PeerGalaxy Original Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring over 187,600+ monthly offerings of FREE telephone- and online-accessible peer support, recovery support, and wellness activities!  Plus 50+ warmlines, helplines, chatlines, and hotlines.  Plus workshops, webinars, job postings, resources, observances, special events, consumer input opportunities and more.

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

Click the Accessibility Button on the right side, halfway down in the middle, for enhanced viewing and/or access options!  Click the Translate Button in the lower left corner for language options. 

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If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

7

Training Opportunities in July 2020
List Provided Courtesy of State of Oregon, Oregon Health Authority
Click here to download PDF Format, 16 pages

Calendar Event Sorting

At the top, the 24/7/365 SAMHSA Disaster Helpline and similar links.

Next, Bundled “All Day” Events

Some organizations (like 12 step recovery programs, AA, NA, AlAnon, etc.) have so many events happening throughout the day that they need to be in a bundled listing to spare endless scrolling.  Often there is a link to look up events by zip code and other criteria.

Lastly, Time-Specific Events

So you can see what’s happening in the next hours, time specific events are tagged and listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  There can be events and warmlines operating in different time zones, though we try to list all in Oregon’s Pacific Time Zone.

Page Advancement

The calendar displays ~50 listings per page.  To advance to next page with ~50 more listings, click the right arrow in the lower left corner of the calendar


Screenshot image of the page advancing arrows at the bottom of the calendar, lower left corner.
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2024
0 – Hotline – DH – DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends
Jul 24 all-day
0 - Hotline - DH - DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) - 24/7 - Weekdays and Weekends

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

01 – Helpline – GR – Grad Resources – The National Grad Crisis Line – (877)-472-3457 – 24/7 – Weekdays & Weekends @ Phone
Jul 24 all-day

 

 

 

 

The National Grad Crisis Line

1.877.GRAD.HLP (1.877.472.3457)

The National Grad Crisis Line helps graduate students reach free, confidential telephone counseling, crisis intervention, suicide prevention, and information and referral services provided by specially-trained call-takers. Caring, professional staff and well-trained volunteers answer around the clock.

All counselors have completed training to understand the unique issues faced by graduate students. In addition to listening to and empathizing with a caller’s concerns, counselors assess the caller’s lethality risk, counsel, and offer various local support services and mental health resources for follow-up.

1.877.GRAD.HLP

https://gradresources.org/

Who We Are

Since 1990, Grad Resources has recognized the significant role of graduate students in America. From our studies on stress in graduate school to the painful stories of student struggles we hear every day, we understand the pressures they face. We offer services that address their personal, emotional and spiritual needs, providing online materials, meaningful connections, engaging speakers, and supportive faith-based communities that enable graduate students to flourish personally and professionally.
01 – Helpline – Samaritans – Helpline – 887- 870 – 4673 – 24/7 @ phone
Jul 24 all-day

 

24/7 Helpline

887- 870 – 4673

 

Get Support Now

If you are feeling suicidal, lonely, or depressed, we are here for you. Whatever the reason, you will get help from a trained volunteer offering nonjudgmental support. The 24/7 Helpline is confidential and free. You can call or text us any time at 988

You can also use these links

CALL NOW

TEXT NOW

Important information about 988

As of July 16th, 2022, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (NSPL), is transitioning to a three digit number988988 is intended to create an ease of access to care and improve mental health response. NSPL has shared a helpful FAQ document here.

As a member of the NSPL Network, Samaritans will be answering calls going to this line. Moving to 988 does not mean our current number (877-870-4673) goes away. You can still call or text us at this number 24/7.

We are here for you.

 

What happens when you use the 24/7 Helpline?

  1. You call or text Samaritans’ 24/7 Helpline because you need to talk.
  2. One of our incredible volunteers will answer your call or text.
  3. They will ask for your name, but you do not need to disclose it if you don’t feel comfortable.
  4. Our volunteers will listen to you. We will not give advice or try to “fix” anything. We simply want to support you in whatever feelings you want to share.

 

01 – Helpline – SP – Shatterproof – Crisis Text Line – anxiety, depression, substance use disorder – (SHATTERPROOF to 741741) – 24/7 @ Text Line
Jul 24 all-day
01 - Helpline - SP - Shatterproof - Crisis Text Line -  anxiety, depression, substance use disorder - (SHATTERPROOF to 741741) - 24/7 @ Text Line

 

 

 

 

 

Crisis Text Line

SHATTERPROOF to 741741

Who can I call if I am going through a crisis?


I
f you are experiencing anxiety, depression, or a substance use disorder, text- SHATTERPROOF to 741741 for help.

You are not alone. Reach out to the following support hotlines for immediate help. If you have an emergency, please dial 911.

 

02 – Urgent Info – Services and Resources for Families and Children in Response to the Recent Tragic Events Across the Country
Jul 24 all-day

 

Some Resources for Families and Communities:

Due to recent tragic events across the country

 

Agency Logo

Racial Stress and Self-care:

Parent Tip Tool

How race-related stress affects you and your relationship with your child

What effect does racism have on your health and well-being?

Not only does racism impact you as a parent, it can also impact how you interact with your children. Experiences of racism build on each other and can chip away at your emotional, physical and spiritual resources as a parent, contributing to race-related stress. Race-related stress can make it hard to have the space needed to take care of yourself as a parent, which reduces the emotional space you need to adequately take care of your children.

Racism can impact parents emotionally, physically and spiritually

Physical effects

Physical Effects

Physical Effects can include increased hypertension, illness and risky behaviors such as substance use.

Emotional effects

Emotional Effects

Emotional effects can include depression, anxiety, anger, irritability and aggression.

Spiritual effects

Spiritual Effects

Spiritual effects can include a decreased sense of purpose, lack of connection with the larger community, isolation from larger social groups and reduced involvement in communal activities that you enjoy.

Potential reactions to racial stress or trauma

Insecure feelings

Insecure Feelings

Feelings of shame and lack of confidence due to feeling that a situation cannot be changed.

Lack of trust

Lack of Trust

Feeling detached or a lack of trust for others due to experiencing multiple losses or letdowns. This can make it very difficult to seek out help and to identify potential safe sources of support.

Triggers

Triggers

Reminders of the event, such as particular people or situations, can also trigger strong emotional or physical responses (e.g., crying or rapid heartbeat).

Emotions

Difficulty Controlling Emotions

Difficulty controlling emotional responses (going from “zero to one hundred”) can occur as the body helps you adapt to potentially unsafe situations, making you feel constantly on “alert.”

The body’s response to the experience of racism can make accessing resources to cope with the situation difficult. Race-related stress is unique in that it threatens psychological resources that are needed to cope and fulfill basic needs such as financial support, housing, access to jobs, etc.

When your body is in stress mode, it is geared up to help you and your child survive, which sometimes leads to impulsive decisions. If you live in a chronic state of stress related to racism, you can start to engage in survival coping. Survival coping can help you to deal with very hard or potentially life-threatening situations. However, if you continue to exist in this mode long-term, it can make it difficult to enjoy being in the moment with your child and can reduce your ability to feel safe and in control.

What impact can racial stress have on your parenting?

Experiencing race-related stress can also impact the quality of parenting relationships in the following ways:

Impostor syndrome

When you are exposed to racism repeatedly, you often start doubting yourself and can feel like you are an imposter in dominant culture settings or in settings where you feel as though you do not belong. Your inner thoughts might sound something like: “Am I being judged?” “Am I worthy?” “I got lucky.” “I only got this because I am Black.”

Being overly alert (hypervigilance)

Experiencing racial stress can make you more aware of potential dangers and negative experiences that can occur. This, in turn, can make the experience of parenting even more stressful. When you interact with your children, you can sometimes be reminded of negative race-related experiences that you had when you were a child. This reminder can amp up emotional responses, or hyperarousal, making it hard for you to “keep your cool” and be open to flexible problem solving.

“Helicopter parenting” (monitoring in fear)

These experiences of racism and unwarranted blame or lack of acceptance can make you want to protect your children so much, that you don’t allow them to explore in the way that they need to. You may shelter them from failures, which everyone needs to experience in order to learn how to manage everyday life. You may tend to be overly cautious or suspicious. Examples can include not allowing your children to have sleepovers or go to the park, even with your supervision.

Difficulty regulating emotions

  • When your past influences your emotional state, it can affect your emotional responses to both big and minor stressors with children, such as when they misbehave. This, in turn, can lead to being overprotective or overuse of physical discipline, as a means of survival.
  • For children, having parents who can keep perspective (stay cool) when children are upset, or misbehaving is very important. Likewise, it is important to stay calm when disciplining a child, otherwise discipline may go overboard. Both of these things can be hard if you are having difficulty controlling your emotions.

Avoidance

  • Avoiding situations that are related to racism can be a needed strategy to survive; such as instances that may involve violence or threat to yourself or your family. Sometimes you may avoid reminders of past experiences due to the pain or discomfort they cause.
  • If you find yourself avoiding strong feelings or situations with your child that bring up painful memories, it may make it hard to show affection and support for your child. It may even make it difficult to know how to provide emotional support for your child during times of stress. For instance, if your child brings up their own experience of oppression or an event in their life reminds you of something from your own childhood.

Mistrusting others

  • Racism can lead to distrust or mistrust of other communities. Internalized racism is when you begin to accept negative messages about your own abilities and inherent worth by the dominant group in society.
  • When you use society’s norms to judge yourself, you can feel depressed, unworthy and just not good enough. You are taught in many ways to take these feelings and paint them onto another group.
  • Intra and interracial violence, contention among disenfranchised communities or color, and the way the media conveys information about people of color, contribute to this.
  • This kind of coping can make you more vulnerable to racism, because on some level you may believe in racial hierarchy and difference when you belittle other groups. And when you show your children that it is right to discriminate against certain other groups, you make them more vulnerable to discrimination that they face.

Minimizing racism

  • Racism is overwhelming, as is the history of violence. You are sometimes taught that accepting this and minimizing racism is the only thing you can do. But when you ignore racism, and accept powerlessness, you encourage your kids to internalize racism. This can lead to increased levels of depression, anxiety and externalizing behaviors (e.g., engaging in risky behaviors, such as alcohol or substance use).
  • When you believe that you should be able to handle and manage it all without a break or without asking for help, you are at increased risk for health problems and can miss important cues about your well-being and safety.

Self-blame

Experiencing chronically unfair and dangerous discriminatory practices due to race can lead to feelings of low worth. For parents, this can also lead to a questioning of your parenting choices and abilities.

Unbalanced Racial and Ethnic Socialization (RES)

Unbalanced messaging or communication about race and ethnicity occurs when you only promote messages of mistrust, preparation for bias, or only give racial pride messages to your children.

So, what can you do to mitigate racial stress?

As parents, it is important to develop positive identities and share your cultural identities with your children. Positive cultural identity and advocacy are protective factors against racism, which can help to reduce and prevent racial stress.

There are many other ways to cope with stress and everyone has different preferences. Reducing stress can also allow you to model healthy coping strategies for your child. Here are some suggestions with links you can try.

Agency Logo
Talking with Children About Tragic Events

What do we tell our children? How do we reassure them of their own safety?

At The Dougy Center in Portland, Oregon, we’ve provided grief support groups for children, teens, young adults and their parents or adult caregivers since 1982.

Based on our experience, here are some things for adults to keep in mind as you struggle with how to talk with children following tragic events, such as natural disasters, plane crashes, or school shootings.

1. Don’t project your fears onto your children. They take their cues from the adults around them.
You can’t hear the news about children being murdered or communities devastated by natural disasters without thinking about how you’d feel if it happened to your family, friends, or hometown. The outpouring of care and empathy for the families who lost loved ones will be powerful, and…we all know it could have been our friends, our child, our family and community members who died or were injured.

Identifying with the senselessness and randomness makes us all feel more vulnerable. But we should remember that children don’t always see things the same way that adults do, and it won’t be helpful to them for us to fall apart. They need to see that we care, that we feel terrible about this tragedy, and that we will do everything we can to keep them safe. They will take their cues from our behavior.

It’s okay to show emotion. We can model for children that feeling sad, scared, and upset is normal after tragedies. But we don’t want to overwhelm them with our emotions, or put them in the position of having to ‘parent,’ or take care of, the adults around them. Make sure you also model taking care of yourself, by sharing with trusted and supportive adult friends, eating (and drinking) healthfully.

2. Try to limit their access to the recurring news and exposure to the tragedy over and over.
Over-exposure to the graphic and emotional news can be overwhelming for children and can cause unnecessary anxiety and fear. Some children who repeatedly watched the footage of planes crashing into the towers on 9/11 thought it was happening again and again. Some children (and some adults) may have difficulty getting graphic scenes and images out of their minds. Too much exposure can fuel their fear, so don’t let them sit and watch the news over and over. Better yet, set the example of not doing so yourself as well.

3. Understand that you can’t completely shield them from what happened.
It would be next to impossible to hide these events from children, as much as we wish we could. You might be able to shield your own child in your home, for example, by not turning on (or owning) a television, but you can’t protect your children from hearing about it from other kids. The fact is, they will hear about it, so although they don’t “need” to know about it, pretending we can shield them is magical thinking.

That said, you don’t need to give them more information than they can handle, or more than they’re asking for. A simple, “Did they talk about what happened in _____ today at school?” would be a good starter. They need to know that you’re not trying to hide the truth from them, that you’re open to talking about it, but that you’re also not forcing them to do so.

4. Model truth-telling and build trust with your children by letting them hear things, even hard things, from you directly.
Eight days after the 9/11 attacks, I was meeting in small groups with pre-school workers in New York City, talking about how to respond to the young children in their care about the events. A man asked to speak to me privately after one of the trainings, and asked for my advice around his 7-year-old daughter. For the last week, since September 12th, she had been having stomach aches and difficulty sleeping. He said it was not tied to the events of 9/11 because, “We don’t have a television.” As his story unfolded it was evident that he did not want to have to explain to his child why people would do such horrible things, a normal dilemma that we face as parents and adults. This child was experiencing physical reactions, as it turned out, not primarily because of her reaction to the events of 9/11, but because she was unable to share her fears and concerns and questions in her own home, faced with her parents’ denial.

Here are some principles to keep in mind as you talk with children:

1. There is no one typical reaction one can or should expect from children.
Their responses will vary all over the ‘emotional’ map, from seeming disinterest to nightmares, eating issues, and anxiety. How any specific child will respond will depend on their age, previous experience with death and loss, and their personality style. Fearful children will tend to worry; quiet children may keep their feelings to themselves; those who want to appear unfazed may exhibit a sense of bravado or lack of caring. Of course, children directly affected – those who had a family member die; those who witnessed the tragedy; those who had friends die – will tend to have longer-term reactions and needs. Watch for changes in behavior, or concerning trends. While it would be normal to have heightened anxiety and sleeplessness, any concerning behavior or troubling symptoms should be taken seriously, and if warranted, professional help sought.

2. Many children will have an increased sense of fear about their safety.
Understandably. So will many adults. After a shooting at an Oregon mall in December 2012, the news outlets were filled with people who said they’d never take their children there again. Others said they’d return as soon as it opened in order to support the stores and employees who had experienced the traumatic events, and whose livelihoods were going to suffer as a result of the several day closure. Some runners in the Boston Marathon vowed to return; others said they would never do so again.

While we can’t guarantee to our children that nothing bad will ever happen to them, we can provide assurance that these events are relatively rare, and that we will do everything we can to keep them safe. Children may have many questions about the events, particularly about natural disasters. Answer their questions with language that fits their developmental stage. It’s okay if you don’t know the answer to a question. If it’s a question that might have an answer, offer to look up more information. You can also ask children what they think the answer is as they often have thoughts and ideas they want to share with you. In the case of natural disasters, if your child is fearful of something like that happening in your community, talk with them about the safety plan that you have in place for your family and home. You can also look into what community safety measures are in place and whatever elements are relevant with your children. Many children will be reassured knowing that there are specific, tangible things they and your family can do if something occurs. Some examples include, picking a meeting place, keeping flashlights in every bedroom, talking about where you will keep emergency water and food.

3. Children want, need, and deserve the truth.
In over 30 years of providing grief support to thousands of children and teens at The Dougy Center for Grieving Children & Families, we have never heard a child say, “I’m glad I was lied to.” Many, however, struggle with anger and lack of trust toward parents or other adults who lied to them. When we don’t tell the truth, they learn that we cannot be trusted. As difficult as it can be at times, and as horrendous as the truth may be, children want, need, and deserve the truth. Being able to talk openly and honestly with your children about tragic events and other losses, creates a foundation of trust, enabling them to come to you in the future with their questions, fears, and concerns.

 

 

Daniel Tiger

Helping Children with Tragic Events in the News

In times of community or world-wide crisis, it’s easy to assume that young children don’t know what’s going on. But one thing’s for sure — children are very sensitive to how their parents feel. They’re keenly aware of the expressions on their parents’ faces and the tone of their voices. Children can sense when their parents are really worried, whether they’re watching the news or talking about it with others. No matter what children know about a “crisis,” it’s especially scary for children to realize that their parents are scared.

