PeerGalaxy

Oregon's Peer Support Directory

PeerGalaxy Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring offerings of telephone + online peer support + wellness activities! 

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

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If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

Training Opportunities in July 2020
List Provided Courtesy of State of Oregon, Oregon Health Authority
Click here to download PDF Format, 16 pages

How Events are Sorted:

First, at the top of the list: Disaster Hotline & Oregon Safe + Strong Helpline.

Next in the list: Bundled “All Day” Events for organizations with events happening at multiple times throughout the day and/or in many formats or locations; these are bundled into a single listing to prevent endless scrolling.  Usually these offer a lookup by zip code or other criteria. 

Lastly, Time-Specific Events listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  Warmlines and places east of Oregon’s time zone tend to start earlier (e.g. 4am in Oregon is 7am in New York).

Jan
23
Sun
01 – Helpline – SSH – Safe + Strong Helpline for Behavioral, Mental and Emotional Health Support – Interpreters Available @ 1-800-923-4357 (HELP) – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free
Jan 23 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

01 – Mental Health Resources for the the Deaf and Hard of Hearing – Crisis Lines, Support Groups, Mental Health Services – Online
Jan 23 all-day

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

As we emerge from the winter season, our exposure to limited sunlight and longer periods of darkness may affect our mental and emotional well-being.

Valentine’s Day is around the corner, which can bring with it additional anxiety, depression and other stress about romance and relationships. Research shows that deaf people are more likely to struggle socially, emotionally and with other issues impacting mental health.

Tips for Self-Care

“Recovery is not so much a dream as it is a plan.” – Carolyn Spring

In “Actually, I am Not Okay! Mental Health in the Deaf Community,” Deaf Unity offers some self-care strategies:

  • Don’t be embarrassed to ask for help. You are not alone. It is so important that you do not struggle in silence.
  • Eat well. Deaf nutritionist Jeanann Doyle explains that good nutrition is tied to positive mental health.
  • Enjoy time with friends. Research has shown that early or pervasive lack of communication access with family members and others in the deaf person’s environment are mental health risk factors. Spending quality time with companions may reduce feelings of isolation and loneliness.
  • Be kind to yourself. Negative attitudes from deaf and hearing individuals can be a barrier to healthy social and emotional development. Take part in positive experiences with and about deaf people, which break down negative stereotypes and increases awareness.

Find a Qualified Professional

The number of accessible mental health providers and services has been increasing along with awareness of the diverse communication and identities of deaf individuals.

Technology allows for remote counseling with deaf-sensitive professionals. The Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center offers national and statewide directories for mental health services for deaf people.

NDC’s Mental Health Services tip sheet offers several considerations for providing effective counseling services:

  • Direct and effortless communication between the deaf person and practitioner.
  • Practitioner’s cultural competency (i.e. understanding of deaf experiences in a hearing world, communication preferences and deaf culture).
  • Effective and appropriate means of mental health assessments.
  • The importance of accurate and qualified interpretation between ASL and English in mental health settings.

Additional Resources

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate crisis services, community resources and deaf-accessible hotlines:

  • Crisis Line for VideoPhone users who use American Sign Language (available 24/7): 321-800-3323 (321-800-DEAF)
  • National Suicide Prevention Hotline: To chat online with a counselor (2pm-2am Monday-Friday Eastern Standard Time) TTY Hotline: 800-799-4889
  • Crisis text line: text START to 741-741 (free, available 24/7, sometimes have Deaf counselors available)
  • National Domestic Violence Hotline:
    • E-mail: deafhelp@thehotline.org
    • TTY: 1-800-787-3224 (24/7 hotline)
    • VP: 1-855-812-1001 (Monday to Friday 9AM—5PM Pacific Standard Time

 

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Recovery Project

The Deaf and Hard of Hearing Project is building a welcoming network for Deaf-to-Deaf peer support and training.  We also find hearing friends and allies in mental health programs and support for recovery from traumatic experience.

Who Are We?  on YouTube

Deaf individuals tell their recovery stories through 10-15 minute videos.  All 7 share about being diagnosed with a mental illness and their journey to satisfying, complex lives.  They are open about the dark days and their hope.  All presented in In their native language – American Sign Language with captions in English.  We present them here in the hope of educating and inspiring others and creating community.

My Story:  Marco

My Story: Marnie

My Story: Lori

My Story: Minh

My Story: Mary

My Story: Taimin

My Story: Val

What is Peer Support?

What is Peer Support and the Recovery Model and How that is Different than the Medical Model (PDF)

Presentation developed and presented by Marnie Forgere, Deaf and Hard of Hearing project coordinator

How to Communicate

Tip Sheet #1 “Communicating with Deaf and Hard of Hearing”

Tip Sheet #2 “How to use American Sign Language Interpreter”

Tip Sheet #3 “How to get a Deaf or Hard of Hearing Person’s Attention”

Tip Sheet #4 “Helpful tips about Language Use”

All 4 Tip Sheets

“How to be Deaf-friendly with or without Interpreters” Guide for Hearing

White Paper Released (PDF)

BEING SEEN !
Establishing Deaf to Deaf Peer Support Services and Training
Successes and Lessons Learned From the Massachusetts Experience  

 

Button Art by Rachel Klein & Diane Squires

Prepared by: Deborah Delman, Marnie Fougere, and Meighan Haupt
In collaboration with the Deaf Community Voice Team with The Transformation Center: Val Ennis, Marco Gonzalez, Lori Johnstone, Mary O’Shea, Taimin Rosado, Sharon Sacks, Minh Vo

With special appreciation to allies Justine Barros, Cathy Mylotte, Lucille Traina, Robert Walker and
Catherine Quinerly

Links and Resources

Minnesota Certified Peer Support Specialists program

MCDHH (MA Commission for tech Deaf and Hard of Hearing)

MCDHH Boston YouTube Channel

Deaf-Hope.org  Founded by Deaf women in California “Our mission at DeafHope is to end domestic and sexual violence in Deaf communities through empowerment, education and services.”

Deaf YES Center at UMass Medical School, Worcester, MA

Harvard Committee on Deaf Awareness (CODA)

“Intimate Partner Violence in the Deaf Community: 5 Things You Need to Know & 5 Things You Can Do” (written for mental health providers) PDF

“Signs of Safety: A Deaf Accessible Toolkit for Trauma and Addiction” PDFASL

911 Disability Indicator Program

12-Step online for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Sounds of Sobriety (SOS):  This online email group was formed to help us who have a hearing loss (deaf, deafened, or hard of hearing) to find a place to recover from alcoholism. For many of us, face-to-face AA meetings no longer work. All members of AA, or those who think they may have a problem with alcohol, are welcome.    SOS_online_group-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Deaf Grateful:  This is a real-time open discussion meeting on Saturday at 4 pm (EST) for deaf & HOH people who have a desire to stop drinking. Meeting uses videoconferencing software (easily downloaded) that requires a high speed internet connection and a webcam. Our communication mode is ASL only (no audio).
http://doda.omnijoin.com

VA – VisionAware – Support Groups and Other Resources For the Blind and Visually Impaired @ Online Event Register Online
Jan 23 all-day

 

 

support group sitting around table

Importance of Joining a Support Group

If you’ve been diagnosed with an eye condition, have a family member who has, or have become a caregiver, joining a support group may be the most important thing you’ll ever do. Whether online or in your local community, such groups offer the opportunity to talk to others; share common concerns, frustrations, and stories; and find solutions to your vision-related difficulties. For more information on support groups, you can read Support Groups and the Adjustment Process.

Check out Finding Support Groups for more information including links to directory listings of support groups.

Support Group Resources and Supportive Communities Meeting Virtually

  • The APH Directory of Services allows you to find local support groups as well as organizations that offer counseling and adjustment services, low vision services, mobility training, and vocational rehabilitation.
  • ILVSG TeleSupport – This support group is designed for older adults with low vision who may not have access to the internet or other in-person groups. It is a monthly meeting offered over the phone and there are no fees or obligations. It is designed for low vision seniors anywhere in the U.S. who have no access to the Internet or cannot attend a live support group. Learn more at: MD Support — TeleSupport or call toll-free at 1-888-866-6148 to get started!

