resources
  • Referrals to local and telehealth providers and support groups
  • Culturally sensitive support
  • Counselors who speak English and Spanish
  • Interpreter services in 60 languages

Frequently Asked Questions about the National Maternal Mental Health Hotline.

Use our Partner Toolkit to promote the Hotline or order promotional materials.

Date Last Reviewed:
01 – Helpline – Native and Strong Helpline – Washington State Only – 24/7
Apr 21 all-day
01 - Helpline - Native and Strong Helpline - Washington State Only - 24/7

 

Native & Strong Lifeline

Available 24/7

Dial 988 + 4

The Native & Strong Lifeline is a crisis call center operated entirely by Native staff and is available 24/7 in Washington
State. To connect with the Native & Strong Lifeline from a Washington State area code, dial 988 and press “4”.

The Native crisis counselor who answers will help with mental health crises in an empathetic and culturally connected way.
The Native & Strong Lifeline currently employs 16 Indigenous counselors from all over the United States. In addition to the training all 988 crisis counselors receive, Native & Strong counselors are trained in cultural competency, traditional forms of healing, and Native slang and language. Counselors use cultural activities, traditional medicines, and connections with elders and Native healers as a part of self-care planning with callers, in addition to clinical and community resources.

Although Native & Strong is only available in Washington State, this crisis call center can serve as a model for Tribes
that want to open their own crisis call centers nationwide.

To learn more about how Native & Strong was created, visit
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hleYKuADK70

 

02 – Urgent Info – MAC – Mapping Action Collective – Oregon Resources and Services for Transgender Youth and Young Adults
Apr 21 all-day
02 - Urgent Info - MAC - Mapping Action Collective - Oregon Resources and Services for Transgender Youth and Young Adults

 

RESOURCES

Trans Youth and Young Adults

“These rescources selectedf from the Mapping Action Collective

( https://www.oregonyouthresourcemap.com)

Description:

Description:

541 Willamette St #310, Eugene, OR 97401

 

Description:

1132 SW 13th Ave, Portland, OR 97205

Description:

Ages: 16-24
Housing & Shelter: Homeless Youth
941 W. 7th Ave. Eugene, OR 97402
New Roads Drop-In Center: (541) 686-4310
Station 7 Youth Crisis Line: (541) 689-3111

Description:

COVID Message: Hours may be impacted by COVID. Please call for updated hours.
Eligibility: Homeless youth ages 12-21
Languages: English, Spanish
Ages: 12-21
Housing & Shelter: Housing Services
1202 SE Douglas Ave, Roseburg, OR 97470

Description:

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources
Nativity Lutheran Church, 60850 Brosterhous Rd., Bend

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources
Prineville Presbyterian Church, 1771 NW Madras Hwy, Prineville

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources
5633 SE Division St. Portland, OR 97206

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources
1144 Gateway Loop, Suite 200, Springfield, OR 97477
Crystal Falk, Director of Youth and Family Services: (541) 686-5060

Description:

COVID Message: Building temporarily closed due to COVID, please reach out via phone or email to get support.Languages: English
Ages: 16-25
Mental Health: Support Groups

Description:

Description:

3620 SE Powell Blvd, #102 Portland OR 97202​

Description:

COVID Message: Counseling and Assessments for Surgery letters are being conducted via teletherapy or phone. In-office visits are offered to existing clients on a case-by-case basis.
Cost: Brave Space primarily works with people with Oregon Health Plan insurance. If you have private insurance, please check out our resource guide for therapists who take your insurance.
Dillehunt Hall, Room 1007 3235 S.W. Pavilion Loop Portland, OR 97239

Description:

Description:

Community Resources: LGBTQ+ Resources

Description:

Business: (541) 386-4808
24 Hour Hotline: (541) 386-6603

Description:

Description:

Basic Needs: Public Transit

Description:

Eligibility: We have only two requirements in an effort to be as inclusive as possible: 1) You identify as transgender (FTM, genderqueer, non-binary, genderfluid, gender non-conforming, and every other non-cis identity within the trans umbrella.) 2) You cannot afford to purchase a binder, or you cannot safely obtain a binder.

Description:

Are you able to pay for hair removal services out of pocket?

Are you employed and able to save some money towards hair removal services?

Are you a citizen or documented immigrant?

Do you identify as white, or do you experience white/light-skinned privilege?

If you answered YES to these questions, you may consider making space for our trans siblings who mostly answered NO. (Even if you answer YES to most or all of these questions, you are still eligible to apply.)

Description:

Eligibility: We have only two requirements in an effort to be as inclusive as possible: You identify as transgender (MTF, genderqueer, non-binary, genderfluid, gender non-conforming, and every other non-cis identity assigned male at birth within the trans umbrella.) You cannot afford to purchase femme shapewear, or you cannot safely obtain femme shapewear. We accept all requests for support, and applications are open year-round. Once you complete your application, your request will be added to our waitlist. Shipping is discrete and 100% free, and we ship internationally to 90+ countries and counting.
Cost: This program is intended to help trans folks who otherwise can not afford or access femme shapewear. We ask that you consider your access before applying.

Description:

Eligibility: You identify as transgender (FTM, MTF, non-binary, genderqueer, gender non-conforming, and all other non-cis identities). You have financial need that prevents you from affording hormone replacement therapy. You are 18 years old or older (19+ in Nebraska) at the time you apply. You live in one of the states Plume serves. You are not currently on Medicare. If you live in CO or KY, you are not currently on Medicaid.

Cost: This program is intended to help trans folks who otherwise can not afford gender-affirming surgery. We ask that you consider your access to healthcare before applying for this grant. Here are some questions to consider:Do you have health insurance coverage that is trans-inclusive?

If not, do you qualify for Medicaid?

Do you live in a state whose Medicaid plans cover HRT?

Are you employed and able to pay for HRT out of pocket?

Are there nearby clinics that offer HRT with informed consent?

Do you have reliable transportation options to access a provider?

Do you consider yourself healthy and able-bodied (i.e., not living with a chronic or long-standing illness)?

Do you identify as white, or do you experience white/light-skinned privilege?

If you answered YES to most of these questions, you may consider making space for our trans siblings who mostly answered NO. (Even if you answer YES to most or all of these questions, you are still eligible to apply.)

Minimum age served: 18

Description:

Eligibility: We have very few requirements in an effort to be as inclusive as possible: You identify as transgender (FTM, MTF, non-binary, genderqueer, gender non-conforming, and all other non-cis identities). You are 18 years of age or older at the time of your surgery, or have consent from your legal guardian(s) and healthcare provider(s). You have financial need that prevents you from affording gender-affirming surgery. You can demonstrate past attempts at affording care (i.e. saving money, fundraising, attempting to get insurance coverage). You complete your surgery in the United States with a US-based surgeon.

Cost: This program is intended to help trans folks who otherwise can not afford gender-affirming surgery. We ask that you consider your access to healthcare before applying for this grant. Here are some questions to consider:Do you have health insurance coverage that is trans-inclusive?

If not, do you qualify for Medicaid? (Learn more)

Do you have access to healthcare providers who are trans competent, and are able to travel to them to receive care?

Are you employed and able to save some money towards surgery?

Are you a citizen or documented immigrant?

Do you consider yourself healthy and able-bodied (i.e., not living with a chronic or long-standing illness)?

Do you identify as white, or do you experience white/light-skinned privilege?

If you answered YES to most of these questions, you may consider making space for our trans siblings who mostly answered NO. (Even if you answer YES to most or all of these questions, you are still eligible to apply.)

Minimum age served: 18

Description:

Eligibility: It is a benefit for eligible Health Share of Oregon members in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties.
Languages: Spanish, Russian, Mandarin, Arabic, Vietnamese, Somali, Swahili
9955 NE Glisan St, Portland, OR 97220

Description:

Basic Needs: Transportation

Description:

Basic Needs: Transportation
10055 E Burnside St, Portland, OR 97216
Energy Assistance: (503) 294-7444
Housing & Rent Assistance: (503) 721-1740

Description:

650 NW Irving St, Portland, OR 97209

Description:

Day Services & Drop-in: Mail, Laundry, & Showers
610 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97205

Description:

Call or Text: (541) 246-4046
24/7 Text (541) 246-4046

Description:

Maximum age served: 18
605 W 4th Ave, Eugene, OR 97402

Description:

Springfield: (541) 726-3714

Description:

1175 G St, Springfield, 97477

Description:

1160 Grant St, Eugene, OR 97402

Description:

3500 E 17th Ave, Eugene, 97403

Description:

Text “START” to 678678

Description:

323 E 12th Ave, Eugene, 97401

Description:

1300 Irvington Dr, Eugene, 97404

Description:

Description:

Community Resources: Veteran Services
02 – Urgent Info – Services and Resources for Families and Children in Response to the Recent Tragic Events Across the Country
Apr 21 all-day

 

Some Resources for Families and Communities:

Due to recent tragic events across the country

 

Agency Logo

Racial Stress and Self-care:

Parent Tip Tool

How race-related stress affects you and your relationship with your child

What effect does racism have on your health and well-being?

