PeerGalaxy Calendar

Welcome to PeerGalaxy Calendar featuring over 82,000 monthly offerings of FREE telephone- and online-accessible peer support, recovery support + wellness activities!

Over 30+ warmlines plus webinars, workshops, job postings, special events, consumer input opportunities and more.

WE ARE PEER FOR YOU!

Click the Accessibility Button on the right side, halfway down in the middle, for enhanced viewing and/or access options!  Click the Translate Button in the lower left corner for language options. 

Your use of this site is subject to the Privacy Policy, Terms and Conditions of Use.  Reminder: Fees or charges may be charged by your carrier for sending or receiving SMS text messaging, phone, or data.

If you have an event to add, email us: webmail@peergalaxy.com

Training Opportunities in July 2020
List Provided Courtesy of State of Oregon, Oregon Health Authority
Click here to download PDF Format, 16 pages

How Events are Sorted:

First, at the top of the list: Disaster Hotline & Oregon Safe + Strong Helpline.

Next in the list: Bundled “All Day” Events for organizations with events happening at multiple times throughout the day and/or in many formats or locations; these are bundled into a single listing to prevent endless scrolling.  Usually these offer a lookup by zip code or other criteria. 

Lastly, Time-Specific Events listed by start time from 12:01am early morning to 11:59pm late night.  Warmlines and places east of Oregon’s time zone tend to start earlier (e.g. 4am in Oregon is 7am in New York).

May
27
Fri
00 – Hotline – VideoPhone+ASL DEAF – Accessible Hotline @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) – Anytime 24/7/365 – Weekdays and Weekends @ VideoPhone+ASL
May 27 all-day
00 - Hotline - VideoPhone+ASL DEAF - Accessible Hotline @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) - Anytime 24/7/365 - Weekdays and Weekends @ VideoPhone+ASL

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

01 – Helpline – SSH – Safe + Strong Helpline for Behavioral, Mental and Emotional Health Support – Interpreters Available @ 1-800-923-4357 (HELP) – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free
May 27 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

AM – All Month – Deaf Accessible Peer Support and Mental Health Resources plus Crisis Line (Video + ASL (American Sign Language)) – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online
May 27 all-day

Deaf Accessible—Crisis Lines, Support and Mental Health Resources

Mental Health Resources for People experiencing Deafness or Hard of Hearing

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

  • Crisis Line for VideoPhone users who use American Sign Language (available 24/7): (321) 800-DEAF (321-800-3323)
  • National Suicide Prevention Hotline: To chat online with a counselor (2pm-2am Monday-Friday Eastern Standard Time) TTY Hotline: 800-799-4889
  • Crisis text line: text START to 741-741 (free, available 24/7, sometimes have Deaf counselors available)
  • National Domestic Violence Hotline:
    • E-mail: deafhelp@thehotline.org
    • TTY: 1-800-787-3224 (24/7 hotline)
    • VP: 1-855-812-1001 (Monday to Friday 9AM—5PM Pacific Standard Time

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Recovery Project

The Deaf and Hard of Hearing Project is building a welcoming network for Deaf-to-Deaf peer support and training.  We also find hearing friends and allies in mental health programs and support for recovery from traumatic experience.

Who Are We?  on YouTube

Deaf individuals tell their recovery stories through 10-15 minute videos.  All 7 share about being diagnosed with a mental illness and their journey to satisfying, complex lives.  They are open about the dark days and their hope.  All presented in In their native language – American Sign Language with captions in English.  We present them here in the hope of educating and inspiring others and creating community.

My Story:  Marco

My Story: Marnie

My Story: Lori

My Story: Minh

My Story: Mary

My Story: Taimin

My Story: Val

What is Peer Support?

What is Peer Support and the Recovery Model and How that is Different than the Medical Model (PDF)

Presentation developed and presented by Marnie Forgere, Deaf and Hard of Hearing project coordinator

How to Communicate

Tip Sheet #1 “Communicating with Deaf and Hard of Hearing”

Tip Sheet #2 “How to use American Sign Language Interpreter”

Tip Sheet #3 “How to get a Deaf or Hard of Hearing Person’s Attention”

Tip Sheet #4 “Helpful tips about Language Use”

All 4 Tip Sheets

“How to be Deaf-friendly with or without Interpreters” Guide for Hearing

White Paper Released (PDF)

BEING SEEN !
Establishing Deaf to Deaf Peer Support Services and Training
Successes and Lessons Learned From the Massachusetts Experience  

Button Art by Rachel Klein & Diane Squires

Prepared by: Deborah Delman, Marnie Fougere, and Meighan Haupt
In collaboration with the Deaf Community Voice Team with The Transformation Center: Val Ennis, Marco Gonzalez, Lori Johnstone, Mary O’Shea, Taimin Rosado, Sharon Sacks, Minh Vo

With special appreciation to allies Justine Barros, Cathy Mylotte, Lucille Traina, Robert Walker and
Catherine Quinerly

More Links and Resources

Minnesota Certified Peer Support Specialists program

MCDHH (MA Commission for tech Deaf and Hard of Hearing)

MCDHH Boston YouTube Channel

Deaf-Hope.org  Founded by Deaf women in California “Our mission at DeafHope is to end domestic and sexual violence in Deaf communities through empowerment, education and services.”

Deaf YES Center at UMass Medical School, Worcester, MA

Harvard Committee on Deaf Awareness (CODA)

“Intimate Partner Violence in the Deaf Community: 5 Things You Need to Know & 5 Things You Can Do” (written for mental health providers) PDF

“Signs of Safety: A Deaf Accessible Toolkit for Trauma and Addiction” PDFASL

911 Disability Indicator Program

12-Step online programs

Sounds of Sobriety (SOS):  This online email group was formed to help us who have a hearing loss (deaf, deafened, or hard of hearing) to find a place to recover from alcoholism. For many of us, face-to-face AA meetings no longer work. All members of AA, or those who think they may have a problem with alcohol, are welcome.