 

  • The Friendship Line – The Institute on Aging established this toll-free line for older adults who may be depressed, lonely, disabled, or in crisis.  It is both a crisis “hotline” and a ‘warmline” for emotional support. Trained volunteers answer the calls and make calls. The Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including: providing emotional support, elder abuse reporting, well-being checks, grief support through assistance and reassurance, active suicide intervention, information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities. Volunteers will also call people on a regular basis to help monitor their  physical and mental health concerns. This service can improve the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Reach out today and call 1-800-971-0016. To learn more, visit Senior Intervention Hotline for Crisis Support Services.

 

  • Social Call – This Covia program connects adults 60 and older to new friends on the phone or video calls. Volunteers are “matched” to participants with the goal of building friendships through weekly calls.  This free service is a great way to socialize and make connections when you can’t get out in your community. Go to: Social Call | Covia Corporate or call 1-877-797-7299 to get started. 

 

  • Covia Well Connected and Well Connected Espanol– This program, previously known as Senior Center without Walls, offers enrichment, community, fun, support and learning groups for older adults who may be homebound. All groups meet over the phone and/or on-line and are free. They offer support groups specifically for the visually impaired. It is a rich and supportive community and there is something for everyone! Visit their website to check out the catalog of offerings and learn how it all works. Call 1-877-797-7299 to register and get started.  

 

  • Mather Telephone Topics – Join Telephone Topics to learn about a variety of topics: wellness, music, sports, history. Participate in live discussions and enjoy live performances from home. All you do is call the phone number or log on to the Zoom meeting. Participation is FREE and open to everyone, anywhere! Learn more at: Aging Well Discussions and Programs | Telephone Topics (mather.com)  Then click on “Download Schedule” and choose an option that interests you. If you have questions about Telephone Topics, call 1-888-600-2560.

 

  • Eye2Eye is a free phone-based peer support program which offers emotional support, assessment, information, and referrals to people who are blind or visually impaired and their families. It helps people cope with the challenges of adjusting to vision loss, using trained peer support specialists who are also blind or visually impaired. They serve people in more than twenty states.
  • The American Council of the Blind (ACB) has a list of helpful resources for people with vision loss and their families. It also has a national directory of affiliates in each state. Seniors can find information through the ACB affiliate Alliance on Aging and Vision Loss.

 

 

 

 

  • Vision Exchange is an online resource for support group leaders who facilitate support groups for adults with vision loss. The purpose is to exchange ideas, information, and community resources to help adults with low vision be more independent

 

  • The Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) was the first community-based nonprofit organization in the country to address the needs of families and friends providing long-term care at home. FCA now offers programs at national, state, and local levels to support and sustain caregivers, and has an online family support group.

 

 

Phone emotional peer support line for blind persons

Rutgers has launched the nation’s first peer support helpline for the legally blind and their families.

Eye2Eye – 833-932-3931 (83-EYE2EYE-1) – is staffed 24/7 by peer support specialists who are legally blind and understand the challenges callers face.

The program, which is funded by a grant from the Lavelle Fund for the Blind, serves residents in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. The helpline assists people with vision impairments and blindness to work through some of the practical and emotional challenges associated with losing vision. Services include peer support, clinical assessment and referrals to resources for help with mental health, employment and technology. The program also offers callers resilience training to promote wellness, strength and self-care.

Recent studies show that one-third of people with vision loss suffer from depression and anxiety. This risk has gone largely unaddressed in the medical community, which has focused more on the practical problems faced by the visually impaired, such as finding employment and navigating everyday tasks, said Steven Silverstein, a clinical psychologist and vision researcher who co-directs the program with Cherie Castellano, the National Peer Support Call Center program director at  Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care.

The Eye2Eye peers all have different forms of visual impairments, and these began at different times during their lives. This allows for a ‘cultural connection’ between callers with a wide range of vision problems and life concerns, and our peer counselors.”

Steven Silverstein, clinical psychologist and vision researcher

Warmline – Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jan 23 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

ISE – Integrated Self of Eugene – Awareness Through Movement Class – Free – Sundays @ Online Via Zoom
Jan 23 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Logo

Awareness Through Movement Class – Free – Online – Sundays, 1:00 PM PST

This week I’m giving a lesson called A More Comfortable Neck so naturally this lesson will do most of the movements in the hips and shoulders. Whaaaaa you say?

The movement of the neck is supported in the torso. The neck muscles actually attach between the shoulder blades. The flexors of the abdomen play a huge roll in the support of our head. It takes a baby months to be able to hold its head up by itself and that is because it has to learn this kind of support first.

I became interested in the Feldenkrais Method® because my neck was killing me over ten years ago. I love any and all lessons neck.  You’ll love this one too.

Be sure to find a comfortable place on the floor and wear loose clothing.
If you can arrange it so I can see you, it is helpful but not required.
I’ll be online about 10 minutes early if you have any questions before we start.

Click Here to Join Class

Meeting ID: 834 9584 5561
Passcode: 222079
One tap mobile
+16699009128,,83495845561#,,,,,,0#,,222079# US (San Jose)
+12532158782,,83495845561#,,,,,,0#,,222079# US (Tacoma)

Dial by your location
+1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
+1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
+1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
+1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
+1 301 715 8592 US (Washington D.C)
+1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
Meeting ID: 834 9584 5561
Passcode: 222079
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kbPKKLiHZk

 

Click here to visit my new website.

Click here for more information about my classes.  

Click here to see my latest blog post.

Click here for more information about my mini-course.

ROCC – Recovery Outreach Community Center Emotional Awareness Group with Mark – Tuesdays @ Online via Zoom
Jan 23 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

logo

EMOTIONAL AWARENESS WITH MARK

ONLINE – TUESDAYS 2–3PM PST

This is a mutual support group for all kinds of challenges, such as anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem. Focus is on tools & solutions.

Click link below to attend group. You will be asked to register on ZOOM. It’s free and fast!

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZIofu-grj4tG90p8MxArdVQIJO86TWmgVmo

ZOOM Meeting ID:865 9680 5719

ROCC Website:

https://www.roccsalem.org

ROCC Facebook Page:

https://www.facebook.com/ROCCSALEM/

ROCC Facebook Group for Chat:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/232944234571700/

Jan
24
Mon
01 – Helpline – SSH – Safe + Strong Helpline for Behavioral, Mental and Emotional Health Support – Interpreters Available @ 1-800-923-4357 (HELP) – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free
Jan 24 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

01 – Mental Health Resources for the the Deaf and Hard of Hearing – Crisis Lines, Support Groups, Mental Health Services – Online
Jan 24 all-day

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

As we emerge from the winter season, our exposure to limited sunlight and longer periods of darkness may affect our mental and emotional well-being.

Valentine’s Day is around the corner, which can bring with it additional anxiety, depression and other stress about romance and relationships. Research shows that deaf people are more likely to struggle socially, emotionally and with other issues impacting mental health.

Tips for Self-Care

“Recovery is not so much a dream as it is a plan.” – Carolyn Spring

In “Actually, I am Not Okay! Mental Health in the Deaf Community,” Deaf Unity offers some self-care strategies:

  • Don’t be embarrassed to ask for help. You are not alone. It is so important that you do not struggle in silence.
  • Eat well. Deaf nutritionist Jeanann Doyle explains that good nutrition is tied to positive mental health.
  • Enjoy time with friends. Research has shown that early or pervasive lack of communication access with family members and others in the deaf person’s environment are mental health risk factors. Spending quality time with companions may reduce feelings of isolation and loneliness.
  • Be kind to yourself. Negative attitudes from deaf and hearing individuals can be a barrier to healthy social and emotional development. Take part in positive experiences with and about deaf people, which break down negative stereotypes and increases awareness.

Find a Qualified Professional

The number of accessible mental health providers and services has been increasing along with awareness of the diverse communication and identities of deaf individuals.