Not only does racism impact you as a parent, it can also impact how you interact with your children. Experiences of racism build on each other and can chip away at your emotional, physical and spiritual resources as a parent, contributing to race-related stress. Race-related stress can make it hard to have the space needed to take care of yourself as a parent, which reduces the emotional space you need to adequately take care of your children.

Racism can impact parents emotionally, physically and spiritually

Physical effects

Physical Effects

Physical Effects can include increased hypertension, illness and risky behaviors such as substance use.

Emotional effects

Emotional Effects

Emotional effects can include depression, anxiety, anger, irritability and aggression.

Spiritual effects

Spiritual Effects

Spiritual effects can include a decreased sense of purpose, lack of connection with the larger community, isolation from larger social groups and reduced involvement in communal activities that you enjoy.

Potential reactions to racial stress or trauma

Insecure feelings

Insecure Feelings

Feelings of shame and lack of confidence due to feeling that a situation cannot be changed.

Lack of trust

Lack of Trust

Feeling detached or a lack of trust for others due to experiencing multiple losses or letdowns. This can make it very difficult to seek out help and to identify potential safe sources of support.

Triggers

Triggers

Reminders of the event, such as particular people or situations, can also trigger strong emotional or physical responses (e.g., crying or rapid heartbeat).

Emotions

Difficulty Controlling Emotions

Difficulty controlling emotional responses (going from “zero to one hundred”) can occur as the body helps you adapt to potentially unsafe situations, making you feel constantly on “alert.”

The body’s response to the experience of racism can make accessing resources to cope with the situation difficult. Race-related stress is unique in that it threatens psychological resources that are needed to cope and fulfill basic needs such as financial support, housing, access to jobs, etc.

When your body is in stress mode, it is geared up to help you and your child survive, which sometimes leads to impulsive decisions. If you live in a chronic state of stress related to racism, you can start to engage in survival coping. Survival coping can help you to deal with very hard or potentially life-threatening situations. However, if you continue to exist in this mode long-term, it can make it difficult to enjoy being in the moment with your child and can reduce your ability to feel safe and in control.

What impact can racial stress have on your parenting?

Experiencing race-related stress can also impact the quality of parenting relationships in the following ways:

Impostor syndrome

When you are exposed to racism repeatedly, you often start doubting yourself and can feel like you are an imposter in dominant culture settings or in settings where you feel as though you do not belong. Your inner thoughts might sound something like: “Am I being judged?” “Am I worthy?” “I got lucky.” “I only got this because I am Black.”

Being overly alert (hypervigilance)

Experiencing racial stress can make you more aware of potential dangers and negative experiences that can occur. This, in turn, can make the experience of parenting even more stressful. When you interact with your children, you can sometimes be reminded of negative race-related experiences that you had when you were a child. This reminder can amp up emotional responses, or hyperarousal, making it hard for you to “keep your cool” and be open to flexible problem solving.

“Helicopter parenting” (monitoring in fear)

These experiences of racism and unwarranted blame or lack of acceptance can make you want to protect your children so much, that you don’t allow them to explore in the way that they need to. You may shelter them from failures, which everyone needs to experience in order to learn how to manage everyday life. You may tend to be overly cautious or suspicious. Examples can include not allowing your children to have sleepovers or go to the park, even with your supervision.

Difficulty regulating emotions

  • When your past influences your emotional state, it can affect your emotional responses to both big and minor stressors with children, such as when they misbehave. This, in turn, can lead to being overprotective or overuse of physical discipline, as a means of survival.
  • For children, having parents who can keep perspective (stay cool) when children are upset, or misbehaving is very important. Likewise, it is important to stay calm when disciplining a child, otherwise discipline may go overboard. Both of these things can be hard if you are having difficulty controlling your emotions.

Avoidance

  • Avoiding situations that are related to racism can be a needed strategy to survive; such as instances that may involve violence or threat to yourself or your family. Sometimes you may avoid reminders of past experiences due to the pain or discomfort they cause.
  • If you find yourself avoiding strong feelings or situations with your child that bring up painful memories, it may make it hard to show affection and support for your child. It may even make it difficult to know how to provide emotional support for your child during times of stress. For instance, if your child brings up their own experience of oppression or an event in their life reminds you of something from your own childhood.

Mistrusting others

  • Racism can lead to distrust or mistrust of other communities. Internalized racism is when you begin to accept negative messages about your own abilities and inherent worth by the dominant group in society.
  • When you use society’s norms to judge yourself, you can feel depressed, unworthy and just not good enough. You are taught in many ways to take these feelings and paint them onto another group.
  • Intra and interracial violence, contention among disenfranchised communities or color, and the way the media conveys information about people of color, contribute to this.
  • This kind of coping can make you more vulnerable to racism, because on some level you may believe in racial hierarchy and difference when you belittle other groups. And when you show your children that it is right to discriminate against certain other groups, you make them more vulnerable to discrimination that they face.

Minimizing racism

  • Racism is overwhelming, as is the history of violence. You are sometimes taught that accepting this and minimizing racism is the only thing you can do. But when you ignore racism, and accept powerlessness, you encourage your kids to internalize racism. This can lead to increased levels of depression, anxiety and externalizing behaviors (e.g., engaging in risky behaviors, such as alcohol or substance use).
  • When you believe that you should be able to handle and manage it all without a break or without asking for help, you are at increased risk for health problems and can miss important cues about your well-being and safety.

Self-blame

Experiencing chronically unfair and dangerous discriminatory practices due to race can lead to feelings of low worth. For parents, this can also lead to a questioning of your parenting choices and abilities.

Unbalanced Racial and Ethnic Socialization (RES)

Unbalanced messaging or communication about race and ethnicity occurs when you only promote messages of mistrust, preparation for bias, or only give racial pride messages to your children.

So, what can you do to mitigate racial stress?

As parents, it is important to develop positive identities and share your cultural identities with your children. Positive cultural identity and advocacy are protective factors against racism, which can help to reduce and prevent racial stress.

There are many other ways to cope with stress and everyone has different preferences. Reducing stress can also allow you to model healthy coping strategies for your child. Here are some suggestions with links you can try.

Agency Logo
Talking with Children About Tragic Events

What do we tell our children? How do we reassure them of their own safety?

At The Dougy Center in Portland, Oregon, we’ve provided grief support groups for children, teens, young adults and their parents or adult caregivers since 1982.

Based on our experience, here are some things for adults to keep in mind as you struggle with how to talk with children following tragic events, such as natural disasters, plane crashes, or school shootings.

1. Don’t project your fears onto your children. They take their cues from the adults around them.
You can’t hear the news about children being murdered or communities devastated by natural disasters without thinking about how you’d feel if it happened to your family, friends, or hometown. The outpouring of care and empathy for the families who lost loved ones will be powerful, and…we all know it could have been our friends, our child, our family and community members who died or were injured.

Identifying with the senselessness and randomness makes us all feel more vulnerable. But we should remember that children don’t always see things the same way that adults do, and it won’t be helpful to them for us to fall apart. They need to see that we care, that we feel terrible about this tragedy, and that we will do everything we can to keep them safe. They will take their cues from our behavior.

It’s okay to show emotion. We can model for children that feeling sad, scared, and upset is normal after tragedies. But we don’t want to overwhelm them with our emotions, or put them in the position of having to ‘parent,’ or take care of, the adults around them. Make sure you also model taking care of yourself, by sharing with trusted and supportive adult friends, eating (and drinking) healthfully.

2. Try to limit their access to the recurring news and exposure to the tragedy over and over.
Over-exposure to the graphic and emotional news can be overwhelming for children and can cause unnecessary anxiety and fear. Some children who repeatedly watched the footage of planes crashing into the towers on 9/11 thought it was happening again and again. Some children (and some adults) may have difficulty getting graphic scenes and images out of their minds. Too much exposure can fuel their fear, so don’t let them sit and watch the news over and over. Better yet, set the example of not doing so yourself as well.

3. Understand that you can’t completely shield them from what happened.
It would be next to impossible to hide these events from children, as much as we wish we could. You might be able to shield your own child in your home, for example, by not turning on (or owning) a television, but you can’t protect your children from hearing about it from other kids. The fact is, they will hear about it, so although they don’t “need” to know about it, pretending we can shield them is magical thinking.

That said, you don’t need to give them more information than they can handle, or more than they’re asking for. A simple, “Did they talk about what happened in _____ today at school?” would be a good starter. They need to know that you’re not trying to hide the truth from them, that you’re open to talking about it, but that you’re also not forcing them to do so.

4. Model truth-telling and build trust with your children by letting them hear things, even hard things, from you directly.
Eight days after the 9/11 attacks, I was meeting in small groups with pre-school workers in New York City, talking about how to respond to the young children in their care about the events. A man asked to speak to me privately after one of the trainings, and asked for my advice around his 7-year-old daughter. For the last week, since September 12th, she had been having stomach aches and difficulty sleeping. He said it was not tied to the events of 9/11 because, “We don’t have a television.” As his story unfolded it was evident that he did not want to have to explain to his child why people would do such horrible things, a normal dilemma that we face as parents and adults. This child was experiencing physical reactions, as it turned out, not primarily because of her reaction to the events of 9/11, but because she was unable to share her fears and concerns and questions in her own home, faced with her parents’ denial.