SOS_online_group-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Deaf Grateful:  This is a real-time open discussion meeting on Saturdays at 1pm PST / 4pm EST for deaf & HOH people who have a desire to stop drinking. Meeting uses videoconferencing software (easily downloaded) that requires a high speed internet connection and a webcam. Our communication mode is ASL only (no audio).
http://doda.omnijoin.com

Deaf Unity Self Care Tips & StrategiesTips for Self-Care

“Recovery is not so much a dream as it is a plan.” – Carolyn Spring

In “Actually, I am Not Okay! Mental Health in the Deaf Community,” Deaf Unity offers some self-care strategies:

  • Don’t be embarrassed to ask for help. You are not alone. It is so important that you do not struggle in silence.
  • Eat well. Deaf nutritionist Jeanann Doyle explains that good nutrition is tied to positive mental health.
  • Enjoy time with friends. Research has shown that early or pervasive lack of communication access with family members and others in the deaf person’s environment are mental health risk factors. Spending quality time with companions may reduce feelings of isolation and loneliness.
  • Be kind to yourself. Negative attitudes from deaf and hearing individuals can be a barrier to healthy social and emotional development. Take part in positive experiences with and about deaf people, which break down negative stereotypes and increases awareness.

Find a Qualified Professional

The number of accessible mental health providers and services has been increasing along with awareness of the diverse communication and identities of deaf individuals.

Technology allows for remote counseling with deaf-sensitive professionals.

The Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center offers national and statewide directories for mental health services for deaf people.

NDC’s Mental Health Services tip sheet

offers several considerations for providing effective counseling services:

  • Direct and effortless communication between the deaf person and practitioner.
  • Practitioner’s cultural competency (i.e. understanding of deaf experiences in a hearing world, communication preferences and deaf culture).
  • Effective and appropriate means of mental health assessments.
  • The importance of accurate and qualified interpretation between ASL and English in mental health settings.

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

MC – Master Chen – Tai Chi Resource – PreRecorded Tai Chi Videos – Weekdays and Weekends @ YouTube Link
May 27 all-day

 

Sponsor Cover Art

Free Tia Chi Training Videos

Provided by Master  JianFeng Chen

WEEKDAYS AND WEEKENDS

 

 Link to Master Chen pre-recorded YouTube videos: 

https://www.youtube.com/user/JianfengChen1978/videos?view=2&sort=dd&live_view=503&shelf_id=0

 

About Master JianFeng

Master JianFeng Chen is from the Fujian province of China. Inspired by his teachers and experiences, he wanted to bring traditional training of internal/external martial arts to the people of America. In China, martial arts is deeply imbedded in everyday life. Energy work, through Qigong and Tai Chi are often not stressed enough, so the full benefits of practice are not realized. His goal is to bring awareness of your breath, your energy, your movements and how it affects yourself and others so everyone can achieve balance and thus happiness and health in their lives.At the age of 8, JianFeng, joined the Junior Athletic School of Zhangzhou to begin his formal martial arts training. At the age of 11, he was selected to join the Fujian State Athletic Wushu Unit, that is internationally renowned for winning championships, especially in Tai Chi. His teachers were Grand Masters and World Champions in Tai Chi and Wushu.

PSI – Postpartum Support International – Maternal Depression Support Groups and Educational Resources – Online @ Regester for Details
May 27 all-day

Sponsor

 

Event Banner

 

Maternal Depression Support Groups and Educational  Resources

On-line

Peer Support Groups & More! Postpartum

Support International (PSI) Weekly Support Groups: PSI facilitates a wide variety of postpartum support groups every week for diverse populations, and all family members.

PSI also staffs a non-emergency helpline for education and support:  The number is 1-800-944-4773. PSI also offers a free peer mentor program where Mons or Dads can work 1-1 with a peer mentor once per week for up to 6 months.

Link to webpage for specific support groups, dates and times: 

https://www.postpartum.net/get-help/psi-online-support-meetings/

 

West Coast On-line Peer Support Forum:

Postpartum Progress Hosts Regional, On-line Forums for Maternal Depression and/or Anxiety:

These regional forums are moderated by volunteer Warrior Mom® Ambassadors who have completed Mental Health First Aid training.

Link to webpage to select a particular region, including West Coast (includes Oregon):

https://postpartumprogress.com/postpartum-progdress-online-peer-support

 

Oregon On-line Peer Support Groups: 

Free peer support groups and discussion forums, moderated by, “Well Mama,” for mothers and families on a wide variety of topics related to pregnancy and postpartum mental health.

Link to register:  https://www.wellmamaoregon.com/support/

 

 On-line Maternal Depression Education Resources:  

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH): NIMH provides a comprehensive, downloadable educational manual about Postpartum (Perinatal) Depression. 

Link to the webpage to download this educational material: 

https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/perinatal-depression/index.shtml

 

Oregon Health Authority (OHA):

OHA provides a wide variety of educational materials on pregnancy and postpartum depression for both mothers and family members.