Technology allows for remote counseling with deaf-sensitive professionals. The Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center offers national and statewide directories for mental health services for deaf people.

NDC’s Mental Health Services tip sheet offers several considerations for providing effective counseling services:

  • Direct and effortless communication between the deaf person and practitioner.
  • Practitioner’s cultural competency (i.e. understanding of deaf experiences in a hearing world, communication preferences and deaf culture).
  • Effective and appropriate means of mental health assessments.
  • The importance of accurate and qualified interpretation between ASL and English in mental health settings.

Additional Resources

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate crisis services, community resources and deaf-accessible hotlines:

  • Crisis Line for VideoPhone users who use American Sign Language (available 24/7): 321-800-3323 (321-800-DEAF)
  • National Suicide Prevention Hotline: To chat online with a counselor (2pm-2am Monday-Friday Eastern Standard Time) TTY Hotline: 800-799-4889
  • Crisis text line: text START to 741-741 (free, available 24/7, sometimes have Deaf counselors available)
  • National Domestic Violence Hotline:
    • E-mail: deafhelp@thehotline.org
    • TTY: 1-800-787-3224 (24/7 hotline)
    • VP: 1-855-812-1001 (Monday to Friday 9AM—5PM Pacific Standard Time

 

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Recovery Project

The Deaf and Hard of Hearing Project is building a welcoming network for Deaf-to-Deaf peer support and training.  We also find hearing friends and allies in mental health programs and support for recovery from traumatic experience.

Who Are We?  on YouTube

Deaf individuals tell their recovery stories through 10-15 minute videos.  All 7 share about being diagnosed with a mental illness and their journey to satisfying, complex lives.  They are open about the dark days and their hope.  All presented in In their native language – American Sign Language with captions in English.  We present them here in the hope of educating and inspiring others and creating community.

My Story:  Marco

My Story: Marnie

My Story: Lori

My Story: Minh

My Story: Mary

My Story: Taimin

My Story: Val

What is Peer Support?

What is Peer Support and the Recovery Model and How that is Different than the Medical Model (PDF)

Presentation developed and presented by Marnie Forgere, Deaf and Hard of Hearing project coordinator

How to Communicate

Tip Sheet #1 “Communicating with Deaf and Hard of Hearing”

Tip Sheet #2 “How to use American Sign Language Interpreter”

Tip Sheet #3 “How to get a Deaf or Hard of Hearing Person’s Attention”

Tip Sheet #4 “Helpful tips about Language Use”

All 4 Tip Sheets

“How to be Deaf-friendly with or without Interpreters” Guide for Hearing

White Paper Released (PDF)

BEING SEEN !
Establishing Deaf to Deaf Peer Support Services and Training
Successes and Lessons Learned From the Massachusetts Experience  

 

Button Art by Rachel Klein & Diane Squires

Prepared by: Deborah Delman, Marnie Fougere, and Meighan Haupt
In collaboration with the Deaf Community Voice Team with The Transformation Center: Val Ennis, Marco Gonzalez, Lori Johnstone, Mary O’Shea, Taimin Rosado, Sharon Sacks, Minh Vo

With special appreciation to allies Justine Barros, Cathy Mylotte, Lucille Traina, Robert Walker and
Catherine Quinerly

Links and Resources

Minnesota Certified Peer Support Specialists program

MCDHH (MA Commission for tech Deaf and Hard of Hearing)

MCDHH Boston YouTube Channel

Deaf-Hope.org  Founded by Deaf women in California “Our mission at DeafHope is to end domestic and sexual violence in Deaf communities through empowerment, education and services.”

Deaf YES Center at UMass Medical School, Worcester, MA

Harvard Committee on Deaf Awareness (CODA)

“Intimate Partner Violence in the Deaf Community: 5 Things You Need to Know & 5 Things You Can Do” (written for mental health providers) PDF

“Signs of Safety: A Deaf Accessible Toolkit for Trauma and Addiction” PDFASL

911 Disability Indicator Program

12-Step online for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Sounds of Sobriety (SOS):  This online email group was formed to help us who have a hearing loss (deaf, deafened, or hard of hearing) to find a place to recover from alcoholism. For many of us, face-to-face AA meetings no longer work. All members of AA, or those who think they may have a problem with alcohol, are welcome.    SOS_online_group-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Deaf Grateful:  This is a real-time open discussion meeting on Saturday at 4 pm (EST) for deaf & HOH people who have a desire to stop drinking. Meeting uses videoconferencing software (easily downloaded) that requires a high speed internet connection and a webcam. Our communication mode is ASL only (no audio).
http://doda.omnijoin.com

VA – VisionAware – Support Groups and Other Resources For the Blind and Visually Impaired @ Online Event Register Online
Jan 24 all-day

 

 

support group sitting around table

Importance of Joining a Support Group

If you’ve been diagnosed with an eye condition, have a family member who has, or have become a caregiver, joining a support group may be the most important thing you’ll ever do. Whether online or in your local community, such groups offer the opportunity to talk to others; share common concerns, frustrations, and stories; and find solutions to your vision-related difficulties. For more information on support groups, you can read Support Groups and the Adjustment Process.

Check out Finding Support Groups for more information including links to directory listings of support groups.

Support Group Resources and Supportive Communities Meeting Virtually

  • The APH Directory of Services allows you to find local support groups as well as organizations that offer counseling and adjustment services, low vision services, mobility training, and vocational rehabilitation.
  • ILVSG TeleSupport – This support group is designed for older adults with low vision who may not have access to the internet or other in-person groups. It is a monthly meeting offered over the phone and there are no fees or obligations. It is designed for low vision seniors anywhere in the U.S. who have no access to the Internet or cannot attend a live support group. Learn more at: MD Support — TeleSupport or call toll-free at 1-888-866-6148 to get started!

 

  • The Friendship Line – The Institute on Aging established this toll-free line for older adults who may be depressed, lonely, disabled, or in crisis.  It is both a crisis “hotline” and a ‘warmline” for emotional support. Trained volunteers answer the calls and make calls. The Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including: providing emotional support, elder abuse reporting, well-being checks, grief support through assistance and reassurance, active suicide intervention, information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities. Volunteers will also call people on a regular basis to help monitor their  physical and mental health concerns. This service can improve the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Reach out today and call 1-800-971-0016. To learn more, visit Senior Intervention Hotline for Crisis Support Services.

 

  • Social Call – This Covia program connects adults 60 and older to new friends on the phone or video calls. Volunteers are “matched” to participants with the goal of building friendships through weekly calls.  This free service is a great way to socialize and make connections when you can’t get out in your community. Go to: Social Call | Covia Corporate or call 1-877-797-7299 to get started. 

 

  • Covia Well Connected and Well Connected Espanol– This program, previously known as Senior Center without Walls, offers enrichment, community, fun, support and learning groups for older adults who may be homebound. All groups meet over the phone and/or on-line and are free. They offer support groups specifically for the visually impaired. It is a rich and supportive community and there is something for everyone! Visit their website to check out the catalog of offerings and learn how it all works. Call 1-877-797-7299 to register and get started.  

 

  • Mather Telephone Topics – Join Telephone Topics to learn about a variety of topics: wellness, music, sports, history. Participate in live discussions and enjoy live performances from home. All you do is call the phone number or log on to the Zoom meeting. Participation is FREE and open to everyone, anywhere! Learn more at: Aging Well Discussions and Programs | Telephone Topics (mather.com)  Then click on “Download Schedule” and choose an option that interests you. If you have questions about Telephone Topics, call 1-888-600-2560.

 

  • Eye2Eye is a free phone-based peer support program which offers emotional support, assessment, information, and referrals to people who are blind or visually impaired and their families. It helps people cope with the challenges of adjusting to vision loss, using trained peer support specialists who are also blind or visually impaired. They serve people in more than twenty states.
  • The American Council of the Blind (ACB) has a list of helpful resources for people with vision loss and their families. It also has a national directory of affiliates in each state. Seniors can find information through the ACB affiliate Alliance on Aging and Vision Loss.

