PeerGalaxy Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring offerings of telephone + online peer support + wellness activities! 

UPDATED: Click on the new Accessibility Button in the upper right corner for viewing options!

If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

Your use of this site is subject to the Privacy Policy, Terms and Conditions of Use.

There could be fees or charges by your carrier for sending or receiving SMS text messaging, phone, or data.

Training Opportunities in June 2020
List Provided Courtesy of State of Oregon, Oregon Health Authority
Click here to download PDF Format, 16 pages

Jul
6
Mon
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 6 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Jul
7
Tue
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 7 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Jul
8
Wed
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 8 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Jul
9
Thu
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 9 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Jul
10
Fri
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 10 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Anxiety Support with Mark at ROCC – Fridays @ Online via Zoom
Jul 10 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

logo

ROCC Salem presents online peer support

ANXIETY SUPPORT with MARK
FRIDAYS 12-1pm PST

This is a support group for those who experience or have experienced anxiety in their lives. A daily meditation is read at the beginning and then the group goes around the table to share. Click link below to attend group. You will be asked to register on ZOOM. It’s free and fast!

https://us04web.zoom.us/meeting/register/uJIsdOivqDorWxvjBSc6K9G3RjRIsLjd-A

ZOOM Meeting ID# 561 317 611

ROCC has peer support by phone and other online groups, too!

Do you need someone to talk to?

We’re available for anyone to call peer support no matter what!

Call anytime between 11am – 7pm PST 7 days per week, weekdays and weekends.

971-718-8668 (MONDAY-THURSDAY)
971-718-0967 (TUESDAY-FRIDAY)
971-718-8670 (FRIDAY-MONDAY)

To learn about ROCC’s Online Groups visit:
http://www.roccsalem.org/online-groups

ROCC Mission Statement

Recovery Outreach Community Center (ROCC), is a safe place for people recovering from or who are interested in mental health, addiction, trauma, or other related issues. Our mission is to empower and respect others through peer-led service and peer-to-peer support. We want to encourage self-direction, personal responsibility and hope, by providing a safe place for people to share story and heal.

ROCC Principles

Principle I

The source of ROCC’s power is peer-to-peer relations. By sharing story and experiences, we lead each other into hope.

Principle II

Self-direction and personal recovery is ROCC’s goal. To be able to lead, control and choose your own recovery path will achieve a self-determined life.

Principle III

ROCC requires respectful conduct and encourages the voice of all. We must instill hope in the individual while fulfilling the values of the group.

ROCC Website:

https://www.roccsalem.org

ROCC Facebook Page:

https://www.facebook.com/ROCCSALEM/

ROCC Facebook Group for Chat:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/232944234571700/

Jul
11
Sat
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 11 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Jul
12
Sun
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 12 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Jul
13
Mon
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 13 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Jul
14
Tue
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 14 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Jul
15
Wed
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 15 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Jul
16
Thu
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 16 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Jul
17
Fri
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 17 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Anxiety Support with Mark at ROCC – Fridays @ Online via Zoom
Jul 17 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

logo

ROCC Salem presents online peer support

ANXIETY SUPPORT with MARK
FRIDAYS 12-1pm PST

This is a support group for those who experience or have experienced anxiety in their lives. A daily meditation is read at the beginning and then the group goes around the table to share. Click link below to attend group. You will be asked to register on ZOOM. It’s free and fast!

https://us04web.zoom.us/meeting/register/uJIsdOivqDorWxvjBSc6K9G3RjRIsLjd-A

ZOOM Meeting ID# 561 317 611

ROCC has peer support by phone and other online groups, too!

Do you need someone to talk to?

We’re available for anyone to call peer support no matter what!

Call anytime between 11am – 7pm PST 7 days per week, weekdays and weekends.

971-718-8668 (MONDAY-THURSDAY)
971-718-0967 (TUESDAY-FRIDAY)
971-718-8670 (FRIDAY-MONDAY)

To learn about ROCC’s Online Groups visit:
http://www.roccsalem.org/online-groups

ROCC Mission Statement

Recovery Outreach Community Center (ROCC), is a safe place for people recovering from or who are interested in mental health, addiction, trauma, or other related issues. Our mission is to empower and respect others through peer-led service and peer-to-peer support. We want to encourage self-direction, personal responsibility and hope, by providing a safe place for people to share story and heal.

ROCC Principles

Principle I

The source of ROCC’s power is peer-to-peer relations. By sharing story and experiences, we lead each other into hope.

Principle II

Self-direction and personal recovery is ROCC’s goal. To be able to lead, control and choose your own recovery path will achieve a self-determined life.

Principle III

ROCC requires respectful conduct and encourages the voice of all. We must instill hope in the individual while fulfilling the values of the group.