Some Scary, Confusing Images

The way that news is presented on television can be quite confusing for a young child. The same video segment may be shown over and over again through the day, as if each showing was a different event. Someone who has died turns up alive and then dies again and again. Children often become very anxious since they don’t understand much about videotape replays, closeups, and camera angles. Any televised danger seems close to home to them because the tragic scenes are taking place on the TV set in their own living room. Children can’t tell the difference between what’s close and what’s far away, what’s real and what’s pretend, or what’s new and what’s re-run.

The younger the children are, the more likely they are to be interested in scenes of close-up faces, particularly if the people are expressing some strong feelings. When there’s tragic news, the images on TV are most often much too graphic and disturbing for young children.

“Who will take care of me?”

In times of crisis, children want to know, “Who will take care of me?” They’re dependent on adults for their survival and security. They’re naturally self-centered. They need to hear very clearly that their parents are doing all they can to take care of them and to keep them safe. They also need to hear that people in the government and other grown-ups they don’t even know are working hard to keep them safe, too.

Helping Children Feel More Secure

Play is one of the important ways young children have of dealing with their concerns. Of course, playing about violent news can be scary and sometimes unsafe, so adults need to be nearby to help redirect that kind of play into nurturing themes, such as a hospital for the wounded or a pretend meal for emergency workers.

When children are scared and anxious, they might become more dependent, clingy, and afraid to go to bed at night. Whining, aggressive behavior, or toilet “accidents” may be their way of asking for more comfort from the important adults in their lives. Little by little, as the adults around them become more confident, hopeful and secure, our children probably will, too.

Turn Off the TV

When there’s something tragic in the news, many parents get concerned about what and how to tell their children. It’s even harder than usual if we’re struggling with our own powerful feelings about what has happened. Adults are sometimes surprised that their own reactions to a televised crisis are so strong, but great loss and devastation in the news often reawaken our own earlier losses and fears – even some we think we might have “forgotten”

It’s easy to allow ourselves to get drawn into watching televised news of a crisis for hours and hours; however, exposing ourselves to so many tragedies can make us feel hopeless, insecure, and even depressed. We help our children and ourselves if we’re able to limit our own television viewing. Our children need us to spend time with them – away from the frightening images on the screen.

Talking and Listening

Even if we wanted to, it would be impossible to give our children all the reasons for such things as war, terrorists, abuse, murders, major fires, hurricanes, and earthquakes. If they ask questions, our best answer may be to ask them, “What do you think happened?” If the answer is “I don’t know,” then the simplest reply might be something like, “I’m sad about the news, and I’m worried. But I love you, and I’m here to care for you.”

If we don’t let children know it’s okay to feel sad and scared, they may think something is wrong with them when they do feel that way. They certainly don’t need to hear all the details of what’s making us sad or scared, but if we can help them accept their own feelings as natural and normal, their feelings will be much more manageable for them.

Angry feelings are part of being human, especially when we feel powerless. One of the most important messages we can give our children is, “It’s okay to be angry, but it’s not okay to hurt ourselves or others.” Besides giving children the right to their anger, we can help them find constructive things to do with their feelings. This way, we’ll be giving them useful tools that will serve them all their life, and help them to become the worlds’ future peacemakers — the world’s future “helpers.”

Helpful Hints

  • Do your best to keep the television off, or at least limit how much your child sees of any news event.
  • Try to keep yourself calm. Your presence can help your child feel more secure.
  • Give your child extra comfort and physical affection, like hugs or snuggling up together with a favorite book. Physical comfort goes a long way towards providing inner security. That closeness can nourish you, too.
  • Try to keep regular routines as normal as possible. Children and adults count on their familiar pattern of everyday life.
  • Plan something that you and your child enjoy doing together, like taking a walk, going on a picnic, having some quiet time, or doing something silly. It can help to know there are simple things in life that can help us feel better, in good times and in bad.
  • Even if children don’t mention what they’ve seen or heard in the news, it can help to ask what they think has happened. If parents don’t bring up the subject, children can be left with their misinterpretations. You may be really surprised at how much your child has heard from others.
  • Focus attention on the helpers, like the police, firemen, doctors, nurses, paramedics, and volunteers. It’s reassuring to know there are many caring people who are doing all they can to help others in this world.
  • Let your child know if you’re making a donation, going to a town meeting, writing a letter or e-mail of support, or taking some other action. It can help children to know that adults take many different active roles and that we don’t give in to helplessness in times of worldwide crisis.

 

04 – Resources – AKIDSCO – A Kids Book About School Shootings – Free
Jul 24 all-day

A Kids Book About School Shootings

Crystal Woodman Miller

Many of us are going to need to find the words to talk to the kids in our lives about tragic events like the school shooting in Uvalde, Texas. Here’s a free resource from A Kids Company About to help you do that was written by Crystal Woodman-Miller, one of the survivors of the Columbine school shooting.

I hate that we need tools like this. I can’t wait for us to have to write the book “A Kids Book About Why It’s So Hard To Buy A Gun”

Link: www.akidsco.com

There aren’t enough words to explain all the thoughts, emotions, and heartbreak that comes with yesterday’s tragedy in Uvalde. We hope this book helps everyone start somewhere.

We’re making #AKidsBookAboutSchoolShootings free for kids, grownups, and educators everywhere, so that this conversation can get started when it matters most.

FREE DOWNLOAD

A Kids Book About School Shootings by Crystal Woodman Miller:

Link: akidsco.com

 

05 – Warmline – IOA – Institute on Aging – Friendship Line – Seniors and Disabled Hotline and Warmline – 800-670-1360 – 24/7 @ Toll Free Number
Jul 24 all-day

illustration of man on phone

 

Friendship Line

24 Hours a Day 365 Days A Year

800-670-1360

 

Friendship is just a phone call away for Americans age 60 and over and for adults living with disabilities.

The Friendship Line is offered 24 hours a day, 365 days a year by the nonprofit Institute on Aging at 800-971-0016. It is both a crisis intervention hotline and a “warmline” for nonurgent calls.

The confidential service offers active suicide intervention, The service, founded by Patrick Arbore, director of the Institute on Aging’s Center for Elderly Suicide Prevention, is accredited by the American Association of Suicidology. emotional support, elder abuse prevention and counseling, grief support, and information and referrals for isolated older adults.

The Friendship Line also offers outreach, calling on those who suffer from depression, loneliness, isolation, anxiousness, or who may be contemplating suicide. The goal of these well-being checks is to prevent suicide by improving the quality of life and connectedness of isolated older adults.

 

CONNECT With Us

Institute on Aging (IOA) CONNECT is your direct line to us and the starting point for help with your concerns about the needs of older adults and adults with disabilities. IOA CONNECT links you with our services, as well as community services available.

Call IOA CONNECT

415-750-4111

650-424-1411

 

ADAA – Anxiety & Depression Association of America – Online Peer-to-Peer Communities – Anxiety and Depression Support Community – 24/7 Weekdays & Weekends @ online register for details
Jul 24 all-day
ADAA - Anxiety & Depression Association of America - Online Peer-to-Peer Communities - Anxiety and Depression Support Community - 24/7 Weekdays & Weekends @ online register for details

 

 

 

 

 

ADAA  – Anxiety and Depression Support Community

Join from this Page

The Anxiety and Depression peer to peer community has more than 80,000 subscribers from around the world. The objective of this community is to create a space that those suffering from anxiety and depression can turn to find and offer comfort and support, to share information and personal experiences, and to make connections with those in the community.

ADAA also posts on the community page providing helpful tips and strategies about anxiety and depression through blogs and free webinars written/hosted by our professional mental health members, infographics, books, podcasts and more specific to anxiety and depression.

 

 

SGS – Support Groups – Mental Health: Anxiety and Panic Disorders – Message Board & Support Group – 24/7 @ Register For Details
Jul 24 all-day

Mental Health:

Anxiety & Panic Disorders

24/7

Our anxiety and panic disorders support group offers a compassionate and understanding community where individuals can share experiences and coping strategies to manage and overcome anxiety-related challenges.

When you create an account you’ll always come back to where you left off. With an account you can also be notified of new replies, save bookmarks, and use likes to thank others. We can all work together to make this community great. heart

Use the link Below to Join

https://supportgroups.com/

About SupportGroups™

SupportGroups.com is a safe, social support network that allows members & therapists to engage in group discussions for everyone involved. Our groups provide support for those dealing with Mental and Physical Health issues, Addiction, Relationships, or their Identity. Our mission is simple: Provide support in a safe online community for everyone who needs it.

VAFP – VisionAware and Front Porch – Support Groups and Other Resources For the Blind and Visually Impaired @ Online Event Register Online
Jul 24 all-day

 

 

support group sitting around table

Importance of Joining a Support Group

If you’ve been diagnosed with an eye condition, have a family member who has, or have become a caregiver, joining a support group may be the most important thing you’ll ever do. Whether online or in your local community, such groups offer the opportunity to talk to others; share common concerns, frustrations, and stories; and find solutions to your vision-related difficulties. For more information on support groups, you can read Support Groups and the Adjustment Process.

Check out Finding Support Groups for more information including links to directory listings of support groups.

Support Group Resources and Supportive Communities Meeting Virtually

  • The APH Directory of Services allows you to find local support groups as well as organizations that offer counseling and adjustment services, low vision services, mobility training, and vocational rehabilitation.
  • ILVSG TeleSupport – This support group is designed for older adults with low vision who may not have access to the internet or other in-person groups. It is a monthly meeting offered over the phone and there are no fees or obligations. It is designed for low vision seniors anywhere in the U.S. who have no access to the Internet or cannot attend a live support group. Learn more at: MD Support — TeleSupport or call toll-free at 1-888-866-6148 to get started!

 

  • The Friendship Line – The Institute on Aging established this toll-free line for older adults who may be depressed, lonely, disabled, or in crisis.  It is both a crisis “hotline” and a ‘warmline” for emotional support. Trained volunteers answer the calls and make calls. The Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including: providing emotional support, elder abuse reporting, well-being checks, grief support through assistance and reassurance, active suicide intervention, information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities. Volunteers will also call people on a regular basis to help monitor their  physical and mental health concerns. This service can improve the quality of life and contentedness of isolated callers. Reach out today and call 1-800-971-0016. To learn more, visit Senior Intervention Hotline for Crisis Support Services.

 

  • Social Call – This Covia program connects adults 60 and older to new friends on the phone or video calls. Volunteers are “matched” to participants with the goal of building friendships through weekly calls.  This free service is a great way to socialize and make connections when you can’t get out in your community. Go to: Social Call | Covia Corporate or call 1-877-797-7299 to get started. 

 

  • Covia Well Connected and Well Connected Espanol– This program, previously known as Senior Center without Walls, offers enrichment, community, fun, support and learning groups for older adults who may be homebound. All groups meet over the phone and/or on-line and are free. They offer support groups specifically for the visually impaired. It is a rich and supportive community and there is something for everyone! Visit their website to check out the catalog of offerings and learn how it all works. Call 1-877-797-7299 to register and get started.  

 

  • Mather Telephone Topics – Join Telephone Topics to learn about a variety of topics: wellness, music, sports, history. Participate in live discussions and enjoy live performances from home. All you do is call the phone number or log on to the Zoom meeting. Participation is FREE and open to everyone, anywhere! Learn more at: Aging Well Discussions and Programs | Telephone Topics (mather.com)  Then click on “Download Schedule” and choose an option that interests you. If you have questions about Telephone Topics, call 1-888-600-2560.

 

  • Eye2Eye is a free phone-based peer support program which offers emotional support, assessment, information, and referrals to people who are blind or visually impaired and their families. It helps people cope with the challenges of adjusting to vision loss, using trained peer support specialists who are also blind or visually impaired. They serve people in more than twenty states.
  • The American Council of the Blind (ACB) has a list of helpful resources for people with vision loss and their families. It also has a national directory of affiliates in each state. Seniors can find information through the ACB affiliate Alliance on Aging and Vision Loss.

 

 

 

 

  • Vision Exchange is an online resource for support group leaders who facilitate support groups for adults with vision loss. The purpose is to exchange ideas, information, and community resources to help adults with low vision be more independent

 

  • The Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) was the first community-based nonprofit organization in the country to address the needs of families and friends providing long-term care at home. FCA now offers programs at national, state, and local levels to support and sustain caregivers, and has an online family support group.

 

 

Phone emotional peer support line for blind persons

Rutgers has launched the nation’s first peer support helpline for the legally blind and their families.

Eye2Eye – 833-932-3931 (83-EYE2EYE-1) – is staffed 24/7 by peer support specialists who are legally blind and understand the challenges callers face.

The program, which is funded by a grant from the Lavelle Fund for the Blind, serves residents in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. The helpline assists people with vision impairments and blindness to work through some of the practical and emotional challenges associated with losing vision. Services include peer support, clinical assessment and referrals to resources for help with mental health, employment and technology. The program also offers callers resilience training to promote wellness, strength and self-care.

Recent studies show that one-third of people with vision loss suffer from depression and anxiety. This risk has gone largely unaddressed in the medical community, which has focused more on the practical problems faced by the visually impaired, such as finding employment and navigating everyday tasks, said Steven Silverstein, a clinical psychologist and vision researcher who co-directs the program with Cherie Castellano, the National Peer Support Call Center program director at  Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care.

The Eye2Eye peers all have different forms of visual impairments, and these began at different times during their lives. This allows for a ‘cultural connection’ between callers with a wide range of vision problems and life concerns, and our peer counselors.”

Steven Silverstein, clinical psychologist and vision researcher

 

 

Well Connected Program Offerings

Welcome to Well Connected

Well Connected is a nationwide phone and online community that brings  people over the age of 60 together to explore, learn, laugh, and share  experiences. Over 3,500 members join educational, fun, and engaging groups from the comfort of home. The Well Connected community of participants, staff, facilitators, and presenters value being connected to  engaging content, and to each other. Well Connected is a Front Porch  Community Service and is free of charge to individual members.

A Word About Inclusion

We welcome participants from a variety of backgrounds, beliefs, opinions, living situations, and abilities. Many of our participants are low vision or blind. Many are dealing with health concerns, chronic or disabling conditions or other issues. Please be sensitive, and mindful of the diversity in our community.

How It Works

1. Browse the materials and find groups that interest you, there a currently    groups to select from.

( download the 2024 Catalog In PDF or TEXT and choose from 77 different groups! )

• Once you are enrolled in the program, there is no limit to the number of
groups you may join. ( To Join use this Link ) or by phone at 877- 797-7299

• Check your Participant Calendar for group times in your time zone, and
for information about how to join.

 

2. Join by Phone

• All groups can be joined by telephone using a toll-free number from an
unblocked number.

• To join a group, call the program line, and when prompted, enter the
two-digit code listed on the Participant Calendar.

• If you need help getting into groups, we can call you! Call the office to
request an automated call-in to any group.

3. Join Online

• All groups can be joined online with a device that connects to the
Internet.

• Create your own online registration account and sign yourself up!

• Once you’re registered for groups in advance, and you will get an email
the morning of the group (check your spam folder!) with a personal link
to join.

• Allow the system to access your microphone and speakers.

• Click the Join Group button to enter the meeting.

• If you need tech help, contact us and we can send you more detailed
instructions, or walk you through how it works.

Call or email the office to get started, or if you have any questions.

(877) 797-7299 | connections@frontporch.net

Other Resources:  

Writing Group:

https://www.portlandwritersmill.org/about-us/

 

Poem Reading and Sharing Group:

https://wccls.bibliocommons.com/events/62686fc43560cac65899bb5c

 

Meditation:

Every Monday from 8 p.m. to 8:30 on zoom, go to https://www.firstunitarianportland.org/events-calendar/ and click on Monday night Loving Kindness Meditatio

05 – Warmline – Samaritans – HEY SAM Peer To Peer Texting Service – Text “Hey Sam” to 439726 – Weekdays and Weekends @ 6am to 6pm PST @ Text
Jul 24 @ 6:00 am – 6:00 pm
05 - Warmline - Samaritans - HEY SAM Peer To Peer Texting Service - Text "Hey Sam" to 439726 - Weekdays and Weekends @ 6am to 6pm PST @ Text

 

Hey Sam

Daily:  6AM – 6PM PST

Hey Sam is a dedicated peer-to-peer texting service for people up to 24 years old. Designed for and staffed by young people, Hey Sam gives youth the opportunity to reach peers if they are struggling, need someone to talk to, or need support.

If you or someone you know is feeling lonely, depressed, overwhelmed, or suicidal, we are here for you.

Whatever the reason, reach out. You are not alone.