 

 

 

 

  • Vision Exchange is an online resource for support group leaders who facilitate support groups for adults with vision loss. The purpose is to exchange ideas, information, and community resources to help adults with low vision be more independent

 

  • The Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) was the first community-based nonprofit organization in the country to address the needs of families and friends providing long-term care at home. FCA now offers programs at national, state, and local levels to support and sustain caregivers, and has an online family support group.

 

 

Phone emotional peer support line for blind persons

Rutgers has launched the nation’s first peer support helpline for the legally blind and their families.

Eye2Eye – 833-932-3931 (83-EYE2EYE-1) – is staffed 24/7 by peer support specialists who are legally blind and understand the challenges callers face.

The program, which is funded by a grant from the Lavelle Fund for the Blind, serves residents in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. The helpline assists people with vision impairments and blindness to work through some of the practical and emotional challenges associated with losing vision. Services include peer support, clinical assessment and referrals to resources for help with mental health, employment and technology. The program also offers callers resilience training to promote wellness, strength and self-care.

Recent studies show that one-third of people with vision loss suffer from depression and anxiety. This risk has gone largely unaddressed in the medical community, which has focused more on the practical problems faced by the visually impaired, such as finding employment and navigating everyday tasks, said Steven Silverstein, a clinical psychologist and vision researcher who co-directs the program with Cherie Castellano, the National Peer Support Call Center program director at  Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care.

The Eye2Eye peers all have different forms of visual impairments, and these began at different times during their lives. This allows for a ‘cultural connection’ between callers with a wide range of vision problems and life concerns, and our peer counselors.”

Steven Silverstein, clinical psychologist and vision researcher

Warmline – Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jan 24 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

ROCC – Recovery Outreach Community Center Emotional Awareness Group with Mark – Tuesdays @ Online via Zoom
Jan 24 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

logo

EMOTIONAL AWARENESS WITH MARK

ONLINE – TUESDAYS 2–3PM PST

This is a mutual support group for all kinds of challenges, such as anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem. Focus is on tools & solutions.

Click link below to attend group. You will be asked to register on ZOOM. It’s free and fast!

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZIofu-grj4tG90p8MxArdVQIJO86TWmgVmo

ZOOM Meeting ID:865 9680 5719

ROCC Website:

https://www.roccsalem.org

ROCC Facebook Page:

https://www.facebook.com/ROCCSALEM/

ROCC Facebook Group for Chat:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/232944234571700/

Jan
25
Tue
01 – Helpline – SSH – Safe + Strong Helpline for Behavioral, Mental and Emotional Health Support – Interpreters Available @ 1-800-923-4357 (HELP) – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free
Jan 25 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

01 – Mental Health Resources for the the Deaf and Hard of Hearing – Crisis Lines, Support Groups, Mental Health Services – Online
Jan 25 all-day

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

As we emerge from the winter season, our exposure to limited sunlight and longer periods of darkness may affect our mental and emotional well-being.

Valentine’s Day is around the corner, which can bring with it additional anxiety, depression and other stress about romance and relationships. Research shows that deaf people are more likely to struggle socially, emotionally and with other issues impacting mental health.

Tips for Self-Care

“Recovery is not so much a dream as it is a plan.” – Carolyn Spring

In “Actually, I am Not Okay! Mental Health in the Deaf Community,” Deaf Unity offers some self-care strategies:

  • Don’t be embarrassed to ask for help. You are not alone. It is so important that you do not struggle in silence.
  • Eat well. Deaf nutritionist Jeanann Doyle explains that good nutrition is tied to positive mental health.
  • Enjoy time with friends. Research has shown that early or pervasive lack of communication access with family members and others in the deaf person’s environment are mental health risk factors. Spending quality time with companions may reduce feelings of isolation and loneliness.
  • Be kind to yourself. Negative attitudes from deaf and hearing individuals can be a barrier to healthy social and emotional development. Take part in positive experiences with and about deaf people, which break down negative stereotypes and increases awareness.

Find a Qualified Professional

The number of accessible mental health providers and services has been increasing along with awareness of the diverse communication and identities of deaf individuals.

Technology allows for remote counseling with deaf-sensitive professionals. The Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center offers national and statewide directories for mental health services for deaf people.

NDC’s Mental Health Services tip sheet offers several considerations for providing effective counseling services:

  • Direct and effortless communication between the deaf person and practitioner.
  • Practitioner’s cultural competency (i.e. understanding of deaf experiences in a hearing world, communication preferences and deaf culture).
  • Effective and appropriate means of mental health assessments.
  • The importance of accurate and qualified interpretation between ASL and English in mental health settings.

Additional Resources

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate crisis services, community resources and deaf-accessible hotlines:

  • Crisis Line for VideoPhone users who use American Sign Language (available 24/7): 321-800-3323 (321-800-DEAF)
  • National Suicide Prevention Hotline: To chat online with a counselor (2pm-2am Monday-Friday Eastern Standard Time) TTY Hotline: 800-799-4889
  • Crisis text line: text START to 741-741 (free, available 24/7, sometimes have Deaf counselors available)
  • National Domestic Violence Hotline:
    • E-mail: deafhelp@thehotline.org
    • TTY: 1-800-787-3224 (24/7 hotline)
    • VP: 1-855-812-1001 (Monday to Friday 9AM—5PM Pacific Standard Time

 

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Recovery Project

The Deaf and Hard of Hearing Project is building a welcoming network for Deaf-to-Deaf peer support and training.  We also find hearing friends and allies in mental health programs and support for recovery from traumatic experience.

Who Are We?  on YouTube

Deaf individuals tell their recovery stories through 10-15 minute videos.  All 7 share about being diagnosed with a mental illness and their journey to satisfying, complex lives.  They are open about the dark days and their hope.  All presented in In their native language – American Sign Language with captions in English.  We present them here in the hope of educating and inspiring others and creating community.

My Story:  Marco

My Story: Marnie

My Story: Lori

My Story: Minh

My Story: Mary

My Story: Taimin

My Story: Val

What is Peer Support?

What is Peer Support and the Recovery Model and How that is Different than the Medical Model (PDF)

Presentation developed and presented by Marnie Forgere, Deaf and Hard of Hearing project coordinator

How to Communicate

Tip Sheet #1 “Communicating with Deaf and Hard of Hearing”

Tip Sheet #2 “How to use American Sign Language Interpreter”

Tip Sheet #3 “How to get a Deaf or Hard of Hearing Person’s Attention”

Tip Sheet #4 “Helpful tips about Language Use”

All 4 Tip Sheets

“How to be Deaf-friendly with or without Interpreters” Guide for Hearing

White Paper Released (PDF)

BEING SEEN !
Establishing Deaf to Deaf Peer Support Services and Training
Successes and Lessons Learned From the Massachusetts Experience  

 

Button Art by Rachel Klein & Diane Squires

Prepared by: Deborah Delman, Marnie Fougere, and Meighan Haupt
In collaboration with the Deaf Community Voice Team with The Transformation Center: Val Ennis, Marco Gonzalez, Lori Johnstone, Mary O’Shea, Taimin Rosado, Sharon Sacks, Minh Vo

With special appreciation to allies Justine Barros, Cathy Mylotte, Lucille Traina, Robert Walker and
Catherine Quinerly

Links and Resources

Minnesota Certified Peer Support Specialists program

MCDHH (MA Commission for tech Deaf and Hard of Hearing)

MCDHH Boston YouTube Channel

Deaf-Hope.org  Founded by Deaf women in California “Our mission at DeafHope is to end domestic and sexual violence in Deaf communities through empowerment, education and services.”