ROCC Website:

https://www.roccsalem.org

ROCC Facebook Page:

https://www.facebook.com/ROCCSALEM/

ROCC Facebook Group for Chat:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/232944234571700/

Jul
18
Sat
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 18 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Jul
19
Sun
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 19 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Jul
20
Mon
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 20 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Jul
21
Tue
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 21 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Jul
22
Wed
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 22 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Jul
23
Thu
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 23 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Jul
24
Fri
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 24 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Anxiety Support with Mark at ROCC – Fridays @ Online via Zoom
Jul 24 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

logo

ROCC Salem presents online peer support

ANXIETY SUPPORT with MARK
FRIDAYS 12-1pm PST

This is a support group for those who experience or have experienced anxiety in their lives. A daily meditation is read at the beginning and then the group goes around the table to share. Click link below to attend group. You will be asked to register on ZOOM. It’s free and fast!

https://us04web.zoom.us/meeting/register/uJIsdOivqDorWxvjBSc6K9G3RjRIsLjd-A

ZOOM Meeting ID# 561 317 611

ROCC has peer support by phone and other online groups, too!

Do you need someone to talk to?

We’re available for anyone to call peer support no matter what!

Call anytime between 11am – 7pm PST 7 days per week, weekdays and weekends.

971-718-8668 (MONDAY-THURSDAY)
971-718-0967 (TUESDAY-FRIDAY)
971-718-8670 (FRIDAY-MONDAY)

To learn about ROCC’s Online Groups visit:
http://www.roccsalem.org/online-groups

ROCC Mission Statement

Recovery Outreach Community Center (ROCC), is a safe place for people recovering from or who are interested in mental health, addiction, trauma, or other related issues. Our mission is to empower and respect others through peer-led service and peer-to-peer support. We want to encourage self-direction, personal responsibility and hope, by providing a safe place for people to share story and heal.

ROCC Principles

Principle I

The source of ROCC’s power is peer-to-peer relations. By sharing story and experiences, we lead each other into hope.

Principle II

Self-direction and personal recovery is ROCC’s goal. To be able to lead, control and choose your own recovery path will achieve a self-determined life.

Principle III

ROCC requires respectful conduct and encourages the voice of all. We must instill hope in the individual while fulfilling the values of the group.

ROCC Website:

https://www.roccsalem.org

ROCC Facebook Page:

https://www.facebook.com/ROCCSALEM/

ROCC Facebook Group for Chat:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/232944234571700/

Jul
25
Sat
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 25 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Jul
26
Sun
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 26 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Jul
27
Mon
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 27 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Jul
28
Tue
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 28 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Jul
29
Wed
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 29 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Jul
30
Thu
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 30 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Jul
31
Fri
Telephone Support with Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jul 31 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

Anxiety Support with Mark at ROCC – Fridays @ Online via Zoom
Jul 31 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

logo

ROCC Salem presents online peer support

ANXIETY SUPPORT with MARK
FRIDAYS 12-1pm PST

This is a support group for those who experience or have experienced anxiety in their lives. A daily meditation is read at the beginning and then the group goes around the table to share. Click link below to attend group. You will be asked to register on ZOOM. It’s free and fast!

https://us04web.zoom.us/meeting/register/uJIsdOivqDorWxvjBSc6K9G3RjRIsLjd-A

ZOOM Meeting ID# 561 317 611

ROCC has peer support by phone and other online groups, too!

Do you need someone to talk to?

We’re available for anyone to call peer support no matter what!

Call anytime between 11am – 7pm PST 7 days per week, weekdays and weekends.

971-718-8668 (MONDAY-THURSDAY)
971-718-0967 (TUESDAY-FRIDAY)
971-718-8670 (FRIDAY-MONDAY)

To learn about ROCC’s Online Groups visit:
http://www.roccsalem.org/online-groups

ROCC Mission Statement

Recovery Outreach Community Center (ROCC), is a safe place for people recovering from or who are interested in mental health, addiction, trauma, or other related issues. Our mission is to empower and respect others through peer-led service and peer-to-peer support. We want to encourage self-direction, personal responsibility and hope, by providing a safe place for people to share story and heal.

ROCC Principles

Principle I

The source of ROCC’s power is peer-to-peer relations. By sharing story and experiences, we lead each other into hope.

Principle II

Self-direction and personal recovery is ROCC’s goal. To be able to lead, control and choose your own recovery path will achieve a self-determined life.

Principle III

ROCC requires respectful conduct and encourages the voice of all. We must instill hope in the individual while fulfilling the values of the group.

ROCC Website:

https://www.roccsalem.org

ROCC Facebook Page:

https://www.facebook.com/ROCCSALEM/

ROCC Facebook Group for Chat:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/232944234571700/