How it Works

  1. Text Hey Sam at 439-726 when you need to talk.
  2. One of our incredible volunteers will answer your text.
  3. They will ask for your name, but you do not need to disclose it if you don’t feel comfortable.
  4. Our volunteers will listen to you. We will not give advice or try to “fix” anything. We simply want to support you in whatever feelings you want to share.

TERMS OF SERVICE

By texting short code 439-726 you will be connected to a support line chat. Message frequency varies. Message and data rates may apply. Carriers are not liable for delayed or undelivered messages. If you no longer wish to receive messages from Hey Sam, you may opt out at any time by texting the word STOP. You may opt back in by texting the services again. You may reply HELP for help. While Hey Sam operates from 9am to 9pm, Samaritans Helpline is available 24x7x365 by phone or text at 877-870-4673 (sms:+18778704673) and is available to anyone of any age. You may contact Hey Sam by email at heysam@samaritanshope.org with questions about these Terms.  Privacy Policy

 

05 – Warmline – LGBTNHC – LGBT National Senior Hotline – Monday though Friday @ phone
Jul 24 @ 1:00 pm – 9:00 pm
05 - Warmline - LGBTNHC - LGBT National Senior Hotline - Monday though Friday @ phone

 

 

 

LGBT National Senior Hotline

888-234-7243

Monday thru Friday from 1pm to 9pm, PST

Many seniors in our community face unique challenges.
In some cases, LGBTQIA+ seniors may not be out to family and if they are, often fear having to go back in the closet if they need assisted services.

We understand that and can talk about it.

We provide a confidential safe space where seniors can speak about their unique issues concerning sexual orientation or gender identity/expression. This includes coming out issues, family dynamics, relationship concerns, elder abuse,  HIV/AIDS anxiety, safer sex information, suicide, and much more.

Sometimes you just need to be heard. We’re here. 

You deserve respect, support, affirmation, and acceptance.

We don’t give advice, and we never tell you what you should do.  Ultimately, those choices are yours to make, but we are here to help you on your journey.

Our highly trained & dedicated LGBTQIA+ volunteers are  here to provide free & confidential services.

Everyone who offers support at the LGBT National Help Center identifies as part of the LGBTQIA+ community.

We offer support, information, and local resources throughout the United States and beyond.

We will never report your calls to any outside organization or authority.

Calls are never outsourced or answered by any other organizations.

WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN CALLING THE LGBT NATIONAL SENIOR HOTLINE

We provide a safe space while on a call.

All of our peer support volunteers are trained and identify as part of the LGBTQIA+ community.

Our calls are confidential. We don’t know who you are.

There are no recordings made of your conversation.

If you would like us to search for local resources near you, we might ask for your zip code/postal code or city, state, or country. We will never ask for your exact address.

Sometimes our conversations can be heavy, and a person might need to stop the conversation and let the emotions they are feeling sink in. That’s ok. If it’s time for you to end the call, you should certainly do so. You will not be judged, and we’re very glad you called for the amount of time you did.

We don’t call other suicide hotlines, 911, or rescue services on your behalf. While we will not make those calls for you, we will do our best to provide you with the phone numbers to call for yourself if you choose. (The exception is if you make credible threat to someone else.)

If you attempt to start a call during open hours and can’t get through, that means that all of our volunteers are currently talking with other people. Please try back in a few minutes. Should you still not be able to get through, you are always welcome to email us at help@LGBThotline.org.

 

 

WRILC – Western Reserve Independent living Center – Anxiety/Stress Mangement Peer Support Group Zoom Meeting – Wednesdays @ online via zoom
Jul 24 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
WRILC - Western Reserve Independent living Center - Anxiety/Stress Mangement Peer Support Group Zoom Meeting - Wednesdays @ online via zoom

 

 

 

Stress & Anxiety Peer
Support Group
Wednesdays
From 11:00 AM-12:00PM PST
Virtual meeting info
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/9313429948
Meeting ID: 931 342 9948
Phone: +16465588656
Join us on the Third Wednesday of each month to discuss deferent topics surrounding Stress and Anxiety. What is stress and anxiety? Different methods of helping deal with stress and anxiety? What works for you?
LCPRS – Life Connections Peer Recovery Services – Anxiety Support Group – Weekdays @ Join Via Website
Jul 24 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anxiety Support Group

Monday through Friday – 3:30 – 4:30PM PST

Life Connections understands the need for individuals who are needing support and may not be able to travel or want the comfort of their own home. We offer remote support by virtual and phone capabilities. We want to offer a way for you to stay physically distant but stay socially engaged. We offer support groups, one on one support, and just that socialization that we all need. Join group any time during the posted time.

Virtual events are online Via Zoom

 

 

 

05 – Warmline – AMALA – AMALA The Muslim Youth Hopeline – 855 – 95 – 26252 – Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday – 6-10PM PST @ Phone Number
Jul 24 @ 6:00 pm – 10:00 pm

 

 

Youth Hopeline

This Hopeline is NOT a 24-hour line yet. It currently runs during limited times.

HOURS OF OPERATION
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays
Between the Hours of 6 PM -10 PM PST

 

We are also offering text-in services Wednesday & Sunday 6PM – 10PM PST.

 

 

AMALA Hopeline

Peer Support

AMALA’s youth volunteers, all over the age of 18. Our Counselors undergo a 30 hour training developed by professionals in the mental health field.

They are trained
para-professional providing peer support

This includes topics such as:
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Eating disorders
  • Substance abuse

Volunteers are equipped to help callers and recognize cultural nuances that may be impacting the caller.

Follow-up trainings and meetings are also held for volunteer counselors to make sure they are well-equipped to deal with each call they receive. Supervisors are also present at each shift to handle more difficult calls/situations. These hopeline peer counselors are NOT licensed professionals.

 

Jul
25
Thu
2024
0 – Hotline – DH – DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends
Jul 25 all-day
0 - Hotline - DH - DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) - 24/7 - Weekdays and Weekends

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

01 – Helpline – GR – Grad Resources – The National Grad Crisis Line – (877)-472-3457 – 24/7 – Weekdays & Weekends @ Phone
Jul 25 all-day

 

 

 

 

The National Grad Crisis Line

1.877.GRAD.HLP (1.877.472.3457)

The National Grad Crisis Line helps graduate students reach free, confidential telephone counseling, crisis intervention, suicide prevention, and information and referral services provided by specially-trained call-takers. Caring, professional staff and well-trained volunteers answer around the clock.

All counselors have completed training to understand the unique issues faced by graduate students. In addition to listening to and empathizing with a caller’s concerns, counselors assess the caller’s lethality risk, counsel, and offer various local support services and mental health resources for follow-up.

1.877.GRAD.HLP

https://gradresources.org/

Who We Are

Since 1990, Grad Resources has recognized the significant role of graduate students in America. From our studies on stress in graduate school to the painful stories of student struggles we hear every day, we understand the pressures they face. We offer services that address their personal, emotional and spiritual needs, providing online materials, meaningful connections, engaging speakers, and supportive faith-based communities that enable graduate students to flourish personally and professionally.
01 – Helpline – Samaritans – Helpline – 887- 870 – 4673 – 24/7 @ phone
Jul 25 all-day

 

24/7 Helpline

887- 870 – 4673

 

Get Support Now

If you are feeling suicidal, lonely, or depressed, we are here for you. Whatever the reason, you will get help from a trained volunteer offering nonjudgmental support. The 24/7 Helpline is confidential and free. You can call or text us any time at 988

You can also use these links

CALL NOW

TEXT NOW

Important information about 988

As of July 16th, 2022, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (NSPL), is transitioning to a three digit number988988 is intended to create an ease of access to care and improve mental health response. NSPL has shared a helpful FAQ document here.

As a member of the NSPL Network, Samaritans will be answering calls going to this line. Moving to 988 does not mean our current number (877-870-4673) goes away. You can still call or text us at this number 24/7.

We are here for you.

 

What happens when you use the 24/7 Helpline?

  1. You call or text Samaritans’ 24/7 Helpline because you need to talk.
  2. One of our incredible volunteers will answer your call or text.
  3. They will ask for your name, but you do not need to disclose it if you don’t feel comfortable.
  4. Our volunteers will listen to you. We will not give advice or try to “fix” anything. We simply want to support you in whatever feelings you want to share.

 

01 – Helpline – SP – Shatterproof – Crisis Text Line – anxiety, depression, substance use disorder – (SHATTERPROOF to 741741) – 24/7 @ Text Line
Jul 25 all-day
01 - Helpline - SP - Shatterproof - Crisis Text Line -  anxiety, depression, substance use disorder - (SHATTERPROOF to 741741) - 24/7 @ Text Line

 

 

 

 

 

Crisis Text Line

SHATTERPROOF to 741741

Who can I call if I am going through a crisis?


I
f you are experiencing anxiety, depression, or a substance use disorder, text- SHATTERPROOF to 741741 for help.

You are not alone. Reach out to the following support hotlines for immediate help. If you have an emergency, please dial 911.

 

02 – Urgent Info – Services and Resources for Families and Children in Response to the Recent Tragic Events Across the Country
Jul 25 all-day

 

Some Resources for Families and Communities:

Due to recent tragic events across the country

 

Agency Logo

Racial Stress and Self-care:

Parent Tip Tool

How race-related stress affects you and your relationship with your child

What effect does racism have on your health and well-being?

Not only does racism impact you as a parent, it can also impact how you interact with your children. Experiences of racism build on each other and can chip away at your emotional, physical and spiritual resources as a parent, contributing to race-related stress. Race-related stress can make it hard to have the space needed to take care of yourself as a parent, which reduces the emotional space you need to adequately take care of your children.

Racism can impact parents emotionally, physically and spiritually

Physical effects

Physical Effects

Physical Effects can include increased hypertension, illness and risky behaviors such as substance use.

Emotional effects

Emotional Effects

Emotional effects can include depression, anxiety, anger, irritability and aggression.

Spiritual effects

Spiritual Effects

Spiritual effects can include a decreased sense of purpose, lack of connection with the larger community, isolation from larger social groups and reduced involvement in communal activities that you enjoy.

Potential reactions to racial stress or trauma

Insecure feelings

Insecure Feelings

Feelings of shame and lack of confidence due to feeling that a situation cannot be changed.

Lack of trust

Lack of Trust

Feeling detached or a lack of trust for others due to experiencing multiple losses or letdowns. This can make it very difficult to seek out help and to identify potential safe sources of support.

Triggers

Triggers

Reminders of the event, such as particular people or situations, can also trigger strong emotional or physical responses (e.g., crying or rapid heartbeat).

Emotions

Difficulty Controlling Emotions

Difficulty controlling emotional responses (going from “zero to one hundred”) can occur as the body helps you adapt to potentially unsafe situations, making you feel constantly on “alert.”

The body’s response to the experience of racism can make accessing resources to cope with the situation difficult. Race-related stress is unique in that it threatens psychological resources that are needed to cope and fulfill basic needs such as financial support, housing, access to jobs, etc.

When your body is in stress mode, it is geared up to help you and your child survive, which sometimes leads to impulsive decisions. If you live in a chronic state of stress related to racism, you can start to engage in survival coping. Survival coping can help you to deal with very hard or potentially life-threatening situations. However, if you continue to exist in this mode long-term, it can make it difficult to enjoy being in the moment with your child and can reduce your ability to feel safe and in control.

What impact can racial stress have on your parenting?

Experiencing race-related stress can also impact the quality of parenting relationships in the following ways:

Impostor syndrome

When you are exposed to racism repeatedly, you often start doubting yourself and can feel like you are an imposter in dominant culture settings or in settings where you feel as though you do not belong. Your inner thoughts might sound something like: “Am I being judged?” “Am I worthy?” “I got lucky.” “I only got this because I am Black.”

Being overly alert (hypervigilance)

Experiencing racial stress can make you more aware of potential dangers and negative experiences that can occur. This, in turn, can make the experience of parenting even more stressful. When you interact with your children, you can sometimes be reminded of negative race-related experiences that you had when you were a child. This reminder can amp up emotional responses, or hyperarousal, making it hard for you to “keep your cool” and be open to flexible problem solving.

“Helicopter parenting” (monitoring in fear)

These experiences of racism and unwarranted blame or lack of acceptance can make you want to protect your children so much, that you don’t allow them to explore in the way that they need to. You may shelter them from failures, which everyone needs to experience in order to learn how to manage everyday life. You may tend to be overly cautious or suspicious. Examples can include not allowing your children to have sleepovers or go to the park, even with your supervision.

Difficulty regulating emotions

  • When your past influences your emotional state, it can affect your emotional responses to both big and minor stressors with children, such as when they misbehave. This, in turn, can lead to being overprotective or overuse of physical discipline, as a means of survival.
  • For children, having parents who can keep perspective (stay cool) when children are upset, or misbehaving is very important. Likewise, it is important to stay calm when disciplining a child, otherwise discipline may go overboard. Both of these things can be hard if you are having difficulty controlling your emotions.

Avoidance

  • Avoiding situations that are related to racism can be a needed strategy to survive; such as instances that may involve violence or threat to yourself or your family. Sometimes you may avoid reminders of past experiences due to the pain or discomfort they cause.
  • If you find yourself avoiding strong feelings or situations with your child that bring up painful memories, it may make it hard to show affection and support for your child. It may even make it difficult to know how to provide emotional support for your child during times of stress. For instance, if your child brings up their own experience of oppression or an event in their life reminds you of something from your own childhood.

Mistrusting others

  • Racism can lead to distrust or mistrust of other communities. Internalized racism is when you begin to accept negative messages about your own abilities and inherent worth by the dominant group in society.
  • When you use society’s norms to judge yourself, you can feel depressed, unworthy and just not good enough. You are taught in many ways to take these feelings and paint them onto another group.
  • Intra and interracial violence, contention among disenfranchised communities or color, and the way the media conveys information about people of color, contribute to this.
  • This kind of coping can make you more vulnerable to racism, because on some level you may believe in racial hierarchy and difference when you belittle other groups. And when you show your children that it is right to discriminate against certain other groups, you make them more vulnerable to discrimination that they face.

Minimizing racism

  • Racism is overwhelming, as is the history of violence. You are sometimes taught that accepting this and minimizing racism is the only thing you can do. But when you ignore racism, and accept powerlessness, you encourage your kids to internalize racism. This can lead to increased levels of depression, anxiety and externalizing behaviors (e.g., engaging in risky behaviors, such as alcohol or substance use).
  • When you believe that you should be able to handle and manage it all without a break or without asking for help, you are at increased risk for health problems and can miss important cues about your well-being and safety.

Self-blame

Experiencing chronically unfair and dangerous discriminatory practices due to race can lead to feelings of low worth. For parents, this can also lead to a questioning of your parenting choices and abilities.

Unbalanced Racial and Ethnic Socialization (RES)

Unbalanced messaging or communication about race and ethnicity occurs when you only promote messages of mistrust, preparation for bias, or only give racial pride messages to your children.

So, what can you do to mitigate racial stress?

As parents, it is important to develop positive identities and share your cultural identities with your children. Positive cultural identity and advocacy are protective factors against racism, which can help to reduce and prevent racial stress.

There are many other ways to cope with stress and everyone has different preferences. Reducing stress can also allow you to model healthy coping strategies for your child. Here are some suggestions with links you can try.

Agency Logo
Talking with Children About Tragic Events

What do we tell our children? How do we reassure them of their own safety?

At The Dougy Center in Portland, Oregon, we’ve provided grief support groups for children, teens, young adults and their parents or adult caregivers since 1982.

Based on our experience, here are some things for adults to keep in mind as you struggle with how to talk with children following tragic events, such as natural disasters, plane crashes, or school shootings.

1. Don’t project your fears onto your children. They take their cues from the adults around them.
You can’t hear the news about children being murdered or communities devastated by natural disasters without thinking about how you’d feel if it happened to your family, friends, or hometown. The outpouring of care and empathy for the families who lost loved ones will be powerful, and…we all know it could have been our friends, our child, our family and community members who died or were injured.

Identifying with the senselessness and randomness makes us all feel more vulnerable. But we should remember that children don’t always see things the same way that adults do, and it won’t be helpful to them for us to fall apart. They need to see that we care, that we feel terrible about this tragedy, and that we will do everything we can to keep them safe. They will take their cues from our behavior.

It’s okay to show emotion. We can model for children that feeling sad, scared, and upset is normal after tragedies. But we don’t want to overwhelm them with our emotions, or put them in the position of having to ‘parent,’ or take care of, the adults around them. Make sure you also model taking care of yourself, by sharing with trusted and supportive adult friends, eating (and drinking) healthfully.

2. Try to limit their access to the recurring news and exposure to the tragedy over and over.
Over-exposure to the graphic and emotional news can be overwhelming for children and can cause unnecessary anxiety and fear. Some children who repeatedly watched the footage of planes crashing into the towers on 9/11 thought it was happening again and again. Some children (and some adults) may have difficulty getting graphic scenes and images out of their minds. Too much exposure can fuel their fear, so don’t let them sit and watch the news over and over. Better yet, set the example of not doing so yourself as well.