Here are some principles to keep in mind as you talk with children:

1. There is no one typical reaction one can or should expect from children.
Their responses will vary all over the ‘emotional’ map, from seeming disinterest to nightmares, eating issues, and anxiety. How any specific child will respond will depend on their age, previous experience with death and loss, and their personality style. Fearful children will tend to worry; quiet children may keep their feelings to themselves; those who want to appear unfazed may exhibit a sense of bravado or lack of caring. Of course, children directly affected – those who had a family member die; those who witnessed the tragedy; those who had friends die – will tend to have longer-term reactions and needs. Watch for changes in behavior, or concerning trends. While it would be normal to have heightened anxiety and sleeplessness, any concerning behavior or troubling symptoms should be taken seriously, and if warranted, professional help sought.

2. Many children will have an increased sense of fear about their safety.
Understandably. So will many adults. After a shooting at an Oregon mall in December 2012, the news outlets were filled with people who said they’d never take their children there again. Others said they’d return as soon as it opened in order to support the stores and employees who had experienced the traumatic events, and whose livelihoods were going to suffer as a result of the several day closure. Some runners in the Boston Marathon vowed to return; others said they would never do so again.

While we can’t guarantee to our children that nothing bad will ever happen to them, we can provide assurance that these events are relatively rare, and that we will do everything we can to keep them safe. Children may have many questions about the events, particularly about natural disasters. Answer their questions with language that fits their developmental stage. It’s okay if you don’t know the answer to a question. If it’s a question that might have an answer, offer to look up more information. You can also ask children what they think the answer is as they often have thoughts and ideas they want to share with you. In the case of natural disasters, if your child is fearful of something like that happening in your community, talk with them about the safety plan that you have in place for your family and home. You can also look into what community safety measures are in place and whatever elements are relevant with your children. Many children will be reassured knowing that there are specific, tangible things they and your family can do if something occurs. Some examples include, picking a meeting place, keeping flashlights in every bedroom, talking about where you will keep emergency water and food.

3. Children want, need, and deserve the truth.
In over 30 years of providing grief support to thousands of children and teens at The Dougy Center for Grieving Children & Families, we have never heard a child say, “I’m glad I was lied to.” Many, however, struggle with anger and lack of trust toward parents or other adults who lied to them. When we don’t tell the truth, they learn that we cannot be trusted. As difficult as it can be at times, and as horrendous as the truth may be, children want, need, and deserve the truth. Being able to talk openly and honestly with your children about tragic events and other losses, creates a foundation of trust, enabling them to come to you in the future with their questions, fears, and concerns.

 

 

Daniel Tiger

Helping Children with Tragic Events in the News

In times of community or world-wide crisis, it’s easy to assume that young children don’t know what’s going on. But one thing’s for sure — children are very sensitive to how their parents feel. They’re keenly aware of the expressions on their parents’ faces and the tone of their voices. Children can sense when their parents are really worried, whether they’re watching the news or talking about it with others. No matter what children know about a “crisis,” it’s especially scary for children to realize that their parents are scared.

Some Scary, Confusing Images

The way that news is presented on television can be quite confusing for a young child. The same video segment may be shown over and over again through the day, as if each showing was a different event. Someone who has died turns up alive and then dies again and again. Children often become very anxious since they don’t understand much about videotape replays, closeups, and camera angles. Any televised danger seems close to home to them because the tragic scenes are taking place on the TV set in their own living room. Children can’t tell the difference between what’s close and what’s far away, what’s real and what’s pretend, or what’s new and what’s re-run.

The younger the children are, the more likely they are to be interested in scenes of close-up faces, particularly if the people are expressing some strong feelings. When there’s tragic news, the images on TV are most often much too graphic and disturbing for young children.

“Who will take care of me?”

In times of crisis, children want to know, “Who will take care of me?” They’re dependent on adults for their survival and security. They’re naturally self-centered. They need to hear very clearly that their parents are doing all they can to take care of them and to keep them safe. They also need to hear that people in the government and other grown-ups they don’t even know are working hard to keep them safe, too.

Helping Children Feel More Secure

Play is one of the important ways young children have of dealing with their concerns. Of course, playing about violent news can be scary and sometimes unsafe, so adults need to be nearby to help redirect that kind of play into nurturing themes, such as a hospital for the wounded or a pretend meal for emergency workers.

When children are scared and anxious, they might become more dependent, clingy, and afraid to go to bed at night. Whining, aggressive behavior, or toilet “accidents” may be their way of asking for more comfort from the important adults in their lives. Little by little, as the adults around them become more confident, hopeful and secure, our children probably will, too.

Turn Off the TV

When there’s something tragic in the news, many parents get concerned about what and how to tell their children. It’s even harder than usual if we’re struggling with our own powerful feelings about what has happened. Adults are sometimes surprised that their own reactions to a televised crisis are so strong, but great loss and devastation in the news often reawaken our own earlier losses and fears – even some we think we might have “forgotten”

It’s easy to allow ourselves to get drawn into watching televised news of a crisis for hours and hours; however, exposing ourselves to so many tragedies can make us feel hopeless, insecure, and even depressed. We help our children and ourselves if we’re able to limit our own television viewing. Our children need us to spend time with them – away from the frightening images on the screen.

Talking and Listening

Even if we wanted to, it would be impossible to give our children all the reasons for such things as war, terrorists, abuse, murders, major fires, hurricanes, and earthquakes. If they ask questions, our best answer may be to ask them, “What do you think happened?” If the answer is “I don’t know,” then the simplest reply might be something like, “I’m sad about the news, and I’m worried. But I love you, and I’m here to care for you.”

If we don’t let children know it’s okay to feel sad and scared, they may think something is wrong with them when they do feel that way. They certainly don’t need to hear all the details of what’s making us sad or scared, but if we can help them accept their own feelings as natural and normal, their feelings will be much more manageable for them.

Angry feelings are part of being human, especially when we feel powerless. One of the most important messages we can give our children is, “It’s okay to be angry, but it’s not okay to hurt ourselves or others.” Besides giving children the right to their anger, we can help them find constructive things to do with their feelings. This way, we’ll be giving them useful tools that will serve them all their life, and help them to become the worlds’ future peacemakers — the world’s future “helpers.”

Helpful Hints

  • Do your best to keep the television off, or at least limit how much your child sees of any news event.
  • Try to keep yourself calm. Your presence can help your child feel more secure.
  • Give your child extra comfort and physical affection, like hugs or snuggling up together with a favorite book. Physical comfort goes a long way towards providing inner security. That closeness can nourish you, too.
  • Try to keep regular routines as normal as possible. Children and adults count on their familiar pattern of everyday life.
  • Plan something that you and your child enjoy doing together, like taking a walk, going on a picnic, having some quiet time, or doing something silly. It can help to know there are simple things in life that can help us feel better, in good times and in bad.
  • Even if children don’t mention what they’ve seen or heard in the news, it can help to ask what they think has happened. If parents don’t bring up the subject, children can be left with their misinterpretations. You may be really surprised at how much your child has heard from others.
  • Focus attention on the helpers, like the police, firemen, doctors, nurses, paramedics, and volunteers. It’s reassuring to know there are many caring people who are doing all they can to help others in this world.
  • Let your child know if you’re making a donation, going to a town meeting, writing a letter or e-mail of support, or taking some other action. It can help children to know that adults take many different active roles and that we don’t give in to helplessness in times of worldwide crisis.

 

04 – Resources – Transitions to Adulthood Center for Research Transitions – Top 10 Most Popular Young Adult Mental Health Resources in 2023
Apr 21 all-day
04 - Resources - Transitions to Adulthood Center for Research Transitions - Top 10 Most Popular Young Adult  Mental Health Resources in 2023

Our Top 10 Most Popular Young Adult

Mental Health Resources in 2023

 

My Must Have Papers: Managing the Paperwork of Adulting

Managing the paperwork that comes along with “Adulting” is not fun. Our Young Adult Advisory Board and Family Advisory Board set out to make that task a little easier in this tip sheet.

“My Must Have Papers – Managing the Paperwork of Adulting” Tip Sheet. Also available as a comic, “Passport to Adulting: Managing Your Paperwork”.
STAY Tuned Podcast 10 Too Sick to Work Breaking the Narrative

Too Sick to Work? Breaking the Narrative – Podcast

STAY Tuned is a podcast made for and by young adults with mental health conditions. In Episode 10, Dr. Michelle Mullen discussed her work on preventing disability, why the language used to describe the mental health of young adults is so key and what can be done to change the narrative of self-blame.

Episode 10: “Too Sick to Work?” Breaking the Narrative.

All Episodes of S.T.A.Y. Tuned: Supporting Transition-Age Youth Podcast.

3 Tips to Improve Communications with Your Young Adult

This popular tip sheet for families includes 3 specific tips that can help you have better conversations and better relationships with the youth & young adults in your life. It’s worth reading and worth sharing! Read and download 3 Tips to Improve Communications with your Youth & Young Adult.

Accommodations at Work: What Do I Need to Know?

Work can be hard for young adults. And a mental health condition can make things complicated. Accommodations at your workplace can be one helpful solution. But what are they? Our new tip sheet, “Accommodations at Work: What Do I Need to Know?” can help young adults figure that out.