Link to this information: 

https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/HealthyPeopleFamilies/Women/MaternalMentalHealth/Pages/index.aspx

May
28
Sat
00 – Hotline – VideoPhone+ASL DEAF – Accessible Hotline @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) – Anytime 24/7/365 – Weekdays and Weekends @ VideoPhone+ASL
May 28 all-day
00 - Hotline - VideoPhone+ASL DEAF - Accessible Hotline @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) - Anytime 24/7/365 - Weekdays and Weekends @ VideoPhone+ASL

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

01 – Helpline – SSH – Safe + Strong Helpline for Behavioral, Mental and Emotional Health Support – Interpreters Available @ 1-800-923-4357 (HELP) – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free
May 28 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

AM – All Month – Deaf Accessible Peer Support and Mental Health Resources plus Crisis Line (Video + ASL (American Sign Language)) – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online
May 28 all-day

Deaf Accessible—Crisis Lines, Support and Mental Health Resources

Mental Health Resources for People experiencing Deafness or Hard of Hearing

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

  • Crisis Line for VideoPhone users who use American Sign Language (available 24/7): (321) 800-DEAF (321-800-3323)
  • National Suicide Prevention Hotline: To chat online with a counselor (2pm-2am Monday-Friday Eastern Standard Time) TTY Hotline: 800-799-4889
  • Crisis text line: text START to 741-741 (free, available 24/7, sometimes have Deaf counselors available)
  • National Domestic Violence Hotline:
    • E-mail: deafhelp@thehotline.org
    • TTY: 1-800-787-3224 (24/7 hotline)
    • VP: 1-855-812-1001 (Monday to Friday 9AM—5PM Pacific Standard Time

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Recovery Project

The Deaf and Hard of Hearing Project is building a welcoming network for Deaf-to-Deaf peer support and training.  We also find hearing friends and allies in mental health programs and support for recovery from traumatic experience.

Who Are We?  on YouTube

Deaf individuals tell their recovery stories through 10-15 minute videos.  All 7 share about being diagnosed with a mental illness and their journey to satisfying, complex lives.  They are open about the dark days and their hope.  All presented in In their native language – American Sign Language with captions in English.  We present them here in the hope of educating and inspiring others and creating community.

My Story:  Marco

My Story: Marnie

My Story: Lori

My Story: Minh

My Story: Mary

My Story: Taimin

My Story: Val

What is Peer Support?

What is Peer Support and the Recovery Model and How that is Different than the Medical Model (PDF)

Presentation developed and presented by Marnie Forgere, Deaf and Hard of Hearing project coordinator

How to Communicate

Tip Sheet #1 “Communicating with Deaf and Hard of Hearing”

Tip Sheet #2 “How to use American Sign Language Interpreter”

Tip Sheet #3 “How to get a Deaf or Hard of Hearing Person’s Attention”

Tip Sheet #4 “Helpful tips about Language Use”

All 4 Tip Sheets

“How to be Deaf-friendly with or without Interpreters” Guide for Hearing

White Paper Released (PDF)

BEING SEEN !
Establishing Deaf to Deaf Peer Support Services and Training
Successes and Lessons Learned From the Massachusetts Experience  

Button Art by Rachel Klein & Diane Squires

Prepared by: Deborah Delman, Marnie Fougere, and Meighan Haupt
In collaboration with the Deaf Community Voice Team with The Transformation Center: Val Ennis, Marco Gonzalez, Lori Johnstone, Mary O’Shea, Taimin Rosado, Sharon Sacks, Minh Vo

With special appreciation to allies Justine Barros, Cathy Mylotte, Lucille Traina, Robert Walker and
Catherine Quinerly

More Links and Resources

Minnesota Certified Peer Support Specialists program

MCDHH (MA Commission for tech Deaf and Hard of Hearing)

MCDHH Boston YouTube Channel

Deaf-Hope.org  Founded by Deaf women in California “Our mission at DeafHope is to end domestic and sexual violence in Deaf communities through empowerment, education and services.”

Deaf YES Center at UMass Medical School, Worcester, MA

Harvard Committee on Deaf Awareness (CODA)

“Intimate Partner Violence in the Deaf Community: 5 Things You Need to Know & 5 Things You Can Do” (written for mental health providers) PDF

“Signs of Safety: A Deaf Accessible Toolkit for Trauma and Addiction” PDFASL

911 Disability Indicator Program

12-Step online programs

Sounds of Sobriety (SOS):  This online email group was formed to help us who have a hearing loss (deaf, deafened, or hard of hearing) to find a place to recover from alcoholism. For many of us, face-to-face AA meetings no longer work. All members of AA, or those who think they may have a problem with alcohol, are welcome.

SOS_online_group-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Deaf Grateful:  This is a real-time open discussion meeting on Saturdays at 1pm PST / 4pm EST for deaf & HOH people who have a desire to stop drinking. Meeting uses videoconferencing software (easily downloaded) that requires a high speed internet connection and a webcam. Our communication mode is ASL only (no audio).
http://doda.omnijoin.com

Deaf Unity Self Care Tips & StrategiesTips for Self-Care

“Recovery is not so much a dream as it is a plan.” – Carolyn Spring

In “Actually, I am Not Okay! Mental Health in the Deaf Community,” Deaf Unity offers some self-care strategies:

  • Don’t be embarrassed to ask for help. You are not alone. It is so important that you do not struggle in silence.
  • Eat well. Deaf nutritionist Jeanann Doyle explains that good nutrition is tied to positive mental health.
  • Enjoy time with friends. Research has shown that early or pervasive lack of communication access with family members and others in the deaf person’s environment are mental health risk factors. Spending quality time with companions may reduce feelings of isolation and loneliness.
  • Be kind to yourself. Negative attitudes from deaf and hearing individuals can be a barrier to healthy social and emotional development. Take part in positive experiences with and about deaf people, which break down negative stereotypes and increases awareness.

Find a Qualified Professional

The number of accessible mental health providers and services has been increasing along with awareness of the diverse communication and identities of deaf individuals.

Technology allows for remote counseling with deaf-sensitive professionals.

The Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center offers national and statewide directories for mental health services for deaf people.

NDC’s Mental Health Services tip sheet

offers several considerations for providing effective counseling services:

  • Direct and effortless communication between the deaf person and practitioner.
  • Practitioner’s cultural competency (i.e. understanding of deaf experiences in a hearing world, communication preferences and deaf culture).
  • Effective and appropriate means of mental health assessments.
  • The importance of accurate and qualified interpretation between ASL and English in mental health settings.