3. Understand that you can’t completely shield them from what happened.
It would be next to impossible to hide these events from children, as much as we wish we could. You might be able to shield your own child in your home, for example, by not turning on (or owning) a television, but you can’t protect your children from hearing about it from other kids. The fact is, they will hear about it, so although they don’t “need” to know about it, pretending we can shield them is magical thinking.

That said, you don’t need to give them more information than they can handle, or more than they’re asking for. A simple, “Did they talk about what happened in _____ today at school?” would be a good starter. They need to know that you’re not trying to hide the truth from them, that you’re open to talking about it, but that you’re also not forcing them to do so.

4. Model truth-telling and build trust with your children by letting them hear things, even hard things, from you directly.
Eight days after the 9/11 attacks, I was meeting in small groups with pre-school workers in New York City, talking about how to respond to the young children in their care about the events. A man asked to speak to me privately after one of the trainings, and asked for my advice around his 7-year-old daughter. For the last week, since September 12th, she had been having stomach aches and difficulty sleeping. He said it was not tied to the events of 9/11 because, “We don’t have a television.” As his story unfolded it was evident that he did not want to have to explain to his child why people would do such horrible things, a normal dilemma that we face as parents and adults. This child was experiencing physical reactions, as it turned out, not primarily because of her reaction to the events of 9/11, but because she was unable to share her fears and concerns and questions in her own home, faced with her parents’ denial.

Here are some principles to keep in mind as you talk with children:

1. There is no one typical reaction one can or should expect from children.
Their responses will vary all over the ‘emotional’ map, from seeming disinterest to nightmares, eating issues, and anxiety. How any specific child will respond will depend on their age, previous experience with death and loss, and their personality style. Fearful children will tend to worry; quiet children may keep their feelings to themselves; those who want to appear unfazed may exhibit a sense of bravado or lack of caring. Of course, children directly affected – those who had a family member die; those who witnessed the tragedy; those who had friends die – will tend to have longer-term reactions and needs. Watch for changes in behavior, or concerning trends. While it would be normal to have heightened anxiety and sleeplessness, any concerning behavior or troubling symptoms should be taken seriously, and if warranted, professional help sought.

2. Many children will have an increased sense of fear about their safety.
Understandably. So will many adults. After a shooting at an Oregon mall in December 2012, the news outlets were filled with people who said they’d never take their children there again. Others said they’d return as soon as it opened in order to support the stores and employees who had experienced the traumatic events, and whose livelihoods were going to suffer as a result of the several day closure. Some runners in the Boston Marathon vowed to return; others said they would never do so again.

While we can’t guarantee to our children that nothing bad will ever happen to them, we can provide assurance that these events are relatively rare, and that we will do everything we can to keep them safe. Children may have many questions about the events, particularly about natural disasters. Answer their questions with language that fits their developmental stage. It’s okay if you don’t know the answer to a question. If it’s a question that might have an answer, offer to look up more information. You can also ask children what they think the answer is as they often have thoughts and ideas they want to share with you. In the case of natural disasters, if your child is fearful of something like that happening in your community, talk with them about the safety plan that you have in place for your family and home. You can also look into what community safety measures are in place and whatever elements are relevant with your children. Many children will be reassured knowing that there are specific, tangible things they and your family can do if something occurs. Some examples include, picking a meeting place, keeping flashlights in every bedroom, talking about where you will keep emergency water and food.

3. Children want, need, and deserve the truth.
In over 30 years of providing grief support to thousands of children and teens at The Dougy Center for Grieving Children & Families, we have never heard a child say, “I’m glad I was lied to.” Many, however, struggle with anger and lack of trust toward parents or other adults who lied to them. When we don’t tell the truth, they learn that we cannot be trusted. As difficult as it can be at times, and as horrendous as the truth may be, children want, need, and deserve the truth. Being able to talk openly and honestly with your children about tragic events and other losses, creates a foundation of trust, enabling them to come to you in the future with their questions, fears, and concerns.

 

 

Daniel Tiger

Helping Children with Tragic Events in the News

In times of community or world-wide crisis, it’s easy to assume that young children don’t know what’s going on. But one thing’s for sure — children are very sensitive to how their parents feel. They’re keenly aware of the expressions on their parents’ faces and the tone of their voices. Children can sense when their parents are really worried, whether they’re watching the news or talking about it with others. No matter what children know about a “crisis,” it’s especially scary for children to realize that their parents are scared.

Some Scary, Confusing Images

The way that news is presented on television can be quite confusing for a young child. The same video segment may be shown over and over again through the day, as if each showing was a different event. Someone who has died turns up alive and then dies again and again. Children often become very anxious since they don’t understand much about videotape replays, closeups, and camera angles. Any televised danger seems close to home to them because the tragic scenes are taking place on the TV set in their own living room. Children can’t tell the difference between what’s close and what’s far away, what’s real and what’s pretend, or what’s new and what’s re-run.

The younger the children are, the more likely they are to be interested in scenes of close-up faces, particularly if the people are expressing some strong feelings. When there’s tragic news, the images on TV are most often much too graphic and disturbing for young children.

“Who will take care of me?”

In times of crisis, children want to know, “Who will take care of me?” They’re dependent on adults for their survival and security. They’re naturally self-centered. They need to hear very clearly that their parents are doing all they can to take care of them and to keep them safe. They also need to hear that people in the government and other grown-ups they don’t even know are working hard to keep them safe, too.

Helping Children Feel More Secure

Play is one of the important ways young children have of dealing with their concerns. Of course, playing about violent news can be scary and sometimes unsafe, so adults need to be nearby to help redirect that kind of play into nurturing themes, such as a hospital for the wounded or a pretend meal for emergency workers.

When children are scared and anxious, they might become more dependent, clingy, and afraid to go to bed at night. Whining, aggressive behavior, or toilet “accidents” may be their way of asking for more comfort from the important adults in their lives. Little by little, as the adults around them become more confident, hopeful and secure, our children probably will, too.

Turn Off the TV

When there’s something tragic in the news, many parents get concerned about what and how to tell their children. It’s even harder than usual if we’re struggling with our own powerful feelings about what has happened. Adults are sometimes surprised that their own reactions to a televised crisis are so strong, but great loss and devastation in the news often reawaken our own earlier losses and fears – even some we think we might have “forgotten”

It’s easy to allow ourselves to get drawn into watching televised news of a crisis for hours and hours; however, exposing ourselves to so many tragedies can make us feel hopeless, insecure, and even depressed. We help our children and ourselves if we’re able to limit our own television viewing. Our children need us to spend time with them – away from the frightening images on the screen.

Talking and Listening

Even if we wanted to, it would be impossible to give our children all the reasons for such things as war, terrorists, abuse, murders, major fires, hurricanes, and earthquakes. If they ask questions, our best answer may be to ask them, “What do you think happened?” If the answer is “I don’t know,” then the simplest reply might be something like, “I’m sad about the news, and I’m worried. But I love you, and I’m here to care for you.”

If we don’t let children know it’s okay to feel sad and scared, they may think something is wrong with them when they do feel that way. They certainly don’t need to hear all the details of what’s making us sad or scared, but if we can help them accept their own feelings as natural and normal, their feelings will be much more manageable for them.

Angry feelings are part of being human, especially when we feel powerless. One of the most important messages we can give our children is, “It’s okay to be angry, but it’s not okay to hurt ourselves or others.” Besides giving children the right to their anger, we can help them find constructive things to do with their feelings. This way, we’ll be giving them useful tools that will serve them all their life, and help them to become the worlds’ future peacemakers — the world’s future “helpers.”

Helpful Hints

  • Do your best to keep the television off, or at least limit how much your child sees of any news event.
  • Try to keep yourself calm. Your presence can help your child feel more secure.
  • Give your child extra comfort and physical affection, like hugs or snuggling up together with a favorite book. Physical comfort goes a long way towards providing inner security. That closeness can nourish you, too.
  • Try to keep regular routines as normal as possible. Children and adults count on their familiar pattern of everyday life.
  • Plan something that you and your child enjoy doing together, like taking a walk, going on a picnic, having some quiet time, or doing something silly. It can help to know there are simple things in life that can help us feel better, in good times and in bad.
  • Even if children don’t mention what they’ve seen or heard in the news, it can help to ask what they think has happened. If parents don’t bring up the subject, children can be left with their misinterpretations. You may be really surprised at how much your child has heard from others.
  • Focus attention on the helpers, like the police, firemen, doctors, nurses, paramedics, and volunteers. It’s reassuring to know there are many caring people who are doing all they can to help others in this world.
  • Let your child know if you’re making a donation, going to a town meeting, writing a letter or e-mail of support, or taking some other action. It can help children to know that adults take many different active roles and that we don’t give in to helplessness in times of worldwide crisis.

 

04 – Resources – AKIDSCO – A Kids Book About School Shootings – Free
Jul 25 all-day

A Kids Book About School Shootings

Crystal Woodman Miller

Many of us are going to need to find the words to talk to the kids in our lives about tragic events like the school shooting in Uvalde, Texas. Here’s a free resource from A Kids Company About to help you do that was written by Crystal Woodman-Miller, one of the survivors of the Columbine school shooting.

I hate that we need tools like this. I can’t wait for us to have to write the book “A Kids Book About Why It’s So Hard To Buy A Gun”

Link: www.akidsco.com

There aren’t enough words to explain all the thoughts, emotions, and heartbreak that comes with yesterday’s tragedy in Uvalde. We hope this book helps everyone start somewhere.

We’re making #AKidsBookAboutSchoolShootings free for kids, grownups, and educators everywhere, so that this conversation can get started when it matters most.

FREE DOWNLOAD

A Kids Book About School Shootings by Crystal Woodman Miller:

Link: akidsco.com

 

05 – Warmline – IOA – Institute on Aging – Friendship Line – Seniors and Disabled Hotline and Warmline – 800-670-1360 – 24/7 @ Toll Free Number
Jul 25 all-day

illustration of man on phone

 

Friendship Line

24 Hours a Day 365 Days A Year

800-670-1360

 

Friendship is just a phone call away for Americans age 60 and over and for adults living with disabilities.

The Friendship Line is offered 24 hours a day, 365 days a year by the nonprofit Institute on Aging at 800-971-0016. It is both a crisis intervention hotline and a “warmline” for nonurgent calls.

The confidential service offers active suicide intervention, The service, founded by Patrick Arbore, director of the Institute on Aging’s Center for Elderly Suicide Prevention, is accredited by the American Association of Suicidology. emotional support, elder abuse prevention and counseling, grief support, and information and referrals for isolated older adults.

The Friendship Line also offers outreach, calling on those who suffer from depression, loneliness, isolation, anxiousness, or who may be contemplating suicide. The goal of these well-being checks is to prevent suicide by improving the quality of life and connectedness of isolated older adults.

 

CONNECT With Us

Institute on Aging (IOA) CONNECT is your direct line to us and the starting point for help with your concerns about the needs of older adults and adults with disabilities. IOA CONNECT links you with our services, as well as community services available.

Call IOA CONNECT

415-750-4111

650-424-1411

 

ADAA – Anxiety & Depression Association of America – Online Peer-to-Peer Communities – Anxiety and Depression Support Community – 24/7 Weekdays & Weekends @ online register for details
Jul 25 all-day
ADAA - Anxiety & Depression Association of America - Online Peer-to-Peer Communities - Anxiety and Depression Support Community - 24/7 Weekdays & Weekends @ online register for details

 

 

 

 

 

ADAA  – Anxiety and Depression Support Community

Join from this Page

The Anxiety and Depression peer to peer community has more than 80,000 subscribers from around the world. The objective of this community is to create a space that those suffering from anxiety and depression can turn to find and offer comfort and support, to share information and personal experiences, and to make connections with those in the community.

ADAA also posts on the community page providing helpful tips and strategies about anxiety and depression through blogs and free webinars written/hosted by our professional mental health members, infographics, books, podcasts and more specific to anxiety and depression.

 

 

SGS – Support Groups – Mental Health: Anxiety and Panic Disorders – Message Board & Support Group – 24/7 @ Register For Details
Jul 25 all-day

Mental Health:

Anxiety & Panic Disorders

24/7

Our anxiety and panic disorders support group offers a compassionate and understanding community where individuals can share experiences and coping strategies to manage and overcome anxiety-related challenges.

When you create an account you’ll always come back to where you left off. With an account you can also be notified of new replies, save bookmarks, and use likes to thank others. We can all work together to make this community great. heart

Use the link Below to Join

https://supportgroups.com/

About SupportGroups™

SupportGroups.com is a safe, social support network that allows members & therapists to engage in group discussions for everyone involved. Our groups provide support for those dealing with Mental and Physical Health issues, Addiction, Relationships, or their Identity. Our mission is simple: Provide support in a safe online community for everyone who needs it.

VAFP – VisionAware and Front Porch – Support Groups and Other Resources For the Blind and Visually Impaired @ Online Event Register Online
Jul 25 all-day

 

 

support group sitting around table

Importance of Joining a Support Group

If you’ve been diagnosed with an eye condition, have a family member who has, or have become a caregiver, joining a support group may be the most important thing you’ll ever do. Whether online or in your local community, such groups offer the opportunity to talk to others; share common concerns, frustrations, and stories; and find solutions to your vision-related difficulties. For more information on support groups, you can read Support Groups and the Adjustment Process.

Check out Finding Support Groups for more information including links to directory listings of support groups.

Support Group Resources and Supportive Communities Meeting Virtually

  • The APH Directory of Services allows you to find local support groups as well as organizations that offer counseling and adjustment services, low vision services, mobility training, and vocational rehabilitation.
  • ILVSG TeleSupport – This support group is designed for older adults with low vision who may not have access to the internet or other in-person groups. It is a monthly meeting offered over the phone and there are no fees or obligations. It is designed for low vision seniors anywhere in the U.S. who have no access to the Internet or cannot attend a live support group. Learn more at: MD Support — TeleSupport or call toll-free at 1-888-866-6148 to get started!

 

  • The Friendship Line – The Institute on Aging established this toll-free line for older adults who may be depressed, lonely, disabled, or in crisis.  It is both a crisis “hotline” and a ‘warmline” for emotional support. Trained volunteers answer the calls and make calls. The Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including: providing emotional support, elder abuse reporting, well-being checks, grief support through assistance and reassurance, active suicide intervention, information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities. Volunteers will also call people on a regular basis to help monitor their  physical and mental health concerns. This service can improve the quality of life and contentedness of isolated callers. Reach out today and call 1-800-971-0016. To learn more, visit Senior Intervention Hotline for Crisis Support Services.

 

  • Social Call – This Covia program connects adults 60 and older to new friends on the phone or video calls. Volunteers are “matched” to participants with the goal of building friendships through weekly calls.  This free service is a great way to socialize and make connections when you can’t get out in your community. Go to: Social Call | Covia Corporate or call 1-877-797-7299 to get started. 

 

  • Covia Well Connected and Well Connected Espanol– This program, previously known as Senior Center without Walls, offers enrichment, community, fun, support and learning groups for older adults who may be homebound. All groups meet over the phone and/or on-line and are free. They offer support groups specifically for the visually impaired. It is a rich and supportive community and there is something for everyone! Visit their website to check out the catalog of offerings and learn how it all works. Call 1-877-797-7299 to register and get started.  

 

  • Mather Telephone Topics – Join Telephone Topics to learn about a variety of topics: wellness, music, sports, history. Participate in live discussions and enjoy live performances from home. All you do is call the phone number or log on to the Zoom meeting. Participation is FREE and open to everyone, anywhere! Learn more at: Aging Well Discussions and Programs | Telephone Topics (mather.com)  Then click on “Download Schedule” and choose an option that interests you. If you have questions about Telephone Topics, call 1-888-600-2560.

 

  • Eye2Eye is a free phone-based peer support program which offers emotional support, assessment, information, and referrals to people who are blind or visually impaired and their families. It helps people cope with the challenges of adjusting to vision loss, using trained peer support specialists who are also blind or visually impaired. They serve people in more than twenty states.
  • The American Council of the Blind (ACB) has a list of helpful resources for people with vision loss and their families. It also has a national directory of affiliates in each state. Seniors can find information through the ACB affiliate Alliance on Aging and Vision Loss.

 

 

 

 

  • Vision Exchange is an online resource for support group leaders who facilitate support groups for adults with vision loss. The purpose is to exchange ideas, information, and community resources to help adults with low vision be more independent

 

  • The Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) was the first community-based nonprofit organization in the country to address the needs of families and friends providing long-term care at home. FCA now offers programs at national, state, and local levels to support and sustain caregivers, and has an online family support group.

 

 

Phone emotional peer support line for blind persons

Rutgers has launched the nation’s first peer support helpline for the legally blind and their families.

Eye2Eye – 833-932-3931 (83-EYE2EYE-1) – is staffed 24/7 by peer support specialists who are legally blind and understand the challenges callers face.