Applying for a Job: The Young Adults Guide, Revised 2023

This tip sheet is a good starting point for your young adult in their job search journey, covers many topics including resumes, job search boards, interviewing and follow-up. It also includes some great networking resources. Read and download “Applying for a Job – The Young Adult’s Guide” Tip Sheet.

Factors that Influence the Continuous Pursuit of Education, Training, and Employment among Young Adults with Serious Mental Health Conditions

This research brief describes the patterns of education, training, and employment activities for young adults with serious mental health conditions, and identifies factors that hinder or facilitate their ability to consistently pursue these activities. These findings can inform efforts to improve their long-term career trajectories. The “Factors” Research Brief.

STAY Tuned Podcast Episode 6: “We’re Working On It”

Join our conversation with Emma Narkewicz, MPA as we talk about Pre-employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) in MA and dive into what it’s like being a young adult with mental health conditions entering the workforce and sustaining a career. Podcast episode 6: “We’re working on it!”.

Youth are Empowered by Leading Their Own IEP Meetings

Our comic series shows them how to do that. These comics walk young adults through how to participate fully, and lead, their IEP meetings. In the final comic, Mateo is moving towards graduation and prepping for his last IEP meeting of his high school career. Adulting Shorts Series, The “TEA” on IEPs

Engaging Young Adults in Work & School

Our free training for providers shares key info & resources related to the importance of engaging young adults in work and school endeavors, and strategies for doing this work. You also get an inside look into programs that are supporting young adults moving to adulthood.

Engaging Young Adults in Work & School – Training for Providers.

5 Ways Working Helps Me With My Mental Health

This popular blog post is an insightful read and reminder that employment can help manage your mental health and be a powerful tool in recovery. Read Five Ways Working Helps Me Manage My Mental Health Condition.

04 – Resources – VA & ODVA – Veterans Support Groups, Resources, Education, Mental Health and Advocacy
Apr 21 all-day

USE THIS LINK TO OPEN THE VA WELCOME KIT

Print out your VA Welcome Kit

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned.

Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy, so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

LOCATE SERVICES IN OREGON

Veteran Resource Navigator

The Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs (ODVA) has a comprehensive online resource guide (VETERAN RESOURCE NAVIGATOR) available to assist veterans in finding the benefits that are most useful to their unique circumstances at this time.

Use the link below for the Veteran Resource Navigator

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

Veteran Services by County

Click on the link blow for interactive map  access resources in your county in Oregon.

Other Resources Available to Veterans and Military Service Members

DD214 & Military Records Request:

https://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records

Veteran Resource Navigator site by ODVA:

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

(Oregon)Military Help Line:  

Call 888-457-4838

VA Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255:

Press 1.VA Confidential crisis chat at net or text to 838255 

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD:

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/

Defining Discharge Status:

https://militarybenefits.info/character-of-discharge/#:~:text=There%20are%206%20types%20of,DD%20214%20must%20have%20a

How to apply for a discharge status upgrade:

https://www.va.gov/discharge-upgrade-instructions/

Oregon Supportive Services for Vets & Families (Housing):

https://caporegon.org/what-we-do/ssvf/

Clackamas County VSO’s (Veteran Service Officers):

https://www.clackamas.us/socialservices/veterans.html

Portland VA Clinic that can help with homelessness & medical care:

https://www.portland.va.gov/locations/crrc.asp

Portland VA Mental Health Clinic:

https://www.portland.va.gov/services/mentalhealth.asp

Veterans Crisis Line/ Suicide Prevention:

https://www.veteranscrisisline.net/

If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance,

please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.

Contact ODVA Headquarters

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs
700 Summer St NE
Salem, OR 97301

Web: https://www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/default.aspx

Phone: (800) 692-9666 or (503) 373-2085

Fax: (503) 373-2392

Email:orvetsbenefits@odva.state.or.us

Web Resources

Oregon Health Plan – Enrollment Page

https://www.oregon.gov/oha/hsd/ohp/pages/apply.aspx

 

SAMHSA Treatment Locator

https://findtreatment.gov/

VA National Center on PTSD

 PTSD Treatment Decision Aid

 Educational Materials

  Mobile Apps

  Whiteboard Videos

  Consultation Program

 

VA Healthcare – Community Care network

https://www.va.gov/COMMUNITYCARE/providers/Community_Care_Network.asp

 

VA’s Center for Women Veterans (CWV)

https://www.va.gov/womenvet/

Minority Veterans of America

https://www.minorityvets.org/

 

Vet Centers:

Central Oregon Vet Center

Eugene Vet Center

Grants Pass Vet Center

Portland Vet Center

Salem Vet Center

 Community Based Outpatient Clinics:

Bend CBOC

Morrow County VA Telehealth Clinic (Boardman OR)

Brookings VA Clinic

Wallowa County VA Telehealth Clinic (Enterprise OR)

Eugene Health Care Center

Eugene VA Downtown Clinic

Fairview Clinic

Grants Pass West VA CBOC

Hillsboro CBOC

Klamath Falls CBOC

La Grande CBOC

Lincoln City Clinic

North Bend VA Clinic

Community Resource and Referral Center (CRRC)

Salem CBOC

North Coast CBOC

 

Additional Resources By Phone:

Veterans Crisis Line: 800-273-8255, Press 1

Women Veterans Hotline: 855-829-663

Vet Center Call Center: 877-WAR-VETS (927-8387)

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Caregiver Support Line: 855-260-3274

Lines for Life Military Help Line:  Call 1-888-457-4838

Senior Loneliness Line:  Call 503-200-1633

The Trevor Project:  866-488-7386

PEER SUPPORT AND PEER TRAINING

USE THIS LINK TO APPLY

PTSD Self Screening

This self-screen can help you find out if your feelings and behaviors may be related to PTSD.

Only a trained provider can diagnose PTSD. Your responses here are private and secure—they are not collected or shared. You may take a screenshot or print this screen to share with a provider.

Do not take the self-screen for someone else. If you are concerned that someone you care about might have PTSD, please share this screen with them instead.

Start Screen

PTSD Information Voice Mail: (802) 296-6300
Email: ncptsd@va.gov
Also see: VA Mental Health

05 – Warmline – AriStress Helpline – Mental Health Support for Oregon Farmworkers – call or text (833) 987-2474 – 24/7 – Weekdays & Weekends @ toll free
Apr 21 all-day
05 - Warmline - AriStress Helpline - Mental Health Support for Oregon Farmworkers - call or text (833) 987-2474 - 24/7 - Weekdays & Weekends @ toll free

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mental health support available 24/7 to Oregon farmworkers

call or text (833) 987-2474

People can call the AgriStress Helpline when they are in a crisis, need resources, are concerned about a loved one or just need someone to talk to. Calls are answered within 30 seconds, and all callers are screened for suicidality and offered a 24-hour follow-up call.

The Oregon AgriStress Helpline is available 24/7. If you or someone you love is struggling, call or text (833) 987-2474. The phone line can be accessed in up to 160 languages with the help of interpreters, and the text line offers English, Spanish and Vietnamese.

The helpline’s crisis specialists understand the culture, values, stressors and lived experiences of agriculture, forestry, and fishing workers. They can also offer local mental health resources specific to these industries.

 

05 – Warmline – TTP – The Treavor Project – Trevor Lifeline – Call 1-866-488-7386 or Text – “START” to 678-678 – 24/7 – Weekdays & Weekdays @ phone
Apr 21 all-day
05 - Warmline - TTP - The Treavor Project - Trevor Lifeline -  Call 1-866-488-7386 or Text - "START" to 678-678 - 24/7 - Weekdays & Weekdays @ phone

 

Trevor Lifeline

 

TO CALL THE LIFELINE

Call 1-866-488-7386

 

TO TEXT THE LIFELINE

 “START” to 678-678

or use this link TEXT

 

FOR ONLINE CHAT

Click to Start Chat

About TrevorLifeline

TrevorLifeline offers 24/7, free and confidential support by phone, text message (SMS) and online chat. We support LGBTQ+ young people in the U.S. and Mexico who may be experiencing emotional distress related to gender & sexual identity, loneliness, relationships, suicide, supporting a friend or family member.

As part of our commitment to preventing suicide, we are available to help you if you are considering suicide or harming yourself, or if you are noticing warning signs in a friend or family member.

When you reach out to us you will talk with one our friendly and supportive volunteers who are experienced in how to help people in your situation. They will listen to you, unpack your story and feelings, and work with you to help you through your challenges. We are open 24 hours a day, every day of the week. We are always available to talk with you.

 

 

 

 

05 – Warmline – TTP – The Trevor Project – TrevorSpace – Warmline, Chat, Phone – Support Group – 24/7 – Weekdays & Weekends @ Online VIA ZOOM
Apr 21 all-day

Find your 
community at TrevorSpace.

TrevorSpace is an affirming, online community for LGBTQ young people between the ages of 13-24 years old. With over 400,000 members across the globe, you can explore your identity, get advice, find support, and make friends in a moderated community intentionally designed for you.

Meet friends just like you.