Deaf YES Center at UMass Medical School, Worcester, MA

Harvard Committee on Deaf Awareness (CODA)

“Intimate Partner Violence in the Deaf Community: 5 Things You Need to Know & 5 Things You Can Do” (written for mental health providers) PDF

“Signs of Safety: A Deaf Accessible Toolkit for Trauma and Addiction” PDFASL

911 Disability Indicator Program

12-Step online for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Sounds of Sobriety (SOS):  This online email group was formed to help us who have a hearing loss (deaf, deafened, or hard of hearing) to find a place to recover from alcoholism. For many of us, face-to-face AA meetings no longer work. All members of AA, or those who think they may have a problem with alcohol, are welcome.    SOS_online_group-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Deaf Grateful:  This is a real-time open discussion meeting on Saturday at 4 pm (EST) for deaf & HOH people who have a desire to stop drinking. Meeting uses videoconferencing software (easily downloaded) that requires a high speed internet connection and a webcam. Our communication mode is ASL only (no audio).
http://doda.omnijoin.com

VA – VisionAware – Support Groups and Other Resources For the Blind and Visually Impaired @ Online Event Register Online
Jan 25 all-day

 

 

support group sitting around table

Importance of Joining a Support Group

If you’ve been diagnosed with an eye condition, have a family member who has, or have become a caregiver, joining a support group may be the most important thing you’ll ever do. Whether online or in your local community, such groups offer the opportunity to talk to others; share common concerns, frustrations, and stories; and find solutions to your vision-related difficulties. For more information on support groups, you can read Support Groups and the Adjustment Process.

Check out Finding Support Groups for more information including links to directory listings of support groups.

Support Group Resources and Supportive Communities Meeting Virtually

  • The APH Directory of Services allows you to find local support groups as well as organizations that offer counseling and adjustment services, low vision services, mobility training, and vocational rehabilitation.
  • ILVSG TeleSupport – This support group is designed for older adults with low vision who may not have access to the internet or other in-person groups. It is a monthly meeting offered over the phone and there are no fees or obligations. It is designed for low vision seniors anywhere in the U.S. who have no access to the Internet or cannot attend a live support group. Learn more at: MD Support — TeleSupport or call toll-free at 1-888-866-6148 to get started!

 

  • The Friendship Line – The Institute on Aging established this toll-free line for older adults who may be depressed, lonely, disabled, or in crisis.  It is both a crisis “hotline” and a ‘warmline” for emotional support. Trained volunteers answer the calls and make calls. The Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including: providing emotional support, elder abuse reporting, well-being checks, grief support through assistance and reassurance, active suicide intervention, information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities. Volunteers will also call people on a regular basis to help monitor their  physical and mental health concerns. This service can improve the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Reach out today and call 1-800-971-0016. To learn more, visit Senior Intervention Hotline for Crisis Support Services.

 

  • Social Call – This Covia program connects adults 60 and older to new friends on the phone or video calls. Volunteers are “matched” to participants with the goal of building friendships through weekly calls.  This free service is a great way to socialize and make connections when you can’t get out in your community. Go to: Social Call | Covia Corporate or call 1-877-797-7299 to get started. 

 

  • Covia Well Connected and Well Connected Espanol– This program, previously known as Senior Center without Walls, offers enrichment, community, fun, support and learning groups for older adults who may be homebound. All groups meet over the phone and/or on-line and are free. They offer support groups specifically for the visually impaired. It is a rich and supportive community and there is something for everyone! Visit their website to check out the catalog of offerings and learn how it all works. Call 1-877-797-7299 to register and get started.  

 

  • Mather Telephone Topics – Join Telephone Topics to learn about a variety of topics: wellness, music, sports, history. Participate in live discussions and enjoy live performances from home. All you do is call the phone number or log on to the Zoom meeting. Participation is FREE and open to everyone, anywhere! Learn more at: Aging Well Discussions and Programs | Telephone Topics (mather.com)  Then click on “Download Schedule” and choose an option that interests you. If you have questions about Telephone Topics, call 1-888-600-2560.

 

  • Eye2Eye is a free phone-based peer support program which offers emotional support, assessment, information, and referrals to people who are blind or visually impaired and their families. It helps people cope with the challenges of adjusting to vision loss, using trained peer support specialists who are also blind or visually impaired. They serve people in more than twenty states.
  • The American Council of the Blind (ACB) has a list of helpful resources for people with vision loss and their families. It also has a national directory of affiliates in each state. Seniors can find information through the ACB affiliate Alliance on Aging and Vision Loss.

 

 

 

 

  • Vision Exchange is an online resource for support group leaders who facilitate support groups for adults with vision loss. The purpose is to exchange ideas, information, and community resources to help adults with low vision be more independent

 

  • The Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) was the first community-based nonprofit organization in the country to address the needs of families and friends providing long-term care at home. FCA now offers programs at national, state, and local levels to support and sustain caregivers, and has an online family support group.

 

 

Phone emotional peer support line for blind persons

Rutgers has launched the nation’s first peer support helpline for the legally blind and their families.

Eye2Eye – 833-932-3931 (83-EYE2EYE-1) – is staffed 24/7 by peer support specialists who are legally blind and understand the challenges callers face.

The program, which is funded by a grant from the Lavelle Fund for the Blind, serves residents in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. The helpline assists people with vision impairments and blindness to work through some of the practical and emotional challenges associated with losing vision. Services include peer support, clinical assessment and referrals to resources for help with mental health, employment and technology. The program also offers callers resilience training to promote wellness, strength and self-care.

Recent studies show that one-third of people with vision loss suffer from depression and anxiety. This risk has gone largely unaddressed in the medical community, which has focused more on the practical problems faced by the visually impaired, such as finding employment and navigating everyday tasks, said Steven Silverstein, a clinical psychologist and vision researcher who co-directs the program with Cherie Castellano, the National Peer Support Call Center program director at  Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care.

The Eye2Eye peers all have different forms of visual impairments, and these began at different times during their lives. This allows for a ‘cultural connection’ between callers with a wide range of vision problems and life concerns, and our peer counselors.”

Steven Silverstein, clinical psychologist and vision researcher

Warmline – Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jan 25 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

ROCC – Recovery Outreach Community Center Emotional Awareness Group with Mark – Tuesdays @ Online via Zoom
Jan 25 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

logo

EMOTIONAL AWARENESS WITH MARK

ONLINE – TUESDAYS 2–3PM PST

This is a mutual support group for all kinds of challenges, such as anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem. Focus is on tools & solutions.

Click link below to attend group. You will be asked to register on ZOOM. It’s free and fast!

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZIofu-grj4tG90p8MxArdVQIJO86TWmgVmo

ZOOM Meeting ID:865 9680 5719

ROCC Website:

https://www.roccsalem.org

ROCC Facebook Page:

https://www.facebook.com/ROCCSALEM/

ROCC Facebook Group for Chat:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/232944234571700/

Jan
26
Wed
01 – Helpline – SSH – Safe + Strong Helpline for Behavioral, Mental and Emotional Health Support – Interpreters Available @ 1-800-923-4357 (HELP) – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free
Jan 26 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

01 – Mental Health Resources for the the Deaf and Hard of Hearing – Crisis Lines, Support Groups, Mental Health Services – Online
Jan 26 all-day

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

As we emerge from the winter season, our exposure to limited sunlight and longer periods of darkness may affect our mental and emotional well-being.

Valentine’s Day is around the corner, which can bring with it additional anxiety, depression and other stress about romance and relationships. Research shows that deaf people are more likely to struggle socially, emotionally and with other issues impacting mental health.

Tips for Self-Care

“Recovery is not so much a dream as it is a plan.” – Carolyn Spring

In “Actually, I am Not Okay! Mental Health in the Deaf Community,” Deaf Unity offers some self-care strategies:

  • Don’t be embarrassed to ask for help. You are not alone. It is so important that you do not struggle in silence.
  • Eat well. Deaf nutritionist Jeanann Doyle explains that good nutrition is tied to positive mental health.
  • Enjoy time with friends. Research has shown that early or pervasive lack of communication access with family members and others in the deaf person’s environment are mental health risk factors. Spending quality time with companions may reduce feelings of isolation and loneliness.
  • Be kind to yourself. Negative attitudes from deaf and hearing individuals can be a barrier to healthy social and emotional development. Take part in positive experiences with and about deaf people, which break down negative stereotypes and increases awareness.