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

MC – Master Chen – Tai Chi Resource – PreRecorded Tai Chi Videos – Weekdays and Weekends @ YouTube Link
May 28 all-day

 

Sponsor Cover Art

Free Tia Chi Training Videos

Provided by Master  JianFeng Chen

WEEKDAYS AND WEEKENDS

 

 Link to Master Chen pre-recorded YouTube videos: 

https://www.youtube.com/user/JianfengChen1978/videos?view=2&sort=dd&live_view=503&shelf_id=0

 

About Master JianFeng

Master JianFeng Chen is from the Fujian province of China. Inspired by his teachers and experiences, he wanted to bring traditional training of internal/external martial arts to the people of America. In China, martial arts is deeply imbedded in everyday life. Energy work, through Qigong and Tai Chi are often not stressed enough, so the full benefits of practice are not realized. His goal is to bring awareness of your breath, your energy, your movements and how it affects yourself and others so everyone can achieve balance and thus happiness and health in their lives.At the age of 8, JianFeng, joined the Junior Athletic School of Zhangzhou to begin his formal martial arts training. At the age of 11, he was selected to join the Fujian State Athletic Wushu Unit, that is internationally renowned for winning championships, especially in Tai Chi. His teachers were Grand Masters and World Champions in Tai Chi and Wushu.

PSI – Postpartum Support International – Maternal Depression Support Groups and Educational Resources – Online @ Regester for Details
May 28 all-day

Sponsor

 

Event Banner

 

Maternal Depression Support Groups and Educational  Resources

On-line

Peer Support Groups & More! Postpartum

Support International (PSI) Weekly Support Groups: PSI facilitates a wide variety of postpartum support groups every week for diverse populations, and all family members.

PSI also staffs a non-emergency helpline for education and support:  The number is 1-800-944-4773. PSI also offers a free peer mentor program where Mons or Dads can work 1-1 with a peer mentor once per week for up to 6 months.

Link to webpage for specific support groups, dates and times: 

https://www.postpartum.net/get-help/psi-online-support-meetings/

 

West Coast On-line Peer Support Forum:

Postpartum Progress Hosts Regional, On-line Forums for Maternal Depression and/or Anxiety:

These regional forums are moderated by volunteer Warrior Mom® Ambassadors who have completed Mental Health First Aid training.

Link to webpage to select a particular region, including West Coast (includes Oregon):

https://postpartumprogress.com/postpartum-progdress-online-peer-support

 

Oregon On-line Peer Support Groups: 

Free peer support groups and discussion forums, moderated by, “Well Mama,” for mothers and families on a wide variety of topics related to pregnancy and postpartum mental health.

Link to register:  https://www.wellmamaoregon.com/support/

 

 On-line Maternal Depression Education Resources:  

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH): NIMH provides a comprehensive, downloadable educational manual about Postpartum (Perinatal) Depression. 

Link to the webpage to download this educational material: 

https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/perinatal-depression/index.shtml

 

Oregon Health Authority (OHA):

OHA provides a wide variety of educational materials on pregnancy and postpartum depression for both mothers and family members.

Link to this information: 

https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/HealthyPeopleFamilies/Women/MaternalMentalHealth/Pages/index.aspx

May
29
Sun
00 – Hotline – VideoPhone+ASL DEAF – Accessible Hotline @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) – Anytime 24/7/365 – Weekdays and Weekends @ VideoPhone+ASL
May 29 all-day
00 - Hotline - VideoPhone+ASL DEAF - Accessible Hotline @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) - Anytime 24/7/365 - Weekdays and Weekends @ VideoPhone+ASL

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

01 – Helpline – SSH – Safe + Strong Helpline for Behavioral, Mental and Emotional Health Support – Interpreters Available @ 1-800-923-4357 (HELP) – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free
May 29 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

AM – All Month – Deaf Accessible Peer Support and Mental Health Resources plus Crisis Line (Video + ASL (American Sign Language)) – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online
May 29 all-day

Deaf Accessible—Crisis Lines, Support and Mental Health Resources

Mental Health Resources for People experiencing Deafness or Hard of Hearing

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

  • Crisis Line for VideoPhone users who use American Sign Language (available 24/7): (321) 800-DEAF (321-800-3323)
  • National Suicide Prevention Hotline: To chat online with a counselor (2pm-2am Monday-Friday Eastern Standard Time) TTY Hotline: 800-799-4889
  • Crisis text line: text START to 741-741 (free, available 24/7, sometimes have Deaf counselors available)
  • National Domestic Violence Hotline:
    • E-mail: deafhelp@thehotline.org
    • TTY: 1-800-787-3224 (24/7 hotline)
    • VP: 1-855-812-1001 (Monday to Friday 9AM—5PM Pacific Standard Time

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Recovery Project

The Deaf and Hard of Hearing Project is building a welcoming network for Deaf-to-Deaf peer support and training.  We also find hearing friends and allies in mental health programs and support for recovery from traumatic experience.

Who Are We?  on YouTube

Deaf individuals tell their recovery stories through 10-15 minute videos.  All 7 share about being diagnosed with a mental illness and their journey to satisfying, complex lives.  They are open about the dark days and their hope.  All presented in In their native language – American Sign Language with captions in English.  We present them here in the hope of educating and inspiring others and creating community.

My Story:  Marco

My Story: Marnie

My Story: Lori

My Story: Minh

My Story: Mary

My Story: Taimin

My Story: Val

What is Peer Support?