The program, which is funded by a grant from the Lavelle Fund for the Blind, serves residents in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. The helpline assists people with vision impairments and blindness to work through some of the practical and emotional challenges associated with losing vision. Services include peer support, clinical assessment and referrals to resources for help with mental health, employment and technology. The program also offers callers resilience training to promote wellness, strength and self-care.

Recent studies show that one-third of people with vision loss suffer from depression and anxiety. This risk has gone largely unaddressed in the medical community, which has focused more on the practical problems faced by the visually impaired, such as finding employment and navigating everyday tasks, said Steven Silverstein, a clinical psychologist and vision researcher who co-directs the program with Cherie Castellano, the National Peer Support Call Center program director at  Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care.

The Eye2Eye peers all have different forms of visual impairments, and these began at different times during their lives. This allows for a ‘cultural connection’ between callers with a wide range of vision problems and life concerns, and our peer counselors.”

Steven Silverstein, clinical psychologist and vision researcher

 

 

Well Connected Program Offerings

Welcome to Well Connected

Well Connected is a nationwide phone and online community that brings  people over the age of 60 together to explore, learn, laugh, and share  experiences. Over 3,500 members join educational, fun, and engaging groups from the comfort of home. The Well Connected community of participants, staff, facilitators, and presenters value being connected to  engaging content, and to each other. Well Connected is a Front Porch  Community Service and is free of charge to individual members.

A Word About Inclusion

We welcome participants from a variety of backgrounds, beliefs, opinions, living situations, and abilities. Many of our participants are low vision or blind. Many are dealing with health concerns, chronic or disabling conditions or other issues. Please be sensitive, and mindful of the diversity in our community.

How It Works

1. Browse the materials and find groups that interest you, there a currently    groups to select from.

( download the 2024 Catalog In PDF or TEXT and choose from 77 different groups! )

• Once you are enrolled in the program, there is no limit to the number of
groups you may join. ( To Join use this Link ) or by phone at 877- 797-7299

• Check your Participant Calendar for group times in your time zone, and
for information about how to join.

 

2. Join by Phone

• All groups can be joined by telephone using a toll-free number from an
unblocked number.

• To join a group, call the program line, and when prompted, enter the
two-digit code listed on the Participant Calendar.

• If you need help getting into groups, we can call you! Call the office to
request an automated call-in to any group.

3. Join Online

• All groups can be joined online with a device that connects to the
Internet.

• Create your own online registration account and sign yourself up!

• Once you’re registered for groups in advance, and you will get an email
the morning of the group (check your spam folder!) with a personal link
to join.

• Allow the system to access your microphone and speakers.

• Click the Join Group button to enter the meeting.

• If you need tech help, contact us and we can send you more detailed
instructions, or walk you through how it works.

Call or email the office to get started, or if you have any questions.

(877) 797-7299 | connections@frontporch.net

Other Resources:  

Writing Group:

https://www.portlandwritersmill.org/about-us/

 

Poem Reading and Sharing Group:

https://wccls.bibliocommons.com/events/62686fc43560cac65899bb5c

 

Meditation:

Every Monday from 8 p.m. to 8:30 on zoom, go to https://www.firstunitarianportland.org/events-calendar/ and click on Monday night Loving Kindness Meditatio

05 – Warmline – Samaritans – HEY SAM Peer To Peer Texting Service – Text “Hey Sam” to 439726 – Weekdays and Weekends @ 6am to 6pm PST @ Text
Jul 25 @ 6:00 am – 6:00 pm
05 - Warmline - Samaritans - HEY SAM Peer To Peer Texting Service - Text "Hey Sam" to 439726 - Weekdays and Weekends @ 6am to 6pm PST @ Text

 

Hey Sam

Daily:  6AM – 6PM PST

Hey Sam is a dedicated peer-to-peer texting service for people up to 24 years old. Designed for and staffed by young people, Hey Sam gives youth the opportunity to reach peers if they are struggling, need someone to talk to, or need support.

If you or someone you know is feeling lonely, depressed, overwhelmed, or suicidal, we are here for you.

Whatever the reason, reach out. You are not alone.

How it Works

  1. Text Hey Sam at 439-726 when you need to talk.
  2. One of our incredible volunteers will answer your text.
  3. They will ask for your name, but you do not need to disclose it if you don’t feel comfortable.
  4. Our volunteers will listen to you. We will not give advice or try to “fix” anything. We simply want to support you in whatever feelings you want to share.

TERMS OF SERVICE

By texting short code 439-726 you will be connected to a support line chat. Message frequency varies. Message and data rates may apply. Carriers are not liable for delayed or undelivered messages. If you no longer wish to receive messages from Hey Sam, you may opt out at any time by texting the word STOP. You may opt back in by texting the services again. You may reply HELP for help. While Hey Sam operates from 9am to 9pm, Samaritans Helpline is available 24x7x365 by phone or text at 877-870-4673 (sms:+18778704673) and is available to anyone of any age. You may contact Hey Sam by email at heysam@samaritanshope.org with questions about these Terms.  Privacy Policy

 

05 – Warmline – LGBTNHC – LGBT National Senior Hotline – Monday though Friday @ phone
Jul 25 @ 1:00 pm – 9:00 pm
05 - Warmline - LGBTNHC - LGBT National Senior Hotline - Monday though Friday @ phone

 

 

 

LGBT National Senior Hotline

888-234-7243

Monday thru Friday from 1pm to 9pm, PST

Many seniors in our community face unique challenges.
In some cases, LGBTQIA+ seniors may not be out to family and if they are, often fear having to go back in the closet if they need assisted services.

We understand that and can talk about it.

We provide a confidential safe space where seniors can speak about their unique issues concerning sexual orientation or gender identity/expression. This includes coming out issues, family dynamics, relationship concerns, elder abuse,  HIV/AIDS anxiety, safer sex information, suicide, and much more.

Sometimes you just need to be heard. We’re here. 

You deserve respect, support, affirmation, and acceptance.

We don’t give advice, and we never tell you what you should do.  Ultimately, those choices are yours to make, but we are here to help you on your journey.

Our highly trained & dedicated LGBTQIA+ volunteers are  here to provide free & confidential services.

Everyone who offers support at the LGBT National Help Center identifies as part of the LGBTQIA+ community.

We offer support, information, and local resources throughout the United States and beyond.

We will never report your calls to any outside organization or authority.

Calls are never outsourced or answered by any other organizations.

WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN CALLING THE LGBT NATIONAL SENIOR HOTLINE

We provide a safe space while on a call.

All of our peer support volunteers are trained and identify as part of the LGBTQIA+ community.

Our calls are confidential. We don’t know who you are.

There are no recordings made of your conversation.

If you would like us to search for local resources near you, we might ask for your zip code/postal code or city, state, or country. We will never ask for your exact address.

Sometimes our conversations can be heavy, and a person might need to stop the conversation and let the emotions they are feeling sink in. That’s ok. If it’s time for you to end the call, you should certainly do so. You will not be judged, and we’re very glad you called for the amount of time you did.

We don’t call other suicide hotlines, 911, or rescue services on your behalf. While we will not make those calls for you, we will do our best to provide you with the phone numbers to call for yourself if you choose. (The exception is if you make credible threat to someone else.)

If you attempt to start a call during open hours and can’t get through, that means that all of our volunteers are currently talking with other people. Please try back in a few minutes. Should you still not be able to get through, you are always welcome to email us at help@LGBThotline.org.

 

 

LCPRS – Life Connections Peer Recovery Services – Anxiety Support Group – Weekdays @ Join Via Website
Jul 25 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anxiety Support Group

Monday through Friday – 3:30 – 4:30PM PST

Life Connections understands the need for individuals who are needing support and may not be able to travel or want the comfort of their own home. We offer remote support by virtual and phone capabilities. We want to offer a way for you to stay physically distant but stay socially engaged. We offer support groups, one on one support, and just that socialization that we all need. Join group any time during the posted time.

Virtual events are online Via Zoom

 

 

 

ALLAA – All Addicts Anonymous – A Program of Recovery for all Addicts and Addictions – Thursday Literature Study Meeting – Thursdays @ Online Via ZOOM
Jul 25 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Jul
26
Fri
2024
0 – Hotline – DH – DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends
Jul 26 all-day
0 - Hotline - DH - DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) - 24/7 - Weekdays and Weekends

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

01 – Helpline – GR – Grad Resources – The National Grad Crisis Line – (877)-472-3457 – 24/7 – Weekdays & Weekends @ Phone
Jul 26 all-day

 

 

 

 

The National Grad Crisis Line

1.877.GRAD.HLP (1.877.472.3457)

The National Grad Crisis Line helps graduate students reach free, confidential telephone counseling, crisis intervention, suicide prevention, and information and referral services provided by specially-trained call-takers. Caring, professional staff and well-trained volunteers answer around the clock.

All counselors have completed training to understand the unique issues faced by graduate students. In addition to listening to and empathizing with a caller’s concerns, counselors assess the caller’s lethality risk, counsel, and offer various local support services and mental health resources for follow-up.

1.877.GRAD.HLP

https://gradresources.org/

Who We Are

Since 1990, Grad Resources has recognized the significant role of graduate students in America. From our studies on stress in graduate school to the painful stories of student struggles we hear every day, we understand the pressures they face. We offer services that address their personal, emotional and spiritual needs, providing online materials, meaningful connections, engaging speakers, and supportive faith-based communities that enable graduate students to flourish personally and professionally.
01 – Helpline – Samaritans – Helpline – 887- 870 – 4673 – 24/7 @ phone
Jul 26 all-day

 

24/7 Helpline

887- 870 – 4673

 

Get Support Now

If you are feeling suicidal, lonely, or depressed, we are here for you. Whatever the reason, you will get help from a trained volunteer offering nonjudgmental support. The 24/7 Helpline is confidential and free. You can call or text us any time at 988

You can also use these links

CALL NOW

TEXT NOW

Important information about 988

As of July 16th, 2022, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (NSPL), is transitioning to a three digit number988988 is intended to create an ease of access to care and improve mental health response. NSPL has shared a helpful FAQ document here.

As a member of the NSPL Network, Samaritans will be answering calls going to this line. Moving to 988 does not mean our current number (877-870-4673) goes away. You can still call or text us at this number 24/7.

We are here for you.

 

What happens when you use the 24/7 Helpline?

  1. You call or text Samaritans’ 24/7 Helpline because you need to talk.
  2. One of our incredible volunteers will answer your call or text.
  3. They will ask for your name, but you do not need to disclose it if you don’t feel comfortable.
  4. Our volunteers will listen to you. We will not give advice or try to “fix” anything. We simply want to support you in whatever feelings you want to share.

 

01 – Helpline – SP – Shatterproof – Crisis Text Line – anxiety, depression, substance use disorder – (SHATTERPROOF to 741741) – 24/7 @ Text Line
Jul 26 all-day
01 - Helpline - SP - Shatterproof - Crisis Text Line -  anxiety, depression, substance use disorder - (SHATTERPROOF to 741741) - 24/7 @ Text Line

 

 

 

 

 

Crisis Text Line

SHATTERPROOF to 741741

Who can I call if I am going through a crisis?


I
f you are experiencing anxiety, depression, or a substance use disorder, text- SHATTERPROOF to 741741 for help.

You are not alone. Reach out to the following support hotlines for immediate help. If you have an emergency, please dial 911.

 

02 – Urgent Info – Services and Resources for Families and Children in Response to the Recent Tragic Events Across the Country
Jul 26 all-day

 

Some Resources for Families and Communities:

Due to recent tragic events across the country

 

Agency Logo

Racial Stress and Self-care:

Parent Tip Tool

How race-related stress affects you and your relationship with your child

What effect does racism have on your health and well-being?

Not only does racism impact you as a parent, it can also impact how you interact with your children. Experiences of racism build on each other and can chip away at your emotional, physical and spiritual resources as a parent, contributing to race-related stress. Race-related stress can make it hard to have the space needed to take care of yourself as a parent, which reduces the emotional space you need to adequately take care of your children.

Racism can impact parents emotionally, physically and spiritually

Physical effects

Physical Effects

Physical Effects can include increased hypertension, illness and risky behaviors such as substance use.

Emotional effects

Emotional Effects

Emotional effects can include depression, anxiety, anger, irritability and aggression.

Spiritual effects

Spiritual Effects

Spiritual effects can include a decreased sense of purpose, lack of connection with the larger community, isolation from larger social groups and reduced involvement in communal activities that you enjoy.

Potential reactions to racial stress or trauma

Insecure feelings

Insecure Feelings

Feelings of shame and lack of confidence due to feeling that a situation cannot be changed.

Lack of trust

Lack of Trust

Feeling detached or a lack of trust for others due to experiencing multiple losses or letdowns. This can make it very difficult to seek out help and to identify potential safe sources of support.

Triggers

Triggers

Reminders of the event, such as particular people or situations, can also trigger strong emotional or physical responses (e.g., crying or rapid heartbeat).

Emotions

Difficulty Controlling Emotions

Difficulty controlling emotional responses (going from “zero to one hundred”) can occur as the body helps you adapt to potentially unsafe situations, making you feel constantly on “alert.”

The body’s response to the experience of racism can make accessing resources to cope with the situation difficult. Race-related stress is unique in that it threatens psychological resources that are needed to cope and fulfill basic needs such as financial support, housing, access to jobs, etc.

When your body is in stress mode, it is geared up to help you and your child survive, which sometimes leads to impulsive decisions. If you live in a chronic state of stress related to racism, you can start to engage in survival coping. Survival coping can help you to deal with very hard or potentially life-threatening situations. However, if you continue to exist in this mode long-term, it can make it difficult to enjoy being in the moment with your child and can reduce your ability to feel safe and in control.

What impact can racial stress have on your parenting?

Experiencing race-related stress can also impact the quality of parenting relationships in the following ways:

Impostor syndrome

When you are exposed to racism repeatedly, you often start doubting yourself and can feel like you are an imposter in dominant culture settings or in settings where you feel as though you do not belong. Your inner thoughts might sound something like: “Am I being judged?” “Am I worthy?” “I got lucky.” “I only got this because I am Black.”

Being overly alert (hypervigilance)

Experiencing racial stress can make you more aware of potential dangers and negative experiences that can occur. This, in turn, can make the experience of parenting even more stressful. When you interact with your children, you can sometimes be reminded of negative race-related experiences that you had when you were a child. This reminder can amp up emotional responses, or hyperarousal, making it hard for you to “keep your cool” and be open to flexible problem solving.

“Helicopter parenting” (monitoring in fear)

These experiences of racism and unwarranted blame or lack of acceptance can make you want to protect your children so much, that you don’t allow them to explore in the way that they need to. You may shelter them from failures, which everyone needs to experience in order to learn how to manage everyday life. You may tend to be overly cautious or suspicious. Examples can include not allowing your children to have sleepovers or go to the park, even with your supervision.

Difficulty regulating emotions

  • When your past influences your emotional state, it can affect your emotional responses to both big and minor stressors with children, such as when they misbehave. This, in turn, can lead to being overprotective or overuse of physical discipline, as a means of survival.
  • For children, having parents who can keep perspective (stay cool) when children are upset, or misbehaving is very important. Likewise, it is important to stay calm when disciplining a child, otherwise discipline may go overboard. Both of these things can be hard if you are having difficulty controlling your emotions.

Avoidance

  • Avoiding situations that are related to racism can be a needed strategy to survive; such as instances that may involve violence or threat to yourself or your family. Sometimes you may avoid reminders of past experiences due to the pain or discomfort they cause.
  • If you find yourself avoiding strong feelings or situations with your child that bring up painful memories, it may make it hard to show affection and support for your child. It may even make it difficult to know how to provide emotional support for your child during times of stress. For instance, if your child brings up their own experience of oppression or an event in their life reminds you of something from your own childhood.

Mistrusting others

  • Racism can lead to distrust or mistrust of other communities. Internalized racism is when you begin to accept negative messages about your own abilities and inherent worth by the dominant group in society.
  • When you use society’s norms to judge yourself, you can feel depressed, unworthy and just not good enough. You are taught in many ways to take these feelings and paint them onto another group.
  • Intra and interracial violence, contention among disenfranchised communities or color, and the way the media conveys information about people of color, contribute to this.
  • This kind of coping can make you more vulnerable to racism, because on some level you may believe in racial hierarchy and difference when you belittle other groups. And when you show your children that it is right to discriminate against certain other groups, you make them more vulnerable to discrimination that they face.

Minimizing racism

  • Racism is overwhelming, as is the history of violence. You are sometimes taught that accepting this and minimizing racism is the only thing you can do. But when you ignore racism, and accept powerlessness, you encourage your kids to internalize racism. This can lead to increased levels of depression, anxiety and externalizing behaviors (e.g., engaging in risky behaviors, such as alcohol or substance use).
  • When you believe that you should be able to handle and manage it all without a break or without asking for help, you are at increased risk for health problems and can miss important cues about your well-being and safety.