Start a discussion, get advice, and find support from other members in similar situations. With 500+ clubs on TrevorSpace, you can quickly find and connect with new friends who share your interests and hobbies anytime, anywhere.

Safely talk to others in our moderated community.

Our team of online moderators and AI-technology help enable a secure, members-only safe space where you can be yourself. With a focus on safety, you can securely and discreetly access the resources you need, when you need them.

ADAA – Anxiety & Depression Association of America – Online Peer-to-Peer Communities – Anxiety and Depression Support Community – 24/7 Weekdays & Weekends @ online register for details
Apr 21 all-day
ADAA - Anxiety & Depression Association of America - Online Peer-to-Peer Communities - Anxiety and Depression Support Community - 24/7 Weekdays & Weekends @ online register for details

 

 

 

 

 

ADAA  – Anxiety and Depression Support Community

Join from this Page

The Anxiety and Depression peer to peer community has more than 80,000 subscribers from around the world. The objective of this community is to create a space that those suffering from anxiety and depression can turn to find and offer comfort and support, to share information and personal experiences, and to make connections with those in the community.

ADAA also posts on the community page providing helpful tips and strategies about anxiety and depression through blogs and free webinars written/hosted by our professional mental health members, infographics, books, podcasts and more specific to anxiety and depression.

 

 

AM – All Month – OMH – Office of Minority Health US Department of Health and Human Services – Resource’s and Publications
Apr 21 all-day

 

 

NATIONAL MINORITY MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS MONTH

OMH – Office of Minority Health, US Department of Health and Human Services

Resource’s and Publications

LGBTQIA+

Mental Health Disorders and Treatment

Substance Use

Trauma and Violence

COVID-19

DDA – Dual Diagnosis Anonymous – DDA Chat Room and Resource Group – 24/7 @ Online Via ZOOM
Apr 21 all-day
DDA - Dual Diagnosis Anonymous - DDA Chat Room and Resource Group - 24/7 @ Online Via ZOOM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DDA Chat room and resource group

Greetings,
This new chat/resource group was created to help support those and their families who suffer from mental health and, or, addiction struggles during the coronavirus situation.
Please know that we are all in this together, so please invite those who might be able to help or benefit.  The five rules of respect will govern this site, so love, encouragement, and valid resources are the primary mission of this group. We look forward to the support of the community and sharing support and resources for those who need it.
IMPORTANT: Anyone who chooses to promote panic, fear, racism, or misinformation will be asked to stop and or be blocked.
Love, peace, and blessings (LPB)

Join The Facebook Group

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1053021475070135/

DDA’s Five Rules of Respect
1. First, and most importantly, who you see here and what is said here, let it stay here! (Here! Here!) Confidentiality and anonymity are the spiritual foundations that keep our recovery possible.
2. Questions and answers are welcome and positive feedback is given, when asked for.
3. Keep it real.
4. Try not to disrupt the group.
5. It is OK to pass, if you do not wish to share.
INSP – Inspire – Drug Abuse Communities and More – Online via Website or IOS APP – 24/7 – Weekdays & Weekends @ Online via website
Apr 21 all-day
INSP - Inspire - Drug Abuse Communities and More - Online via Website or IOS APP - 24/7 - Weekdays & Weekends @ Online via website

Inspire Support Communities

A place that’s safe for sharing and always free for members

We’ve carefully designed an environment where it’s okay to open up about personal experiences and share sensitive health information. Joining Inspire is — and always will be — free for members.

To Open an Inspire Account, Use this link:https://www.inspire.com/

Inspire: The Vital Health Community

Inspire is the vital community of more than two million patients and caregivers —a carefully designed environment where everyone feels comfortable and safe to open up about personal health experiences and share sensitive health information. These genuine connections instill hope and drive greater understanding. Patients and caregivers from around the world discover advice and information they can’t find elsewhere, and by understanding patients’ rich and varied health journeys on Inspire, researchers and health practitioners around the world are advancing treatments and making breakthrough discoveries.

 

FIND A COMMUNITY OF SUPPORT

Click Here To See Our Support Communities

 

About the Inspire Community Platform

Create A personal Journal

Your journal belongs to you; you may choose to have your journal entries show up in some, all, or none of your communities. Journal entries are generally longer and can be on any topic.

Join Community Discussions

Discussions belong to the community and are generally shorter than journal entries and are meant to encourage conversations between members. For example, if you wanted to ask for other members’ experiences with a particular treatment, you would post a discussion in the appropriate community. If you wanted to talk about your day, something more personal or off-topic, you would post a journal entry.

Create and Manage A Friends List

Friends are other members whom you may grow to trust and want to share more information with, or with whom you want to exchange private messages. You will be able to post journal entries that only your “friends” can read, and you will be able to send messages to your friends through our site without giving out your email address.

Use Inspire A.I. for quick answers

Inspire AI is a new feature on inspire that uses artificial intelligence to provide quick responses to member questions. The responses are automatically generated. The tool leverages a large language model (LLM), similar to what is used for popular tools such as ChatGPT. When you post on Inspire, you can choose whether you want to receive a response from InspireAI in addition to receiving replies from Inspire members. InspireAI is currently available in select cancer communities.

MHA – Mental Health America – Inspire Support Groups and Discussion Community – 24/7 Weekends & Weekends @ Online via Inspire plus Apps
Apr 21 all-day

INSPIRE online community forum

About this Online Tool

Our Inspire communities provide a place for people with similar interests to support and encourage each other 24/7 online. Inspire is the largest provider of health-specific communities. MHA (Mental Health America) staff moderate the online support groups and communities.

Link to INSPIRE.com:

https://www.inspire.com/

 

Link to Mental Health America groups on INSPIRE.com:

https://www.inspire.com/groups/mental-health-america/

 

Browse All Groups on INSPIRE.com:

https://www.inspire.com/groups/

Apps are available to download as well.

 

About Mental Health America

Mental Health America (MHA) – founded in 1909 – is the nation’s leading community-based nonprofit dedicated to addressing the needs of those living with mental illness and to promoting the overall mental health of all Americans. Our work is driven by our commitment to promote mental health as a critical part of overall wellness, including prevention services for all; early identification and intervention for those at risk; integrated care, services, and supports for those who need it; with recovery as the goal.

https://screening.mhanational.org/content/mental-health-america-inspire

 

MSC – My Sisters Circle – Women’s Mental Health Support Group 24/7 @ Online via facebook group
Apr 21 all-day
MSC - My Sisters Circle - Women's Mental Health Support Group 24/7 @ Online via facebook group

 

 

 

My Sister’s Circle – Women’s Mental Health Support Group

A positive support group for women with mental health and/or substance use issues. We are coming together to share our lives, positivity, and experiences to feel less alone during our own personal journey. This will be a creative group that is open to many facets of expression!

To Join The Group and Attend Use the link below

https://www.facebook.com/groups/215292063128837

Be Kind and Courteous

We’re all in this together to create a welcoming environment. Let’s treat everyone with respect. Healthy debates are natural, but kindness is required.
Respect Everyones’s Privacy
Being part of this group requires mutual trust. Authentic, expressive discussions make groups great, but may also be sensitive and private. What’s shared in the group should stay in the group.
No Hate Speech or Bullying
Make sure everyone feels safe. Bullying of any kind isn’t allowed, and degrading comments about things like race, religion, culture, sexual orientation, gender or identity will not be tolerated.
No Promotions, Solicitations, or Spamming
Give more than you take to this group. Self-promotion, spam and irrelevant links aren’t allowed. The exchange of money between members is prohibited.
No Promotion of Domestic Violence or child Abuse
Do not post anything that condones domestic violence or child abuse. We encourage anyone who is or has a child that is being abused to seek help immediately.
No Reporting!
If you report a post, I found out it flags Facebook and the group can get deleted for violations. So, please either message an ADMIN/MOD or comment “admin” in the post. Thanks!
No Religious Posting
Please do not share religious postings in this group. We have many different backgrounds, from all around the world, and we want to make this group inclusive to all.

 

NK – Neurokindred – Peer Support Group – RSVP @ Online Register for Details
Apr 21 all-day

 

 

Peer Support Group

Welcome to Neurokindred’s Online Autistic-led peer support groups.

As Autistic adults, we have often navigated a world feeling isolated and disconnected, our unique experiences not fully understood by those around us. This has been especially true in our interactions with others, including health professionals, where there’s been a notable lack of attunements.

Yet, there’s a hopeful aspect to this shared journey:
the powerful connection that comes from mutual understanding within the Autistic community. This sense of unity fosters belonging, acceptance, and validation.

Peer support groups are a testament to the strength found in shared experiences. Centering lived experience as the dominant narrative has empowering effects.

Research is finally tuning into what many disability, recovery and minority groups have been building for years-the power of shared experience and community. Crane et al. (2020) conducted a qualitative evaluation of an Autistic-led peer group program for late-identified Autistic adults.

 

Over 10 weekly sessions, participants engaged in group discussions on a range of topics, from the implications of late diagnosis, disclosure in different contexts, cross-cultural communication difficulties, emotion regulation, sensory experiences, executive function differences, cognitive flexibility, the intersection of Autism and mental health and self-advocacy.