What is Peer Support and the Recovery Model and How that is Different than the Medical Model (PDF)

Presentation developed and presented by Marnie Forgere, Deaf and Hard of Hearing project coordinator

How to Communicate

Tip Sheet #1 “Communicating with Deaf and Hard of Hearing”

Tip Sheet #2 “How to use American Sign Language Interpreter”

Tip Sheet #3 “How to get a Deaf or Hard of Hearing Person’s Attention”

Tip Sheet #4 “Helpful tips about Language Use”

All 4 Tip Sheets

“How to be Deaf-friendly with or without Interpreters” Guide for Hearing

White Paper Released (PDF)

BEING SEEN !
Establishing Deaf to Deaf Peer Support Services and Training
Successes and Lessons Learned From the Massachusetts Experience  

Button Art by Rachel Klein & Diane Squires

Prepared by: Deborah Delman, Marnie Fougere, and Meighan Haupt
In collaboration with the Deaf Community Voice Team with The Transformation Center: Val Ennis, Marco Gonzalez, Lori Johnstone, Mary O’Shea, Taimin Rosado, Sharon Sacks, Minh Vo

With special appreciation to allies Justine Barros, Cathy Mylotte, Lucille Traina, Robert Walker and
Catherine Quinerly

More Links and Resources

Minnesota Certified Peer Support Specialists program

MCDHH (MA Commission for tech Deaf and Hard of Hearing)

MCDHH Boston YouTube Channel

Deaf-Hope.org  Founded by Deaf women in California “Our mission at DeafHope is to end domestic and sexual violence in Deaf communities through empowerment, education and services.”

Deaf YES Center at UMass Medical School, Worcester, MA

Harvard Committee on Deaf Awareness (CODA)

“Intimate Partner Violence in the Deaf Community: 5 Things You Need to Know & 5 Things You Can Do” (written for mental health providers) PDF

“Signs of Safety: A Deaf Accessible Toolkit for Trauma and Addiction” PDFASL

911 Disability Indicator Program

12-Step online programs

Sounds of Sobriety (SOS):  This online email group was formed to help us who have a hearing loss (deaf, deafened, or hard of hearing) to find a place to recover from alcoholism. For many of us, face-to-face AA meetings no longer work. All members of AA, or those who think they may have a problem with alcohol, are welcome.

SOS_online_group-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Deaf Grateful:  This is a real-time open discussion meeting on Saturdays at 1pm PST / 4pm EST for deaf & HOH people who have a desire to stop drinking. Meeting uses videoconferencing software (easily downloaded) that requires a high speed internet connection and a webcam. Our communication mode is ASL only (no audio).
http://doda.omnijoin.com

Deaf Unity Self Care Tips & StrategiesTips for Self-Care

“Recovery is not so much a dream as it is a plan.” – Carolyn Spring

In “Actually, I am Not Okay! Mental Health in the Deaf Community,” Deaf Unity offers some self-care strategies:

  • Don’t be embarrassed to ask for help. You are not alone. It is so important that you do not struggle in silence.
  • Eat well. Deaf nutritionist Jeanann Doyle explains that good nutrition is tied to positive mental health.
  • Enjoy time with friends. Research has shown that early or pervasive lack of communication access with family members and others in the deaf person’s environment are mental health risk factors. Spending quality time with companions may reduce feelings of isolation and loneliness.
  • Be kind to yourself. Negative attitudes from deaf and hearing individuals can be a barrier to healthy social and emotional development. Take part in positive experiences with and about deaf people, which break down negative stereotypes and increases awareness.

Find a Qualified Professional

The number of accessible mental health providers and services has been increasing along with awareness of the diverse communication and identities of deaf individuals.

Technology allows for remote counseling with deaf-sensitive professionals.

The Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center offers national and statewide directories for mental health services for deaf people.

NDC’s Mental Health Services tip sheet

offers several considerations for providing effective counseling services:

  • Direct and effortless communication between the deaf person and practitioner.
  • Practitioner’s cultural competency (i.e. understanding of deaf experiences in a hearing world, communication preferences and deaf culture).
  • Effective and appropriate means of mental health assessments.
  • The importance of accurate and qualified interpretation between ASL and English in mental health settings.

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

MC – Master Chen – Tai Chi Resource – PreRecorded Tai Chi Videos – Weekdays and Weekends @ YouTube Link
May 29 all-day

 

Sponsor Cover Art

Free Tia Chi Training Videos

Provided by Master  JianFeng Chen

WEEKDAYS AND WEEKENDS

 

 Link to Master Chen pre-recorded YouTube videos: 

https://www.youtube.com/user/JianfengChen1978/videos?view=2&sort=dd&live_view=503&shelf_id=0

 

About Master JianFeng

Master JianFeng Chen is from the Fujian province of China. Inspired by his teachers and experiences, he wanted to bring traditional training of internal/external martial arts to the people of America. In China, martial arts is deeply imbedded in everyday life. Energy work, through Qigong and Tai Chi are often not stressed enough, so the full benefits of practice are not realized. His goal is to bring awareness of your breath, your energy, your movements and how it affects yourself and others so everyone can achieve balance and thus happiness and health in their lives.At the age of 8, JianFeng, joined the Junior Athletic School of Zhangzhou to begin his formal martial arts training. At the age of 11, he was selected to join the Fujian State Athletic Wushu Unit, that is internationally renowned for winning championships, especially in Tai Chi. His teachers were Grand Masters and World Champions in Tai Chi and Wushu.

PSI – Postpartum Support International – Maternal Depression Support Groups and Educational Resources – Online @ Regester for Details
May 29 all-day

Sponsor

 

Event Banner

 

Maternal Depression Support Groups and Educational  Resources

On-line

Peer Support Groups & More! Postpartum

Support International (PSI) Weekly Support Groups: PSI facilitates a wide variety of postpartum support groups every week for diverse populations, and all family members.