Self-blame

Experiencing chronically unfair and dangerous discriminatory practices due to race can lead to feelings of low worth. For parents, this can also lead to a questioning of your parenting choices and abilities.

Unbalanced Racial and Ethnic Socialization (RES)

Unbalanced messaging or communication about race and ethnicity occurs when you only promote messages of mistrust, preparation for bias, or only give racial pride messages to your children.

So, what can you do to mitigate racial stress?

As parents, it is important to develop positive identities and share your cultural identities with your children. Positive cultural identity and advocacy are protective factors against racism, which can help to reduce and prevent racial stress.

There are many other ways to cope with stress and everyone has different preferences. Reducing stress can also allow you to model healthy coping strategies for your child. Here are some suggestions with links you can try.

Agency Logo
Talking with Children About Tragic Events

What do we tell our children? How do we reassure them of their own safety?

At The Dougy Center in Portland, Oregon, we’ve provided grief support groups for children, teens, young adults and their parents or adult caregivers since 1982.

Based on our experience, here are some things for adults to keep in mind as you struggle with how to talk with children following tragic events, such as natural disasters, plane crashes, or school shootings.

1. Don’t project your fears onto your children. They take their cues from the adults around them.
You can’t hear the news about children being murdered or communities devastated by natural disasters without thinking about how you’d feel if it happened to your family, friends, or hometown. The outpouring of care and empathy for the families who lost loved ones will be powerful, and…we all know it could have been our friends, our child, our family and community members who died or were injured.

Identifying with the senselessness and randomness makes us all feel more vulnerable. But we should remember that children don’t always see things the same way that adults do, and it won’t be helpful to them for us to fall apart. They need to see that we care, that we feel terrible about this tragedy, and that we will do everything we can to keep them safe. They will take their cues from our behavior.

It’s okay to show emotion. We can model for children that feeling sad, scared, and upset is normal after tragedies. But we don’t want to overwhelm them with our emotions, or put them in the position of having to ‘parent,’ or take care of, the adults around them. Make sure you also model taking care of yourself, by sharing with trusted and supportive adult friends, eating (and drinking) healthfully.

2. Try to limit their access to the recurring news and exposure to the tragedy over and over.
Over-exposure to the graphic and emotional news can be overwhelming for children and can cause unnecessary anxiety and fear. Some children who repeatedly watched the footage of planes crashing into the towers on 9/11 thought it was happening again and again. Some children (and some adults) may have difficulty getting graphic scenes and images out of their minds. Too much exposure can fuel their fear, so don’t let them sit and watch the news over and over. Better yet, set the example of not doing so yourself as well.

3. Understand that you can’t completely shield them from what happened.
It would be next to impossible to hide these events from children, as much as we wish we could. You might be able to shield your own child in your home, for example, by not turning on (or owning) a television, but you can’t protect your children from hearing about it from other kids. The fact is, they will hear about it, so although they don’t “need” to know about it, pretending we can shield them is magical thinking.

That said, you don’t need to give them more information than they can handle, or more than they’re asking for. A simple, “Did they talk about what happened in _____ today at school?” would be a good starter. They need to know that you’re not trying to hide the truth from them, that you’re open to talking about it, but that you’re also not forcing them to do so.

4. Model truth-telling and build trust with your children by letting them hear things, even hard things, from you directly.
Eight days after the 9/11 attacks, I was meeting in small groups with pre-school workers in New York City, talking about how to respond to the young children in their care about the events. A man asked to speak to me privately after one of the trainings, and asked for my advice around his 7-year-old daughter. For the last week, since September 12th, she had been having stomach aches and difficulty sleeping. He said it was not tied to the events of 9/11 because, “We don’t have a television.” As his story unfolded it was evident that he did not want to have to explain to his child why people would do such horrible things, a normal dilemma that we face as parents and adults. This child was experiencing physical reactions, as it turned out, not primarily because of her reaction to the events of 9/11, but because she was unable to share her fears and concerns and questions in her own home, faced with her parents’ denial.

Here are some principles to keep in mind as you talk with children:

1. There is no one typical reaction one can or should expect from children.
Their responses will vary all over the ‘emotional’ map, from seeming disinterest to nightmares, eating issues, and anxiety. How any specific child will respond will depend on their age, previous experience with death and loss, and their personality style. Fearful children will tend to worry; quiet children may keep their feelings to themselves; those who want to appear unfazed may exhibit a sense of bravado or lack of caring. Of course, children directly affected – those who had a family member die; those who witnessed the tragedy; those who had friends die – will tend to have longer-term reactions and needs. Watch for changes in behavior, or concerning trends. While it would be normal to have heightened anxiety and sleeplessness, any concerning behavior or troubling symptoms should be taken seriously, and if warranted, professional help sought.

2. Many children will have an increased sense of fear about their safety.
Understandably. So will many adults. After a shooting at an Oregon mall in December 2012, the news outlets were filled with people who said they’d never take their children there again. Others said they’d return as soon as it opened in order to support the stores and employees who had experienced the traumatic events, and whose livelihoods were going to suffer as a result of the several day closure. Some runners in the Boston Marathon vowed to return; others said they would never do so again.

While we can’t guarantee to our children that nothing bad will ever happen to them, we can provide assurance that these events are relatively rare, and that we will do everything we can to keep them safe. Children may have many questions about the events, particularly about natural disasters. Answer their questions with language that fits their developmental stage. It’s okay if you don’t know the answer to a question. If it’s a question that might have an answer, offer to look up more information. You can also ask children what they think the answer is as they often have thoughts and ideas they want to share with you. In the case of natural disasters, if your child is fearful of something like that happening in your community, talk with them about the safety plan that you have in place for your family and home. You can also look into what community safety measures are in place and whatever elements are relevant with your children. Many children will be reassured knowing that there are specific, tangible things they and your family can do if something occurs. Some examples include, picking a meeting place, keeping flashlights in every bedroom, talking about where you will keep emergency water and food.

3. Children want, need, and deserve the truth.
In over 30 years of providing grief support to thousands of children and teens at The Dougy Center for Grieving Children & Families, we have never heard a child say, “I’m glad I was lied to.” Many, however, struggle with anger and lack of trust toward parents or other adults who lied to them. When we don’t tell the truth, they learn that we cannot be trusted. As difficult as it can be at times, and as horrendous as the truth may be, children want, need, and deserve the truth. Being able to talk openly and honestly with your children about tragic events and other losses, creates a foundation of trust, enabling them to come to you in the future with their questions, fears, and concerns.

 

 

Daniel Tiger

Helping Children with Tragic Events in the News

In times of community or world-wide crisis, it’s easy to assume that young children don’t know what’s going on. But one thing’s for sure — children are very sensitive to how their parents feel. They’re keenly aware of the expressions on their parents’ faces and the tone of their voices. Children can sense when their parents are really worried, whether they’re watching the news or talking about it with others. No matter what children know about a “crisis,” it’s especially scary for children to realize that their parents are scared.

Some Scary, Confusing Images

The way that news is presented on television can be quite confusing for a young child. The same video segment may be shown over and over again through the day, as if each showing was a different event. Someone who has died turns up alive and then dies again and again. Children often become very anxious since they don’t understand much about videotape replays, closeups, and camera angles. Any televised danger seems close to home to them because the tragic scenes are taking place on the TV set in their own living room. Children can’t tell the difference between what’s close and what’s far away, what’s real and what’s pretend, or what’s new and what’s re-run.

The younger the children are, the more likely they are to be interested in scenes of close-up faces, particularly if the people are expressing some strong feelings. When there’s tragic news, the images on TV are most often much too graphic and disturbing for young children.

“Who will take care of me?”

In times of crisis, children want to know, “Who will take care of me?” They’re dependent on adults for their survival and security. They’re naturally self-centered. They need to hear very clearly that their parents are doing all they can to take care of them and to keep them safe. They also need to hear that people in the government and other grown-ups they don’t even know are working hard to keep them safe, too.

Helping Children Feel More Secure

Play is one of the important ways young children have of dealing with their concerns. Of course, playing about violent news can be scary and sometimes unsafe, so adults need to be nearby to help redirect that kind of play into nurturing themes, such as a hospital for the wounded or a pretend meal for emergency workers.

When children are scared and anxious, they might become more dependent, clingy, and afraid to go to bed at night. Whining, aggressive behavior, or toilet “accidents” may be their way of asking for more comfort from the important adults in their lives. Little by little, as the adults around them become more confident, hopeful and secure, our children probably will, too.

Turn Off the TV

When there’s something tragic in the news, many parents get concerned about what and how to tell their children. It’s even harder than usual if we’re struggling with our own powerful feelings about what has happened. Adults are sometimes surprised that their own reactions to a televised crisis are so strong, but great loss and devastation in the news often reawaken our own earlier losses and fears – even some we think we might have “forgotten”

It’s easy to allow ourselves to get drawn into watching televised news of a crisis for hours and hours; however, exposing ourselves to so many tragedies can make us feel hopeless, insecure, and even depressed. We help our children and ourselves if we’re able to limit our own television viewing. Our children need us to spend time with them – away from the frightening images on the screen.

Talking and Listening

Even if we wanted to, it would be impossible to give our children all the reasons for such things as war, terrorists, abuse, murders, major fires, hurricanes, and earthquakes. If they ask questions, our best answer may be to ask them, “What do you think happened?” If the answer is “I don’t know,” then the simplest reply might be something like, “I’m sad about the news, and I’m worried. But I love you, and I’m here to care for you.”

If we don’t let children know it’s okay to feel sad and scared, they may think something is wrong with them when they do feel that way. They certainly don’t need to hear all the details of what’s making us sad or scared, but if we can help them accept their own feelings as natural and normal, their feelings will be much more manageable for them.

Angry feelings are part of being human, especially when we feel powerless. One of the most important messages we can give our children is, “It’s okay to be angry, but it’s not okay to hurt ourselves or others.” Besides giving children the right to their anger, we can help them find constructive things to do with their feelings. This way, we’ll be giving them useful tools that will serve them all their life, and help them to become the worlds’ future peacemakers — the world’s future “helpers.”

Helpful Hints

  • Do your best to keep the television off, or at least limit how much your child sees of any news event.
  • Try to keep yourself calm. Your presence can help your child feel more secure.
  • Give your child extra comfort and physical affection, like hugs or snuggling up together with a favorite book. Physical comfort goes a long way towards providing inner security. That closeness can nourish you, too.
  • Try to keep regular routines as normal as possible. Children and adults count on their familiar pattern of everyday life.
  • Plan something that you and your child enjoy doing together, like taking a walk, going on a picnic, having some quiet time, or doing something silly. It can help to know there are simple things in life that can help us feel better, in good times and in bad.
  • Even if children don’t mention what they’ve seen or heard in the news, it can help to ask what they think has happened. If parents don’t bring up the subject, children can be left with their misinterpretations. You may be really surprised at how much your child has heard from others.
  • Focus attention on the helpers, like the police, firemen, doctors, nurses, paramedics, and volunteers. It’s reassuring to know there are many caring people who are doing all they can to help others in this world.
  • Let your child know if you’re making a donation, going to a town meeting, writing a letter or e-mail of support, or taking some other action. It can help children to know that adults take many different active roles and that we don’t give in to helplessness in times of worldwide crisis.

 

04 – Resources – AKIDSCO – A Kids Book About School Shootings – Free
Jul 26 all-day

A Kids Book About School Shootings

Crystal Woodman Miller

Many of us are going to need to find the words to talk to the kids in our lives about tragic events like the school shooting in Uvalde, Texas. Here’s a free resource from A Kids Company About to help you do that was written by Crystal Woodman-Miller, one of the survivors of the Columbine school shooting.

I hate that we need tools like this. I can’t wait for us to have to write the book “A Kids Book About Why It’s So Hard To Buy A Gun”

Link: www.akidsco.com

There aren’t enough words to explain all the thoughts, emotions, and heartbreak that comes with yesterday’s tragedy in Uvalde. We hope this book helps everyone start somewhere.

We’re making #AKidsBookAboutSchoolShootings free for kids, grownups, and educators everywhere, so that this conversation can get started when it matters most.

FREE DOWNLOAD

A Kids Book About School Shootings by Crystal Woodman Miller:

Link: akidsco.com

 

05 – Warmline – IOA – Institute on Aging – Friendship Line – Seniors and Disabled Hotline and Warmline – 800-670-1360 – 24/7 @ Toll Free Number
Jul 26 all-day

illustration of man on phone

 

Friendship Line

24 Hours a Day 365 Days A Year

800-670-1360

 

Friendship is just a phone call away for Americans age 60 and over and for adults living with disabilities.

The Friendship Line is offered 24 hours a day, 365 days a year by the nonprofit Institute on Aging at 800-971-0016. It is both a crisis intervention hotline and a “warmline” for nonurgent calls.

The confidential service offers active suicide intervention, The service, founded by Patrick Arbore, director of the Institute on Aging’s Center for Elderly Suicide Prevention, is accredited by the American Association of Suicidology. emotional support, elder abuse prevention and counseling, grief support, and information and referrals for isolated older adults.

The Friendship Line also offers outreach, calling on those who suffer from depression, loneliness, isolation, anxiousness, or who may be contemplating suicide. The goal of these well-being checks is to prevent suicide by improving the quality of life and connectedness of isolated older adults.

 

CONNECT With Us

Institute on Aging (IOA) CONNECT is your direct line to us and the starting point for help with your concerns about the needs of older adults and adults with disabilities. IOA CONNECT links you with our services, as well as community services available.

Call IOA CONNECT

415-750-4111

650-424-1411

 

ADAA – Anxiety & Depression Association of America – Online Peer-to-Peer Communities – Anxiety and Depression Support Community – 24/7 Weekdays & Weekends @ online register for details
Jul 26 all-day
ADAA - Anxiety & Depression Association of America - Online Peer-to-Peer Communities - Anxiety and Depression Support Community - 24/7 Weekdays & Weekends @ online register for details

 

 

 

 

 

ADAA  – Anxiety and Depression Support Community

Join from this Page

The Anxiety and Depression peer to peer community has more than 80,000 subscribers from around the world. The objective of this community is to create a space that those suffering from anxiety and depression can turn to find and offer comfort and support, to share information and personal experiences, and to make connections with those in the community.

ADAA also posts on the community page providing helpful tips and strategies about anxiety and depression through blogs and free webinars written/hosted by our professional mental health members, infographics, books, podcasts and more specific to anxiety and depression.

 

 

SGS – Support Groups – Mental Health: Anxiety and Panic Disorders – Message Board & Support Group – 24/7 @ Register For Details
Jul 26 all-day

Mental Health:

Anxiety & Panic Disorders

24/7

Our anxiety and panic disorders support group offers a compassionate and understanding community where individuals can share experiences and coping strategies to manage and overcome anxiety-related challenges.

When you create an account you’ll always come back to where you left off. With an account you can also be notified of new replies, save bookmarks, and use likes to thank others. We can all work together to make this community great. heart

Use the link Below to Join

https://supportgroups.com/

About SupportGroups™

SupportGroups.com is a safe, social support network that allows members & therapists to engage in group discussions for everyone involved. Our groups provide support for those dealing with Mental and Physical Health issues, Addiction, Relationships, or their Identity. Our mission is simple: Provide support in a safe online community for everyone who needs it.

VAFP – VisionAware and Front Porch – Support Groups and Other Resources For the Blind and Visually Impaired @ Online Event Register Online
Jul 26 all-day

 

 

support group sitting around table

Importance of Joining a Support Group

If you’ve been diagnosed with an eye condition, have a family member who has, or have become a caregiver, joining a support group may be the most important thing you’ll ever do. Whether online or in your local community, such groups offer the opportunity to talk to others; share common concerns, frustrations, and stories; and find solutions to your vision-related difficulties. For more information on support groups, you can read Support Groups and the Adjustment Process.

Check out Finding Support Groups for more information including links to directory listings of support groups.

Support Group Resources and Supportive Communities Meeting Virtually

  • The APH Directory of Services allows you to find local support groups as well as organizations that offer counseling and adjustment services, low vision services, mobility training, and vocational rehabilitation.
  • ILVSG TeleSupport – This support group is designed for older adults with low vision who may not have access to the internet or other in-person groups. It is a monthly meeting offered over the phone and there are no fees or obligations. It is designed for low vision seniors anywhere in the U.S. who have no access to the Internet or cannot attend a live support group. Learn more at: MD Support — TeleSupport or call toll-free at 1-888-866-6148 to get started!