Find a Qualified Professional

The number of accessible mental health providers and services has been increasing along with awareness of the diverse communication and identities of deaf individuals.

Technology allows for remote counseling with deaf-sensitive professionals. The Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center offers national and statewide directories for mental health services for deaf people.

NDC’s Mental Health Services tip sheet offers several considerations for providing effective counseling services:

  • Direct and effortless communication between the deaf person and practitioner.
  • Practitioner’s cultural competency (i.e. understanding of deaf experiences in a hearing world, communication preferences and deaf culture).
  • Effective and appropriate means of mental health assessments.
  • The importance of accurate and qualified interpretation between ASL and English in mental health settings.

Additional Resources

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate crisis services, community resources and deaf-accessible hotlines:

  • Crisis Line for VideoPhone users who use American Sign Language (available 24/7): 321-800-3323 (321-800-DEAF)
  • National Suicide Prevention Hotline: To chat online with a counselor (2pm-2am Monday-Friday Eastern Standard Time) TTY Hotline: 800-799-4889
  • Crisis text line: text START to 741-741 (free, available 24/7, sometimes have Deaf counselors available)
  • National Domestic Violence Hotline:
    • E-mail: deafhelp@thehotline.org
    • TTY: 1-800-787-3224 (24/7 hotline)
    • VP: 1-855-812-1001 (Monday to Friday 9AM—5PM Pacific Standard Time

 

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Recovery Project

The Deaf and Hard of Hearing Project is building a welcoming network for Deaf-to-Deaf peer support and training.  We also find hearing friends and allies in mental health programs and support for recovery from traumatic experience.

Who Are We?  on YouTube

Deaf individuals tell their recovery stories through 10-15 minute videos.  All 7 share about being diagnosed with a mental illness and their journey to satisfying, complex lives.  They are open about the dark days and their hope.  All presented in In their native language – American Sign Language with captions in English.  We present them here in the hope of educating and inspiring others and creating community.

My Story:  Marco

My Story: Marnie

My Story: Lori

My Story: Minh

My Story: Mary

My Story: Taimin

My Story: Val

What is Peer Support?

What is Peer Support and the Recovery Model and How that is Different than the Medical Model (PDF)

Presentation developed and presented by Marnie Forgere, Deaf and Hard of Hearing project coordinator

How to Communicate

Tip Sheet #1 “Communicating with Deaf and Hard of Hearing”

Tip Sheet #2 “How to use American Sign Language Interpreter”

Tip Sheet #3 “How to get a Deaf or Hard of Hearing Person’s Attention”

Tip Sheet #4 “Helpful tips about Language Use”

All 4 Tip Sheets

“How to be Deaf-friendly with or without Interpreters” Guide for Hearing

White Paper Released (PDF)

BEING SEEN !
Establishing Deaf to Deaf Peer Support Services and Training
Successes and Lessons Learned From the Massachusetts Experience  

 

Button Art by Rachel Klein & Diane Squires

Prepared by: Deborah Delman, Marnie Fougere, and Meighan Haupt
In collaboration with the Deaf Community Voice Team with The Transformation Center: Val Ennis, Marco Gonzalez, Lori Johnstone, Mary O’Shea, Taimin Rosado, Sharon Sacks, Minh Vo

With special appreciation to allies Justine Barros, Cathy Mylotte, Lucille Traina, Robert Walker and
Catherine Quinerly

Links and Resources

Minnesota Certified Peer Support Specialists program

MCDHH (MA Commission for tech Deaf and Hard of Hearing)

MCDHH Boston YouTube Channel

Deaf-Hope.org  Founded by Deaf women in California “Our mission at DeafHope is to end domestic and sexual violence in Deaf communities through empowerment, education and services.”

Deaf YES Center at UMass Medical School, Worcester, MA

Harvard Committee on Deaf Awareness (CODA)

“Intimate Partner Violence in the Deaf Community: 5 Things You Need to Know & 5 Things You Can Do” (written for mental health providers) PDF

“Signs of Safety: A Deaf Accessible Toolkit for Trauma and Addiction” PDFASL

911 Disability Indicator Program

12-Step online for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Sounds of Sobriety (SOS):  This online email group was formed to help us who have a hearing loss (deaf, deafened, or hard of hearing) to find a place to recover from alcoholism. For many of us, face-to-face AA meetings no longer work. All members of AA, or those who think they may have a problem with alcohol, are welcome.    SOS_online_group-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Deaf Grateful:  This is a real-time open discussion meeting on Saturday at 4 pm (EST) for deaf & HOH people who have a desire to stop drinking. Meeting uses videoconferencing software (easily downloaded) that requires a high speed internet connection and a webcam. Our communication mode is ASL only (no audio).
http://doda.omnijoin.com

VA – VisionAware – Support Groups and Other Resources For the Blind and Visually Impaired @ Online Event Register Online
Jan 26 all-day

 

 

support group sitting around table

Importance of Joining a Support Group

If you’ve been diagnosed with an eye condition, have a family member who has, or have become a caregiver, joining a support group may be the most important thing you’ll ever do. Whether online or in your local community, such groups offer the opportunity to talk to others; share common concerns, frustrations, and stories; and find solutions to your vision-related difficulties. For more information on support groups, you can read Support Groups and the Adjustment Process.

Check out Finding Support Groups for more information including links to directory listings of support groups.

Support Group Resources and Supportive Communities Meeting Virtually

  • The APH Directory of Services allows you to find local support groups as well as organizations that offer counseling and adjustment services, low vision services, mobility training, and vocational rehabilitation.
  • ILVSG TeleSupport – This support group is designed for older adults with low vision who may not have access to the internet or other in-person groups. It is a monthly meeting offered over the phone and there are no fees or obligations. It is designed for low vision seniors anywhere in the U.S. who have no access to the Internet or cannot attend a live support group. Learn more at: MD Support — TeleSupport or call toll-free at 1-888-866-6148 to get started!

 

  • The Friendship Line – The Institute on Aging established this toll-free line for older adults who may be depressed, lonely, disabled, or in crisis.  It is both a crisis “hotline” and a ‘warmline” for emotional support. Trained volunteers answer the calls and make calls. The Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including: providing emotional support, elder abuse reporting, well-being checks, grief support through assistance and reassurance, active suicide intervention, information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities. Volunteers will also call people on a regular basis to help monitor their  physical and mental health concerns. This service can improve the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Reach out today and call 1-800-971-0016. To learn more, visit Senior Intervention Hotline for Crisis Support Services.

 

  • Social Call – This Covia program connects adults 60 and older to new friends on the phone or video calls. Volunteers are “matched” to participants with the goal of building friendships through weekly calls.  This free service is a great way to socialize and make connections when you can’t get out in your community. Go to: Social Call | Covia Corporate or call 1-877-797-7299 to get started. 

 

  • Covia Well Connected and Well Connected Espanol– This program, previously known as Senior Center without Walls, offers enrichment, community, fun, support and learning groups for older adults who may be homebound. All groups meet over the phone and/or on-line and are free. They offer support groups specifically for the visually impaired. It is a rich and supportive community and there is something for everyone! Visit their website to check out the catalog of offerings and learn how it all works. Call 1-877-797-7299 to register and get started.  

 

  • Mather Telephone Topics – Join Telephone Topics to learn about a variety of topics: wellness, music, sports, history. Participate in live discussions and enjoy live performances from home. All you do is call the phone number or log on to the Zoom meeting. Participation is FREE and open to everyone, anywhere! Learn more at: Aging Well Discussions and Programs | Telephone Topics (mather.com)  Then click on “Download Schedule” and choose an option that interests you. If you have questions about Telephone Topics, call 1-888-600-2560.

 

  • Eye2Eye is a free phone-based peer support program which offers emotional support, assessment, information, and referrals to people who are blind or visually impaired and their families. It helps people cope with the challenges of adjusting to vision loss, using trained peer support specialists who are also blind or visually impaired. They serve people in more than twenty states.
  • The American Council of the Blind (ACB) has a list of helpful resources for people with vision loss and their families. It also has a national directory of affiliates in each state. Seniors can find information through the ACB affiliate Alliance on Aging and Vision Loss.