PSI also staffs a non-emergency helpline for education and support:  The number is 1-800-944-4773. PSI also offers a free peer mentor program where Mons or Dads can work 1-1 with a peer mentor once per week for up to 6 months.

Link to webpage for specific support groups, dates and times: 

https://www.postpartum.net/get-help/psi-online-support-meetings/

 

West Coast On-line Peer Support Forum:

Postpartum Progress Hosts Regional, On-line Forums for Maternal Depression and/or Anxiety:

These regional forums are moderated by volunteer Warrior Mom® Ambassadors who have completed Mental Health First Aid training.

Link to webpage to select a particular region, including West Coast (includes Oregon):

https://postpartumprogress.com/postpartum-progdress-online-peer-support

 

Oregon On-line Peer Support Groups: 

Free peer support groups and discussion forums, moderated by, “Well Mama,” for mothers and families on a wide variety of topics related to pregnancy and postpartum mental health.

Link to register:  https://www.wellmamaoregon.com/support/

 

 On-line Maternal Depression Education Resources:  

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH): NIMH provides a comprehensive, downloadable educational manual about Postpartum (Perinatal) Depression. 

Link to the webpage to download this educational material: 

https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/perinatal-depression/index.shtml

 

Oregon Health Authority (OHA):

OHA provides a wide variety of educational materials on pregnancy and postpartum depression for both mothers and family members.

Link to this information: 

https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/HealthyPeopleFamilies/Women/MaternalMentalHealth/Pages/index.aspx

May
30
Mon
00 – Hotline – VideoPhone+ASL DEAF – Accessible Hotline @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) – Anytime 24/7/365 – Weekdays and Weekends @ VideoPhone+ASL
May 30 all-day
00 - Hotline - VideoPhone+ASL DEAF - Accessible Hotline @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) - Anytime 24/7/365 - Weekdays and Weekends @ VideoPhone+ASL

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

01 – Helpline – SSH – Safe + Strong Helpline for Behavioral, Mental and Emotional Health Support – Interpreters Available @ 1-800-923-4357 (HELP) – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free
May 30 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health

AM – All Month – Deaf Accessible Peer Support and Mental Health Resources plus Crisis Line (Video + ASL (American Sign Language)) – Weekdays and Weekends @ Online
May 30 all-day

Deaf Accessible—Crisis Lines, Support and Mental Health Resources

Mental Health Resources for People experiencing Deafness or Hard of Hearing

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

  • Crisis Line for VideoPhone users who use American Sign Language (available 24/7): (321) 800-DEAF (321-800-3323)
  • National Suicide Prevention Hotline: To chat online with a counselor (2pm-2am Monday-Friday Eastern Standard Time) TTY Hotline: 800-799-4889
  • Crisis text line: text START to 741-741 (free, available 24/7, sometimes have Deaf counselors available)
  • National Domestic Violence Hotline:
    • E-mail: deafhelp@thehotline.org
    • TTY: 1-800-787-3224 (24/7 hotline)
    • VP: 1-855-812-1001 (Monday to Friday 9AM—5PM Pacific Standard Time

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Recovery Project

The Deaf and Hard of Hearing Project is building a welcoming network for Deaf-to-Deaf peer support and training.  We also find hearing friends and allies in mental health programs and support for recovery from traumatic experience.

Who Are We?  on YouTube

Deaf individuals tell their recovery stories through 10-15 minute videos.  All 7 share about being diagnosed with a mental illness and their journey to satisfying, complex lives.  They are open about the dark days and their hope.  All presented in In their native language – American Sign Language with captions in English.  We present them here in the hope of educating and inspiring others and creating community.

My Story:  Marco

My Story: Marnie

My Story: Lori

My Story: Minh

My Story: Mary

My Story: Taimin

My Story: Val

What is Peer Support?

What is Peer Support and the Recovery Model and How that is Different than the Medical Model (PDF)

Presentation developed and presented by Marnie Forgere, Deaf and Hard of Hearing project coordinator

How to Communicate

Tip Sheet #1 “Communicating with Deaf and Hard of Hearing”

Tip Sheet #2 “How to use American Sign Language Interpreter”

Tip Sheet #3 “How to get a Deaf or Hard of Hearing Person’s Attention”

Tip Sheet #4 “Helpful tips about Language Use”

All 4 Tip Sheets

“How to be Deaf-friendly with or without Interpreters” Guide for Hearing

White Paper Released (PDF)

BEING SEEN !
Establishing Deaf to Deaf Peer Support Services and Training
Successes and Lessons Learned From the Massachusetts Experience  

Button Art by Rachel Klein & Diane Squires

Prepared by: Deborah Delman, Marnie Fougere, and Meighan Haupt
In collaboration with the Deaf Community Voice Team with The Transformation Center: Val Ennis, Marco Gonzalez, Lori Johnstone, Mary O’Shea, Taimin Rosado, Sharon Sacks, Minh Vo

With special appreciation to allies Justine Barros, Cathy Mylotte, Lucille Traina, Robert Walker and
Catherine Quinerly

More Links and Resources

Minnesota Certified Peer Support Specialists program

MCDHH (MA Commission for tech Deaf and Hard of Hearing)

MCDHH Boston YouTube Channel

Deaf-Hope.org  Founded by Deaf women in California “Our mission at DeafHope is to end domestic and sexual violence in Deaf communities through empowerment, education and services.”

Deaf YES Center at UMass Medical School, Worcester, MA

Harvard Committee on Deaf Awareness (CODA)

“Intimate Partner Violence in the Deaf Community: 5 Things You Need to Know & 5 Things You Can Do” (written for mental health providers) PDF

“Signs of Safety: A Deaf Accessible Toolkit for Trauma and Addiction” PDFASL

911 Disability Indicator Program

12-Step online programs

Sounds of Sobriety (SOS):  This online email group was formed to help us who have a hearing loss (deaf, deafened, or hard of hearing) to find a place to recover from alcoholism. For many of us, face-to-face AA meetings no longer work. All members of AA, or those who think they may have a problem with alcohol, are welcome.