 

  • The Friendship Line – The Institute on Aging established this toll-free line for older adults who may be depressed, lonely, disabled, or in crisis.  It is both a crisis “hotline” and a ‘warmline” for emotional support. Trained volunteers answer the calls and make calls. The Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including: providing emotional support, elder abuse reporting, well-being checks, grief support through assistance and reassurance, active suicide intervention, information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities. Volunteers will also call people on a regular basis to help monitor their  physical and mental health concerns. This service can improve the quality of life and contentedness of isolated callers. Reach out today and call 1-800-971-0016. To learn more, visit Senior Intervention Hotline for Crisis Support Services.

 

  • Social Call – This Covia program connects adults 60 and older to new friends on the phone or video calls. Volunteers are “matched” to participants with the goal of building friendships through weekly calls.  This free service is a great way to socialize and make connections when you can’t get out in your community. Go to: Social Call | Covia Corporate or call 1-877-797-7299 to get started. 

 

  • Covia Well Connected and Well Connected Espanol– This program, previously known as Senior Center without Walls, offers enrichment, community, fun, support and learning groups for older adults who may be homebound. All groups meet over the phone and/or on-line and are free. They offer support groups specifically for the visually impaired. It is a rich and supportive community and there is something for everyone! Visit their website to check out the catalog of offerings and learn how it all works. Call 1-877-797-7299 to register and get started.  

 

  • Mather Telephone Topics – Join Telephone Topics to learn about a variety of topics: wellness, music, sports, history. Participate in live discussions and enjoy live performances from home. All you do is call the phone number or log on to the Zoom meeting. Participation is FREE and open to everyone, anywhere! Learn more at: Aging Well Discussions and Programs | Telephone Topics (mather.com)  Then click on “Download Schedule” and choose an option that interests you. If you have questions about Telephone Topics, call 1-888-600-2560.

 

  • Eye2Eye is a free phone-based peer support program which offers emotional support, assessment, information, and referrals to people who are blind or visually impaired and their families. It helps people cope with the challenges of adjusting to vision loss, using trained peer support specialists who are also blind or visually impaired. They serve people in more than twenty states.
  • The American Council of the Blind (ACB) has a list of helpful resources for people with vision loss and their families. It also has a national directory of affiliates in each state. Seniors can find information through the ACB affiliate Alliance on Aging and Vision Loss.

 

 

 

 

  • Vision Exchange is an online resource for support group leaders who facilitate support groups for adults with vision loss. The purpose is to exchange ideas, information, and community resources to help adults with low vision be more independent

 

  • The Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) was the first community-based nonprofit organization in the country to address the needs of families and friends providing long-term care at home. FCA now offers programs at national, state, and local levels to support and sustain caregivers, and has an online family support group.

 

 

Phone emotional peer support line for blind persons

Rutgers has launched the nation’s first peer support helpline for the legally blind and their families.

Eye2Eye – 833-932-3931 (83-EYE2EYE-1) – is staffed 24/7 by peer support specialists who are legally blind and understand the challenges callers face.

The program, which is funded by a grant from the Lavelle Fund for the Blind, serves residents in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. The helpline assists people with vision impairments and blindness to work through some of the practical and emotional challenges associated with losing vision. Services include peer support, clinical assessment and referrals to resources for help with mental health, employment and technology. The program also offers callers resilience training to promote wellness, strength and self-care.

Recent studies show that one-third of people with vision loss suffer from depression and anxiety. This risk has gone largely unaddressed in the medical community, which has focused more on the practical problems faced by the visually impaired, such as finding employment and navigating everyday tasks, said Steven Silverstein, a clinical psychologist and vision researcher who co-directs the program with Cherie Castellano, the National Peer Support Call Center program director at  Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care.

The Eye2Eye peers all have different forms of visual impairments, and these began at different times during their lives. This allows for a ‘cultural connection’ between callers with a wide range of vision problems and life concerns, and our peer counselors.”

Steven Silverstein, clinical psychologist and vision researcher

 

 

Well Connected Program Offerings

Welcome to Well Connected

Well Connected is a nationwide phone and online community that brings  people over the age of 60 together to explore, learn, laugh, and share  experiences. Over 3,500 members join educational, fun, and engaging groups from the comfort of home. The Well Connected community of participants, staff, facilitators, and presenters value being connected to  engaging content, and to each other. Well Connected is a Front Porch  Community Service and is free of charge to individual members.

A Word About Inclusion

We welcome participants from a variety of backgrounds, beliefs, opinions, living situations, and abilities. Many of our participants are low vision or blind. Many are dealing with health concerns, chronic or disabling conditions or other issues. Please be sensitive, and mindful of the diversity in our community.

How It Works

1. Browse the materials and find groups that interest you, there a currently    groups to select from.

( download the 2024 Catalog In PDF or TEXT and choose from 77 different groups! )

• Once you are enrolled in the program, there is no limit to the number of
groups you may join. ( To Join use this Link ) or by phone at 877- 797-7299

• Check your Participant Calendar for group times in your time zone, and
for information about how to join.

 

2. Join by Phone

• All groups can be joined by telephone using a toll-free number from an
unblocked number.

• To join a group, call the program line, and when prompted, enter the
two-digit code listed on the Participant Calendar.

• If you need help getting into groups, we can call you! Call the office to
request an automated call-in to any group.

3. Join Online

• All groups can be joined online with a device that connects to the
Internet.

• Create your own online registration account and sign yourself up!

• Once you’re registered for groups in advance, and you will get an email
the morning of the group (check your spam folder!) with a personal link
to join.

• Allow the system to access your microphone and speakers.

• Click the Join Group button to enter the meeting.

• If you need tech help, contact us and we can send you more detailed
instructions, or walk you through how it works.

Call or email the office to get started, or if you have any questions.

(877) 797-7299 | connections@frontporch.net

Other Resources:  

Writing Group:

https://www.portlandwritersmill.org/about-us/

 

Poem Reading and Sharing Group:

https://wccls.bibliocommons.com/events/62686fc43560cac65899bb5c

 

Meditation:

Every Monday from 8 p.m. to 8:30 on zoom, go to https://www.firstunitarianportland.org/events-calendar/ and click on Monday night Loving Kindness Meditatio

05 – Warmline – Samaritans – HEY SAM Peer To Peer Texting Service – Text “Hey Sam” to 439726 – Weekdays and Weekends @ 6am to 6pm PST @ Text
Jul 26 @ 6:00 am – 6:00 pm
05 - Warmline - Samaritans - HEY SAM Peer To Peer Texting Service - Text "Hey Sam" to 439726 - Weekdays and Weekends @ 6am to 6pm PST @ Text

 

Hey Sam

Daily:  6AM – 6PM PST

Hey Sam is a dedicated peer-to-peer texting service for people up to 24 years old. Designed for and staffed by young people, Hey Sam gives youth the opportunity to reach peers if they are struggling, need someone to talk to, or need support.

If you or someone you know is feeling lonely, depressed, overwhelmed, or suicidal, we are here for you.

Whatever the reason, reach out. You are not alone.

How it Works

  1. Text Hey Sam at 439-726 when you need to talk.
  2. One of our incredible volunteers will answer your text.
  3. They will ask for your name, but you do not need to disclose it if you don’t feel comfortable.
  4. Our volunteers will listen to you. We will not give advice or try to “fix” anything. We simply want to support you in whatever feelings you want to share.

TERMS OF SERVICE

By texting short code 439-726 you will be connected to a support line chat. Message frequency varies. Message and data rates may apply. Carriers are not liable for delayed or undelivered messages. If you no longer wish to receive messages from Hey Sam, you may opt out at any time by texting the word STOP. You may opt back in by texting the services again. You may reply HELP for help. While Hey Sam operates from 9am to 9pm, Samaritans Helpline is available 24x7x365 by phone or text at 877-870-4673 (sms:+18778704673) and is available to anyone of any age. You may contact Hey Sam by email at heysam@samaritanshope.org with questions about these Terms.  Privacy Policy

 

05 – Warmline – LGBTNHC – LGBT National Senior Hotline – Monday though Friday @ phone
Jul 26 @ 1:00 pm – 9:00 pm
05 - Warmline - LGBTNHC - LGBT National Senior Hotline - Monday though Friday @ phone

 

 

 

LGBT National Senior Hotline

888-234-7243

Monday thru Friday from 1pm to 9pm, PST

Many seniors in our community face unique challenges.
In some cases, LGBTQIA+ seniors may not be out to family and if they are, often fear having to go back in the closet if they need assisted services.

We understand that and can talk about it.

We provide a confidential safe space where seniors can speak about their unique issues concerning sexual orientation or gender identity/expression. This includes coming out issues, family dynamics, relationship concerns, elder abuse,  HIV/AIDS anxiety, safer sex information, suicide, and much more.

Sometimes you just need to be heard. We’re here. 

You deserve respect, support, affirmation, and acceptance.

We don’t give advice, and we never tell you what you should do.  Ultimately, those choices are yours to make, but we are here to help you on your journey.

Our highly trained & dedicated LGBTQIA+ volunteers are  here to provide free & confidential services.

Everyone who offers support at the LGBT National Help Center identifies as part of the LGBTQIA+ community.

We offer support, information, and local resources throughout the United States and beyond.

We will never report your calls to any outside organization or authority.

Calls are never outsourced or answered by any other organizations.

WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN CALLING THE LGBT NATIONAL SENIOR HOTLINE

We provide a safe space while on a call.

All of our peer support volunteers are trained and identify as part of the LGBTQIA+ community.

Our calls are confidential. We don’t know who you are.

There are no recordings made of your conversation.

If you would like us to search for local resources near you, we might ask for your zip code/postal code or city, state, or country. We will never ask for your exact address.

Sometimes our conversations can be heavy, and a person might need to stop the conversation and let the emotions they are feeling sink in. That’s ok. If it’s time for you to end the call, you should certainly do so. You will not be judged, and we’re very glad you called for the amount of time you did.

We don’t call other suicide hotlines, 911, or rescue services on your behalf. While we will not make those calls for you, we will do our best to provide you with the phone numbers to call for yourself if you choose. (The exception is if you make credible threat to someone else.)

If you attempt to start a call during open hours and can’t get through, that means that all of our volunteers are currently talking with other people. Please try back in a few minutes. Should you still not be able to get through, you are always welcome to email us at help@LGBThotline.org.

 

 

LCPRS – Life Connections Peer Recovery Services – Anxiety Support Group – Weekdays @ Join Via Website
Jul 26 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anxiety Support Group

Monday through Friday – 3:30 – 4:30PM PST

Life Connections understands the need for individuals who are needing support and may not be able to travel or want the comfort of their own home. We offer remote support by virtual and phone capabilities. We want to offer a way for you to stay physically distant but stay socially engaged. We offer support groups, one on one support, and just that socialization that we all need. Join group any time during the posted time.

Virtual events are online Via Zoom

 

 

 

ALLAA – All Addicts Anonymous – Big Book Study Sessions – “We Stood at the Turning Point” Big Book Study Sessions – Fridays @ Online Via ZOOM
Jul 26 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
ALLAA - All Addicts Anonymous - Big Book Study Sessions - "We Stood at the Turning Point" Big Book Study Sessions - Fridays @ Online Via ZOOM

 

 

 

 

 

 

“We Stood at the Turning Point” BBSS Meeting

 4-5:30PM PST – Fridays

The BBSS process is a fearless and thorough way of working the 12 Steps developed by five members of Alcoholics Anonymous from Hyannis, Massachusetts in the mid-1980s.

Meetings follow a 15-week rotation where key portions of the AA Big Book — covering one or more of the Steps — are read, witnessed to by a main speaker, and discussed by those qualified to share.

Zoom Meeting ID: 594 783 5344
Audio Only Option: 1-301-715-8592
Password: 222
Email: aaabigbookstepstudy@gmail.com
Contact: Matt D.

05 – Warmline – AMALA – AMALA The Muslim Youth Hopeline – 855 – 95 – 26252 – Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday – 6-10PM PST @ Phone Number
Jul 26 @ 6:00 pm – 10:00 pm

 

 

Youth Hopeline

This Hopeline is NOT a 24-hour line yet. It currently runs during limited times.

HOURS OF OPERATION
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays
Between the Hours of 6 PM -10 PM PST

 

We are also offering text-in services Wednesday & Sunday 6PM – 10PM PST.

 

 

AMALA Hopeline

Peer Support

AMALA’s youth volunteers, all over the age of 18. Our Counselors undergo a 30 hour training developed by professionals in the mental health field.

They are trained
para-professional providing peer support

This includes topics such as:
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Eating disorders
  • Substance abuse

Volunteers are equipped to help callers and recognize cultural nuances that may be impacting the caller.

Follow-up trainings and meetings are also held for volunteer counselors to make sure they are well-equipped to deal with each call they receive. Supervisors are also present at each shift to handle more difficult calls/situations. These hopeline peer counselors are NOT licensed professionals.

 

Jul
27
Sat
2024
0 – Hotline – DH – DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) – 24/7 – Weekdays and Weekends
Jul 27 all-day
0 - Hotline - DH - DeafHelp VideoPhone App + ASL (American Sign Language) Deaf + HoH Accessible @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) - 24/7 - Weekdays and Weekends

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

01 – Helpline – GR – Grad Resources – The National Grad Crisis Line – (877)-472-3457 – 24/7 – Weekdays & Weekends @ Phone
Jul 27 all-day

 

 

 

 

The National Grad Crisis Line

1.877.GRAD.HLP (1.877.472.3457)

The National Grad Crisis Line helps graduate students reach free, confidential telephone counseling, crisis intervention, suicide prevention, and information and referral services provided by specially-trained call-takers. Caring, professional staff and well-trained volunteers answer around the clock.

All counselors have completed training to understand the unique issues faced by graduate students. In addition to listening to and empathizing with a caller’s concerns, counselors assess the caller’s lethality risk, counsel, and offer various local support services and mental health resources for follow-up.

1.877.GRAD.HLP

https://gradresources.org/

Who We Are

Since 1990, Grad Resources has recognized the significant role of graduate students in America. From our studies on stress in graduate school to the painful stories of student struggles we hear every day, we understand the pressures they face. We offer services that address their personal, emotional and spiritual needs, providing online materials, meaningful connections, engaging speakers, and supportive faith-based communities that enable graduate students to flourish personally and professionally.
01 – Helpline – Samaritans – Helpline – 887- 870 – 4673 – 24/7 @ phone
Jul 27 all-day

 

24/7 Helpline

887- 870 – 4673

 

Get Support Now

If you are feeling suicidal, lonely, or depressed, we are here for you. Whatever the reason, you will get help from a trained volunteer offering nonjudgmental support. The 24/7 Helpline is confidential and free. You can call or text us any time at 988

You can also use these links

CALL NOW

TEXT NOW

Important information about 988

As of July 16th, 2022, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (NSPL), is transitioning to a three digit number988988 is intended to create an ease of access to care and improve mental health response. NSPL has shared a helpful FAQ document here.

As a member of the NSPL Network, Samaritans will be answering calls going to this line. Moving to 988 does not mean our current number (877-870-4673) goes away. You can still call or text us at this number 24/7.

We are here for you.

 

What happens when you use the 24/7 Helpline?

  1. You call or text Samaritans’ 24/7 Helpline because you need to talk.
  2. One of our incredible volunteers will answer your call or text.
  3. They will ask for your name, but you do not need to disclose it if you don’t feel comfortable.
  4. Our volunteers will listen to you. We will not give advice or try to “fix” anything. We simply want to support you in whatever feelings you want to share.

 

01 – Helpline – SP – Shatterproof – Crisis Text Line – anxiety, depression, substance use disorder – (SHATTERPROOF to 741741) – 24/7 @ Text Line
Jul 27 all-day
01 - Helpline - SP - Shatterproof - Crisis Text Line -  anxiety, depression, substance use disorder - (SHATTERPROOF to 741741) - 24/7 @ Text Line

 

 

 

 

 

Crisis Text Line

SHATTERPROOF to 741741

Who can I call if I am going through a crisis?


I
f you are experiencing anxiety, depression, or a substance use disorder, text- SHATTERPROOF to 741741 for help.

You are not alone. Reach out to the following support hotlines for immediate help. If you have an emergency, please dial 911.

 

02 – Urgent Info – Services and Resources for Families and Children in Response to the Recent Tragic Events Across the Country
Jul 27 all-day

 

Some Resources for Families and Communities:

Due to recent tragic events across the country

 

Agency Logo

Racial Stress and Self-care:

Parent Tip Tool

How race-related stress affects you and your relationship with your child

What effect does racism have on your health and well-being?

Not only does racism impact you as a parent, it can also impact how you interact with your children. Experiences of racism build on each other and can chip away at your emotional, physical and spiritual resources as a parent, contributing to race-related stress. Race-related stress can make it hard to have the space needed to take care of yourself as a parent, which reduces the emotional space you need to adequately take care of your children.

Racism can impact parents emotionally, physically and spiritually

Physical effects

Physical Effects

Physical Effects can include increased hypertension, illness and risky behaviors such as substance use.

Emotional effects

Emotional Effects

Emotional effects can include depression, anxiety, anger, irritability and aggression.