Interviews with 16 Autistic adults revealed three powerful themes:

  • An Autistic facilitator provided a positive role model for embracing a positive Autistic identity, fostered relational safety and facilitated more open dialogue.
  • The joint sense of community and connection was powerfully affirming.
  • The most significant outcome, that is conducive to well-being, was a shift in perspective towards a positive, strengths-focused Autistic identity.

Our online peer support groups aim to replicate this environment. Led by an Autistic group facilitator, our groups provide a safe haven for exploring and embracing Autistic identity, offering post-identification support, and fostering a recovery-focused approach that celebrates the strengths of being Autistic. We understand that the journey to self-acceptance and community building is unique for each individual, and our groups are tailored to nurture this process.

Join us to experience this accessible service that goes beyond traditional support, one that is rooted in the power of shared experiences and community, designed to enhance well-being and foster a positive Autistic identity. Here, you’re not just joining a group; you’re becoming part of a community that understands, accepts, and celebrates the Autistic way of being.

INTERESTED?  FOLLOW THIS LINK TO REGISTER

ODVA – Oregon Dept of Veterans Affairs – Veterans Resource number (1-800-698-2411) & Veteran Resource Listings
Apr 21 all-day

 

Veteran Resource Navigator

The Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs (ODVA) has a comprehensive online resource guide (VETERAN RESOURCE NAVIGATOR) available to assist veterans in finding the benefits that are most useful to their unique circumstances at this time.

 

Use the link below for the Veteran Resource Navigator

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx)

 

USE THIS LINK TO OPEN THE VA WELCOME KIT

Print out your VA Welcome Kit

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned.

Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy, so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

Download your VA Welcome Kit

You are welcome to share this guide with friends or family members who need help with their benefits too. You can print out copies for yourself and others:

Download our guides to VA benefits and services

For Veterans

For family members

Other Resources Available to Veterans and Military Service Members

DD214 & Military Records Request:

https://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records

Veteran Resource Navigator site by ODVA:

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

(Oregon)Military Help Line:  

Call 888-457-4838

VA Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255:

Press 1.VA Confidential crisis chat at net or text to 838255 

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD:

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/

Defining Discharge Status:

https://militarybenefits.info/character-of-discharge/#:~:text=There%20are%206%20types%20of,DD%20214%20must%20have%20a

How to apply for a discharge status upgrade:

https://www.va.gov/discharge-upgrade-instructions/

Oregon Supportive Services for Vets & Families (Housing):

https://caporegon.org/what-we-do/ssvf/

Clackamas County VSO’s (Veteran Service Officers):

https://www.clackamas.us/socialservices/veterans.html

Portland VA Clinic that can help with homelessness & medical care:

https://www.portland.va.gov/locations/crrc.asp

Portland VA Mental Health Clinic:

https://www.portland.va.gov/services/mentalhealth.asp

Veterans Crisis Line/ Suicide Prevention:

https://www.veteranscrisisline.net/

 

If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance,

please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.

 

Contact ODVA Headquarters

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs
700 Summer St NE
Salem, OR 97301

Web: https://www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/default.aspx

Phone: (800) 692-9666 or (503) 373-2085

Fax: (503) 373-2392

Email:orvetsbenefits@odva.state.or.us

ODVA – Oregon Dept of Veterans Affairs – Veterans Resource Number (1-800-698-2411) & Veterans Resource Listings
Apr 21 all-day

 

VA now allows veterans in suicidal crisis to go to any VA or non-VA healthcare facility for free emergency healthcare

Veterans in acute suicidal crisis can now go to any VA or non-VA healthcare facility for emergency health care at no cost — including inpatient or crisis residential care for up to 30 days and outpatient care for up to 90 days.

Veterans do not need to be enrolled in VA health care to use this benefit. This expansion will increase access to acute suicide care for up to 9 million veterans who are not currently enrolled in the VA system.

The final policy, which took effect on Jan. 17, allows the VA to:

  • Provide, pay for, or reimburse for treatment of eligible individuals’ emergency suicide care, transportation costs, and follow-up care at a VA or non-VA facility for up to 30 days of inpatient care and 90 days of outpatient care.
  • Make appropriate referrals for care following the period of emergency suicide care.
  • Determine eligibility for other VA services and benefits.
  • Refer eligible individuals for appropriate VA programs and benefits following the period of emergency suicide care.

Eligible individuals, regardless of VA enrollment status, are:

  • Veterans who were discharged or released from active duty after more than 24 months of active service under conditions other than dishonorable.
  • Former members of the armed forces, including reserve service members, who served more than 100 days under a combat exclusion or in support of a contingency operation either directly or by operating an unmanned aerial vehicle from another location who were discharged under conditions other than dishonorable.
  • Former members of the armed forces who were the victim of a physical assault of a sexual nature, a battery of a sexual nature, or sexual harassment while serving in the armed forces.

If you or someone you know is struggling: Don’t wait. Reach out. Visit www.va.gov/REACH for resources and information, or call 988 (then press 1) to quickly connect with caring, qualified crisis support 24/7.

Veteran Resource Navigator

The Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs (ODVA) has a comprehensive online resource guide (VETERAN RESOURCE NAVIGATOR) available to assist veterans in finding the benefits that are most useful to their unique circumstances at this time.

 

Use the link below for the Veteran Resource Navigator

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx)

 

USE THIS LINK TO OPEN THE VA WELCOME KIT

Print out your VA Welcome Kit

Whether you’re just getting out of the service or you’ve been a civilian for years now, the VA Welcome Kit can help guide you to the benefits and services you’ve earned.

Based on where you are in life, your VA benefits and services can support you in different ways. Keep your welcome kit handy, so you can turn to it throughout your life—like when it’s time to go to school, get a job, buy a house, get health care, retire, or make plans for your care as you age.

Download your VA Welcome Kit

You are welcome to share this guide with friends or family members who need help with their benefits too. You can print out copies for yourself and others:

Download our guides to VA benefits and services

For Veterans

For family members

Other Resources Available to Veterans and Military Service Members

DD214 & Military Records Request:

https://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records

Veteran Resource Navigator site by ODVA:

https://www.oregon.gov/odva/COVID/Pages/default.aspx

(Oregon)Military Help Line:  

Call 888-457-4838

VA Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255:

Press 1.VA Confidential crisis chat at net or text to 838255 

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for PTSD:

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/

Defining Discharge Status:

https://militarybenefits.info/character-of-discharge/#:~:text=There%20are%206%20types%20of,DD%20214%20must%20have%20a

How to apply for a discharge status upgrade:

https://www.va.gov/discharge-upgrade-instructions/

Oregon Supportive Services for Vets & Families (Housing):

https://caporegon.org/what-we-do/ssvf/

Clackamas County VSO’s (Veteran Service Officers):

https://www.clackamas.us/socialservices/veterans.html

Portland VA Clinic that can help with homelessness & medical care:

https://www.portland.va.gov/locations/crrc.asp

Portland VA Mental Health Clinic:

https://www.portland.va.gov/services/mentalhealth.asp

Veterans Crisis Line/ Suicide Prevention:

https://www.veteranscrisisline.net/

 

If you are a veteran or family member with specific questions not addressed here, or if you need other direct assistance,

please contact an ODVA Resource Navigator by calling (503) 373-2085 or toll-free at 1-800-692-9666.

 

Contact ODVA Headquarters

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs
700 Summer St NE
Salem, OR 97301

Web: https://www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/default.aspx

Phone: (800) 692-9666 or (503) 373-2085

Fax: (503) 373-2392

Email:orvetsbenefits@odva.state.or.us

OHA – Oregon Health Authority – News and Resources For Family Leaders
Apr 21 all-day

 

 

 

 

 

News and Resources for Family Leaders

New OHP Open Card Handbook:

I know it is often hard to navigate the differences between regular OHP and what gets called Open Card or Fee For Service. I hope this handbook is helpful – feel free to share.

https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HSD/OHP/Tools/Open-Card-Handbook-EN.pdf

 

New resource: Family partnerships training for your CLINICIANS!

The National Federation of Families has created a new curriculum module called FAMILY Partnerships.
FAMILY Partnerships is a FREE 6-lesson, self-paced online module designed to improve clinicians’ attitudes, beliefs, and practices to authentically partner with families in behavioral health care settings. 

 

ODE – School Safety and Prevention System Advisory – a chance to join

The Oregon Department of Education (ODE) is extending the deadline for submitting your application to join the ODE School Safety and Prevention System (SSPS) Advisory Group to Friday, March 29, 2024. As a member of the SSPS Advisory Group, you will have an opportunity to help shape equitable policies and practices related to the safety of schools, students, and educational staff in Oregon. We are seeking individuals with experience, insight, and a strong commitment to equity to advance successful experiences and outcomes for Oregon’s students.

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/ORED/bulletins/3854c36    

 

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome – great resource

https://www.fasdcollaborative.com/

 

Rural school based mental health summary – see the attached

 

 

 

 

Short video explaining FERPA –

Student Privacy 101: FERPA for Parents and Students

Vocational Rehabilitation Consumer Input Opportunity

ODHS invites partners to review and comment on VR’s Draft State Plan.