SOS_online_group-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Deaf Grateful:  This is a real-time open discussion meeting on Saturdays at 1pm PST / 4pm EST for deaf & HOH people who have a desire to stop drinking. Meeting uses videoconferencing software (easily downloaded) that requires a high speed internet connection and a webcam. Our communication mode is ASL only (no audio).
http://doda.omnijoin.com

Deaf Unity Self Care Tips & StrategiesTips for Self-Care

“Recovery is not so much a dream as it is a plan.” – Carolyn Spring

In “Actually, I am Not Okay! Mental Health in the Deaf Community,” Deaf Unity offers some self-care strategies:

  • Don’t be embarrassed to ask for help. You are not alone. It is so important that you do not struggle in silence.
  • Eat well. Deaf nutritionist Jeanann Doyle explains that good nutrition is tied to positive mental health.
  • Enjoy time with friends. Research has shown that early or pervasive lack of communication access with family members and others in the deaf person’s environment are mental health risk factors. Spending quality time with companions may reduce feelings of isolation and loneliness.
  • Be kind to yourself. Negative attitudes from deaf and hearing individuals can be a barrier to healthy social and emotional development. Take part in positive experiences with and about deaf people, which break down negative stereotypes and increases awareness.

Find a Qualified Professional

The number of accessible mental health providers and services has been increasing along with awareness of the diverse communication and identities of deaf individuals.

Technology allows for remote counseling with deaf-sensitive professionals.

The Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center offers national and statewide directories for mental health services for deaf people.

NDC’s Mental Health Services tip sheet

offers several considerations for providing effective counseling services:

  • Direct and effortless communication between the deaf person and practitioner.
  • Practitioner’s cultural competency (i.e. understanding of deaf experiences in a hearing world, communication preferences and deaf culture).
  • Effective and appropriate means of mental health assessments.
  • The importance of accurate and qualified interpretation between ASL and English in mental health settings.

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

MC – Master Chen – Tai Chi Resource – PreRecorded Tai Chi Videos – Weekdays and Weekends @ YouTube Link
May 30 all-day

 

Sponsor Cover Art

Free Tia Chi Training Videos

Provided by Master  JianFeng Chen

WEEKDAYS AND WEEKENDS

 

 Link to Master Chen pre-recorded YouTube videos: 

https://www.youtube.com/user/JianfengChen1978/videos?view=2&sort=dd&live_view=503&shelf_id=0

 

About Master JianFeng

Master JianFeng Chen is from the Fujian province of China. Inspired by his teachers and experiences, he wanted to bring traditional training of internal/external martial arts to the people of America. In China, martial arts is deeply imbedded in everyday life. Energy work, through Qigong and Tai Chi are often not stressed enough, so the full benefits of practice are not realized. His goal is to bring awareness of your breath, your energy, your movements and how it affects yourself and others so everyone can achieve balance and thus happiness and health in their lives.At the age of 8, JianFeng, joined the Junior Athletic School of Zhangzhou to begin his formal martial arts training. At the age of 11, he was selected to join the Fujian State Athletic Wushu Unit, that is internationally renowned for winning championships, especially in Tai Chi. His teachers were Grand Masters and World Champions in Tai Chi and Wushu.

PSI – Postpartum Support International – Maternal Depression Support Groups and Educational Resources – Online @ Regester for Details
May 30 all-day

Sponsor

 

Event Banner

 

Maternal Depression Support Groups and Educational  Resources

On-line

Peer Support Groups & More! Postpartum

Support International (PSI) Weekly Support Groups: PSI facilitates a wide variety of postpartum support groups every week for diverse populations, and all family members.

PSI also staffs a non-emergency helpline for education and support:  The number is 1-800-944-4773. PSI also offers a free peer mentor program where Mons or Dads can work 1-1 with a peer mentor once per week for up to 6 months.

Link to webpage for specific support groups, dates and times: 

https://www.postpartum.net/get-help/psi-online-support-meetings/

 

West Coast On-line Peer Support Forum:

Postpartum Progress Hosts Regional, On-line Forums for Maternal Depression and/or Anxiety:

These regional forums are moderated by volunteer Warrior Mom® Ambassadors who have completed Mental Health First Aid training.

Link to webpage to select a particular region, including West Coast (includes Oregon):

https://postpartumprogress.com/postpartum-progdress-online-peer-support

 

Oregon On-line Peer Support Groups: 

Free peer support groups and discussion forums, moderated by, “Well Mama,” for mothers and families on a wide variety of topics related to pregnancy and postpartum mental health.

Link to register:  https://www.wellmamaoregon.com/support/

 

 On-line Maternal Depression Education Resources:  

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH): NIMH provides a comprehensive, downloadable educational manual about Postpartum (Perinatal) Depression. 

Link to the webpage to download this educational material: 

https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/perinatal-depression/index.shtml

 

Oregon Health Authority (OHA):

OHA provides a wide variety of educational materials on pregnancy and postpartum depression for both mothers and family members.

Link to this information: 

https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/HealthyPeopleFamilies/Women/MaternalMentalHealth/Pages/index.aspx

Warmline – MHAAO – Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon – Evolve Peer Support Services – Multiple Numbers -Weekdays – 9am-5pm (PST) @ Phone
May 30 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

logo 144h

MHAAO is pleased to offer Evolve’s Peer Support by Phone for persons affected by the pandemic, wildfires, and similar issues.

Do you need someone to talk to?  We’re available for anyone to call peer support no matter what!