Spiritual effects

Spiritual Effects

Spiritual effects can include a decreased sense of purpose, lack of connection with the larger community, isolation from larger social groups and reduced involvement in communal activities that you enjoy.

Potential reactions to racial stress or trauma

Insecure feelings

Insecure Feelings

Feelings of shame and lack of confidence due to feeling that a situation cannot be changed.

Lack of trust

Lack of Trust

Feeling detached or a lack of trust for others due to experiencing multiple losses or letdowns. This can make it very difficult to seek out help and to identify potential safe sources of support.

Triggers

Triggers

Reminders of the event, such as particular people or situations, can also trigger strong emotional or physical responses (e.g., crying or rapid heartbeat).

Emotions

Difficulty Controlling Emotions

Difficulty controlling emotional responses (going from “zero to one hundred”) can occur as the body helps you adapt to potentially unsafe situations, making you feel constantly on “alert.”

The body’s response to the experience of racism can make accessing resources to cope with the situation difficult. Race-related stress is unique in that it threatens psychological resources that are needed to cope and fulfill basic needs such as financial support, housing, access to jobs, etc.

When your body is in stress mode, it is geared up to help you and your child survive, which sometimes leads to impulsive decisions. If you live in a chronic state of stress related to racism, you can start to engage in survival coping. Survival coping can help you to deal with very hard or potentially life-threatening situations. However, if you continue to exist in this mode long-term, it can make it difficult to enjoy being in the moment with your child and can reduce your ability to feel safe and in control.

What impact can racial stress have on your parenting?

Experiencing race-related stress can also impact the quality of parenting relationships in the following ways:

Impostor syndrome

When you are exposed to racism repeatedly, you often start doubting yourself and can feel like you are an imposter in dominant culture settings or in settings where you feel as though you do not belong. Your inner thoughts might sound something like: “Am I being judged?” “Am I worthy?” “I got lucky.” “I only got this because I am Black.”

Being overly alert (hypervigilance)

Experiencing racial stress can make you more aware of potential dangers and negative experiences that can occur. This, in turn, can make the experience of parenting even more stressful. When you interact with your children, you can sometimes be reminded of negative race-related experiences that you had when you were a child. This reminder can amp up emotional responses, or hyperarousal, making it hard for you to “keep your cool” and be open to flexible problem solving.

“Helicopter parenting” (monitoring in fear)

These experiences of racism and unwarranted blame or lack of acceptance can make you want to protect your children so much, that you don’t allow them to explore in the way that they need to. You may shelter them from failures, which everyone needs to experience in order to learn how to manage everyday life. You may tend to be overly cautious or suspicious. Examples can include not allowing your children to have sleepovers or go to the park, even with your supervision.

Difficulty regulating emotions

  • When your past influences your emotional state, it can affect your emotional responses to both big and minor stressors with children, such as when they misbehave. This, in turn, can lead to being overprotective or overuse of physical discipline, as a means of survival.
  • For children, having parents who can keep perspective (stay cool) when children are upset, or misbehaving is very important. Likewise, it is important to stay calm when disciplining a child, otherwise discipline may go overboard. Both of these things can be hard if you are having difficulty controlling your emotions.

Avoidance

  • Avoiding situations that are related to racism can be a needed strategy to survive; such as instances that may involve violence or threat to yourself or your family. Sometimes you may avoid reminders of past experiences due to the pain or discomfort they cause.
  • If you find yourself avoiding strong feelings or situations with your child that bring up painful memories, it may make it hard to show affection and support for your child. It may even make it difficult to know how to provide emotional support for your child during times of stress. For instance, if your child brings up their own experience of oppression or an event in their life reminds you of something from your own childhood.

Mistrusting others

  • Racism can lead to distrust or mistrust of other communities. Internalized racism is when you begin to accept negative messages about your own abilities and inherent worth by the dominant group in society.
  • When you use society’s norms to judge yourself, you can feel depressed, unworthy and just not good enough. You are taught in many ways to take these feelings and paint them onto another group.
  • Intra and interracial violence, contention among disenfranchised communities or color, and the way the media conveys information about people of color, contribute to this.
  • This kind of coping can make you more vulnerable to racism, because on some level you may believe in racial hierarchy and difference when you belittle other groups. And when you show your children that it is right to discriminate against certain other groups, you make them more vulnerable to discrimination that they face.

Minimizing racism

  • Racism is overwhelming, as is the history of violence. You are sometimes taught that accepting this and minimizing racism is the only thing you can do. But when you ignore racism, and accept powerlessness, you encourage your kids to internalize racism. This can lead to increased levels of depression, anxiety and externalizing behaviors (e.g., engaging in risky behaviors, such as alcohol or substance use).
  • When you believe that you should be able to handle and manage it all without a break or without asking for help, you are at increased risk for health problems and can miss important cues about your well-being and safety.

Self-blame

Experiencing chronically unfair and dangerous discriminatory practices due to race can lead to feelings of low worth. For parents, this can also lead to a questioning of your parenting choices and abilities.

Unbalanced Racial and Ethnic Socialization (RES)

Unbalanced messaging or communication about race and ethnicity occurs when you only promote messages of mistrust, preparation for bias, or only give racial pride messages to your children.

So, what can you do to mitigate racial stress?

As parents, it is important to develop positive identities and share your cultural identities with your children. Positive cultural identity and advocacy are protective factors against racism, which can help to reduce and prevent racial stress.

There are many other ways to cope with stress and everyone has different preferences. Reducing stress can also allow you to model healthy coping strategies for your child. Here are some suggestions with links you can try.

Agency Logo
Talking with Children About Tragic Events

What do we tell our children? How do we reassure them of their own safety?

At The Dougy Center in Portland, Oregon, we’ve provided grief support groups for children, teens, young adults and their parents or adult caregivers since 1982.

Based on our experience, here are some things for adults to keep in mind as you struggle with how to talk with children following tragic events, such as natural disasters, plane crashes, or school shootings.

1. Don’t project your fears onto your children. They take their cues from the adults around them.
You can’t hear the news about children being murdered or communities devastated by natural disasters without thinking about how you’d feel if it happened to your family, friends, or hometown. The outpouring of care and empathy for the families who lost loved ones will be powerful, and…we all know it could have been our friends, our child, our family and community members who died or were injured.

Identifying with the senselessness and randomness makes us all feel more vulnerable. But we should remember that children don’t always see things the same way that adults do, and it won’t be helpful to them for us to fall apart. They need to see that we care, that we feel terrible about this tragedy, and that we will do everything we can to keep them safe. They will take their cues from our behavior.

It’s okay to show emotion. We can model for children that feeling sad, scared, and upset is normal after tragedies. But we don’t want to overwhelm them with our emotions, or put them in the position of having to ‘parent,’ or take care of, the adults around them. Make sure you also model taking care of yourself, by sharing with trusted and supportive adult friends, eating (and drinking) healthfully.

2. Try to limit their access to the recurring news and exposure to the tragedy over and over.
Over-exposure to the graphic and emotional news can be overwhelming for children and can cause unnecessary anxiety and fear. Some children who repeatedly watched the footage of planes crashing into the towers on 9/11 thought it was happening again and again. Some children (and some adults) may have difficulty getting graphic scenes and images out of their minds. Too much exposure can fuel their fear, so don’t let them sit and watch the news over and over. Better yet, set the example of not doing so yourself as well.

3. Understand that you can’t completely shield them from what happened.
It would be next to impossible to hide these events from children, as much as we wish we could. You might be able to shield your own child in your home, for example, by not turning on (or owning) a television, but you can’t protect your children from hearing about it from other kids. The fact is, they will hear about it, so although they don’t “need” to know about it, pretending we can shield them is magical thinking.

That said, you don’t need to give them more information than they can handle, or more than they’re asking for. A simple, “Did they talk about what happened in _____ today at school?” would be a good starter. They need to know that you’re not trying to hide the truth from them, that you’re open to talking about it, but that you’re also not forcing them to do so.

4. Model truth-telling and build trust with your children by letting them hear things, even hard things, from you directly.
Eight days after the 9/11 attacks, I was meeting in small groups with pre-school workers in New York City, talking about how to respond to the young children in their care about the events. A man asked to speak to me privately after one of the trainings, and asked for my advice around his 7-year-old daughter. For the last week, since September 12th, she had been having stomach aches and difficulty sleeping. He said it was not tied to the events of 9/11 because, “We don’t have a television.” As his story unfolded it was evident that he did not want to have to explain to his child why people would do such horrible things, a normal dilemma that we face as parents and adults. This child was experiencing physical reactions, as it turned out, not primarily because of her reaction to the events of 9/11, but because she was unable to share her fears and concerns and questions in her own home, faced with her parents’ denial.

Here are some principles to keep in mind as you talk with children:

1. There is no one typical reaction one can or should expect from children.
Their responses will vary all over the ‘emotional’ map, from seeming disinterest to nightmares, eating issues, and anxiety. How any specific child will respond will depend on their age, previous experience with death and loss, and their personality style. Fearful children will tend to worry; quiet children may keep their feelings to themselves; those who want to appear unfazed may exhibit a sense of bravado or lack of caring. Of course, children directly affected – those who had a family member die; those who witnessed the tragedy; those who had friends die – will tend to have longer-term reactions and needs. Watch for changes in behavior, or concerning trends. While it would be normal to have heightened anxiety and sleeplessness, any concerning behavior or troubling symptoms should be taken seriously, and if warranted, professional help sought.

2. Many children will have an increased sense of fear about their safety.
Understandably. So will many adults. After a shooting at an Oregon mall in December 2012, the news outlets were filled with people who said they’d never take their children there again. Others said they’d return as soon as it opened in order to support the stores and employees who had experienced the traumatic events, and whose livelihoods were going to suffer as a result of the several day closure. Some runners in the Boston Marathon vowed to return; others said they would never do so again.

While we can’t guarantee to our children that nothing bad will ever happen to them, we can provide assurance that these events are relatively rare, and that we will do everything we can to keep them safe. Children may have many questions about the events, particularly about natural disasters. Answer their questions with language that fits their developmental stage. It’s okay if you don’t know the answer to a question. If it’s a question that might have an answer, offer to look up more information. You can also ask children what they think the answer is as they often have thoughts and ideas they want to share with you. In the case of natural disasters, if your child is fearful of something like that happening in your community, talk with them about the safety plan that you have in place for your family and home. You can also look into what community safety measures are in place and whatever elements are relevant with your children. Many children will be reassured knowing that there are specific, tangible things they and your family can do if something occurs. Some examples include, picking a meeting place, keeping flashlights in every bedroom, talking about where you will keep emergency water and food.

3. Children want, need, and deserve the truth.
In over 30 years of providing grief support to thousands of children and teens at The Dougy Center for Grieving Children & Families, we have never heard a child say, “I’m glad I was lied to.” Many, however, struggle with anger and lack of trust toward parents or other adults who lied to them. When we don’t tell the truth, they learn that we cannot be trusted. As difficult as it can be at times, and as horrendous as the truth may be, children want, need, and deserve the truth. Being able to talk openly and honestly with your children about tragic events and other losses, creates a foundation of trust, enabling them to come to you in the future with their questions, fears, and concerns.

 

 

Daniel Tiger

Helping Children with Tragic Events in the News

In times of community or world-wide crisis, it’s easy to assume that young children don’t know what’s going on. But one thing’s for sure — children are very sensitive to how their parents feel. They’re keenly aware of the expressions on their parents’ faces and the tone of their voices. Children can sense when their parents are really worried, whether they’re watching the news or talking about it with others. No matter what children know about a “crisis,” it’s especially scary for children to realize that their parents are scared.

Some Scary, Confusing Images

The way that news is presented on television can be quite confusing for a young child. The same video segment may be shown over and over again through the day, as if each showing was a different event. Someone who has died turns up alive and then dies again and again. Children often become very anxious since they don’t understand much about videotape replays, closeups, and camera angles. Any televised danger seems close to home to them because the tragic scenes are taking place on the TV set in their own living room. Children can’t tell the difference between what’s close and what’s far away, what’s real and what’s pretend, or what’s new and what’s re-run.

The younger the children are, the more likely they are to be interested in scenes of close-up faces, particularly if the people are expressing some strong feelings. When there’s tragic news, the images on TV are most often much too graphic and disturbing for young children.

“Who will take care of me?”

In times of crisis, children want to know, “Who will take care of me?” They’re dependent on adults for their survival and security. They’re naturally self-centered. They need to hear very clearly that their parents are doing all they can to take care of them and to keep them safe. They also need to hear that people in the government and other grown-ups they don’t even know are working hard to keep them safe, too.

Helping Children Feel More Secure

Play is one of the important ways young children have of dealing with their concerns. Of course, playing about violent news can be scary and sometimes unsafe, so adults need to be nearby to help redirect that kind of play into nurturing themes, such as a hospital for the wounded or a pretend meal for emergency workers.

When children are scared and anxious, they might become more dependent, clingy, and afraid to go to bed at night. Whining, aggressive behavior, or toilet “accidents” may be their way of asking for more comfort from the important adults in their lives. Little by little, as the adults around them become more confident, hopeful and secure, our children probably will, too.

Turn Off the TV

When there’s something tragic in the news, many parents get concerned about what and how to tell their children. It’s even harder than usual if we’re struggling with our own powerful feelings about what has happened. Adults are sometimes surprised that their own reactions to a televised crisis are so strong, but great loss and devastation in the news often reawaken our own earlier losses and fears – even some we think we might have “forgotten”

It’s easy to allow ourselves to get drawn into watching televised news of a crisis for hours and hours; however, exposing ourselves to so many tragedies can make us feel hopeless, insecure, and even depressed. We help our children and ourselves if we’re able to limit our own television viewing. Our children need us to spend time with them – away from the frightening images on the screen.

Talking and Listening

Even if we wanted to, it would be impossible to give our children all the reasons for such things as war, terrorists, abuse, murders, major fires, hurricanes, and earthquakes. If they ask questions, our best answer may be to ask them, “What do you think happened?” If the answer is “I don’t know,” then the simplest reply might be something like, “I’m sad about the news, and I’m worried. But I love you, and I’m here to care for you.”

If we don’t let children know it’s okay to feel sad and scared, they may think something is wrong with them when they do feel that way. They certainly don’t need to hear all the details of what’s making us sad or scared, but if we can help them accept their own feelings as natural and normal, their feelings will be much more manageable for them.

Angry feelings are part of being human, especially when we feel powerless. One of the most important messages we can give our children is, “It’s okay to be angry, but it’s not okay to hurt ourselves or others.” Besides giving children the right to their anger, we can help them find constructive things to do with their feelings. This way, we’ll be giving them useful tools that will serve them all their life, and help them to become the worlds’ future peacemakers — the world’s future “helpers.”

Helpful Hints

  • Do your best to keep the television off, or at least limit how much your child sees of any news event.
  • Try to keep yourself calm. Your presence can help your child feel more secure.
  • Give your child extra comfort and physical affection, like hugs or snuggling up together with a favorite book. Physical comfort goes a long way towards providing inner security. That closeness can nourish you, too.
  • Try to keep regular routines as normal as possible. Children and adults count on their familiar pattern of everyday life.
  • Plan something that you and your child enjoy doing together, like taking a walk, going on a picnic, having some quiet time, or doing something silly. It can help to know there are simple things in life that can help us feel better, in good times and in bad.
  • Even if children don’t mention what they’ve seen or heard in the news, it can help to ask what they think has happened. If parents don’t bring up the subject, children can be left with their misinterpretations. You may be really surprised at how much your child has heard from others.
  • Focus attention on the helpers, like the police, firemen, doctors, nurses, paramedics, and volunteers. It’s reassuring to know there are many caring people who are doing all they can to help others in this world.
  • Let your child know if you’re making a donation, going to a town meeting, writing a letter or e-mail of support, or taking some other action. It can help children to know that adults take many different active roles and that we don’t give in to helplessness in times of worldwide crisis.

 

04 – Resources – AKIDSCO – A Kids Book About School Shootings – Free
Jul 27 all-day

A Kids Book About School Shootings

Crystal Woodman Miller

Many of us are going to need to find the words to talk to the kids in our lives about tragic events like the school shooting in Uvalde, Texas. Here’s a free resource from A Kids Company About to help you do that was written by Crystal Woodman-Miller, one of the survivors of the Columbine school shooting.

I hate that we need tools like this. I can’t wait for us to have to write the book “A Kids Book About Why It’s So Hard To Buy A Gun”

Link: www.akidsco.com

There aren’t enough words to explain all the thoughts, emotions, and heartbreak that comes with yesterday’s tragedy in Uvalde. We hope this book helps everyone start somewhere.

We’re making #AKidsBookAboutSchoolShootings free for kids, grownups, and educators everywhere, so that this conversation can get started when it matters most.

FREE DOWNLOAD

A Kids Book About School Shootings by Crystal Woodman Miller:

Link: akidsco.com