ODHS invites comments through Feb. 21, 2024, via:  Electronic form

By postal mail to Don Alveshere, Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation, 500 Summer Street NE E-87, Salem, Oregon 97301-1120
By email to policy@odhsoha.oregon.gov
By phone to Don Alveshere, 541-241-0165

You can get the draft state plan in other languages, large print, braille or a format you prefer free of charge. Email vr.info@odhsoha.oregon.gov or call 503-945-5880 or 877-277-0513.

State Plan (Full Draft)
Draft State Plan – Goals section 
Información en español

The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act requires VR to submit a state plan every four years. The plan serves as a grant application to our federal funder, the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA), and is a collaboration between the State Rehabilitation Council and VR. It serves as VR’s roadmap for how we will assist people with disabilities to achieve, maintain and advance in employment and independence.

Sign up to receive email updates from VR and the SRC.

Learn more about VR at oregon.gov/odhs/vr. Learn more about the State Rehabilitation Council at www.ORSRC.org.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PSS – Peer Support Space – Peer Support Space Online Group – 24/7 Weekdays & Weekends
Apr 21 all-day

 

 

 

Click Here To Join This Group

 

Peer Support Space Online Group is a safe space for anyone to share anything in a NONJUDGMENTAL and SUPPORTIVE environment. We believe that you never know what anyone is going through, that it is okay to not be okay, and that when we share our stories we become empowered and remind others that they are not alone.
All topics are welcome here (ex: mental illness, trauma, sexual abuse, addiction, suicidality etc.). Here we feel safe to express ourselves without fear of being judged. Here we listen to and support one another.
You are loved. You matter. You are not alone.
Rules:*
1. We respect and validate all sexual orientations, genders, ages, and disabilities as well as those of diverse neurological, racial, religious, and cultural backgrounds.
2. We are welcoming and introduce ourselves to new members.
3. Sexual harassment or harassment of any kind will not be tolerated. If asked to stop, stop. If you feel you are being harassed, in any way, by any member please message an admin.
4. While sharing what has helped YOU is encouraged, we believe that there are many routes to recovery and individuals should be the “drivers” of their recovery journey including treatment choices.
5. You are allowed to share something and ask to not be given advice.
*This is a growing group, rules are subject to change.*
***Please note, that although we honor confidentiality this space this is the internet and as such we cannot guarantee privacy – please share using your own discretion.***

 

RDB – raices de bienestar – Sudicide Prevention and Intervention for Latine Communities – Online Self Study @ online register for details
Apr 21 all-day

 

Raíces is thrilled to announce the launch of our on-demand Suicide Prevention and Intervention for Latine Communities training! Led by our dedicated experts, Dra. Ruth Zúñiga and Dra. Daisy Bueno.


To register please visit: https://raicesdebienestar.ce21.com/

For more information about this training please contact Ruby Cabrera at ruby@raicesdebienesetar.com

SGS – Support Groups – Mental Health: Anxiety and Panic Disorders – Message Board & Support Group – 24/7 @ Register For Details
Apr 21 all-day

Mental Health:

Anxiety & Panic Disorders

24/7

Our anxiety and panic disorders support group offers a compassionate and understanding community where individuals can share experiences and coping strategies to manage and overcome anxiety-related challenges.

When you create an account you’ll always come back to where you left off. With an account you can also be notified of new replies, save bookmarks, and use likes to thank others. We can all work together to make this community great. heart

Use the link Below to Join

https://supportgroups.com/

About SupportGroups™

SupportGroups.com is a safe, social support network that allows members & therapists to engage in group discussions for everyone involved. Our groups provide support for those dealing with Mental and Physical Health issues, Addiction, Relationships, or their Identity. Our mission is simple: Provide support in a safe online community for everyone who needs it.

SGS – Support Groups – Mental Health: Self-Harm & Suicidal Thoughts – Message Board & Support Group – 24/7 @ Register For Details
Apr 21 all-day

 

 

 

Mental Health:

Self-Harm & Suicidal Thoughts

24/7

The Self-Harm & Suicidal Thoughts support group offers a safe and compassionate space for individuals to share their struggles, find understanding, and seek hope in their journey towards healing and recovery.

When you create an account you’ll always come back to where you left off. With an account you can also be notified of new replies, save bookmarks, and use likes to thank others. We can all work together to make this community great. heart

Use the link Below to Join

https://supportgroups.com/

About SupportGroups™

SupportGroups.com is a safe, social support network that allows members & therapists to engage in group discussions for everyone involved. Our groups provide support for those dealing with Mental and Physical Health issues, Addiction, Relationships, or their Identity. Our mission is simple: Provide support in a safe online community for everyone who needs it.

 

USDVA – U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs – PTSD Self Screen Tool Online
Apr 21 all-day
WA – Wildflower Alliance – Join our Discord Community Online Peer Support Server – 24/7 @ Online via Zoom
Apr 21 all-day
WA - Wildflower Alliance - Join our Discord Community Online Peer Support Server - 24/7 @ Online via Zoom

Discord Community

Discord is a social platform that we use to host an online peer support & community space.

You can log into Discord via a web browser, but for the best experience we recommend downloading the mobile or desktop app.

Discord Features

  • Anonymous
    You choose how much about yourself to share
  • Zero pressure
    Read along and participate at your own pace
  • Community
    Hundreds of people to potentially connect with
  • Private channels
    For marginalized identities and experiences
  • 24/7 access
    Share whatever, whenever
  • Peer support
    Our team and volunteers are active throughout the day and into the night

What happens on Discord?

People from Western Mass and all over the world use our Discord to:

  • Give and receive support
  • Discuss topics that are important to us
  • Share pictures, music, memes, and more
  • Join live support groups and activities
  • Connect with others who have similar identities and experiences

 

To see a video tutorial for our Discord Server

https://wildfloweralliance.org/discord/

ALLAA – All Addicts Anonymous – A Program of Recovery for all Addicts and Addictions – “Sunlight of the Spirt” Group – Sundays @ Online Via ZOOM
Apr 21 @ 5:00 am – 6:00 am
ALLAA - All Addicts Anonymous - A Program of Recovery for all Addicts and Addictions - "Sunlight of the Spirt" Group - Sundays @ Online Via ZOOM

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Sunlight of the Spirit” Group

Topics: “Strictly Recovery” Q&A, podcast speakers, reading & discussion, meditation

Language: English

Zoom Meeting ID: 2723 740 62

Password: (Send an email request to the address below)

Email: sunlightofthespirit852@hotmail.com

Contact: Nick

 

Warmline – PRPSN – Project Return Peer Support Network Warmline (English or Spanish/Español) – Call 1-888-448-9777 @ 7am-3pm PST – Weekends @ phone
Apr 21 @ 7:00 am – 3:00 pm
Warmline - PRPSN - Project Return Peer Support Network Warmline (English or Spanish/Español) - Call 1-888-448-9777 @ 7am-3pm PST - Weekends @ phone

Project Return Peer Support Network

Call us at: (888) 448-9777

English or Spanish

Monday through Friday, 11:30am to 7pm PST / 2:30 pm to 10pm EST

Saturday through Sunday, 7am-3pm PST / 10am-6pm EST

Ever wish you had someone to talk to? Someone who is supportive, caring and non-judgmental? Someone who is understanding and empathetic to your feelings? The Warm Line is a non-crisis toll-free line and is specifically, but not limited to, people who are coping with a mental health concern.

We are Los Angeles County’s first after-hours telephone line for individuals with mental health challenges and are staffed entirely by peers with lived experience. We are available to listen when traditional mental health services are closed.

The Warm Line supporters can also provide referrals to services or organizations that are of interest, such as healthcare facilities, mental health services, family planning agencies, shelters, self-help and support groups, and much more.

Our Warm Line was recognized as an innovative program by the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health (LACDMH).

Fore more information about Warm Lines in the United States, click here: warmline.org

 

 

LWF – Livewell Foundation – LiveWell Strategy Group (All adults welcome!) – Sundays @ Online Via ZOOM
Apr 21 @ 8:00 am – 9:15 am
LWF - Livewell Foundation - LiveWell Strategy Group  (All adults welcome!) - Sundays @ Online Via ZOOM

 

 

 

 

 

Livewell Foundation

LiveWell Strategy Group

Sundays – 8:00 – 9:15AM PST

Zoom meeting ID: 84197265600

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84197265600

This approximately 75-minute support group includes a LiveWell Strategy related discussion and reflection. Learn new skills for better managing your moods, reducing symptoms and relapses of depression, and increasing wellbeing in a supportive group of peers who “really get it.”

LiveWell support groups are strategically designed to empower you to take longterm control of your own mental health self-care.

In a supportive community of peers, you’ll learn new strategies and skills for reducing symptoms and relapses of depression, and for living a more meaningful, connected, and productive life.

No registration or waiting lists

SRF – She Recovers Foundation – SheRecovers Together Online – Morning Meeting – Daily @ Online Via ZOOM
Apr 21 @ 9:00 am – 10:00 am

 

Morning Meeting 9:00AM PST Daily

SHE RECOVERS® Together Online Gatherings / SHE RECOVERS Yoga / SHE RECOVERS Dance are twice-daily, hour-long, trauma-informed and facilitated by volunteer Professional SHE RECOVERS Designees.