Happy to work with any age groups from any area.

Will make arrangements for virtual peer support if requested. 

Generally available @ 9am-5pm PST Weekdays, Monday through Friday.

See names and numbers below.

Flyer excerpt(s):
Have you been impacted by COVID-19 or the Oregon Wildfires?
Our Peer Support Specialists are here to help!
Call us Monday through Friday, 9am-5pm PST
==========
Monica Alexander
971-337-6716
Bill Beall
971-337-4550
Roman Becerra
971-930-9017
Bryan Corley
971-282-8101
Amber Hatkoff
971-352-0582
Molly Griggs
971-337-5506
Anthony Jarrard
971-337-4791
Grace Jo
503-314-3309
Amber Lakin
971-930-9404
Jenny Manzanares
971-241-1404
Howard Marlow
971-337-6293
Jesse Maxwell
971-202-6337
Larae Miller
503-719-1725
Brenda Mitchell
971-337-6715
Geoff Moser
971-202-3142
Marianne O’Neill-Tutor
971-337-6624
Tara Prince
971-413-0264
Kristina Teasley
971-930-9014
=========
Evolve is a program of Mental Health and Addictions Association of Oregon (MHAAO).
flyer p2

 

PHV – Portland Hearing Voices – Current and Local Online Groups, Resources – Mondays 12:30 to 1:30pm and Wednesdays 12:30 to 2:00pm and more @ Online Via ZOOM
May 30 @ 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm

 

Current and Local Online Groups

Hearing Voices Online: Every Monday from 12:30pm – 1:30pm PST.
Meeting ID: 827 1850 5172
Hearing Voices Online: Every Wednesday from 12:30pm to 2:00pm PST.
Meeting ID: 827 1850 5172
Salem:  Aaron Benson is hosting an online HVN group for Project ABLE.  It meets each Wednesday at 2pm.
Vancouver:  Chiara Caballero and John McDonald have been hosting an online HVN group but it may not be held anymore due to lack of facilitators and lack of funds to pay a replacement.  It’s listed here:  https://namiswwa.org/support-groups/hvn-hearing-voices-network-groups/
Find more groups with HVN USA here: http://www.hearingvoicesusa.org/find-a-group

 

FT – FolkTime – Virtual Programs – ORIGAMI STORY TIME – Tuesdays @ Online via Zoom
May 30 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Virtual Programs – ORIGAMI STORY TIME
Tuesday, May 172:00 – 3:00pm
Weekly on Tuesday, until Jun 2, 2022

FolkTime Social Programs is inviting you to ORIGAMI STORY TIME.

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us06web.zoom.us/j/94662476019

Meeting ID: 946 6247 6019

One tap mobile
+12532158782,,94662476019# US (Tacoma)
+13462487799,,94662476019# US (Houston)

Dial by your location
+1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
+1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
+1 720 707 2699 US (Denver)
+1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
+1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
+1 646 558 8656 US (New York)

Meeting ID: 946 6247 6019

Find your local number: https://us06web.zoom.us/u/kvbDGUbRY

May
31
Tue
00 – Hotline – VideoPhone+ASL DEAF – Accessible Hotline @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) – Anytime 24/7/365 – Weekdays and Weekends @ VideoPhone+ASL
May 31 all-day
00 - Hotline - VideoPhone+ASL DEAF - Accessible Hotline @ (321) 800-3323 (DEAF) - Anytime 24/7/365 - Weekdays and Weekends @ VideoPhone+ASL

Deaf & HoH Accessible Crisis Line

Video Phone with ASL

Available 24/7/365

Call VP (321) 800-3323

Crisis Resources and Deaf-Accessible Hotlines

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) offers several resources and strategies to locate deaf-accessible crisis services, community resources and hotlines:

Link: https://www.nccsdclearinghouse.org/crisis-resources.html

 

You matter.  You are not alone.  Meaningful social connections can make a huge difference.  You deserve support.

If you know or find additional resources, please share.  If you have feedback, please share.

Email us at: webmail@peergalaxy.com

 

“when the world comes crashing at
your feet
it’s okay to let others
help pick up the pieces
if we’re present to take part in your
happiness
when your circumstances are great
we are more than capable
of sharing your pain”

― Rupi Kaur, The Sun and Her Flowers

01 – Helpline – SSH – Safe + Strong Helpline for Behavioral, Mental and Emotional Health Support – Interpreters Available @ 1-800-923-4357 (HELP) – 24/7 Weekdays and Weekends @ Phone, Toll-Free
May 31 all-day

Safe & Strong Oregon Helpline

FREE, available 24/7 at 1-800-923-4357  

Language interpreters available

1-800-923-HELP (4357)

Excerpt(s) from L4L (Lines for Life) web page:

https://www.linesforlife.org/obhsl/#:~:text=1%2D800%2D923%2DHELP%20(4357)&text=Safe%20%2B%20Strong%20Helpline%2C%20in%20partnership,is%20struggling%20and%20seeking%20support

Help is free and available 24/7. Language interpreters are available.

Safe + Strong Helpline, in partnership with the Oregon Health Authority, is an emotional support and resource referral line that can assist anyone who is struggling and seeking support. Callers do not need to be in a crisis to contact this line.

Many of us are juggling concerns about wildfires and smoke, COVID-19, political unrest, financial instability, and more, in addition to the everyday things we personally struggle with.

Disasters can leave us feeling increased anxiety, worry, anger, or depression. In these challenging times, we provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, or just connection with a person who cares.

If you or a loved one is feeling worried, upset, or overwhelmed, give us a call. Our call counselor will listen, assess your needs, and problem-solve with referral to community services and resources if needed.

Visit the Safe & Strong Oregon website for more resources and information at:

https://www.safestrongoregon.org/mental-emotional-health