 

 

 

 

  • Vision Exchange is an online resource for support group leaders who facilitate support groups for adults with vision loss. The purpose is to exchange ideas, information, and community resources to help adults with low vision be more independent

 

  • The Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) was the first community-based nonprofit organization in the country to address the needs of families and friends providing long-term care at home. FCA now offers programs at national, state, and local levels to support and sustain caregivers, and has an online family support group.

 

 

Phone emotional peer support line for blind persons

Rutgers has launched the nation’s first peer support helpline for the legally blind and their families.

Eye2Eye – 833-932-3931 (83-EYE2EYE-1) – is staffed 24/7 by peer support specialists who are legally blind and understand the challenges callers face.

The program, which is funded by a grant from the Lavelle Fund for the Blind, serves residents in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. The helpline assists people with vision impairments and blindness to work through some of the practical and emotional challenges associated with losing vision. Services include peer support, clinical assessment and referrals to resources for help with mental health, employment and technology. The program also offers callers resilience training to promote wellness, strength and self-care.

Recent studies show that one-third of people with vision loss suffer from depression and anxiety. This risk has gone largely unaddressed in the medical community, which has focused more on the practical problems faced by the visually impaired, such as finding employment and navigating everyday tasks, said Steven Silverstein, a clinical psychologist and vision researcher who co-directs the program with Cherie Castellano, the National Peer Support Call Center program director at  Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care.

The Eye2Eye peers all have different forms of visual impairments, and these began at different times during their lives. This allows for a ‘cultural connection’ between callers with a wide range of vision problems and life concerns, and our peer counselors.”

Steven Silverstein, clinical psychologist and vision researcher

Warmline – Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jan 26 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

ROCC – Recovery Outreach Community Center Emotional Awareness Group with Mark – Tuesdays @ Online via Zoom
Jan 26 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

logo

EMOTIONAL AWARENESS WITH MARK

ONLINE – TUESDAYS 2–3PM PST

This is a mutual support group for all kinds of challenges, such as anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem. Focus is on tools & solutions.

Click link below to attend group. You will be asked to register on ZOOM. It’s free and fast!

https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZIofu-grj4tG90p8MxArdVQIJO86TWmgVmo

ZOOM Meeting ID:865 9680 5719

ROCC Website:

https://www.roccsalem.org

ROCC Facebook Page:

https://www.facebook.com/ROCCSALEM/

ROCC Facebook Group for Chat:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/232944234571700/

Jan
27
Thu
01 – Helpline – SSH – Safe + Strong Helpline for Behavioral, Mental and Emotional Health Support – Interpreters Available @ 1-800-923-4357 (HELP) – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free
Jan 27 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

01 – Mental Health Resources for the the Deaf and Hard of Hearing – Crisis Lines, Support Groups, Mental Health Services – Online
Jan 27 all-day

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

As we emerge from the winter season, our exposure to limited sunlight and longer periods of darkness may affect our mental and emotional well-being.

Valentine’s Day is around the corner, which can bring with it additional anxiety, depression and other stress about romance and relationships. Research shows that deaf people are more likely to struggle socially, emotionally and with other issues impacting mental health.

Tips for Self-Care

“Recovery is not so much a dream as it is a plan.” – Carolyn Spring

In “Actually, I am Not Okay! Mental Health in the Deaf Community,” Deaf Unity offers some self-care strategies:

  • Don’t be embarrassed to ask for help. You are not alone. It is so important that you do not struggle in silence.
  • Eat well. Deaf nutritionist Jeanann Doyle explains that good nutrition is tied to positive mental health.
  • Enjoy time with friends. Research has shown that early or pervasive lack of communication access with family members and others in the deaf person’s environment are mental health risk factors. Spending quality time with companions may reduce feelings of isolation and loneliness.
  • Be kind to yourself. Negative attitudes from deaf and hearing individuals can be a barrier to healthy social and emotional development. Take part in positive experiences with and about deaf people, which break down negative stereotypes and increases awareness.

Find a Qualified Professional

The number of accessible mental health providers and services has been increasing along with awareness of the diverse communication and identities of deaf individuals.

Technology allows for remote counseling with deaf-sensitive professionals. The Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center offers national and statewide directories for mental health services for deaf people.

NDC’s Mental Health Services tip sheet offers several considerations for providing effective counseling services:

  • Direct and effortless communication between the deaf person and practitioner.
  • Practitioner’s cultural competency (i.e. understanding of deaf experiences in a hearing world, communication preferences and deaf culture).
  • Effective and appropriate means of mental health assessments.
  • The importance of accurate and qualified interpretation between ASL and English in mental health settings.

Additional Resources

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate crisis services, community resources and deaf-accessible hotlines:

  • Crisis Line for VideoPhone users who use American Sign Language (available 24/7): 321-800-3323 (321-800-DEAF)
  • National Suicide Prevention Hotline: To chat online with a counselor (2pm-2am Monday-Friday Eastern Standard Time) TTY Hotline: 800-799-4889
  • Crisis text line: text START to 741-741 (free, available 24/7, sometimes have Deaf counselors available)
  • National Domestic Violence Hotline:
    • E-mail: deafhelp@thehotline.org
    • TTY: 1-800-787-3224 (24/7 hotline)
    • VP: 1-855-812-1001 (Monday to Friday 9AM—5PM Pacific Standard Time

 

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Recovery Project

The Deaf and Hard of Hearing Project is building a welcoming network for Deaf-to-Deaf peer support and training.  We also find hearing friends and allies in mental health programs and support for recovery from traumatic experience.

Who Are We?  on YouTube

Deaf individuals tell their recovery stories through 10-15 minute videos.  All 7 share about being diagnosed with a mental illness and their journey to satisfying, complex lives.  They are open about the dark days and their hope.  All presented in In their native language – American Sign Language with captions in English.  We present them here in the hope of educating and inspiring others and creating community.

My Story:  Marco

My Story: Marnie

My Story: Lori

My Story: Minh

My Story: Mary

My Story: Taimin

My Story: Val

What is Peer Support?

What is Peer Support and the Recovery Model and How that is Different than the Medical Model (PDF)

Presentation developed and presented by Marnie Forgere, Deaf and Hard of Hearing project coordinator

How to Communicate

Tip Sheet #1 “Communicating with Deaf and Hard of Hearing”

Tip Sheet #2 “How to use American Sign Language Interpreter”

Tip Sheet #3 “How to get a Deaf or Hard of Hearing Person’s Attention”

Tip Sheet #4 “Helpful tips about Language Use”

All 4 Tip Sheets

“How to be Deaf-friendly with or without Interpreters” Guide for Hearing

White Paper Released (PDF)

BEING SEEN !
Establishing Deaf to Deaf Peer Support Services and Training
Successes and Lessons Learned From the Massachusetts Experience  

 

Button Art by Rachel Klein & Diane Squires

Prepared by: Deborah Delman, Marnie Fougere, and Meighan Haupt
In collaboration with the Deaf Community Voice Team with The Transformation Center: Val Ennis, Marco Gonzalez, Lori Johnstone, Mary O’Shea, Taimin Rosado, Sharon Sacks, Minh Vo

With special appreciation to allies Justine Barros, Cathy Mylotte, Lucille Traina, Robert Walker and
Catherine Quinerly

Links and Resources

Minnesota Certified Peer Support Specialists program

MCDHH (MA Commission for tech Deaf and Hard of Hearing)

MCDHH Boston YouTube Channel

Deaf-Hope.org  Founded by Deaf women in California “Our mission at DeafHope is to end domestic and sexual violence in Deaf communities through empowerment, education and services.”