A free authenticated zoom account is required to attend. Visit http://herecovers.org/together-online/#schedule for the full gathering schedule.

We welcome women and non-binary individuals who identify with women’s communities – who are in or seeking recovery – into this space. We also welcome all races, sexual orientations, and all those differences of life situations, backgrounds, and abilities.

These gatherings are facilitated and supported by trained volunteers. They do not constitute a therapeutic or coaching relationship and are not a replacement for trauma therapy, addiction treatment, psychiatric, or medical care.

If you are seeking treatment or professional recovery support please visit our online directory of trusted resources @ sherecovers.org

By participating in these gatherings, you agree to adhere to our Gathering Agreements @ bit.ly/SRTGatheringAgreements and to co-create a welcoming and supportive environment built on mutual respect for all participants, volunteers, and facilitators. SHE RECOVERS Foundation space-holders reserve the right to remove any individual who appears to be violating the group guidelines and terms of use @ bit.ly/SRtermsofuse set out by SRF.

*By registering for this free offering, you are opting in to receive emails from SHE RECOVERS Foundation. You can unsubscribe at any time.

The Gatherings occur twice-daily at 9:00AM & 5:00PM PST. Visit https://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html to convert to your local time.

To attend this online group register with the link below

CLICK TO REGISTER AND ATTEND

DDA – Dual Diagnosis Anonymous: – Online Meeting – Sundays 10:00AM PST @ Online Via ZOOM
Apr 21 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am
DDA - Dual Diagnosis Anonymous: - Online Meeting - Sundays 10:00AM PST @ Online Via ZOOM

Dual Diagnosis Online Meeting

Sundays – 10:00AM PST

Online Via Zoom: To Join, click on the Link Below

JOIN MEETING VIA ZOOM

Our Mission Statement

Our Mission Statement is our fifth tradition, which states, “Each DDA group has one primary purpose – to carry its message of hope and recovery to those who still suffer from the effects of Dual Diagnosis.”

Dual Diagnosis Anonymous is a fellowship of persons who share their experiences, strengths, weaknesses, feelings, fears, and hopes with one another to resolve our dual diagnosis and/or learn to live at peace with unresolved problems. The only requirement for membership in DDA is a desire to develop healthy, addiction-free lifestyles.

Since 1996, we have been serving persons with severe and persistent mental health and/or substance use challenges and their families in Oregon, numerous states, and worldwide. We provide support and fellowship to help overcome and start on the road to recovery from dual diagnosis.

For more information, please contact us at the Central Office using the contact us page or by calling (503)222-6484.

DDAOR – Dual Diagnosis Anonymous of Oregon: – Online Dual Diagnosis Meetings in Oregon – Sundays 10-11AM PST @ Online Via ZOOM
Apr 21 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am
DDAOR - Dual Diagnosis Anonymous of Oregon: - Online Dual Diagnosis Meetings in Oregon - Sundays 10-11AM PST @ Online Via ZOOM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dual Diagnosis of Oregon Online Meeting

SUNDAYS – 10-11AM PST

 

Join Zoom Meeting: https://zoom.us/j/302462886

 

Our Mission Statement

Our Mission Statement is our fifth tradition, which states, “Each DDA group has one primary purpose – to carry its message of hope and recovery to those who still suffer from the effects of Dual Diagnosis.”

Dual Diagnosis Anonymous is a fellowship of persons who share their experiences, strengths, weaknesses, feelings, fears, and hopes with one another to resolve our dual diagnosis and/or learn to live at peace with unresolved problems. The only requirement for membership in DDA is a desire to develop healthy, addiction-free lifestyles.

Since 1996, we have been serving persons with severe and persistent mental health and/or substance use challenges and their families in Oregon, numerous states, and worldwide. We provide support and fellowship to help overcome and start on the road to recovery from dual diagnosis.

For more information, please contact us at the Central Office using the contact us page or by calling (503)222-6484.

DBSA – Depression Bipolar Support Alliance – Famiy and Friends Support Group – Team Led – Sundays @ Online Via HeyPeers
Apr 21 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
DBSA - Depression Bipolar Support Alliance - Famiy and Friends Support Group - Team Led  - Sundays @ Online Via HeyPeers

 

Family and Friends Support Group

Sundays 1-2PM PST

Team Led

Online Support Group Information

All DBSA online support groups are free of charge. Online support groups are led by peers, which means that the person guiding the meeting knows firsthand what it’s like to live with a mood disorder.

Our national online support groups are hosted by HeyPeers, a DBSA vendor.

Upon registration, you will receive an email from them to assist you with managing your account.

Register Through HeyPeers

DBSA – Depression Bipolar Support Alliance – Famiy and Friends Support Group – Team Led – Sundays @ Online Via HeyPeers
Apr 21 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
DBSA - Depression Bipolar Support Alliance - Famiy and Friends Support Group - Team Led  - Sundays @ Online Via HeyPeers

 

 

 

 

 

Family and Friends Support Group

Sundays 1-2PM PST

Team Led

Online Support Group Information

All DBSA online support groups are free of charge. Online support groups are led by peers, which means that the person guiding the meeting knows firsthand what it’s like to live with a mood disorder.

Our national online support groups are hosted by HeyPeers, a DBSA vendor.

Upon registration, you will receive an email from them to assist you with managing your account.

Register Through HeyPeers

 

DBSA – Depression Bipolar Support Alliance – Online Support Group – Sundays – 1-2PM PST @ Online Via HeyPeers
Apr 21 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

 

 

 

 

DBSA Online Support Group

Sundays 1-2PM PST

Online Support Group Information

All DBSA online support groups are free of charge. Online support groups are led by peers, which means that the person guiding the meeting knows firsthand what it’s like to live with a mood disorder.

Our national online support groups are hosted by HeyPeers, a DBSA vendor.

Upon registration, you will receive an email from them to assist you with managing your account.

Register Through HeyPeers

 

CA/OSA – Cocaine Anonymous Online Service Area – Online 12 Step Meeting – DAILY REPRIEVE – 7 Days A Week @ Online Via ZOOM
Apr 21 @ 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

DAILY REPRIEVE

Join Via ZOOM

ID: 852 6648 1221

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85266481221

 

MEETING/GROUP TYPES:

OPEN: Attended by C.A. members, their families, friends and other interested people.
CLOSED: Attendance is limited to C.A. members only.

Cocaine Anonymous Around the World Clock

Pacific Standard Time (PDT) Eastern Standard Time (EDT) Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) British Standard Time (BST) Central European Summer Time (CEST)
July 26, 2023 9:08:36 AM July 26, 2023 12:08:36 PM July 26, 2023 4:08:36 PM July 26, 2023 5:08:36 PM July 26, 2023 6:08:36 PM
Sweden, Stockholm South Africa, Johannesburg Thailand, Bangkok Asia, Hong Kong Australia, Melbourne
6:08:36 PM 6:08:36 PM 11:08:36 PM 12:08:36 AM 2:08:36 AM

Please check the time above for the time zone you are in.  U.S. Daylight Savings and U.K. Daylight Savings happen about two weeks apart. U.K. falls back at 2am Sunday October 25th/U.S. falls back at 2am Sunday November 1st. The schedule can vary and be 1 hour different during that period.

Online Service Area

Cocaine Anonymous is a Fellowship of, by, and for addicts seeking recovery. Friends and Family of addicts should contact Co-Anon Family Groups, a Fellowship dedicated to their much different needs. Some items contained in these pages are published with permission of C.A. World Services, Inc., but this does not imply endorsement of this website by the C.A. World Service Conference or the C.A. World Service Office. The information provided within this website is intended to be a convenience for those who visit our website. Such inclusion does not constitute or imply endorsement by, or affiliation with, the Area or the Districts within. “Cocaine Anonymous World Service Conference Approved Literature. Copyright © 2022 Cocaine Anonymous World Services, Inc. “C.A.”, “Cocaine Anonymous” and the C.A. logo are registered trademarks of Cocaine Anonymous World Services, Inc. All rights reserved.” “In the spirit of Tradition Six, C.A. is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization, or institution. As such, in the Area, District, Service Committees of Cocaine Anonymous and Cocaine Anonymous as a whole does not endorse and is not affiliated with or any of the companies and/or services offered on the site. Any links to external websites or services are only provided as a convenience to our members.”

webmaster@ca-online.org

05 – Warmline – CPSCO – Connections Peer Support Center – Outreach Warmline – Call 1-800-809-6262 @ 2-7pm PST – Weekdays & Weekends @ Phone
Apr 21 @ 2:00 pm – 7:00 pm

 

Connections Peer Support Center
Outreach Warmline: 1-800-809-6262 OR 1-603-427-6966

2pm-7pm PST 7 DAYS A WEEK

Call and either talk to someone or if we are on the line with someone, leave a message, and we will call you back before the end of the day.

 

ROCC – Recovery Outreach Community Center – Amongst Ourselves with Deena – Sundays @ online via Zoom
Apr 21 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
ROCC - Recovery Outreach Community Center - Amongst Ourselves with Deena - Sundays @ online via Zoom

AMONGST OURSELVES

Healing from Dissociative Identity Disorder