Deaf YES Center at UMass Medical School, Worcester, MA

Harvard Committee on Deaf Awareness (CODA)

“Intimate Partner Violence in the Deaf Community: 5 Things You Need to Know & 5 Things You Can Do” (written for mental health providers) PDF

“Signs of Safety: A Deaf Accessible Toolkit for Trauma and Addiction” PDFASL

911 Disability Indicator Program

12-Step online for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Sounds of Sobriety (SOS):  This online email group was formed to help us who have a hearing loss (deaf, deafened, or hard of hearing) to find a place to recover from alcoholism. For many of us, face-to-face AA meetings no longer work. All members of AA, or those who think they may have a problem with alcohol, are welcome.    SOS_online_group-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Deaf Grateful:  This is a real-time open discussion meeting on Saturday at 4 pm (EST) for deaf & HOH people who have a desire to stop drinking. Meeting uses videoconferencing software (easily downloaded) that requires a high speed internet connection and a webcam. Our communication mode is ASL only (no audio).
http://doda.omnijoin.com

VA – VisionAware – Support Groups and Other Resources For the Blind and Visually Impaired @ Online Event Register Online
Jan 27 all-day

 

 

support group sitting around table

Importance of Joining a Support Group

If you’ve been diagnosed with an eye condition, have a family member who has, or have become a caregiver, joining a support group may be the most important thing you’ll ever do. Whether online or in your local community, such groups offer the opportunity to talk to others; share common concerns, frustrations, and stories; and find solutions to your vision-related difficulties. For more information on support groups, you can read Support Groups and the Adjustment Process.

Check out Finding Support Groups for more information including links to directory listings of support groups.

Support Group Resources and Supportive Communities Meeting Virtually

  • The APH Directory of Services allows you to find local support groups as well as organizations that offer counseling and adjustment services, low vision services, mobility training, and vocational rehabilitation.
  • ILVSG TeleSupport – This support group is designed for older adults with low vision who may not have access to the internet or other in-person groups. It is a monthly meeting offered over the phone and there are no fees or obligations. It is designed for low vision seniors anywhere in the U.S. who have no access to the Internet or cannot attend a live support group. Learn more at: MD Support — TeleSupport or call toll-free at 1-888-866-6148 to get started!

 

  • The Friendship Line – The Institute on Aging established this toll-free line for older adults who may be depressed, lonely, disabled, or in crisis.  It is both a crisis “hotline” and a ‘warmline” for emotional support. Trained volunteers answer the calls and make calls. The Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including: providing emotional support, elder abuse reporting, well-being checks, grief support through assistance and reassurance, active suicide intervention, information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities. Volunteers will also call people on a regular basis to help monitor their  physical and mental health concerns. This service can improve the quality of life and connectedness of isolated callers. Reach out today and call 1-800-971-0016. To learn more, visit Senior Intervention Hotline for Crisis Support Services.

 

  • Social Call – This Covia program connects adults 60 and older to new friends on the phone or video calls. Volunteers are “matched” to participants with the goal of building friendships through weekly calls.  This free service is a great way to socialize and make connections when you can’t get out in your community. Go to: Social Call | Covia Corporate or call 1-877-797-7299 to get started. 

 

  • Covia Well Connected and Well Connected Espanol– This program, previously known as Senior Center without Walls, offers enrichment, community, fun, support and learning groups for older adults who may be homebound. All groups meet over the phone and/or on-line and are free. They offer support groups specifically for the visually impaired. It is a rich and supportive community and there is something for everyone! Visit their website to check out the catalog of offerings and learn how it all works. Call 1-877-797-7299 to register and get started.  

 

  • Mather Telephone Topics – Join Telephone Topics to learn about a variety of topics: wellness, music, sports, history. Participate in live discussions and enjoy live performances from home. All you do is call the phone number or log on to the Zoom meeting. Participation is FREE and open to everyone, anywhere! Learn more at: Aging Well Discussions and Programs | Telephone Topics (mather.com)  Then click on “Download Schedule” and choose an option that interests you. If you have questions about Telephone Topics, call 1-888-600-2560.

 

  • Eye2Eye is a free phone-based peer support program which offers emotional support, assessment, information, and referrals to people who are blind or visually impaired and their families. It helps people cope with the challenges of adjusting to vision loss, using trained peer support specialists who are also blind or visually impaired. They serve people in more than twenty states.
  • The American Council of the Blind (ACB) has a list of helpful resources for people with vision loss and their families. It also has a national directory of affiliates in each state. Seniors can find information through the ACB affiliate Alliance on Aging and Vision Loss.

 

 

 

 

  • Vision Exchange is an online resource for support group leaders who facilitate support groups for adults with vision loss. The purpose is to exchange ideas, information, and community resources to help adults with low vision be more independent

 

  • The Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) was the first community-based nonprofit organization in the country to address the needs of families and friends providing long-term care at home. FCA now offers programs at national, state, and local levels to support and sustain caregivers, and has an online family support group.

 

 

Phone emotional peer support line for blind persons

Rutgers has launched the nation’s first peer support helpline for the legally blind and their families.

Eye2Eye – 833-932-3931 (83-EYE2EYE-1) – is staffed 24/7 by peer support specialists who are legally blind and understand the challenges callers face.

The program, which is funded by a grant from the Lavelle Fund for the Blind, serves residents in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. The helpline assists people with vision impairments and blindness to work through some of the practical and emotional challenges associated with losing vision. Services include peer support, clinical assessment and referrals to resources for help with mental health, employment and technology. The program also offers callers resilience training to promote wellness, strength and self-care.

Recent studies show that one-third of people with vision loss suffer from depression and anxiety. This risk has gone largely unaddressed in the medical community, which has focused more on the practical problems faced by the visually impaired, such as finding employment and navigating everyday tasks, said Steven Silverstein, a clinical psychologist and vision researcher who co-directs the program with Cherie Castellano, the National Peer Support Call Center program director at  Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care.

The Eye2Eye peers all have different forms of visual impairments, and these began at different times during their lives. This allows for a ‘cultural connection’ between callers with a wide range of vision problems and life concerns, and our peer counselors.”

Steven Silverstein, clinical psychologist and vision researcher

Warmline – Pandemic Go Teams (mobile/clinical) @ Clackamas County – Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone
Jan 27 all-day

Clackamas County has initiated Go Teams to help community members struggling with stress and anxiety during this Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic – available by phone 24/7 (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) at: 503-655-8585.

See article on KPTV at: https://www.kptv.com/news/go-teams-clackamas-co-launches-program-to-help-people-struggling-with-stress-anxiety-during-covid/article_d3383498-897f-11ea-9c43-9b4da6c01dc7.html

“Go Teams” wear protective gear and can go into the community and meet with the person who is struggling and listen to their story.  They are trained in psychological first aid which is described as “a provider going to connect with an individual by really listening and showing empathy,” but “[it] is not therapy or case management…[or] crisis mental health services.”

Excerpt(s) from https://www.clackamas.us/coronavirus/mental-health:

logo

Mental Health Connection

Call 503-655-8585. We’re here for you.

Hope and connection are important in these trying times. While the Clackamas County Mental Health Center is not open to walk-ins, the phone number is available 24/7. This number is not just a crisis line, the staff there can provide support for anyone who might be worried or anxious about what is going on.

  • Take care of yourself, your friends, and your family
    Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.
  • Take a break from the news
    Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  • Take care of your body
    Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced mealsexercise regularlyget plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Make time to unwind
    Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others
    While we may not be able to have conversations face to face, we can still reach out and check on each other with the use of technology. Connect with others via phone or text. Use platforms like Facetime or Zoom for video chat or download apps like Marco Polo – a free face-to-face video messaging app – that helps people stay close.
  • Talk about your concerns with a Peer Support Specialist
    This is a person who uses their lived experience of recovery from mental illness and/or addiction, plus skills learned in formal training, to deliver services to promote mind-body recovery and resiliency.

This is a unique time that leaves many parents questioning what to say to their children and how to address the possible emotional fallout from this situation. Here are some suggestions on how to help children cope.

Remember, call the Clackamas County crisis and support line at 503-655-8585 or your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You are not alone in this. We are here to support you.

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